Episodes

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20160617Interview series in which broadcasters follow their personal passions.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

20210518Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most
A Surrogate's Story20190716Gay dad David Gregory-Kumar speaks to the US-based surrogate who carried his baby.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage2015011320160804 (R4)Adrian Goldberg explores the topic of mixed marriage.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage2015012020160805 (R4)Adrian Goldberg meets Rosalind, a Christian who married a Jewish man in the 1970s.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Architect Elsie Owusu Meets Lord Chris Smith20200225Elsie Owusu meets Lord Chris Smith, the former Secretary of State for Culture and chair of the Millennium Commission, to discuss what he feels is his architectural legacy: from the Eden project to the Dome and beyond.

Across three editions of One to One, Elsie - an architect - has been exploring the connection between architecture, art and justice. In today's discussion Lord Smith mulls over his time in office and discusses what he's proudest of: the reintroduction of free museum entrance, and what he's perhaps less happy to recall: the Millennium Dome.

Producer: Karen Gregor

From the Eden Project to The Dome and beyond, Lord Chris Smith discusses his legacy.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Architect Elsie Owusu Talks To Artist Yinka Shonibare2020021820200328 (R4)The artist, Yinka Shonibare CBE, talks to the architect Elsie Owusu about his ambitious and challenging project in Nigeria where he is building two residential centres for artists. One will be in Lagos, the other in the rural setting of Ijebu, which will be based on a working farm. Yinka is a wheelchair user, and he discusses his idea of "enabling architecture", as well as the importance of providing employment for local people, and spreading the word about Nigeria's vibrant cultural life.

Producer: Karen Gregor

The artist, Yinka Shonibare, talks to Elsie Owusu about his ambitious Nigerian project.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Are We Working Too Hard? The Gig Economy20190205
Being A Gay Dad20190723David Gregory-Kumar talks about parenting with fellow gay dad, Chris Hurlston.

David is a BBC journalist, and he's also a gay dad. Across three editions of One to One he is exploring different aspects of gay parenting. Today he meets Chris Hurlston whose children were carried by surrogate mothers, one from India and the other from Nepal.

David and Chris discuss their different experiences of surrogacy, the challenges of raising a daughter, and the protests against teaching LGBT equality in the city where they both live.

Producer: Karen Gregor

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Benjamin Zephaniah Meets Kevin Mceleny20191015In approximately half of couples experiencing difficulty conceiving, part of the problem lies with the male. Despite this, male infertility is a largely under-researched and taboo subject. To find out why, and what needs to be done, Benjamin Zephaniah meets consultant urologist Kevin McEleny, who leads the Male Fertility Service at the Newcastle Fertility Centre in the International Centre for Life. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Support Organisations

Fertility Network UK offers information, advice and support for anyone suffering from infertility related problems.
http://fertilitynetworkuk.org

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority is the UK's independent regulator overseeing the use of gametes and embryos in fertility treatment and research. The website offers details of licensed fertility clinics across the UK.
www.hfea.gov.uk

NHS Fertility
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/infertility/causes/

Male Infertility - Benjamin Zephaniah talks to consultant urologist Kevin McEleny.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Benjamin Zephaniah Meets Richard Clothier2019100120191207 (R4)Benjamin Zephaniah is infertile. This is not something you hear men readily admit. It has been a taboo subject. This has resulted in many men with fertility problems feeling isolated and guilt-ridden whilst also grieving for the child they cannot have by natural methods. Richard Clothier describes his experiences. Benjamin meets Richard's wife Terri in the next programme. Producer Sarah Blunt

Support Organisations

Fertility Network UK offers information, advice and support for anyone suffering from infertility related problems.
http://fertilitynetworkuk.org

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority is the UK's independent regulator overseeing the use of gametes and embryos in fertility treatment and research. The website offers details of licensed fertility clinics across the UK.
www.hfea.gov.uk

NHS Fertility
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/infertility/causes/

Male infertility - the male experience. Benjamin Zephaniah talks to Richard Clothier

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Benjamin Zephaniah is infertile. This is not something you hear men readily admit. It has been a taboo subject. This has resulted in many men with fertility problems feeling isolated and guilt-ridden whilst also grieving for the child they cannot have by natural methods. Richard Clothier describes his experiences. Benjamin meets Richard's wife Terri in the next programme. Producer Sarah Blunt

Male infertility - the male experience.Benjamin Zephaniah talks to Richard Clothier

Benjamin Zephaniah Meets Terri Clothier2019100820191214 (R4)Terri Clothier discusses how her husband's fertility problems affected her and their relationship. When Terri married Richard (who we heard from in the previous programme ) she knew she wanted a family. They both did. Terri imagined life with two children. But this hasn't happened. They were unaware that Richard had a fertility problem. Whilst friends and family were starting their own families Richard and Terri felt alone and isolated. A feeling they describe as grieving. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Support Organisations

Fertility Network UK offers information, advice and support for anyone suffering from infertility related problems.
http://fertilitynetworkuk.org

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority is the UK's independent regulator overseeing the use of gametes and embryos in fertility treatment and research. The website offers details of licensed fertility clinics across the UK.
www.hfea.gov.uk

NHS Fertility
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/infertility/causes/

Male Infertility - the female experience. Benjamin Zephaniah talks to Terri Clothier

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Body Shape: Helen Mort And Anyika Onuora2020091520200919 (R4)Poet and runner Helen Mort talks to retired Olympic track and field athlete Anyika Onuora about body image in sport. In the last of three programmes about body modification and the relationship between how we present ourselves physically to the world and how we feel, Helen swaps experiences with Anyika about striving for 'the perfect image‘ and the effects training and competitive sport have on the body's shape. Anyika reveals her lack of confidence about her body and how she managed this whilst living her life in the public eye in front of vast crowds and TV cameras. Producer Sarah Blunt

Poet Helen Mort talks to retired Olympic athlete Anyika Onuora about body image in sport.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Bridget Kendall With Alexander Mccall Smith20170323Bridget Kendall talks to author Alexander McCall Smith about his work as an academic.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Claire Derry2013092420160226 (R4)Carolyn Quinn speaks to Claire Derry, whose son went missing in the Australian outback.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Gillian Duffy2013091720160225 (R4)Carolyn Quinn speaks to Gillian Duffy, called a 'bigoted woman' in 2010 by Gordon Brown.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Stephanie Slater2013091020160224 (R4)Carolyn Quinn speaks to Stephanie Slater, who survived a violent kidnapping in 1992.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Christina Lamb Talks To Lady Khadija Idi Amin2015040720160222 (R4)Christina Lamb talks to Lady Khadija, daughter of Idi Amin, about family legacy.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

City Or Country? Alys Fowler Meets Gregory Leadbetter2019111220191116 (R4)Acclaimed gardening writer, Alys Fowler, tries to work out where she wants to live, in the city or the countryside, with the help of poet, Gregory Leadbetter.
Alys grew up in deepest rural England but for years has found happiness in the city of Birmingham, her small garden and local allotment. But she's starting to feel the pull of the countryside again, and the access to the natural world it offers. However, Gregory - through the lens of poetry - discusses how paying close attention to nature wherever you are can have a profound effect.

Producer: Karen Gregor

Acclaimed gardening writer, Alys Fowler, tries to work out where she wants to live.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

City Or Country? Alys Fowler Meets Ruth Allen2019110520191109 (R4)Acclaimed gardening writer, Alys Fowler, tries to work out where she wants to live, in the city or the countryside, with the help of outdoor counsellor, Dr. Ruth Allen. Alys grew up in deepest rural England, but for years has lived in Birmingham. She loves the city, and her small garden and allotment, but is starting to feel a pull to return to her roots. But should she? If she does, will the countryside offer her what she feels is missing from her life, a deeper connection with nature, or does the city provide all she needs?

Producer: Karen Gregor

Acclaimed gardening writer Alys Fowler tries to work out where she wants to live.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

City Women And Motherhood2014021820190122 (R4)Andrea Catherwood chose to give up her role as a foreign correspondent once she had children. She switched to the position of news anchor; trading Baghdad for the safety of the studio felt to her like a sensible move.
Last month Nigel Farage made some comments about women in the City being worth less once they'd had children – reigniting a debate about working mothers. But is the City particularly unforgiving?

For this series of 'One to One', we talk to senior women in the City about how they combine motherhood with their high flying careers. Brenda Trenowden is a managing director at ANZ bank in London's financial hub Canary Wharf. How does she manage a full time, high pressured job that takes up evenings as well?

Producer: Perminder Khatkar

Women in the City talk about how they have combined motherhood with a high-flying career.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

City Women And Motherhood2014022520190129 (R4)Andrea Catherwood decided to give up her career as a foreign correspondent after she had her first child as leaving him for weeks or months at a time to report from the frontline was something she felt she wasn't able to do. Instead she moved into presenting the news.

Last month Nigel Farage said controversially that if women in the City were prepared to sacrifice family life they could do just as well as men.

But there are now a number of senior City women who do combine their careers with motherhood. Charlotte Crosswell is Chief Executive Officer of the trading derivatives platform of NASDAQ in London and a mother of one, so how does she make it work ?
This programme was first broadcast in 2014 and Charlotte Crosswell is now the current CEO of Innovative Finance.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Women in the City talk about how becoming a mother has impacted on their career.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Coming Back From The Brink2017080320180104 (R4)Primrose Granville asks chef Henroy Brown how he came back from serious illness.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Community Radio Awards 2016 Female Presenter of the Year, Primrose Granville talks to the Jamaican chef Henroy Brown about his near death experience as a young man in his twenties, when he was diagnosed first with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, and then with the near fatal Steven Johnson syndrome.

She herself came through a very traumatic point in her own life. In 2003 she was an Early Years/Special Needs practitioner with dreams of becoming a Head Teacher, married with a young son. A freak incident ended all that. Within 18 months she was unemployed, unemployable, separated and with no financial security. She was also mourning the loss of her father.

"For years I did nothing & felt like nothing until someone introduced me to community radio." she says "Being out of work was the worst thing that ever happened to me, even more than the loss of my marriage, my father & my financial freedom. I knew I had ambition but others didn't seem to. However, I never gave up, as losing my ambition was one loss too many."

Primrose asks Henroy what gave him the strength to carry on when he was at his lowest point, and how he has managed to rebuild his life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Dame Kelly Holmes Talks To Helen Glover2018010920180709 (R4)The Olympic rower, Helen Glover, speaks to Dame Kelly Holmes about 'life after gold' - how to cope after retiring from sport.

Helen Glover is one of our most successful athletes; in a life devoted to rowing she's won a phenomenal 21 Olympic, World and European gold medals. But now that she's considering retirement, a future away from competitive rowing seems as daunting as it is liberating. She worries that, in her early 30s, her best days could be behind her. So, for this series, she is speaking to athletes who have already made the transition away from professional sport. In this programme, Dame Kelly Holmes tells her how she rebuilt her life and her identity.

Producer Karen Gregor.

Life After Gold: What happens to top athletes after they retire from sport?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Helen Pike20160719Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the first female head teacher of Magdalen College School.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Soweto Kinch2016070520170608 (R4)Datshiane Navanayagam talks to Soweto Kinch about his unexpected educational journey.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Val Mcdermid2016071220180828 (R4)Datshiane Navanayagam talks to Val McDermid about her unexpected educational journey.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Unexpected stories of education: The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the crime writer, Val McDermid, about an unusual educational experiment she was part of in the 1960s.

Datshiane Navanayagam had a difficult childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness, but she was always expected to achieve educationally and won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on an unexpected educational journey.

Today she meets the crime writer, Val McDermid, who was part of an educational experiment in the 1960s which separated her from her peers and pushed her forward by a year.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Angela Mudge2016060720180313 (R4)Playwright David Greig finds out what it takes to be an extreme runner.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance and why do people do it?

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way as well as many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David is speaking to two fellow runners. Today he meets former world hill running champion, Angela Mudge. Born with birth defects that affected her feet, Angela spent the first two and half years of life almost continually with her lower legs and feet in plaster. Despite this, she went onto be a hugely successful long-distance runner. Her most memorable race was when she became the first woman to break three hours when she won the Sierre-Zinal - 'the race of the 4000m peaks'.

But why do they do it?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Ben Smith2016053120180320 (R4)What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance, and why do people do it?

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way amongst many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David speaks to two fellow runners. Today, he meets Ben Smith who - at the time of their conversation - was attempting to set a world record by running 401 marathons on 401 consecutive days. Following a difficult childhood and a challenging time during his 20s, Ben discovered running and it became a form of confidence building and healing. Out of this new sense of confidence, Ben decided to set himself an outlandish challenge, and the 401 was the result.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Playwright David Greig finds out what it takes to be an extreme runner.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

David Schneider With Jenny Diski2015111720160126 (R4)David Schneider talks to journalist and writer Jenny Diski about how to face up to death.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Decca Aikenhead On Being Bereaved As A Child20180130Decca Aikenhead explores being bereaved as a child. This week, she talks to Bridget, who, like Decca herself, lost her Mum to cancer when she was young. Decca wonders whether having time to prepare for a death makes bereavement for children easier or harder.

Cruse Bereavement Care: www.cruse.org.uk
Child Bereavement UK: https://childbereavement.org.

Interview series in which broadcasters follow their personal passions.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Decca Aikenhead On The Effect Of Being Bereaved As A Child 2/220180213Decca Aikenhead explores how the loss of a parent effects a child. Decca herself was nine when her mother died of cancer, and three years ago, her partner drowned suddenly and unexpectedly, leaving her with their two young sons. She has had to raise them on her own and help them cope with his death. She talks to Sandra, who lost both her father and her husband suddenly, about what happens to children when a parent dies without warning.

Producer in Bristol: Sara Conkey.

Decca Aikenhead talks to Sandra, who lost her father suddenly when she was a child.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-rose Craig Talks To Rhiane Fatinikun2020092220200926 (R4)In the first of two programmes exploring how we can increase diversity outdoors in the rural landscape, 18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl talks to Rhiane Fatinikun about Black Girls Hike which she founded about a year ago to enable black women to benefit from the comradery of other black women and enjoy the tranquillity of rural areas. Mya-Rose Craig is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world's birds in her global travels. But what she doesn't see as a British Bangladeshi are many people like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. In recent years she has run Nature Camps to actively encourage Black and Visible Minority ethnic people outdoors. The two women share their experiences and views about how we can remove the barriers, challenge stereotypes and reinforce the message that the outdoors is for everyone. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl talks to Rhiane Fatinikun about increasing diversity outdoors

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-rose Craig Talks To Zakiya Mckenzie2020092920201003 (R4)18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world's' birds in her global travels. What she doesn't see as a British Bangladeshi are many like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. In recent years she has run Nature Camps to actively encourage Black and Visible Minority ethnic people outdoors. In this, the second of two programmes, she shares her experiences and challenges with Zakiya Mckenzie: postgraduate student, writer in residence with the Forestry Commission in 2019 and Ambassador for Black and Green- a group which works to connect Bristol's African and Caribbean communities with the city's environmental sector. Producer Sarah Blunt

Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl talks to Zakiya Mckenzie about increasing diversity outdoors.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Emma Freud Meets Rukmini Callimachi2019070920190713 (R4)Broadcaster, journalist and producer Emma Freud had a dream to work in hard news. She talks to Rukmini Callimachi from the New York Times and presenter of the podcast 'Caliphrate' about her investigations into Islamic State. She asks Rukmini how fear doesn't stop her; why she seeks to understand those who join IS; and whether there is anything that would make her stop.
Producer: Sara Coneky

Emma Freud talks to New York Times journalist Rukmini Callimachi about her reports on IS.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Broadcaster, journalist and producer Emma Freud had a dream to work in hard news. She talks to Rukmini Callimachi from the New York Times and presenter of the podcast 'Caliphrate' about her investigations into Islamic State. She asks Rukmini how fear doesn't stop her; why she seeks to understand those who join IS; and whether there is anything that would make her stop.
Producer: Sara Coneky

Emma Freud talks to New York Times journalist Rukmini Callimachi about her reports on IS.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Emma Freud Talks To Christina Lamb2019070220201103 (R4)Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud always wanted to be a news journalist but never had the confidence or courage to pursue it. She talks to Chief Foreign Correspondent for The Sunday Times Christina Lamb about the realities of the job, to discover if she could ever have achieved her dream.
Producer: Sara Conkey

Emma Freud talks to Christina Lamb about the reality of being a foreign correspondent.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud always wanted to be a news journalist but never had the confidence or courage to pursue it. She talks to Chief Foreign Correspondent for The Sunday Times Christina Lamb about the realities of the job, to discover if she could ever have achieved her dream.
Producer: Sara Conkey

Emma Freud talks to Christina Lamb about the reality of being a foreign correspondent.

Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud always wanted to be a news journalist but never had the confidence or courage to pursue it. She talks to Chief Foreign Correspondent for The Sunday Times Christina Lamb about the realities of the job, to discover if she could ever have achieved her dream.
Producer: Sara Conkey

Emma Freud Talks To Emily Maitlis2019062520191123 (R4)Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud dreamed of being a news journalist. She felt she never had the courage to pursue it, but still wonders if she had what it takes. Emma talks to Newsnight's Emily Maitlis about the adrenaline of the job; whether she ever has self-doubt - and what really drives her.
Producer: Sara Conkey

Emma Freud talks to Emily Maitlis about the reality of being a news journalist.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud dreamed of being a news journalist. She felt she never had the courage to pursue it, but still wonders if she had what it takes. Emma talks to Newsnight's Emily Maitlis about the adrenaline of the job; whether she ever has self-doubt - and what really drives her.

Emma Freud talks to Emily Maitlis about the reality of being a news journalist.

Fergus Keeling Meets Professor Victoria Tischler20180619Why do so many of us feel inspired after we have retired and long to flex our creative muscles? Having recently retired from a demanding job in part because he wants to be more 'hands on' and creative, Fergus Keeling talks to Chartered Psychologist Professor Victoria Tischler about 'life after 60' and why it is that so many people feel creatively inspired after retirement. Released from the demands of busy schedules, deadlines and meetings, Fergus discovers that we are free to connect with the child inside us and 'play' again.
Producer Sarah Blunt.

Fergus Keeling explores 'life after 60' with psychologist Professor Victoria Tischler.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Fergus Keeling Meets Tricia Hamilton20180612Can you have a new creative life after you have retired? Having recently stepped back from a demanding job in part because he wants to be more 'hands on' and creative, Fergus Keeling talks to Bristol hat designer Tricia Hamilton about 'life after 60' and how she changed careers from being a teacher to designing hats. As Fergus discovers, there is much to be gained from flexing your creative muscles in later life.

Producer Sarah Blunt.

Fergus Keeling explores the creative 'life after 60' with hat designer Tricia Hamilton.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Frank Gardner Talks To Dr Stuart Butchart2013082020170426 (R4)Frank Gardner talks to Dr Stuart Butchart about coping with a life-changing injury.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Friendship: Sima Kotecha And Her Mum Hansa Kotecha.2021030920210313 (R4)Can mothers and daughters ever truly be friends? In this episode of the One to One series, BBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha speaks to her mother Hansa about their own relationship; from the love they have to the topics that are absolutely off limits.

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

Can mothers and daughters really be friends? The BBC News correspondent asks her mum.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Friendship: Sima Kotecha Speaks To Ella Risbridger2021030220210306 (R4)BBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha talks to the cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship - from declaring someone your best friend after a drunken party to longer term, deeper relationships. Are group friendships better than one on one relationships, and how much can you really depend on friends when the chips are down?

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

Sima Kotecha talks to cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Friendship: Sima Kotecha Speaks To Her Mum Hansa Kotecha2021030920210313 (R4)Can mothers and daughters ever truly be friends? In this episode of the One to One series, BBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha speaks to her mother Hansa about their own relationship; from the love they have to the topics that are absolutely off limits.

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

The broadcaster talks to her mother about friendship.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Friendship: Sima Kotecha With Ella Risbridger2021030220210306 (R4)BBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha talks to the cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship - from declaring someone your best friend after a drunken party to longer term, deeper relationships. Are group friendships better than one on one relationships, and how much can you really depend on friends when the chips are down?

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

The broadcaster hears what friendship means to cook and writer Ella Risbridger.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

BBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha talks to the cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship - from declaring someone your best friend after a drunken party to longer term, deeper relationships. Are group friendships better than one on one relationships, and how much can you really depend on friends when the chips are down?

Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

The broadcaster hears what friendship means to cook and writer Ella Risbridger.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Gail Emms Talks To Helen Glover2018011620200412 (BBC7)
20200413 (BBC7)
20180716 (R4)
The Olympian, Helen Glover, speaks to world-class badminton player, Gail Emms, about the difficult time she has had since retiring from sport.

Helen Glover is one of our most successful athletes. In a life devoted to rowing, she has won a phenomenal twenty one Olympic, World and European gold medals. But now she is contemplating retirement. And she is discovering that looking to the future - towards a life away from competitive rowing - is as daunting as it is liberating.

Gail Emms, alongside her doubles partner, Nathan Robertson, won a silver medal at the 2004 Olympics and became World Champion in 2006. But when she retired in 2008, she struggled financially and underestimated how hard it might be to find a new sense of identity and purpose.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Life After Gold: Two Olympians discuss what can happen after retiring from top-level sport

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Gerald Scarfe - Bring Back The News!2020010720200215 (R4)When photographer Paul Conroy was injured during a Syrian rocket attack in 2012, his first thought was probably not how this might change reporting of the war. Two other journalists died in the same attack - Remi Ochlik and Marie Colvin. Paul survived, wrote a book which became the basis for a famous documentary, and then worked as consultant on a major film, A Private War. Does his story represent a more powerful way of understanding the war?

Five decades ago Gerald Scarfe went to Asia for The Daily Mail to cover the Vietnam war. He drew it, and here he shares his experiences with Paul as they discuss whether there are different ways to bring back the news. Future programmes in this series to include artist Arabella Dorman.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Gerald Scarfe meets photographer Paul Conroy

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Gerald Scarfe - Bring Back The News!2020011420200222 (R4)In 2015 Arabella Dorman hung a boat upside down in a Piccadilly church. The boat had been carrying refugees in the eastern Mediterranean, but now it was a piece of art, a symbol of 'exile and desperation' as well as courage and hope. Cartoonist Gerald Scarfe, who reported from Vietnam and Northern Ireland, wants to know if there is a different way to report the news, so here he talks to Arabella about whether her boat worked.
The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Gerald Scarfe meets Arabella Dorman

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Gerald Scarfe - Bring Back The News!2020030320201127 (R4)"When we're doing a show, we come up with a design, then sit down and talk about what the world is like. Next you bring in a writer, and then you get an actor in to voice the design, and the personality changes a little bit more." Brian Cosgrove talks to Gerald Scarfe about violence, children's tv, and the difference between the Cosgrove and the Scarfe way of seeing the world. A fascinating insight into two creative minds.

Brian Cosgrove OBE is a the BAFTA-winning director, producer and designer behind some of British television's favourite shows. Gerald Scarfe was a cartoonist at the Sunday Times for 50 years and worked with Pink Floyd on the design for The Wall.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Gerald Scarfe meets Brian Cosgrove, the creator of Dangermouse and Penfold.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Growing Up With A Gay Dad20190730David Gregory-Kumar is a BBC journalist, and a gay dad. For this edition of One to One, he speaks to Sophie Mei Lan about her experience of growing up with a gay dad and step-dad.

Sophie Mei Lan is a journalist, blogger and vlogger in her early 30s. She grew up, from the age of 3, partly with her gay dad and step-dad. She talks to David about the severe bullying she faced in high school, and how she learned to cope. But she also recalls the lighter, if rather excruciating, moment when she was mistaken for her dad's child-bride. Now that Sophie herself is a mum she sees a world that is more tolerant, and David agrees, but shares his feelings about living in Birmingham, a city where there have been protests against the teaching of LGBT equality in primary schools.

Producer: Karen Gregor

Gay dad David Gregory-Kumar meets Sophie Mei Lan, who grew up with a gay dad and step-dad.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Hair Changes: Helen Mort And Niamh Kavanagh20200908How significant is our hair when it comes to projecting an image of ourselves and how we feel? In the second of three programmes about body modification, poet Helen Mort talks to hair stylist Niamh Kavanagh about the role of hair in expressing our personality. Throughout her life Helen has changed the colour and style of her hair and also had her head shaved. She is fascinated by people's responses to hair and what it says about them and us. Niamh has also experimented with her own hair as well as cutting and styling clients' hair, which involves trust, empathy and skill. Producer Sarah Blunt

Poet Helen Mort talks to hair stylist Niamh Kavanagh about hair and personality.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Hair Changes: Helen Mort And Niamh Kavanagh2020090820210515 (R4)How significant is our hair when it comes to projecting an image of ourselves and how we feel? In the second programme about body modification, poet Helen Mort talks to hair stylist Niamh Kavanagh about the role of hair in expressing our personality. Throughout her life Helen has changed the colour and style of her hair and also had her head shaved. She is fascinated by people's responses to hair and what it says about them and us. Niamh has also experimented with her own hair as well as cutting and styling clients' hair, which involves trust, empathy and skill. Producer Sarah Blunt

Poet Helen Mort talks to hair stylist Niamh Kavanagh about hair and personality.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

I'm Done With Race: Lawrence Hoo2018022720190831 (R4)
20190917 (R4)
Jay Brave speaks to the poet Lawrence Hoo about his upbringing in a small village near Weston Super Mare, and what it was like to then move to Bristol where other people noticed the colour of his skin. He talks about how his background informs his attitude towards race and identity, and why he is now done with race.

Producer: Toby Field.

Jay Brave speaks to poet Lawrence Hoo about his attitude to race and identity.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Inheritance: Give It Up Or Pass It On?2018110620190417 (R4)Bronwen Maddox meets the environmentalist Tom Burke, who plans to pass on the majority of his legacy to his passion: supporting bird life. Tom was brought up on a council estate in Plymouth, and didn't inherit any money from his parents. He says hard work, luck and the property price boom have given him a substantial amount to pass on. But he believes leaving too much money to younger family members is the wrong thing to do - and he doesn't want it to go to the state.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

Bronwen Maddox with environmentalist Tom Burke, who's planning to leave his money to birds

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Inheritance: When It Gets Complicated2018103020190416 (R4)Bronwen Maddox talks to Lancaster solicitor and stepfather Gary Rycroft about solving disputes. Our family structures are getting more and more complicated, we're getting more and more demanding, so how can we avoid inheritance disputes? He talks about what writing wills in his professional life has led him to do in his own personal family life.

Producer: Chris Ledgard

Bronwen Maddox talks to solicitor and stepfather Gary Rycroft about solving disputes.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Inheritance: Who Gets The Farm?2018102320190415 (R4)Who gets the farm? Bronwen Maddox goes to Wicton Farm in Herefordshire to meet Claire Howlett. Claire runs the farm with her brother Daniel, while her parents still live in the farmhouse. Succession is a big issue in farming, and Claire explains how she and her family handled the difficulties of passing on the management of this farm from one generation to the next.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

Tricky? Bronwen Maddox hears how one brother and sister sorted out their farm inheritance.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Introverts And Extroverts: Russell Kane And Angela Barnes20200825What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this third and final interview, Russell talks to fellow comedian Angela Barnes about playing the extrovert for work. Is there a disconnect between her on-stage and off-stage versions of self? And if so, are both authentic?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Russell Kane talks to fellow comedian Angela Barnes about playing the extrovert for work.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Introverts And Extroverts: Russell Kane Talks To Jessica Pan2020081820210417 (R4)What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this second of three parts, Russell talks to author Jessica Pan about her year of "living dangerously" as an introvert pretending to be an extrovert in order to open up her world. What did she learn? How did it change her? And what advice does she have for other naturally introverted people?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Comedian Russell Kane talks to author Jessica Pan about life as an introvert

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this second of three parts, Russell talks to author Jessica Pan about her year of "living dangerously" as an introvert pretending to be an extrovert in order to open up her world. What did she learn? How did it change her? And what advice does she have for other naturally introverted people?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Comedian Russell Kane talks to author Jessica Pan about life as an introvert.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Introverts And Extroverts: Russell Kane Talks To Mark Vernon2020081120210412 (R4)
20210410 (R4)
What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this first of three parts, Russell talks to psychotherapist and author Mark Vernon about the origins of the terms "introvert" and "extrovert" as coined by psychoanalyst Carl Jung in 1921. How have Jung's definitions been interpreted over the last 100 years? And how can his theories help us to better understand ourselves?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Comedian Russell Kane talks to psychotherapist Mark Vernon about the origin of these terms

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this first of three parts, Russell asks psychotherapist and author Mark Vernon about the origins of the terms "introvert" and "extrovert" as coined by psychoanalyst Carl Jung in 1921. How have Jung's definitions been interpreted over the last 100 years? And can his theories help us better understand ourselves?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Comedian Russell Kane asks psychotherapist Mark Vernon: what are introverts & extroverts?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What are you: an introvert or an extrovert? Russell Kane is a comedian, so he has always assumed he's a textbook loud-mouthed extrovert. But now he's not so sure.

Across this series of interviews, Russell explores exactly what we mean by the terms "introvert" and "extrovert". He questions whether it is useful to define people in this way and whether we have a cultural bias towards one personality type over the other.

In this first of three parts, Russell asks psychotherapist and author Mark Vernon about the origins of the terms "introvert" and "extrovert" as coined by psychoanalyst Carl Jung in 1921. How have Jung's definitions been interpreted over the last 100 years? And can his theories help us better understand ourselves?

Producer: Becky Ripley

Comedian Russell Kane asks psychotherapist Mark Vernon: what are introverts & extroverts?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Isabel Hardman On Nature And Depression20170919Can nature help our mental health? The Spectator's Isabel Hardman asks Dr Alan Kellas.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Isabel Hardman On Nature And Depression20170926Can growing food can improve our mental health? Isabel talks to JK, a recovering alcoholic

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jan Ravens Talks To Germaine Greer2016020920161103 (R4)Actor and impressionist Jan Ravens talks to Germaine Greer, about her public image.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jan Ravens Talks To Lyse Doucet2016021620161104 (R4)Actor and comedienne Jan Ravens talks to BBC correspondent Lyse Doucet.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jane Hill Meets Caroline Harding2014040120170509 (R4)Jane Hill meets Caroline Harding, who has two children with a rare genetic condition.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jane Hill Meets John Jennings2014040820170516 (R4)Jane Hill meets John Jennings, who does not know if he's inherited a gene for Alzheimer's.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jay Brave And Christopher Sebastian Mcjetters20180306In his One to One series on race and identity, Jay Brave explores why he doesn't identify with the term "black" when it means so much to so many other people. In this episode, he talks to Christopher Sebastian McJetters about his experiences being a black and gay man both in the USA where he's from, and in Prague where he lives now.

Producer: Toby Field.

Jay Brave speaks to Christopher McJetters about his experiences as a black gay man.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jay Brave And Kelechi Okafor20180220Jay Brave is a spoken word artist and entrepreneur who doesn't identify as "black", arguing that an understanding of ethnic background is far more important than race. But actress, director and fitness instructor Kelechi Okafor has an almost opposite approach to identity and is proud to be, and to identify as, "black".

Here they meet and discuss why they think the way they do, what their experiences have been, where their views meet, and how they see themselves as agents for change.

Producer: Toby Field.

Jay Brave and Kelechi Okafor discuss their approach to race and identity.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Jay Elwes Meets Artist Simon Periton20191029What does it mean to "look at" something? Do an artist and a scientist look at a sunset in the same way? Jay Elwes talks to the artist Simon Periton, whose work includes the installations in the new Farringdon Crossrail station. Simon explains how he looks for ideas in everyday objects, taking inspiration from windows, leaves and even empty tin cans.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

What is it to 'look at' something? Artist Simon Periton explores his view of the world.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What does mean to "look at" something? Do an artist and a scientist look at a sunset in the same way? Jay Elwes talks to the artist Simon Periton, whose work includes the installations in the new Farringdon Crossrail station. Simon explains how he looks for ideas in everyday objects, taking inspiration from windows, leaves and even empty tin cans.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Jay Elwes Meets Nasa's John Mather2019102220191110 (R4)How do different people look at the world around them? Do a scientist and an artist see a sunset the same way? In the first of two programmes, we meet the Nobel prize winning astrophysicist, John Mather. Dr Mather is the Senior Project Scientist on the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the Hubble. He talks to the journalist Jay Elwes about the "telescope of the imagination", and how technology can help us look back through space and time to picture our universe in its early days.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

Do scientists and artists see the world differently? With Nasa astronomer John Mather

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

How do different people "look into" something? In the first of two programmes, we meet the Nobel prize winning astrophysicist and cosmologist, John Mather. Dr Mather is the Senior Project Scientist on the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the Hubble. He talks to journalist and friend Jay Elwes about the "telescope of the imagination", and how technology can help us look back through space and time to picture our universe in its early days.
Producer: Chris Ledgard

What does to 'look into' something mean? With Nobel prize-winning astronomer John Mather

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

John Harris Talks To Prof Simon Baron-cohen2015021720161113 (R4)John Harris of the Guardian talks to autism specialist Professor Simon Baron-Cohen.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

John Mccarthy Meets Afghan Refugee Rafi2013021220160803 (R4)John McCarthy talks to Rafi, an Afghan refugee who fled to Britain in 2011.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

John Mccarthy Talks To Rachel Denton2013020520160802 (R4)John McCarthy talks to hermit Rachel Denton about her decision to live alone.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170110Julia Bradbury discusses the challenges of emergency medicine with Dr Martin McKechnie.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170117Julia Bradbury explores the challenges of working in a mental health inpatient unit.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170124Julia Bradbury talks to Laura Rutherford, a volunteer with the Samaritans.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Karen Darke Talks To Diana Davies2020063020200912 (R4)Having celebrated her 81st birthday this year and her 70th with a high speed boat ride down the River Thames, Diana Davies has no intention of leaving her own bungalow and moving in to a retirement home. Age, she argues, is a number not a condition. But how do you keep control of your life if very well meaning family and friends try to persuade you to be less independent as you get older? In this, the last of three conversations about taking control of your life, paralympic athlete and adventurer Karen Darke talks to Diana about her life choices, maintaining her independence and her hopes and fears for the future. Producer Sarah Blunt
Photo of Diana Davies. Copyright Holly Hall.

Does getting old mean you have to lose control of your life? With Diana Davies.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Having celebrated her 81st birthday this year and her 70th with a high speed boat ride down the River Thames, Diana Davies has no intention of leaving her own bungalow and moving in to a retirement home. Age she argues is a number not a condition. But how do you keep control of your life if very well meaning family and friends try to persuade you to be less independent as you get older? In this, the last of three conversations about taking control of your life, paralympic athlete and adventurer Karen Darke talks to Diana about her life choices, maintaining her independence and her hopes and fears for the future. Producer Sarah Blunt
Photo of Diana Davies. Copyright Holly Hall.

Kate Silverton On How Our Fear Of Failure Can Impact On The Choices We Make.2012100920190108 (R4)Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed in a Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough. It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind. In the first of this two-part series for One to One, Kate talks to composer Raymond Yiu, who, despite his love for music at an early age, his strict parental upbringing stopped him from pursuing this as a career as he thought he wasn't good enough.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Kate Silverton explores how our fear of failure can limit your life choices.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Kate Silverton On How Our Fear Of Failure Impacts On The Choices We Make.2012101620190115 (R4)In this One to One we explore how our experience at school can leave kids afraid to take risks as they fear failure. Kate Silverton desperately wanted to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed in a Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough. It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind. In this second and final series on 'failure' businesswoman Kate Hardcastle examines how her experience at school impacted on her life choices.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Kate Silverton talks to a businesswoman on how bullying made her afraid to take risks.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Kriss Akabusi Talks To Helen Glover2018012320180820 (R4)The Olympic rower, Helen Glover, speaks to Kriss Akabusi about 'life after gold'.

Helen Glover is one of our most successful athletes. In a life devoted to rowing, she has won a phenomenal 21 Olympic, World and European gold medals. But now that she is considering retirement, a life away from competitive rowing feels as daunting as it is liberating.

In this programme she speaks to Kriss Akabusi MBE, the larger-than-life, multiple medal-winning Olympic, World, Commonwealth and European sprinter and hurdler. Since leaving athletics, Kriss has had a successful career on TV and in motivational speaking. He and Helen talk about the challenges in finding a new role and identity, and he encourages her to think about what she would like to do next..

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Life After Gold: what happens next? Can Helen Glover learn anything from Kriss Akabusi?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Lady Hale And Elsie Owusu On Architecture And Justice2020021120200321 (R4)Architect Elsie Owusu discusses the refurbishment of the Supreme Court building with Lady Hale.

The creation of the Supreme Court in 2009 was a defining moment in UK legal history. And in architectural history, too. It was decided to refurbish the century-old Middlesex Guildhall which stands in London's Parliament Square. At the time it housed seven Crown Courts and was, according to Lady Hale, 'cluttered and gloomy'. Lady Hale, who has recently retired as the first female President of the Supreme Court, was involved in the renovation process, and worked alongside Elsie Owusu who was one of the architects. Just over 10 years on, they get together to discuss what they wanted to achieve: a building of 'light and transparency' which would mirror the aims of the Supreme Court itself.

Producer: Karen Gregor

What should a Supreme Court look like? Architect Elsie Owusu talks to Lady Hale

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Life In Prison: Alan Rusbridger Talks To Cj Burge2019040920190822 (R4)In her early twenties, CJ Burge was sentenced to nine and a half years in prison for importing drugs into Japan. She went on to spend six years in jail, first in Japan and then in the UK. Today, with a first class Law degree earned through study in prison, she is a different person.

CJ talks to Alan Rusbridger about life in prison in two different countries and reveals the effect that imprisonment had on her mental state. She tells him about being grateful for incarceration and about how she used opportunities in jail to change her life beyond the prison walls.

Producer: Camellia Sinclair

CJ Burge tells Alan Rusbridger about the mental impact of prison life, in Japan and the UK

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Life In Prison: Alan Rusbridger Talks To Dr Sohom Das2019041620190829 (R4)Former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger meets Dr Sohom Das, a consultant forensic psychiatrist. His job is to assess, treat and rehabilitate mentally ill offenders.

Dr Sohom discusses the effect that a life behind bars has upon the mind, tells Alan about the times when he has made a difference, and talks about the challenges of treating mentally ill offenders inside jail.

Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Dr Sohom Das talks to Alan Rusbridger about treating prisoners who are mentally unwell.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Life In Prison: Alan Rusbridger Talks To Jonathan Aitken2019040220190808 (R4)In 1999, Jonathan Aitken was sentenced to 18 months for perjury and perverting the course of justice. He went on to spend seven months behind bars, in three different prisons. At the time, Alan Rusbridger was his adversary. Then editor of The Guardian newspaper, Alan had reported Jonathan to the police for perjury after a high profile libel trial.

Twenty years on, Alan sits down with Jonathan, now a chaplain at Pentonville Prison, to find out what he learned from life behind bars, how the experience of incarceration changed the way he thought, and how it continues to shape his life today.

Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Alan Rusbridger talks to Jonathan Aitken about his experience of incarceration.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility2017022120190909 (R4)Lucy Mangan talks to Bea Harvie, a young carer, about responsibility.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Lucy Mangan feels she avoids responsibility whenever possible. She has cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child which is 'more than enough'. But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. She talks to Bea Harvie, a post-graduate student, whose father got ill when she was thirteen. Bea chose to take on a lot of caring duties towards her younger siblings while her Mother was busy caring for her Father. She describes the experience as something she just got on with, and reveals that it also was a useful distraction from dealing with her own feelings about her Dad's illness. Until one day when she was sixteen and it all caught up with her. She says its like shaking up a bottle of fizzy pop: ' it's got to come out some way.'.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility2017022820190910 (R4)Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility. Why? Today she talks to the Reverend Claire Herbert.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility wherever possible. She's got cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child 'and that's more than enough.' But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. Today she talks to Reverend Claire Herbert about a life dedicated to helping others. One of the first women priests to be ordained, Claire was working as a rector at St Anne's church in Soho when the Admiral Duncan bomb exploded. But she admits that being there for others has not been an easy road - in her 30s she took some time out from full-time church work to become a social worker and learn to be young 'perhaps for the first time'; she has realized that she needs to learn to play, and now gives herself permission sometimes to be 'naughty and horrible.'.

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility wherever possible. She's got cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child 'and that's more than enough.' But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. Today she talks to Reverend Claire Herbert about a life dedicated to helping others. One of the first women priests to be ordained, Claire was working as a rector at St Anne's church in Soho when the Admiral Duncan bomb exploded. But she admits that being there for others has not been an easy road - in her 30s she took some time out from full-time church work to become a social worker and learn to be young 'perhaps for the first time'; she has realized that she needs to learn to play, and now gives herself permission sometimes to be 'naughty and horrible.'.

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility. Why? Today she talks to the Reverend Claire Herbert.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility. Why? Today she talks to the Reverend Claire Herbert.

Mark Lawson Talks To Adam Mars-jones20160223Mark Lawson talks to author and critic Adam Mars-Jones about writing a memoir.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Lawson Talks To Hannah Witton20160301Mark Lawson talks to blogger and vlogger Hannah Witton.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Lawson Talks To Marvin Gaye Chetwynd20160308Mark Lawson talks to the artist and Turner Prize nominee Marvin Gaye Chetwynd.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Lawson Talks To Rachel Cusk20160315Mark Lawson talks to writer and author Rachel Cusk.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Steel And Faye Didymus2017072020180101 (R4)Does the sports psychologist agree that comedy and sport are kind of the same?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Steel's guest this week is impressed by his flow-state, but would like him to reduce his dependence on ironing. She is sports psychologist, Dr. Faye Didymus, from Leeds Beckett University.

Mark believes that his two addictions have much in common - they are stand-up comedy (his job) and sport (watching, playing, talking about it). He's sure that there is a link between the way comedians and sporting types deal with performance anxiety, crowd hostility, risk taking and more. Dr. Didymus, who works with sports stars at the highest level, casts light upon this theory.

In this series, Mark speaks to the former Premiership and England footballer, Graeme Le Saux. And he meets former World Champion snooker player, John Parrott. All three programmes are available as podcasts, and the Parrott & Le Saux podcasts have extra bits.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And Graeme Le Saux2017071320171226 (R4)Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as you need for sport? Really?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Steel And John Parrott2017072720180102 (R4)Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as those you need for sport? Really?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mark Steel is obsessed with sport. Obsessed! And he's certain there's a strong link between sport and stand-up comedy - risk taking, dealing with a hostile crowd, performance anxiety. In this programme he muses on his theory with the snooker player known as 'The Entertainer', John Parrott.

For this series of three programmes, he also meets sports psychologist and former figure skater, Dr. Faye Didymus; and also the former Premiership and England footballer Graeme Le Saux.

You can hear extra bits from both interviews on the podcasts, just go to the Radio 4 website.

Produced in Bristol by Karen Gregor.

Michael Jenkins Meets Adam James2018060520191012 (R4)Michael Jenkins became a Dad unexpectedly aged 18. In this series he's been talking to other men who were also teenage fathers. They talk frankly and openly about the challenges of parenthood at such a young age.
Adam James admits to having very little focus in his life and was half heartedly going to college when he discovered aged 18 that his partner was pregnant. Becoming a Dad has meant learning responsibility, discipline and patience and he's now 24 and has two children. He talks to Michael about the pressures and pleasures of being a father so young.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Film-maker Michael Jenkins explores fatherhood at a young age.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Miranda Rae On The Challenges Of Being A Single Parent2016111520170308 (R4)How do you bring up three children when your husband dies and you are left alone?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mourning - Nine Nights2019031220190914 (R4)Euella Jackson explores how we navigate grief with fellow Jamaican Maaureesha Shaw as they discuss the tradition of nine nights - the period that is spent in mourning prior to the funeral. Do rituals help? What can we learn from the rituals and traditions of other cultures and beliefs? Producer Sarah Bunt

Maaureesha Shaw talks to Euella Jackson about the traditional way of mourning in Jamaica.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Euella Jackson explores how we navigate grief with fellow Jamaican Maaureesha Shaw as they discuss the tradition of Nine Nights - the period that is spent in mourning prior to the funeral. Do rituals help? What can we learn from the rituals and traditions of other cultures and beliefs? Producer Sarah Bunt

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mourning - Traditions In Hinduism20190326Euella Jackson meets Dr Girdari Bhan who is actively involved in the Interfaith Network for the UK and past President of the World Hindu Council UK, to hear about the structured approach to death and mourning practised in Hinduism. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a traditional way of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Bunt

Dr Girdari Bhan, past president of the World Hindu Council UK, discusses mourning.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Mourning - Traditions In Judaism2019031920190921 (R4)Euella Jackson meets Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis to hear about the structured approach to mourning offered in Judaism which aims to guide the mourners through their loss and ease them back into the world beyond grief. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a tradition of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Blunt

Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis discusses mourning with Euella Jackson.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury Meets Faruk Choudhury2021020920210210 (R4)
20210216 (R4)
20210217 (R4)
20210220 (R4)
Five years ago BBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. She'd been given just three years to live and the transplant transformed her life. Sabet, who is of Bangladeshi origin, says it wasn't a difficult decision to make once he realised she could be waiting for years, because of a shortage of Asian donors in the UK. In this, the second of three programmes, Sabet talks to Faruk Choudhury. He is no relation, but he was Lord Mayor of Bristol in 2013 and he set out to increase the number of blood and organ donations from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the city. This was happening at the same time that Sabet was coming to terms with his mum's failing health and his decision to donate, so he followed the Lord Mayor's project closely and sees it as part of his own donation story.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

Sabet donated a kidney to his mum. He chats to Faruk about his campaign for more donors.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury Meets Faruk Choudhury2021022020210216 (R4)
20210217 (R4)
Five years ago BBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. She'd been given just three years to live and the transplant transformed her life. Sabet, who is of Bangladeshi origin, says it wasn't a difficult decision to make once he realised she could be waiting for years, because of a shortage of Asian donors in the UK. In this, the second of three programmes, Sabet talks to Faruk Choudhury. He is no relation, but he was Lord Mayor of Bristol in 2013 and he set out to increase the number of blood and organ donations from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the city. This was happening at the same time that Sabet was coming to terms with his mum's failing health and his decision to donate, so he followed the Lord Mayor's project closely and sees it as part of his own donation story.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

Sabet donated a kidney to his mum. He chats to Faruk about his campaign for more donors.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury Talks To Saj Khan2021022320210227 (R4)BBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother five years ago. He says it was not a difficult decision to make. Once he heard she only had 3 years to live unless he stepped up, his decision was already made. The transplant transformed her life and Sabet says it opened his eyes to the whole issue of organ donation. During his personal donation journey he discovered that there is a lack of organ donors from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the UK and this can lead to extra-long waits for a transplant. In this, the last of three programmes, Sabet talks to Saj Khan, a teacher from Birmingham who has experience of the emotional highs and lows of waiting for a kidney. Saj had his first transplant as a very young man, but sadly the kidney failed just after he graduated and he has spent years and years waiting for a new kidney.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

The broadcaster meets a teacher who's been waiting for a kidney transplant since 2007

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury With Kay Hamilton2021020220210203 (R4)
20210206 (R4)
Five years ago Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. It transformed her life. Sabet, a BBC journalist, says the experience changed his life for the better too. He's now fitter and healthier than before and he's forged a closer relationship with his parents. Organ donation was never on his radar before his mother became so ill, but it's an issue that's very real to him now. In this, the first of three programmes, Sabet talks to Kay Hamilton, his Kidney Coordinator, who played such an important part in his donation journey – and someone he has kept in close contact with since his operation.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

Broadcaster Sabet Choudhury discusses his kidney donation to his mum.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Nihal Talks Dogs2014110420160223 (R4)Broadcaster Nihal owns a staffordshire bull terrier, but why is he stereotyped by his dog?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Nikesh Shukla Meets Hayley Campbell2017013120171112 (R4)
20190622 (R4)
20201106 (R4)
Novelist Nikesh Shukla shares his fascination for boxing with Hayley Campbell.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing three years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Deborah Jump2017021420190706 (R4)Nikesh Shukla asks Dr Deborah Jump how effective boxing gyms are at reducing offending.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Novelist Nikesh Shukla started to learn to box after a racist incident on a train left him feeling vulnerable and needing to learn how protect himself. In the last of his three interviews exploring the sport - and getting personal advice - he speaks to criminologist Dr Deborah Jump. She left her desk at Manchester Metropolitan University to do an ethnographic study - immersing herself into the world of boxing to research it from the inside. She wanted to investigate whether boxing gyms help reduce offending among young people. Her research made her fitter but gave her some food for thought.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Kieran Farrell2017020720190629 (R4)Nikesh Shukla speaks to boxer Kieran Farrell, who suffered brain damage after a fight.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Nikesh Shukla continues his series of interviews on boxing. The level of violence and serious injury has always called the sport into question. Just last year it saw the tragic death of Mike Towell after a fatal head injury and Nick Blackwell retired after a bleed on the brain. These stories are familiar to Kieran Farrell, who discovered a love of boxing aged just 7, and who had 26 fights in a row unbeaten - 14 as a professional. But then he collapsed from a bleed on the brain after a fight against Anthony Crolla. Despite 30% brain damage he was desperate to fight again, but was forced to retire aged 22. Four years on he runs a gym and acts as coach and promoter. He tells Nikesh what attracts a child to the sport, what that night took from him and why he's still happy to encourage children and adults to put on the gloves.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Ocd: Tuppence Middleton Talks To David Adam20210427Actress Tuppence Middleton has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). It's not something she's really talked about before, except with a therapist. That is, until now. In this series, she's on a mission to find out more about the disorder - and herself - and to bust some myths along the way.

Today, she talks journalist David Adam, writer of the best-selling book 'The Man Who Couldn't Stop' with the strap-line 'OCD and the true story of a life lost in thought.' David's OCD was triggered by an illogical obsession with contracting HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. He says each era has its "bogeyman". What might this mean for people today, in the age of coronavirus?

Photo credit: Robert Harper. Producer: Becky Ripley.

Actress Tuppence Middleton talks to writer David Adam about OCD.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Ocd: Tuppence Middleton Talks To Gazal Jones20210413Actress Tuppence Middleton has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). It's not something she's really talked about before, except with a therapist. That is, until now. In this series, she's on a mission to find out more about the disorder - and herself - and to bust some myths along the way.

Today, she talks to clinical psychologist Dr Gazal Jones. What's going on in the brain? How does it affect people differently? And what's the best way to get treatment?

Photo credit: Robert Harper. Producer: Becky Ripley.

Actress Tuppence Middleton talks to clinical psychologist Dr Gazal Jones about OCD.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Ocd: Tuppence Middleton Talks To Rose Cartwright20210420Actress Tuppence Middleton has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). It's not something she's really talked about before, except with a therapist. That is, until now. In this series, she's on a mission to find out more about the disorder - and herself - and to bust some myths along the way.

Today, she talks to screenwriter and author Rose Cartwright, who wrote her memoir 'Pure' after a ten-year struggle with 'Pure O'. What is Pure O? Why are the intrusive thoughts that come with it often violent or sexual? And why do so many people with Pure O suffer in silence?

Photo credit: Robert Harper. Producer: Becky Ripley.

Actress Tuppence Middleton talks to screenwriter Rose Cartwright about 'Pure O'.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Olivia O'leary Meets John Banville2012121120160801 (R4)Olivia O'Leary speaks to Booker Prize-winning author John Banville.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Olivia O'leary With Mick Fitzgerald2012121820160729 (R4)Olivia O'Leary meets one of the greatest ever jump-jockeys, Mick Fitzgerald.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Personality: Katya Adler Talks To James Cracknell2020042820200711 (R4)Katya Adler talks to James Cracknell about personality and how it can change.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

For more than twenty years, from war zones to the seats of political power, Katya Adler has interviewed, observed, told people's stories. And she's always been fascinated by what makes people tick - their personality. Can we change or fake it?
In the first of three programmes, Katya meets Olympic athlete and Vice President of Headway, James Cracknell, who suffered an injury to the brain a decade ago which caused some of his personality traits to change. Katya and James discuss the impact of the injury on James's personality, the extent to which personality is observed by people around us and how our personalities can evolve.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Personality: Katya Adler Talks To Professor Wiebke Bleidorn2020051220200519 (R4)
20200725 (R4)
Since she was a university student, Katya Adler has been fascinated by the idea of personality - how personalities are formed, how they can change, and whether we even really have a fixed set of characteristics.
For the third and final part of this One to One series about personality, Katya speaks to Wiebke Bleidorn, professor of social and personality psychology and head of the Personality Change Lab at the University of California, Davis.
Wiebke talks to Katya about how the field of personality psychology has evolved, discusses her research into how stable personality traits are and reveals whether it is possible to change someone's personality.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Katya Adler talks to psychologist Wiebke Bleidorn about whether personalities can change.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Since she was a university student, Katya Adler has been fascinated by the idea of personality - how personalities are formed, how they can change, and whether we even really have a fixed set of characteristics.
For the third and final part of this One to One series about personality, Katya speaks to Wiebke Bleidorn, professor of social and personality psychology and head of the Personality Change Lab at the University of California, Davis.
Wiebke talks to Katya about how the field of personality psychology has evolved, discusses her research into how stable personality traits are and reveals whether it is possible to change someone's personality.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Personality: Katya Adler Talks To Simon Hattenstone2020050520200718 (R4)Katya Adler talks to Simon Hattenstone about pulling back the mask of famous personalities

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

For the second in this interview series about personality - what it is, how it's formed and how it can change - Katya Adler talks to Simon Hattenstone, features writer at The Guardian newspaper.
For over two decades, Simon has interviewed famous personalities, pulling back their masks to reveal the essence beneath - what motivates them, what drives them, what they are really like. Katya talks to Simon about how he tries to get under the skin of his interviewees, how the personalities of his interviewees change and what place there is in the interview for the personality of the person asking the questions.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy2016120620181111 (R4)Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy, with primatologist Frans de Waal.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy2016122020181110 (R4)Television exec Peter Bazalgette examines empathy in doctors and the difference it makes.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy in doctors with Denis Pereira Gray, and the difference it makes for their patients.
Professor Sir Denis Pereira Gray was a GP for 38 years and is now Patron of the National Association for Patient Participation. He believes that humanity and empathy in medicine contributes to a better outcome for all concerned, and research evidence is piling up in support of that view. Empathy in clinical practice can be fostered through training, narrative medicine and continuity of care.
Producer Beth O'Dea

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy2016122520181218 (R4)
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Television executive Peter Bazalgette talks to Jane Davis, founder of The Reader Organisation, about the power of shared reading in developing empathy, and how books can transform lives. Jane and her volunteers run small groups in which people meet to read books and poems aloud and talk about them. They meet in care homes, libraries, hostels, mental health centres, schools and prisons.
Reading helped Jane to make sense of her own life and she wants to share that. She says: "You've already got your feelings, sometimes you just haven't got any language for them. Something happens to you in shared reading, a sudden moment - a feeling of recognition, of seeing written down something you've had as nameless (and therefore in a sense unknown), taking some form in the visible world, so you can begin to know it. And there's something so important about that – it's a form of consciousness".
Producer Beth O'Dea

Peter Bazalgette talks to Jane Davis about the power of reading in encouraging empathy.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Peter Curran Meets Fiona Murphy20171024Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Peter Curran Meets John Chambers20171031
Rachel Johnson Meets Al Kennedy2014060320170424 (R4)Rachel Johnson talks to writer AL Kennedy about the struggles of writing fiction.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Rachel Johnson Meets Michael Frayn2014061020170425 (R4)Rachel Johnson talks to author Michael Frayn about the struggles of writing fiction.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Rachel Johnson Talks To Absent Mothers - Susanna20190226Rachel Johnson is fascinated by the idea that women are judged more harshly than men on their parenting choices.
In this first episode of two One to Ones, she meets Susanna Thomas, an egyptologist living and working in Cairo, whose twin girls live in the UK with her brother and his wife.
Rachel sent her own three children to boarding school and she wants to explore the emotional cost of 'outsourcing' child-care - for both the mother and the children.
Produced in Bristol by Sara Conkey

Rachel Johnson talks to mothers who made a choice not to live with their children. 1/2

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Rachel Johnson Talks To Absent Mothers: Sarah20190305Rachel Johnson is fascinated how mothers are often judged more harshly for their parenting choices than men. She meets Sarah, who chose to live away from her two children for some months in order to deal with her drug-taking.
This is something Rachel knows something about as her own mother left the family home during an episode of mental illness when she was a child. Rachel explores the effect of this separation on both the children and the mother.
Produced in Bristol by Sara Conkey

Rachel Johnson talks to women who chose not to live with their children for a time.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Samantha Simmonds Meets Alison Pike20171121Journalist Samantha Simmonds explores sibling competition with Professor Alison Pike.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Samantha Simmonds Meets Joanna Briscoe20171128Journalist and mother Samantha Simmonds explores sibling rivalry with Joanna Briscoe.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Samantha Simmonds Meets Nicki Karet20171205Journalist and mother Samantha Simmonds explores sibling competition with Nick Karet.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Samira Ahmed With Lucy Mathen20160727Lucy Mathen tells Samira Ahmed about a tale of charitable endeavour, with a twist.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Samira Ahmed With Murray Melvin20160728Samira Ahmed meets actor Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Sathnam Sanghera Speaks To Alpesh Chauhan2016041920170428 (R4)Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Sathnam Sanghera Talks To Janice Turner2016032220170427 (R4)Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as firmly middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Selina Scott Speaks To Canon Paul Greenwell2015070720161031 (R4)Selina Scott talks to Canon Paul Greenwell about ghosts.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Selina Scott Talks To Ghostbuster Hayley Stevens2015072120161102 (R4)Selina Scott talks to ghostbuster Hayley Stevens, who does not believe in ghosts.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Selina Scott Talks To Yasmin Ishaq2015071420161101 (R4)Selina Scott talks to Yasmin Ishaq who doesn't believe in ghosts, but in jinn.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Sian Harries And Grace Dent Are Ambivalent About Motherhood2017121920180602 (R4)
20201105 (R4)
Comedy writer Sian Harries and columnist Grace Dent discuss whether to have a baby. Or not

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Comedy writer Sian Harries and columnist and broadcaster Grace Dent discuss that strange taboo for women - ambivalence towards motherhood. Should Sian make the decision to have a baby or not to? And she wonders will she regret somewhere down the line not having them. She and Grace talk about how other people can make you feel when you haven't got children.

As the successful writer of programmes like ' Man Down', 'The Now Show' and 'Dilemma', Sian Harries explores how a fear for her career might be affecting her decision to have children. Women certainly have more choice now about whether to become a mother, but does society really accept and respect that choice or is it generally assumed that all women want a baby and that she - and any women who feel ambivalent - will at some point change their minds?

Producer: Toby Field.

Producer: Toby Field.

Sian Harries And Isy Suttie On Whether To Have Children2017121220190105 (R4)Comedy writer Sian Harries and Isy Suttie explore ambivalence to motherhood.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Comedy writer Sian Harries and Isy Suttie discuss that strange taboo - women's ambivalence towards having children. Why is it that you're supposed to want to have children, what does it mean if you're really not sure that you do, and why it is that so many people feel they have the right to tell her she's wrong to feel the way she does?

Sian Harries has written comedy for The Now Show, Greg Davies' 'Man Down' and she's worked closely with her husband, the comedian Rhod Gilbert. But despite her success, she explains how bad it made her feel when someone walked up to her at a party and asked her when she was going to have children. She wonders why people feel they have the right to ask this question, and why it only seems to be of women but never men. She asks Isy, who has chosen to have children, if she always knew she wanted too and whether it just felt "right"?

Producer in Bristol: Toby Field.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Soumaya Keynes Meets Beatrice Cherrier20180515The story of women's under-representation in economics: from the 1920s to #MeToo - how much progress has there really been in the last 100 years? The Economist's Soumaya Keynes talks to Beatrice Cherrier from the French National Centre for Scientific Research, who writes, blogs and tweets on the history of economics studies.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

The story of women in economics: from the 1920s to #MeToo.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Soumaya Keynes Meets Claudia Goldin2018050120200125 (R4)Does economics have a problem with women? Soumaya Keynes and Claudia Goldin talk it over.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Does economics have a problem with women? Soumaya Keynes and Claudia Goldin talk it over.

Soumaya Keynes Meets Stephen Machin20180508The Economist's Soumaya Keynes continues her quest to find out why the study of economics is so dominated by men. Does that affect the kind of economics we get, and why does that matter? In her second programme, Soumaya meets Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, who thinks it's a problem some in his profession are failing to recognize.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Why is economics so male? Does the subject have an image problem?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Steve Backshall20160202Steve Backshall meets polar explorer Ann Daniels.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Taking Control - Karen Darke Talks To Justine Shuttleworth2020061620200905 (R4)How do you take control when suffering a debilitating illness? With Justine Shuttleworth.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

How do you take control of your life when you find yourself facing a crisis or unexpected events turn everything that is familiar and certain upside-down? In the second of three conversations about taking control of your life, Paralympic athlete and adventurer Karen Darke talks to single mother and property developer Justine Shuttleworth. Six years ago Justine became very ill. She sought medical advice but her condition didn't improve. She felt isolated and fearful as the physical and mental effects got worse. Over the course of 18 months she saw 14 doctors, nine psychiatrists and a hormone specialist. Eventually she was diagnosed and treated for Lyme disease. Here, she shares her experiences and describes how she regained control of her life. Producer Sarah Blunt

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Taking Control - Karen Darke Talks To Louai Al Roumani2020060920200822 (R4)How do you take control of your life when you find yourself facing a crisis or unexpected events turn everything that is familiar and certain upside-down? Paralympic cyclist and athlete Karen Darke began her working life as a geologist until a climbing accident resulted in her paralysis from the chest down. Overnight her life radically changed but today she's a full time athlete and became Paralympic Champion in Rio in 2016. In the first of three conversations about taking control of your life she talks to former Syrian Banker and author of 'Lessons from a Warzone', Louai Al Romani. When the war broke out in Syria in 2011, Louai was Head of Finance and Strategy at Banque Bemo Saudi Fransi. Here, Louai describes what he learned about coping in such difficult conditions, and how he developed the resilience and skills to ensure the bank not only survived the first 4 years of the Syrian crisis, but even thrived in the most challenging of times. Producer Sarah Blunt.

How do you take control in a crisis? With former Syrian Banker Louai Al Roumani.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tattoos: Helen Mort And Lou Hopper2020090120210501 (R4)Tattooed poet Helen Mort talks to Tattooist Lou Hopper about “getting inked”. In the first of two programmes about body modifications, Helen explores the body as a canvas and tattoos as an art form. Why do people choose to decorate their skin with tattoos? How do they make the wearer feel? What responses do tattoos evoke ? Are tattoos a way of projecting our personality? What do visual modifications reveal about an individual? Producer Sarah Blunt

Poet Helen Mort talks to tattooist Lou Hopper about \u201cgetting inked\u201d.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tattooed poet Helen Mort talks to Tattooist Lou Hopper about “getting inked”. In the first of three programmes about body modifications, Helen explores the body as a canvas and tattoos as an art form. Why do people choose to decorate their skin with tattoos? How do they make the wearer feel? What responses do tattoos evoke ? Are tattoos a way of projecting our personality? What do visual modifications reveal about an individual? Producer Sarah Blunt

Poet Helen Mort talks to Tattooist Lou Hopper about \u201cgetting inked\u201d.

Tech For Good: Marcus Smith Speaks To Kriti Sharma20210511What do you think of when you hear the words "A.I." or "Artificial Intelligence"? Thanks to science-fiction it's often strange-looking humanoids or futuristic robots hell-bent on destruction. But as Kriti Sharma points out, we are probably using A.I. hundreds of times a day without even thinking about it. It could be, she says, a bank deciding whether to accept or reject your application, or an algorithm might decide whether you get a job interview or what exam grade you receieve. She made her first robot when she was a teenager, and has gone on to use A.I. to help the victims of domestic abuse and to challenge the rise of what she sees as subservient female online assistants. Kriti is now an advisor on A.I. to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Marcus Smith is a content creator from Bristol and a digital native. He is fascinated by technology's impact on us and has studied the effects of online gambling on young people. For this series of 'One to One', Marcus is looking at the 'tech for good' movement and speaks to two leading figures in the tech industry - one who argues that it is currently a force for bad, and one who tries to work with tech to harness the good.

For this second programme, Marcus asks Kriti why she thinks A.I. often has in-built gender and race biases, and hears how she is tackling this by inviting more people from varied backgrounds into the design process.

Producer: Toby Field

Marcus Smith talks to Kriti Sharma about harnessing the good in Artificial Intelligence.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tech For Good: Marcus Smith Speaks To Tristan Harris20210504Have you ever scrolled through social media and been surprised by an advert for something you were looking at the other day? This is no accident. Every view, every like, every click is stored, assessed and calculated, and allows the companies who run these platforms to target you with increasingly accurate advertising. But if you're not paying for the platform you're using, is there anything wrong with that? Well yes, according to Tristan Harris, one of the contributors to the successful Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma. Social media may have started as a means of staying in touch with friends but it has led to multi-million pound businesses which use an economic model that competes for our attention, and Tristan fears this is doing society irrevocable harm.

Marcus Smith is a content creator from Bristol and a digital native. He is fascinated by technology's impact on us and has studied the effects of online gambling on young people. For this series of 'One to One' Marcus is looking at the 'tech for good' movement and speaks to two leading figures in the tech industry - one who argues that it is currently a force for bad, and one who tries to work with tech to harness the good.

For this first programme, Marcus asks Tristan where he thinks we've gone wrong, and what social media companies, regulators and society should be doing about it.

Producer: Toby Field

Tristan Harris talks to Marcus Smith about the damage social media is doing to society.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

The Dream Of Success: Rosie Millard And Actor Ben Hopwood2021012620210130 (R4)For more than 30 years arts journalist and broadcaster Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts. But just what is success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who makes that judgement anyway? The fairy story we love to hear is that all you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But for many the dream does not materialise. They don't get that lucky break. For others it's just a long hard slog, and then there are those who reframe their ambitions as they go through life. In this programme Rosie talks to amateur actor and director Ben Hopwood about living his own dream - on his own terms.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

The long standing arts journalist explores why some reject \u2018the dream'.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

The Dream Of Success: Rosie Millard Meets Author Debbie Bayne2021011220210116 (R4)Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. In the background, there lurks the same narrative arc: that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours! But nothing's ever simple. Many people don't ever achieve the success they wanted or expected, for others it's just a long hard slog, and then there are many whose ambitions are reframed as they go through life.

Rosie explores what constitutes success and failure, particularly in the creative industries. And who gets to make that judgement anyway? In this programme, she asks author Debbie Bayne, who is in her early sixties and still unpublished, how and why she keeps on writing.

Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

The long-standing arts journalist asks what success and failure really mean.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

The Dream Of Success: Rosie Millard With Opera Singer Patrick Egersborg2021011920210123 (R4)What constitutes success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who gets to make that judgement anyway? Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. She says in many cases there is the same narrative arc, that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But this is just a fairy tale, surely! So what does success and failure really mean in the artistic world? Many people don't ever achieve the success they wanted or expected, for others it's just a long hard slog, and then there are many whose ambitions are reframed as they go through life.
In this programme Rosie talks to Norwegian opera singer Patrick Egersborg, who has written a blog about the beginning of the end of his dream.
Produced by Jo Dwyer for BBC Audio in Bristol

Arts journalist Rosie Millard explores what success and failure really mean

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

The Value Of Idling - Verity Sharp Meets Josh Cohen2020012820200401 (R4)
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Could idling help free us from the treadmill of work and increase our creativity? Is boredom conducive to creativity? In the first of two programmes we hear from psychoanalyst, Professor of Modern Literary Theory at Goldsmiths University of London, author and practising idler Josh Cohen. He talks to Verity Sharp about the value of idling, how a much more relaxed attitude to life is not a hindrance but can encourage creativity and why being bored can be positive! Producer Sarah Blunt

Is being idle the answer to information overload? With psychoanalyst and idler Josh Cohen.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Could idling help free us from the treadmill of work and increase our creativity? Is boredom conducive to creativity? In the first of two programmes we hear from psychoanalyst, Professor of Modern Literary Theory at Goldsmiths University of London, author and practising idler Josh Cohen. He talks to Verity Sharp about the value of idling, how a much more relaxed attitude to life is not a hindrance but can encourage creativity and why being bored can be positive! Producer Sarah Blunt

The Value Of Idling - Verity Sharp Meets Tim Parks2020020420200311 (R4)What happens when you become obsessed by words? What happens when this obsession becomes so severe that your life becomes a frenzied narrative filling your every waking moment ? How do you escape? Verity Sharp meets Tim Parks who shares his experiences of a painful chronic condition brought about by a constant mental and physical tension, related to his work as a writer. When doctors couldn't explain his symptoms, he was forced to look elsewhere. He didn't give up writing. He has learned to be idle. Producer Sarah Blunt.

What happens when you suffer information overload? Writer Tim Parks embraces idleness.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What happens when you become obsessed by words? What happens when this obsession becomes so severe that your life becomes a frenzied narrative filling your every waking moment ? How do you escape? Verity Sharp meets Tim Parks who shares his experiences of a painful chronic condition brought about by a constant mental and physical tension, related to his work as a writer. When doctors couldn't explain his symptoms, he was forced to look elsewhere. He didn't give up writing. He has learned to be idle. Producer Sarah Blunt.

What happens when you suffer information overload? Writer Tim Parks embraces idleness.

Tim Dowling Talks To David Thomas2014070120160725 (R4)Tim Dowling talks to author and journalist David Thomas about the nature of ambition.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tim Dowling Talks To Saira Khan2014070820160726 (R4)Tim Dowling talks to former Apprentice finalist, Saira Khan, about the nature of ambition.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tim Samuels Meets Helen Croydon20160628Tim Samuels meets women who have ditched monogamy for an alternative relationship.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Tim Samuels Talks To Helen20160614
Tim Samuels Talks To Salma20160621
Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption2016100420170306 (R4)Sir Trevor McDonald asks former armed robber John McAvoy how he found redemption.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption2016101120170307 (R4)Sir Trevor meets Madeleine Black who struggled to forgive the men who raped her.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Trevor Nelson And Half Siblings 1/32017100320180106 (R4)DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In this programme, Trevor meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson Meets 'janet'20171010What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Trevor Nelson Meets 'pip'20171017What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Veggie Roots: Miles Chambers Meets Rachel Ama2020060220200808 (R4)The poet Miles Chambers grew up in a veggie household in the 1970s. As Miles got older, he grew to love the melding of Caribbean flavours with the fats of meats. He feels guilty about leaving the lifestyle he grew up with behind - especially now plant-based diets are mainstream. He wants to talk to those who have played a role in the meat-free movement, about their lives and experiences – about how the movement has changed over the years, and whether he should return to his plant-based roots.

Rachel Ama's cooking and Youtube channel is all about making Caribbean food with vegan ingredients. Rachel grew up loving chicken, but after she was horrified by a documentary about meat production, she stopped eating meat overnight – since then she's spent years experimenting with capturing her St Lucian roots and her childhood memories of food using only plants.

Both Rachel and Miles are interested in making healthy plant-based options accessible for everyone – but can Rachel convince Miles that it's possible to return to his veggie roots and still get the same satisfaction from food?

Miles Chambers grew up veggie. Can Rachel Ama convince him to return to his roots?

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Veggie Roots: Miles Chambers Meets The Inventor Of The Vegeburger2020052620200801 (R4)Miles Chambers grew up in a veggie household in the 70s - the Vegeburger was a staple in his childhood. He meets the plant-based pioneer, Gregory Sams, who came up with the idea.

As Miles got older, he grew to love the melding of Caribbean flavours with the fats of meats. He looks back with guilt on the lifestyle he left behind - especially now plant-based diets are mainstream. He wants to talk to those who have played a role in the meat-free movement, about their lives and experiences - how the movement has changed over the years, and whether he should return to his plant-based roots.

Greg Sams founded Seed in Paddington - the first vegetarian restaurant in London, and a favourite spot for the likes of Mark Bolan, John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Later he founded the first organic food store, before inventing the Vegeburger - having never tasted a meat burger himself.

Greg explains that while he spent decades advocating a meat-free diet, one experience changed his view.

Gregory Sams invented the Vegeburger mix which fed Miles Chambers as a child in the 1970s.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What's It Like Being A Single Dad Of Three Children?2016112920170310 (R4)Miranda Rae, single mum, meets a single dad with three children and hears his story.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

What's It Like Being A Single Mum To A Child Of Dual Heritage?2016112220161123 (R4)
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Miranda Rae, a single mum herself, explores the challenges facing another single mother.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Working Too Hard? Busy And Important20190219The New Statesman's Helen Lewis meets Brigid Schulte from the Better Life Lab, and author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time". Brigid argues that we confuse being busy with being important, and that a lot of our so-called work time is time wasted. So what's the alternative?

Producer: Chris Ledgard

Helen Lewis talks to Brigid Schulte about how being busy does not mean you're important.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Working Too Hard? The Four-day Week20190205Helen Lewis meets the distinguished economist Robert Skidelsky, who's been asked by the Shadow Chancellor to lead an inquiry into a four-day working week. Lord Skidelsky is a biographer of John Maynard Keynes, who predicted we'd be working 15 hours a week by 2030. So what has happened to the Keynesian dream? And, as he approaches his 80th birthday, why is Lord Skidelsky still working so hard?

Producer: Chris Ledgard

Lord Skidelsky, the economist, tells Helen Lewis about his inquiry into the four-day week.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Working Too Hard? The Gig Economy20190212Helen Lewis, associate editor of the New Statesman, meets Deliveroo and Uber Eats rider, Aaron Tatlow. What's it like to work for an app on your phone, when your boss is an algorithm? Some customers are very friendly, Aaron says - one man just lowers a basket for the food from his second floor window. And what about the dangers of the job, and the physical demands? Last year, Aaron cycled more than 10,000 miles delivering food to customers in York.

Producer: Chris Ledgard

Helen Lewis discovers Deliveroo rider Aaron Tatlow cycled 10,000 miles last year

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Young Dads: Gary Meikle2018052920190924 (R4)Becoming a parent is a challenge at any age, but imagine becoming one before the age of 20. We hear a lot about teenage mothers, but very little about or from the teenage Dads who play an active part in their children's lives. What is it like for young men to find themselves responsible for a child at such a young age? How do they cope? In this series of frank discussions between young Dads, Michael Jenkins who became a father aged 18 talks to other young men who have gone through similar experiences. This week he talks to comedian Gary Meikle from Glasgow about his love for his daughter Ainsley who he brought up pretty much by himself.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Frank discussion between two young men who became fathers in their teens.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most.

Young Fathers2018052220190521 (R4)Bristol film maker Michael Jenkins became a father unexpectedly, aged 18. He found it an overwhelming experience at first but eventually grew up and into the role of being a dedicated dad to his sons who are now 11 and 6. He wanted to talk to other young men who became fathers at a young age to find out how they have dealt with the pressures of teen parenthood. Kevin Makwikila was just starting his second year at college and was planning to train to be an architect when he found out he was going to become a father. For him, there was never any doubt that he wanted to play an active role in his child's life, and now five years on, he is the sole carer for his son. Despite the difficulties he has faced, he loves being a dad and cherishes the relationship he has with his son who's now seven.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

The experience of becoming a father as a teenager is explored by Michael Jenkins.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

01Lynne Truss On Travel: Is It Worth It?2018111320190126 (R4)
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When it comes to travel is the expectation greater than the realisation? Lynne Truss has been a writer for over 25 years and without making it a conscious ambition she has travelled to a huge number of destinations. But if you ask her if she likes travelling, she will say "Absolutely not, I hate it. I find its utterly stressful." This has made her curious as to why we travel. In an age when we have access to the world at the click of a button on the internet or the TV, why do we still want to physically go somewhere else? What do we hope to get out of the experience? Is the hassle of delayed flights, airless rooms, endless queues, the heat, the mosquitoes and the tummy upsets all really worth it? In this, the first of three programmes about the travel experience broadcast in November , Lynne meets global traveller and writer Geoff Dyer. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Lynne Truss asks why travel can both delight and disappoint with travel writer Geoff Dyer

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

When it comes to travel is the expectation greater than the realisation? Lynne Truss has been a writer for over 25 years and without making it a conscious ambition she has travelled to a huge number of destinations. But if you ask her if she likes travelling, she will say "Absolutely not, I hate it. I find its utterly stressful." This has made her curious as to why we travel. In an age when we have access to the world at the click of a button on the internet or the TV, why do we still want to physically go somewhere else? What do we hope to get out of the experience? Is the hassle of delayed flights, airless rooms, endless queues, the heat, the mosquitoes and the tummy upsets all really worth it? In this, the first of three programmes about the travel experience first broadcast in November, Lynne meets global traveller and writer Geoff Dyer. Producer Sarah Blunt.

When it comes to travel is the expectation greater than the realisation? Lynne Truss has been a writer for over 25 years and without making it a conscious ambition she has travelled to a huge number of destinations. But if you ask her if she likes travelling, she will say "Absolutely not, I hate it. I find its utterly stressful." This has made her curious as to why we travel. In an age when we have access to the world at the click of a button on the internet or the TV, why do we still want to physically go somewhere else? What do we hope to get out of the experience? Is the hassle of delayed flights, airless rooms, endless queues, the heat, the mosquitoes and the tummy upsets all really worth it? In this, the first of three programmes about the travel experience first broadcast in November, Lynne meets global traveller and writer Geoff Dyer. Producer Sarah Blunt.

02Lynne Truss On Travel: A Year In A Camper-van2018112020190803 (R4)In the second of three programmes about travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss talks to Jillian Moody about her experiences of travelling across the world in a campervan with her husband and three young daughters. The family bought a second-hand campervan prior to the trip which had no shower and no toilet and after a terrible first night, reality took its toll as they realised their itinerary would have to change. They were faced with many challenges en route but after 38,000 miles, there's no doubt it was a life-changing experience for Jillian. Producer Sarah Bunt.

Lynne Truss talks to Jillian Moody about travelling abroad for a year with her family.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

03Lynne Truss On Travel: Walk Or Pilgrimage?2018112720190810 (R4)In the last of three programmes exploring our experiences of travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons, co-founder of the British Pilgrimage Trust on a short pilgrimage along the Old Way in East Sussex. They begin under the ancient Yew tree in Mary and St Peter's Church in Wilmington and walk via the Long Man and Saint Peter of Vincula in Folkington to St Andrews' Church in Jevington. The journey offers Lynne a chance to discover what a pilgrimage is and how it differs from a walk. Aided by her pilgrim's staff it proves to be a journey of unexpected encounters and experiences for Lynne - unnerving, calming, reflective and enjoyable. Producer Sarah Blunt

Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons on a short pilgrimage to experience a traditional journey.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

In the last of three programmes exploring our experiences of travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons, co-founder of the British Pilgrimage Trust on a short pilgrimage along the Old Way in East Sussex. They begin under the ancient Yew tree in Mary and St Peter's Church in Wilmington and walk via the Long Man and Saint Peter of Vincula in Folkington to St Andrews' Church in Jevington. The journey offers Lynne a chance to discover what a pilgrimage is and how it differs from a walk. Aided by her pilgrim's staff it proves to be a journey of unexpected encounters and experiences for Lynne - unnerving, calming, reflective and enjoyable. Producer Sarah Blunt

Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons on a short pilgrimage to experience a traditional journey.

Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons on a short pilgrimage to experience a traditional journey.

04The Last Space Shuttle2018120420190418 (R4)In 2011, tech journalist Jack Dearlove was at university and won a competition to go to the Kennedy Space Center to "live tweet" the last American Space Shuttle. As a self-confessed space nerd, it was one of the most exciting - and emotional - days of his life. But what was it like for the astronauts on board? Here he talks to Doug Hurley, one of the four on board. Now in his fifties, Doug is still planning one last mission into space, with Elon Musk's new generation of space craft. If successful, it will allow American astronauts once again to go into space from American soil.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Space nerd Jack Dearlove interviews Doug Hurley, astronaut on the last space shuttle.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

In 2011, tech journalist Jack Dearlove was at university and won a competition to go to the Kennedy Space Center to "live tweet" the last American Space Shuttle. As a self-confessed space nerd, it was one of the most exciting - and emotional - days of his life. But what was it like for the astronauts on board? Here he talks to Doug Hurley, one of the four on board. Now in his fifties, Doug is still planning one last mission into space, with Elon Musk's new generation of space craft. If successful, it will allow American astronauts once again to go into space from American soil.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Space nerd Jack Dearlove interviews Doug Hurley, astronaut on the last space shuttle.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most

05Msn Messenger2018121120190419 (R4)Tech journalist Jack Dearlove grew up with Microsoft Messenger. Back in the early 2000s, it was vital for teen communication. Jack is nostalgic about it, and he's not alone. Here he speaks to software developer Jonathan Kay who has tried to keep MSN Messenger alive even after Microsoft tried to kill it off.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

Jack Dearlove talks to software developer Jonathan Kay about their love of MSN Messenger.

Interview series. Broadcasters talk to the people whose stories interest them most