Outlook [World Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20070528
20070602
Daily magazine programme.
20070102
20070103
20070104
20070105
20070106
20070108
20070109
20070110
20070111
20070112
20070113
20070115
20070116
20070117
20070118
20070119
20070120
20070122
20070123
20070124
20070125
20070126
20070127
20070129
20070130
20070131
20070201
20070202
20070203
20070205
20070206
20070207
20070208
20070209
20070210
20070212
20070213
20070215
20070216
20070217
20070219
20070220
20070221
20070222
20070223
20070224
20070226
20070227
20070228
20070301
20070302
20070303
20070305
20070306
20070307
20070308
20070309
20070310
20070312
20070313
20070314
20070315
20070316
20070317
20070319
20070320
20070321
20070322
20070323
20070324
20070326
20070327
20070328
20070329
20070330
20070331
20070402
20070403
20070404
20070405
20070406
20070407
20070409
20070410
20070411
20070412
20070413
20070414
20070416
20070417
20070418
20070419
20070420
20070421
20070423
20070424
20070425
20070426
20070427
20070428
20070430
20070501
20070502
20070503
20070504
20070505
20070507
20070508
20070509
20070510
20070511
20070512
20070514
20070515
20070516
20070517
20070518
20070519
20070521
20070522
20070523
20070524
20070525
20070526
20070528
20070529
20070530
20070531
20070601
20070602
20070604
20070605
20070606
20070607
20070608
20070609
20070611
20070612
20070613
20070614
20070615
20070616
20070618
20070619
20070620
20070621
20070622
20070623
20070625
20070626
20070627
20070628
20070629
20070630
20070702
20070703
20070704
20070705
20070706
20070707
20070709
20070710
20070711
20070712
20070713
20070714
20070716
20070717
20070718
20070719
20070720
20070721
20070723
20070724
20070725
20070726
20070727
20070728
20070730
20070731
20070801
20070802
20070803
20070804
20070806
20070807
20070808
20070809
20070810
20070811
20070813
20070814
20070815
20070816
20070817
20070818
20070820
20070821
20070822
20070823
20070824
20070825
20070827
20070828
20070829
20070830
20070831
20070901
20070903
20070904
20070905
20070906
20070907
20070908
20070910
20070911
20070912
20070913
20070914
20070915
20070917
20070918
20070919
20070920
20070921
20070922
20070924
20070925
20070926
20070927
20070928
20070929
20071001
20071002
20071003
20071004
20071005
20071006
20071008
20071009
20071010
20071011
20071012
20071013
20071015
20071016
20071017
20071018
20071019
20071020
20071029Every weekday the BBC brings listeners personal, human perspectives on the issues affecting us all.
20071030
20071031
20071101
20071102
20071103
20071105
20071106
20071107
20071108
20071109
20071110
20071112
20071113
20071114
20071115
20071116
20071117
20071119
20071120
20071121
20071122
20071123
20071124
20071126
20071127
20071128
20071129
20071130
20071201
20071203
20071204
20071205
20071206
20071207
20071208
20071210
20071211
20071212
20071213
20071214
20071215
20071217
20071218
20071219
20071220
20071221
20071222
20071224
20071225
20071226
20071227
20071228
20071229
20071231
20080101
20080102
20080103
20080104
20080105
20080114
20080115
20080116
20080117
20080118
20080119
20080128
20080129
20080130
20080131
20080201
20080202
20080204
20080205
20080206
20080207
20080208
20080209
20080211
20080212
20080213
20080214
20080215
20080216
20080218
20080219
20080220
20080221
20080222
20080223
20080225
20080226
20080227
20080228
20080229
20080301
20080303
20080304
20080305
20080306
20080307
20080308
20080310
20080311
20080312
20080313
20080314
20080315
20080317
20080318
20080319
20080320
20080321
20080322
20080324
20080325
20080326
20080327
20080328
20080329
20080331
20080401Every weekday the BBC brings listeners personal, human perspectives on the issues affecting us all. With Matthew Bannister.
20080402
20080403
20080404
20080405
20080407
20080408
20080409
20080410
20080411
20080412
20080414
20080415
20080416
20080417
20080418
20080419Global issues from a human perspective.
20080421
20080422
20080423
20080424
20080425
20080426
20080428
20080429
20080430
20080501
20080502
20080503
20080505
20080506
20080507
20080508
20080509
20080510
20080512
20080513
20080514
20080515
20080516
20080517
20080519
20080520
20080521
20080522
20080523
20080524
20080526
20080527
20080528
20080529
20080530
20080531
20080602
20080603
20080604
20080605
20080606
20080607
20080609
20080610
20080611
20080612
20080613
20080614
20080616
20080617
20080618
20080619
20080620
20080621
20080623
20080624
20080625
20080626
20080627
20080628
20080630
20080701
20080702
20080703
20080704
20080705
20080707
20080708
20080709
20080710
20080711
20080712
20080714
20080715
20080716
20080717
20080718
20080719
20080721
20080722
20080723
20080724
20080725
20080726
20080728
20080729
20080730
20080731
20080801
20080802
20080804
20080805
20080806
20080807
20080808
20080809
20080811
20080812
20080813
20080814
20080815
20080816
20080818
20080819
20080820
20080821
20080822
20080823
20080825
20080826
20080827
20080828
20080829
20080830
20080901
20080902
20080903
20080904
20080905
20080906
20080908
20080909
20080910
20080911
20080912
20080913
20080922
20080923
20080924
20080925
20080926
20080927
20080929
20080930
20081001
20081002
20081003
20081004
20081006
20081007
20081008
20081009
20081010
20081011
20081013
20081014
20081015
20081016
20081017
20081018
20081020
20081021
20081022
20081023
20081024
20081025
20081027
20081028
20081029
20081030
20081031
20081101
20081103
20081104
20081105
20081106
20081107
20081108
20081110
20081111
20081112
20081113
20081114
20081115
20081117
20081118
20081119
20081120
20081121
20081124 With Matthew Bannister.
20081201
20081215
20081222
20090112
20090119
20090126
20090209
20090216
20090223
20090302
20090309
20090316
20090323
20100507
20111107Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, a Syrian doctor says he's witnessed injured protesters being attacked in hospitals by the security services. Also, a tent city in New Jersey which is now home to jobless New Yorkers. And the British man who gave up a successful career as a banker to become an award-winning photojournalist.

Inside a Syrian hospital: a doctor's account of violent abuse by security services

20120326
20120402
20120409Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, the legendary American musician and producer Nile Rodgers.

He's the co-founder of 70s disco band Chic and has collaborated with stars like David Bowie, Madonna and Diana Ross.

He tells Matthew about his rise from being the child of heroin addicts to the top of the music industry and about his own battle with drug addiction.

His book about his extraordinary life is called Le Freak, after one of his best known songs.

The legendary musician and producer Nile Rodgers.

20120416
20120423
20120430
20120507Living "where humans don't belong": personal stories from Antarctica

Today's extraordinary personal stories come from Antarctica, the continent "where humans don't belong". We hear from scientists, writers and musicians who have made temporary homes in the white continent - their work inspired by the unique conditions in one of the most inhospitable places on the planet.

2012052120120522
2012052220120523
2012052320120524
2012052420120525
2012052820120529
20120529 (WS)
The man who became a symbol of police brutality towards black people in America.

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, Matthew Bannister in conversation with Rodney King, the black motorist whose brutal beating by police sparked the Los Angeles riots 20 years ago.

When an all-white jury acquitted the police officers involved, violence erupted in which more than fifty people died, thousands were injured and the damage ran into hundreds of millions of dollars.

Rodney King became a symbol of police brutality towards black people, and the incident has taken its place in the history of the American civil rights movement.

Rodney recalls those momentous events, and talks about his own battles with alcohol and crime.

(Image: Rodney King. Credit: Reuters)

2012052920120530
20120530 (WS)
The man sentenced to death for refusing to fight for the Nazis.

The man sentenced to death for refusing to fight for the Nazis.

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world. Today, the Canadian man who keeps a fully trained polar bear in his back garden, the Sardinian chef who cooks the best food in Antarctica and the man who was sentenced to death for refusing to fight for the Nazis during the war - but now - aged ninety - he campaigns on behalf of other German deserters.

2012053020120531
20120531 (WS)
Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.
2012053120120601
20120601 (WS)
Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.
2012060420120605
20120605 (WS)
Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.
2012060520120606
20120606 (WS)
Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.
01/01/201020100102 Life with the pirates. Five Ukrainian sailors tell the story of capture by Somali pirates.
01/01/201020100104
01/02/201020100202
01/02/201120110202
01/02/201220120202
01/03/201020100302
01/03/201120110302

01/03/201220120302The ousted president of the Maldives on his worries for himself and his country.

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, ousted Maldives president Mohamed Nasheed tells us why he resigned and why he fears the future.

Also, four-time World Ironman Champion Chrissie Wellington, who calls herself an accidental athlete.

And Palestinian Mohamad Fahed on exchanging family life in Lebanon for the elite English boarding school Eton.

Chrissie Wellington's book is called A Life Without Limits.

01/03/201220120305
01/04/201020100402
01/05/200920090502
01/05/200920090504 Gabriel Gatehouse journeys along a pipeline across the Ukraine.

Outlook's Ukrainian journey

For Ukrainians, Victory Day at the end of this week, celebrating the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany, exposes old divisions between nationalists and those who regret the demise of the Soviet Union.

Gabriel Gatehouse, the BBC's Kiev correspondent, explores what unites and divides Ukrainians in an east-west journey he made for Outlook earlier this year. His route loosely follows one of the pipelines that transports Russian gas to the European Union.

He sets off from the once mighty factory city of Kharkov near the Russian border in the east, then passes through increasingly deserted villages in the Ukrainian countryside. In western Ukraine, he experiences caf退 society in Lviv before reaching the Slovakian border, where the gas pipeline crosses into the EU.

It's a journey of discovery, as Ukrainians of all walks of life talk to him about their country's future and share very different attitudes to their common past.

01/05/201220120502
01/06/200920090602
01/06/201020100602
01/06/201120110602
01/07/200920090702 Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
01/08/201120110802
01/09/201020100902
01/09/201120110902
01/09/201120110905Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, a former Pakistani fighter pilot talks to the daughter of the Indian civilian pilot he shot down.

Also, the Japanese pensioner volunteering to work at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant.

And, how a new generation of South Africans see their past.

The Pakistani fighter pilot reaching out to relatives of his Indian victims.

01/10/200920091002
01/10/201020101002
01/10/201020101004
01/11/201020101102
01/11/201120111102
01/12/200820081202
01/12/200920091202
01/12/201020101202
01/12/201120111202Two lives forever changed by the massacre that took place 20 years ago in East Timor.

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, two lives that were changed by the Santa Cruz massacre, which happened 20 years ago in Dili, East Timor.

First, British film maker Max Stahl, who filmed the massacre and spread the news around the world.

And also the country's first First Lady, Kirsty Sword Gusmao, who joined the country's struggle for independence after learning about the bloodshed in 1991.

01/12/201120111205
02/01/201220120103
02/02/201020100203
02/02/201120110203
02/02/201220120203
02/02/201220120206Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, breaking the silence on domestic abuse. Zahra Sethi in Pakistan and Sehra Waheed in New York speak out about the years of violence they endured. Sehra's book about her marriage is called Silent Submission.

Also, Humberto Prado from Venezuela tells us how he served time in prison and went on to become a prison governor.

And British fisherman Jeremy Wade shares tall tales of the freshwater monsters he's risked his life to catch. His book is called River Monsters.

(Image: Silhouette of a woman protecting herself from a blow from her partner by holding her arms in front of her face. Credit: Science Photo Library)

Two Pakistani women break the silence on domestic abuse.

02/03/200920090303
02/03/201020100303
02/03/201120110303

02/04/200920090403
02/04/200920090404
02/04/200920090406
02/04/201020100403Escape from a Russian Orphanage

Outlook hears how a small boy fought his way out of a Russian orphanage - with the help of the friends he made along the way.

Vanya Pastukhov was born premature in1990 with cerebral palsy. When he was eighteen months old, he was handed over to the state. He spent the next eight years enduring abuse and neglect, but he never gave up hope.

Vanya is now called John Lahutsky. He's twenty years old, and he lives with his adoptive mother Paula in the United States. He has co-written his story with British journalist Alan Philps. Their book is called "The Boy from Baby House 10", which was the orphanage where Alan and his wife Sarah first met John.

John, Alan and Sarah share the story of his remarkable journey with Outlook's Lucy Ash.

"The Boy from Baby House 10" is published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson.

Escape from a Russian orphanage: how a small boy fought the system and won.

02/04/201020100405Escape from a Russian orphanage: how a small boy fought the system and won.

British grandparents, Lindy and Malcolm Robertson, had spent more than a decade sailing around the world when their trip came to a brutal and bloody end. Lindy remembers their life together and the night when Malcolm was killed and she was subjected to a terrible ordeal.

The three young pirates - two men in their early twenties and a 17 year old boy - were Burmese-bonded labourers who had been sold to a Thai fisherman. They had escaped from the fishing boat and hidden on one of the Butang Islands off the coast of Thailand, where they decided to hijack the Robertsons' boat.

A year on from these horrific events, the remarkably resilient Lindy talks about her life with Malcolm in England and how they worked together and raised a large family. In conversation with Lucy Ash she describes the shocking and violent events of that night, her compassion for her attackers, and how despite her experiences she believes Malcolm would still like her to sail again one day.

Lindy Robertson: A Survivor's Story.

02/04/201220120403
02/05/200920090504
02/05/201120110503
02/05/201220120503
02/05/2017 Gmt20170502True life stories
02/06/200920090603
02/06/201020100603
02/06/201120110603
02/06/201120110606Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Kate Allatt was a busy woman until a sudden stroke left her unable to move, yet totally aware of her surroundings. She tells Matthew about her ongoing recovery from 'locked in syndrome'.

Also, an update with the illegal immigrant expelled from Norway after writing a book. She's now managed to get back there legally.

And the final part of our series marking the 50th anniversary of the freedom rides by US civil rights activists. Today, the man who turned his back on a life of crime after joining the Riders.

'Locked in syndrome': totally aware yet unable to move a muscle after a stroke

The Olympic rower seeking justice for his brother who was killed by the Khmer Rouge

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, Rob Hamill, a New Zealand Olympic rower talks to Lucy Ash about seeking justice for his brother Kerry, who was murdered by the Khmer Rouge.

Rob went to the war crimes tribunal in Cambodia accompanied by a film crew. They recorded the trial and Rob's personal journey of discovery into how and where his brother died.

The film, due out next month, is called Brother Number One - that was the name given to Comrade Duch by the Khmer Rouge.

02/07/200920090703
02/07/201020100703
02/07/201020100705Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
02/08/201020100803
02/08/201120110803
02/09/200920090903
02/09/201020100903
02/10/200920091003 Human stories from behind the global headlines with Ritula Shah
02/10/200920091005
02/11/200920091103
02/11/201020101103
02/11/201120111103
02/12/200820081203
02/12/200920091203
02/12/201020101203The Soviet geneticist who tried to end famine but starved to death in prison

The Soviet Union's greatest plant hunter:

Twelve Soviet scientists famously starved to death during the wartime siege of Leningrad, rather than eat the precious plant and seed collection in their care. Now part of that genetic archive is under threat by property developers. The collection was the lifetime work of Nikolai Ivanovich Vavilov, who perished in Stalin's purges. His son Yuri Vavilov talks to Lucy Ash about the Soviet Union's greatest plant hunter.

Elephant Man:

Dr Iain Douglas-Hamilton has spent decades fighting for Africa's elephants. He pioneered the first in-depth scientific study of elephant social behaviour in Tanzania and founded Save the Elephants, an organisation which strives to protect the animals from the threats of poachers and climate change. Now in his 60s his love for elephants is stronger than ever - despite a narrow escape from one of them. Visit the website: www.savetheelephants.org

Dissecting my father's body:

Dr Mahantesh Ramannavar fulfilled his father's dying wish by dissecting his corpse. There is a shortage of bodies for medical research in India so the dying man wanted to donate his; and insisted his son carry out the operation. Outlook reporter Suhail Haleem catches up with the doctor after the dissection.

03/01/201120110104
03/01/201220120104
03/02/201020100204
03/02/201120110204
03/03/200920090304
03/03/201020100304
03/03/201120110304

03/04/201220120404
03/05/201020100504Pakistani-American Salman Ahmad talks about his mission to bring peace through music.
03/05/201120110504
03/05/201220120504How an Azeri journalist investigating corruption was secretly filmed having sex.

Today, Azeri journalist Khadija Ismayilova tells us that her sex life was secretly filmed and posted online after she made allegations about the president's family. The government strongly denies this claim. Also, Akihiro Harako, one of the 'Fukushima Fifty', describes life in the stricken power plant after it was struck by the earthquake and tsunami.

03/05/2017 Gmt20170503
03/06/200920090604
03/06/201020100604
03/07/200920090704
03/07/200920090706
03/08/200920090804
03/08/201020100804
03/08/201120110804
03/09/200920090904
03/09/201020100904
03/09/201020100906Voices from the hometown of the Ecuadorian migrant who survived a massacre in Mexico

Migrant Massacre Survivor

The discovery of 72 bodies in a ranch in northern Mexico last month shocked a country already reeling from a brutal drugs war. It seems all the victims were migrants from Latin America trying to make it to the United States and as far as we know there were only two survivors. One of them is Freddy, who was shot in the neck, yet managed to walk 22 kilometres to the nearest police checkpoint. The BBC's Irene Caselli has been to his home village in Ecuador

Cynthia Barlow

Ten years ago, Cynthia Barlow was told that her 26-year-old daughter, Alex, had been knocked down by a lorry as she cycled to work in the City of London. There was an inquest and a trial, but she took matters into her own hands, taking the unusual step of buying a stake in the company whose truck had run over her daughter. Her aim was to force companies to improve lorry safety, and to make sure Alex had not died in vain.

Liu Wei

Liu Wei is China's newest celebrity. Remarkably he plays the piano with his feet, as he lost both his arms in an electrical accident when he was playing hide-and-seek as a small boy. So he learnt to use his toes as fingers, taught himself the piano, and is now wowing audiences in China's Got Talent, a TV competition.

03/10/201120111004
03/11/200920091104
03/11/201020101104
03/12/200820081204
03/12/200920091204
03/12/201020101204
03/12/201020101206
04/01/201020100105
04/01/201120110105
04/01/201220120105
04/02/200920090205
04/02/201020100205
04/02/201120110205

04/02/201120110207The famous Russian designer who spent 6 years as a child trying to get home from Siberia

EDUARD KOCHERGIN

Eduard Kochergin is Russia's most famous stage set designer. Like many of his generation, he suffered a horrendous childhood. He never knew his father, who was arrested at the height of Stalin's purges in 1937, and his mother was arrested when he was three. Aged four, during the Second World War, Eduard was sent to the Urals in central Russia to a home for children of "enemies' of the nation". In 1945, he ran away, embarking on an epic 2,500 km journey back home to his mother in Leningrad, now St Petersburg.

CASSA PANCHO

Ten years ago a young mixed-race British woman was so struck by the absence of black dancers in classical ballet that she decided to start her own ballet company. Cassa Pancho was training to be a dancer herself when she founded Ballet Black, an award winning company which also runs a ballet school for young children. The group is currently rehearsing for a production of "Orpheus" at the Royal Opera House in London.

04/03/200920090305
04/03/201020100305
04/03/201120110305

04/03/201120110307The Dutch sea captain who saved more than 200 Afghans from drowning in stormy seas

DRAMATIC SEA RESCUE

When Dutch sea Captain Martin Erik Remeeus got a mayday call to help more than 200 Afghans, who were in danger of losing their lives in the Mediterranean, he rushed to their rescue. Amidst shouting, screaming and 'waves the size of a double-decker bus' Captain Remeeus and his crew managed to save most of the frightened men, women and children who were on board the wooden fishing boat trying to get to Europe, but he describes his pain at seeing some of the group drown.

STANDING UP TO THE MAFIA

Domenico is the newest member of Palermo's first anti-mafia group. In a city where 80% of businesses pay protection money to the mob he is one of a growing band of shopkeepers to join the group Addio Pizzo, which translates as "goodbye protection money". Domenico has been telling Outlook's Dany Mitzman why he refuses to bow down to the gangs despite having his shop firebombed.

MY JEANS, MY PHONE, MY LIFE

Outlook's Rupa Jha has been to meet the courageous Indian teenager who has defied her village council's ruling that women shouldn't wear jeans or use mobile phones. Yasmin tells our reporter why she is standing up to discrimination by wearing her denims and using her phone with pride and encouraging others to do the same.

VOICE OF FREE LIBYA

One of the technicians behind one of Libya's only uncensored radio stations describes the fear and excitement he and his colleagues felt when they launched the station and could speak freely for the first time in 42 years.

JONATHAN KOS-READ

Jonathan Kos-Read has become famous in China for his roles as the token white Westerner in films and television shows. The actor tells Matthew Bannister how he has tried to challenge stereotypes and change the perception of Americans in the country.

Voice of Free Libya, one of the men behind the country's first uncensored radio station

04/04/201120110405

04/04/201220120405
04/05/200920090505
04/05/201020100505
04/05/201120110505
04/05/2017 Gmt20170504
04/06/200920090605
04/06/201020100605
04/06/201020100607Houshang Asadi; Uruguay's wonderboy director; Delhi's tongawallahs
04/07/201120110705
04/08/201020100805
04/08/201120110805
04/08/201120110808Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, Yolanda Potasinski and Nancy Mertzel were one of the first same sex couples to tie the knot in New York. They waited from before dawn to exchange their vows.

Also the Taiwanese prison boss who is hoping to set a world record for having the largest number of inmates dancing at one time.

And the Queen of British Ska, Pauline Black, tells us what it was like growing up as a young black girl in a white working class family in the 1950s.

The same sex couple who became one of the first to tie the knot in New York

04/09/200920090905
04/09/200920090907
04/10/201020101005
04/10/201120111005
04/11/200920091105
04/11/201020101105Acclaimed Burmese writer Wendy Law Yone on life in exile and the upcoming elections.

WENDY LAW YONE: Burmese author in exile

The critically acclaimed Burmese author Wendy Law Yone has lived in exile since 1967. Her father Edward Law Yone was an influential newspaper editor who was imprisoned without trial for five years following the military coup in Burma in 1962. Wendy herself was arrested and interrogated for two weeks by the country's secret police. Today she tells Matthew about her extraordinary life story, describes her relationship with her powerful father and gives her views on the upcoming elections.

04/12/200820081205
04/12/200920091205
04/12/200920091207
05/01/201020100106
05/01/201120110106
05/01/201220120106
05/01/201220120109Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, former US Navy Seal sniper Chris Kyle was responsible for 150 officially confirmed deaths in his ten-year military career.

He believes the true figure is more than 250.

Chris tells Matthew Bannister about his journey from being a Texas cowboy, to becoming the most lethal soldier in American military history.

And, the life model from Gujarat in India, who has to keep her identity secret because conservative political groups have highlighted this kind of modelling as a sign of moral and social decline.

The sniper who's believed to be the most lethal soldier in American military history.

05/02/200920090206
05/02/201020100206Personal stories behind the news from all over the world with Lucy Ash.

Haiti

We hear from Journalist Sheri Fink who spent a week in one of the American emergency field hospitals set up in Haiti and hotel owner Richard Morse who gave the outside world regular updates on Twitter from the moment the earthquake struck.

Macaws

The keepers at a zoo in Belize who are trying to educate people about an endangered species of Scarlet Macaws

Matchmaker

Willy Daily from Lisdoonvarna in Ireland tells us how young love can blossom in a farm yard.

Haiti stories; endangered macaws; the Irish matchmaker.

05/02/201020100208Haiti stories; endangered macaws; the Irish matchmaker.
05/03/200920090306
05/03/201020100306Personal stories behind the news from all over the world with Ritula Shah.

Living With Early Onset Alzheimer's

Former estate agent Mark Priddy was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease at the age of just 36. It came as a shock to Mark and his wife Dione. They decided to make the most of the time they, and their two young daughters, had together. Four years later, Mark is in hospital and his condition is deteriorating rapidly. Once a keen runner and cyclist, Mark no longer recognises the woman he fell in love with. He can't even smile.

Swimming Elephant

Elephants don't normally like sea water but in the Andaman Islands ten elephants were taught to swim in the sea to carry logs between the islands. That was in the seventies, now only three of those elephants survive. Two have have been returned to the wild and no longer swim. That leaves only one seaborne elephant - Rajan.

In Search of Love

Online Dating is one of the most popular innovations of the internet, and one of the biggest markets is India. Arranged marriages have always been the norm in India but the internet has revolutionised the business of finding a life partner. Indian dating websites now boast some 25 million members.

Double Earthquake Survivors

In January, Stanley took his family of nine and fled Haiti after the devastating earthquake. He managed to leave with the help of his brother Pierre, a reggaeton singer. But he ended up in Chile, and was still there when nature struck again.

Early Alzheimers, swimming elephant, indian internet dating, double earthquake survivor.

05/03/201020100308Early Alzheimers, swimming elephant, indian internet dating, double earthquake survivor.

Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.

05/03/201220120306
05/04/201020100406Lindy Robertson: A Survivor's Story.
05/04/201120110406

05/04/201220120406
05/05/200920090506
05/05/201020100506
05/05/201120110506
05/05/201120110509
05/06/200920090606 With Lucy Ash.
05/06/200920090608 With Lucy Ash.
05/07/201020100706
05/07/201120110706
05/08/200920090806
05/08/201020100806
05/09/201120110906
05/10/200920091006
05/10/201020101006
05/10/201120111006
05/11/200920091106
05/11/201020101106
05/11/201020101108
05/12/201120111206
06/01/201020100107
06/01/201120110107
06/02/200920090207
06/02/201220120207
06/03/200920090307
06/03/201220120307
06/04/200920090407 With George Arney.
06/04/200920090408
06/04/201020100407
06/04/201120110407

06/05/200920090507
06/05/2017 Gmt20170506
06/06/201120110607
06/07/200920090707
06/07/201020100707
06/07/201120110707
06/08/200920090807

Human stories from behind the global headlines with Ritula Shah

06/08/201020100807
06/08/201020100809The American man who still doesn't know who he is, six years after losing his memory.

THE MAN WITHOUT AN IDENTITY

Benjaman Kyle describes what it's like not to know anything about his personal history. The American was found unconscious, six years ago, outside a fast food restaurant with no memory of how he got there, or his life before. Today Benjaman's still trying to discover who he is.

CAUCASUS WAR STORIES - ABKHAZIA

Tom Esslemont travels to Abkhazia in the final part of his series looking at the effect decades of conflict have had on the people of the Caucasus. We meet the Russian war veterans who like to kick back and relax on the Black sea coast, and take a tour of Stalin's country house there.

ALTRUISTIC KIDNEY DONOR

British man Chris Kendall explains why he decided to sacrifice one of his vital organs to help a complete stranger.

06/09/201020100907
06/09/201120110907
06/10/201020101007
06/10/201120111007
06/10/201120111010
06/11/200920091107Niki Shisler

A British mother tells us about the agonising choice she and her husband faced following the birth of their severely disabled son.

'89 Squared

We hear from Revolution Square in Bucharest about the year Communism came to an end in Romania.

Tuareg Rebel

Martin Vogl reports from Mali where he meets a former Tuareg rebel trying to build a better future for himself.

Terrible choice, Revolution Square, Tuareg Rebel.

06/11/200920091109 Terrible choice, Revolution Square, Tuareg Rebel.
06/12/201020101207
06/12/201120111207
07/01/200920090108
07/01/201020100108
07/01/201120110108
07/01/201120110110
07/02/201120110208

07/02/201220120208
07/03/201120110308Voice of Free Libya, one of the men behind the country's first uncensored radio station

MAGSIE HAMILTON LITTLE:

When British writer Magsie Hamilton Little witnessed the carnage caused by a suicide bomber in London on July 7th 2005, it had a profound effect on her. Magsie was studying Islam and Farsi, but felt she had no answers to the questions raised by the bombings. In a bid to find that understanding, she set off on a journey to Afghanistan which would lead to her risking her life in an attempt to rescue a kidnapped friend.

BOOK DETAILS:

Dancing with Darkness, Life Death and Hope in Afghanistan by Magsie Hamilton Little by Little Books

How the 7/7 bombings led a British woman on a remarkable journey through Afghanistan

07/03/201220120308
07/04/200920090408
07/04/200920090409
07/04/201020100408
07/04/201120110408

07/04/201120110411Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Prosecutor General Maria Bashir from Herat Province in Afghanistan on the risks she faces. Children in Hungary describe the effects of the toxic sludge that devastated the west of the country last year. And James Bailey on his struggle with OCD which inspired him to write his book, Man, Interrupted

The Afghan woman prosecutor who risks her life to fight crime and domestic violence

07/05/200920090508
07/05/201020100508
07/05/201020100510
07/05/201220120508
07/06/201020100608
07/07/201020100708
07/07/201120110708
07/07/201120110711Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, the US marine whose job was to collect the bodies of soldiers in Iraq, how a camera changed the life of a young South African, and the writer who traded in his home in London to move into hotels.

The woman who collected the bodies of American soldiers in Iraq

07/08/200920090808
07/08/200920090810Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
07/09/200920090908
07/09/201020100908
07/09/201120110908
07/10/200920091008
07/10/201020101008
07/11/201120111103
07/11/201120111104
07/11/201120111108
07/12/200920091208
07/12/201020101208
07/12/201120111208
08/01/200920090109
08/01/201020100109Malawi Gay Marriage

We hear from the brother-in-law of one half of the Malawian couple facing imprisonment for being gay.

Life in the Rift Valley

Two years after the violent aftermath of Kenya's general election, Michael Kaloki revisits one of the worst affected areas.

The 'Whale Man'

British photographer Duncan Murrell tells Ritula Shah how he used a kayak to get close enough to capture stunning photographs of humpback whales.

Malawi gay marriage; Rift Valley Life; The 'Whale Man'.

08/01/201020100111 Malawi gay marriage; Rift Valley Life; The 'Whale Man'.
08/02/201020100209
08/02/201120110209

08/02/201220120209
08/03/201020100309
08/03/201120110309How the 7/7 bombings led a British woman on a remarkable journey through Afghanistan

AMY COONEY

The earthquake that hit the city of Christchurch last month killed more than one hundred and sixty people and injured many more. When the quake struck, Amy Cooney and her brother Jaime Gilbert were just starting their shift working together as managers in a local bar. By the end of the day Jamie was dead and Amy had been rescued from the rubble of the building which had collapsed on top of them. The family were left in shock. Amy has since set up a fund for Jaime's children. She tells Matthew Bannister how she held Jamie's hand as he died.

LEPROSY COLONY

The village of Tichilesti in Romania is home to what's thought to be Europe's last remaining leprosy colony. Since leprosy has largely been eradicated in Europe, the population of the colony has dwindled and now only a handful of patients are left. The oldest of them is Ioana Miscov, who was sent to the colony as a young child. Ioana married a fellow patient and had a daughter called Dominica, who grew up there. Our reporter Tom Wilson has been to visit them.

JERRY WINKLER

28 year-old Jerry Winkler is the Dutch down-and-out and former drug addict who suddenly discovered last year that he was the only son and heir of a multi-millionaire businessman. Now he lives in a well appointed house in the centre of Amsterdam and is using his new found wealth to help other homeless people. He tells us how his life has been transformed.

The New Zealand woman who held her brother's hand as he died in the Christchurch quake

08/03/201220120309
08/03/201220120312Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, the Ugandan woman abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army (led by Joseph Kony) who is now helping other victims cope with the trauma of their past. Agnes Nyaga tells Lucy Ash how she was only 14 years old when she was snatched from her village in 1991 and suffered terrible abuse. But she escaped and has rebuilt her life, now offering vital counselling to other survivors.

Also, leading Egyptian sports journalist Inas Mazhar shares her passion for football, and explains how she's overcome prejudice and won the trust of top players and managers.

(Image: The leader of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), Joseph Kony. Credit: AFP/Getty)

The Ugandan woman abducted by the LRA now helping other victims deal with their past.

08/04/200920090409
08/04/200920090410
08/04/201020100409
08/05/200920090509
08/05/200920090511
08/05/201220120509
08/05/2017 Gmt20170508
08/06/200920090609
08/06/201020100609
08/07/200920090709
08/07/201020100709
08/08/201120110809
08/09/201020100909
08/09/201120110909
08/09/201120110912
08/10/200920091009
08/10/201020101009
08/10/201020101011
08/11/201020101109
08/11/201120111109
08/12/200820081209 With Matthew Bannister.
08/12/200920091209
08/12/201020101209
08/12/201120111209
08/12/201120111212Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, Frank Calabrese Junior, the Chicago mobster who turned informant and secretly recorded his father confessing to multiple murders. He talks about life in the mob, turning on his own father and choosing to go straight.

Also, we meet the man who set up a blind cricket association in Nepal after he lost his sight in a landmine explosion.

And Gemma Howorth the British model whose hands are worth £5m.

The Chicago mobster who turned informant and recorded his father confessing to 13 murders.

09/01/200920090110
09/01/201220120110
09/02/200920090210
09/02/201020100210
09/02/201120110210

09/02/201220120210
09/02/201220120213
09/03/200920090310
09/03/201020100310
09/03/201120110310The New Zealand woman who held her brother's hand as he died in the Christchurch quake

09/04/200920090410
09/04/200920090411
09/04/200920090413
09/04/201020100410
09/04/201020100412
09/04/201220120410
09/05/200920090511
09/05/201120110510
09/05/201220120510
09/05/2017 Gmt20170509
09/06/200920090610
09/06/201020100610
09/06/201120110613
09/07/200920090710
09/07/201020100710New Orleans

In the second of our special programmes five years on from Hurricane Katrina

we hear about the race against time to restore the shattered Superdome in time for the next football season. And meet people from the self help groups that - bit by bit - set about rebuilding their damaged neighbourhoods.

5 years on from Hurricane Katrina, the story of the recovery of New Orleans.

09/07/2010201007125 years on from Hurricane Katrina, the story of the recovery of New Orleans.
09/08/201020100810
09/08/201120110810
09/09/200920090910
09/10/200920091010
09/10/200920091012
09/11/200920091110
09/11/201020101110
09/11/201120111110
09/12/200820081210
09/12/200920091210
09/12/201020101210
10/01/201120110111
10/01/201220120111
10/02/200920090211
10/02/201020100211
10/02/201120110211

10/03/200920090311
10/03/201020100311
10/03/201120110311The British man subjected to repeated domestic violence by his girlfriend

IAN MCNICHOLL

Ian McNicholl is a British man who faced a terrible ordeal at the hands of his former partner. Over the course of their relationship she alienated him from friends and family, took charge of the household accounts and violently attacked him on numerous occasions. She is now in prison serving a seven year sentence for causing grievous and actual bodily harm to him. Ian has decided to speak publicly about his trauma to challenge prejudices about male victims of domestic abuse.

SISSEL SMALLER

When Sissel Smaller gave up her job as a heart transplant nurse to have children she decided she needed a new challenge. So she set about climbing the highest mountains on seven continents. She started with Russia's Mount Elbrus before working her way up to realising her dream of conquering Mount Everest. She's currently preparing for a big climb in Nepal to raise money for charity.

10/04/201220120411
10/05/201020100511
10/05/201120110511
10/05/201220120511
10/05/2017 Gmt20170510
10/06/200920090611
10/06/201020100611
10/07/200920090711
10/07/200920090713
10/08/200920090811
10/08/201020100811
10/08/201120110811
10/09/200920090911
10/09/201020100911
10/10/201120111011
10/11/200920091111
10/11/201020101111
10/11/201120111114Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today, the pleasure and pain of being an older mother. In 2008, Susan Tollefsen became Britain's oldest first time mother at the age of 57.

Also, the 12 year search launched by a Chinese man to reunite a photo he bought in a market with its rightful owner.

First baby at 57 - the pleasure and pain of being an older mother.

Today, the legendary musician and producer Nile Rodgers.

He's the co-founder of 70s disco band Chic and has collaborated with stars like David Bowie, Madonna and Diana Ross.

He tells Matthew about his rise from being the child of heroin addicts to the top of the music industry and about his own battle with drug addiction.

Now he's written a book about his extraordinary life called Le Freak, after one of his best known songs.

(Image: Nile Rodgers. Credit: Getty)

The legendary musician and producer Nile Rodgers.

10/12/200820081211
10/12/200920091211
10/12/201020101211
10/12/201020101213
11/01/201020100112
11/01/201120110112
11/01/201220120112
11/02/200920090212
11/02/201020100212
11/02/201120110212

11/02/201120110214The British undercover cop who cracked under the strain of leading a double life

LIAM THOMAS

British actor Liam Thomas spent a decade working as an undercover police officer across Britain and Europe, keeping company with drug lords, arms dealers and all manner of serious criminals. He tells Lucy Ash about the impact this lifestyle had on both his mental health and his marriage.

SARAH MANGUSO

In her second year of college the American poet Sarah Manguso developed a rare neurological disease which led to the breakdown of her nervous system. She describes the gruelling medical treatment that she had to endure during her lengthy rehabilitation and how she believed sleeping with a close friend helped speed her recovery.

Sarah's book "Two Types of Decay" is published now.

11/03/200920090312
11/03/201020100312
11/03/201120110312

11/03/201120110314
11/04/201120110412

11/04/201220120412
11/05/200920090512
11/05/201020100512
11/05/201120110512
11/05/2017 Gmt20170511
11/06/200920090612
11/06/201020100612Back from the dead - Joshua Mantz

US soldier Captain Joshua Mantz was shot and seriously injured by a sniper in Iraq. His heart stopped for fifteen minutes. But medics kept going and gradually brought him back to life. Aasmah Mir talks to Joshua and the surgeon who refused to give up on him - Dr Dave Deblasio.

Soweto Street Vendors

Street vendors in South Africa are up in arms. They have been told that only FIFA-accredited companies can do business around stadia during the football World Cup. Outlook's Mpho Lakaje talks to vendors whose business has been hit by the ban.

Anil Ananthaswamy

Sleeping on the ice of Lake Baikal in Russia, travelling half a mile down a mineshaft in north America - science writer Anil Ananthaswamy wanted to experience extreme science for himself. He talks to Aasmah about his personal pilgrimage to some of the world's remotest scientific bases.

Captain Joshua Mantz - back from the dead; Soweto street vendors; the Edge of Physics

11/06/201020100614Captain Joshua Mantz - back from the dead; Soweto street vendors; the Edge of Physics
11/07/201120110712
11/08/201020100812
11/08/201120110812
11/08/201120110815
11/09/200920090912
11/09/200920090914
11/10/201020101012
11/10/201120111012
11/11/200920091112
11/11/201020101112
11/12/200820081212
11/12/200920091212Zimbabwe refugees

The stream of poverty-stricken Zimbabweans crossing the border into South Africa continues, despite an historical political agreement in 2008. They arrive in search of a better life - but are they finding it? We hear some of their stories.

Gay Iraqis

Matt Wells reports on the hundreds of homosexuals who are believed to have been killed by death squads in and around Baghdad, and the New York based group which has set out to rescue them.

Museum of Broken Relationships

When Olinka Vištica and Drazen Grubišić called their relationship off, they not only remained friends, but they started a museum together based on objects they had shared together. From bunny rabbits to a prosthetic leg, hundreds of people have contributed to the collection - which is now touring the world.

Zimbabwe refugees in South Africa; Gay Iraqis; Museum of Broken Relationships.

11/12/200920091214 Zimbabwe refugees in South Africa; Gay Iraqis; Museum of Broken Relationships.
12/01/200920090113
12/01/201020100113
12/01/201120110113
12/01/201220120113
12/01/201220120116Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Two years after the Haitian earthquake, Outlook's Lucy Ash talks to Viviane Petit-Frere, a mother who lost three of her children in the disaster.

Still struggling to cope with grief, her only comfort is that her son Hans Charles managed to survive thanks to the generosity of a stranger.

Also today, the disabled Georgian weightlifter who is fighting prejudice as he trains for the Paralympic Games later this year.

And we meet the man known as "the fastest flying human", Norwegian Espen Fadnes talks about base jumping and how he's mastered the art of flying like a bird.

(Image: Two people holding hands and rosary beads on the second anniversary of the Haiti earthquake. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

The mother who lost three of her children in the Haitian earthquake of 2010.

12/02/200920090213
12/02/201020100213
12/02/201020100215Chinese mothers; Revisiting Mandela Street; Solo down the Amazon.
12/03/200920090313
12/03/201020100313
12/03/201020100315
12/03/201220120313
12/04/201020100413
12/04/201120110413

12/04/201220120413
12/05/200920090513
12/05/201020100513
12/05/201120110513
12/05/201120110516
12/06/200920090613
12/06/200920090615Human stories from behind the global headlines with Matthew Bannister.
12/07/201020100713
12/07/201120110713
12/08/200920090813
12/08/201020100813
12/09/201120110913
12/10/200920091013 Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
12/10/201020101013
12/10/201120111013The Saudi Army officer who's become the country's leading contemporary artist

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Abdulnasser Gharem, the Saudi Army officer who has become the country's leading contemporary artists. Also, the American protesters who've taken their anger against the Wall Street banks to Washington DC, and are now camping out in Freedom Plaza. And the British financial trader who has spent more than $90,000 for a ticket to travel into space.

12/11/200920091113
12/11/201020101113
12/11/201020101115
12/12/200820081213
12/12/201120111213
13/01/200920090114 With Matthew Bannister.

With Matthew Bannister.

13/01/201020100114
13/01/201120110114
13/02/200920090214
13/02/201220120214A former white supremacist from America on transforming his life and his body.

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Matthew Bannister talks to American Bryon Widner, a former white supremacist, about how he changed his life inside and out. Also, a Hungarian in London shares one of her favourite recipes as part of our Edible City series. And would-be international footballer Paul Watson tells us how he ended up transforming the footballing fortunes of a tiny Pacific island. His book is called "Up Pohnpei".

13/03/200920090314
13/03/201220120314
13/04/200920090414
13/04/200920090415

Synopsis

With Lucy Ash.

13/04/201020100414
13/04/201120110414
13/05/200920090514
13/05/201020100514
13/05/2017 Gmt20170513
13/06/201120110614Why Pakistani gang-rape victim Mukhtar Mai now fears for her life

Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

Today Pakistani rape victim Mukhtar Mai tells Lucy Ash about the day she was gang-raped in 2002, her subsequent fight to get justice and her feelings now that five of the six men previously convicted of gang-raping her have been released.

Also, the American woman who had her hands and feet amputated following a rare blood infection.

And the German-born Chinese film-maker who understands more about her own life after following a family of migrant workers in China.

13/07/200920090714
13/07/201020100714
13/07/201120110714
13/08/200920090814Human stories from behind the global headlines with Ritula Shah
13/08/201020100814
13/08/201020100816The Priest who reaches out to Mexican gang kids by using street slang in his sermons.

FATHER LOOS

Father Loos is a softly-spoken Catholic priest but when he is preaching from his pulpit in Mexico City, his gentle voice becomes loud and brash. His sermons are peppered with slang and expletives. He tells Aasmah Mir why he thinks this is the best way to connect with young gang members in a country that is being torn apart by drugs and violence.

LIFE ON THE TRANS-AMAZON HIGHWAY

Our reporter, Alfonso Daniels, takes us on a journey across the new multi-billion dollar highway through the Amazon jungle. He introduces us to the people who lives have been transformed, for better and for worse, because of the new road.

13/09/201120110914
13/10/201020101014
13/10/201120111014
13/10/201120111017
13/11/200920091114
13/11/200920091116
13/12/201020101214
13/12/201120111214
14/01/200920090115
14/01/201020100115
14/02/201120110215
14/02/201220120215
14/03/201120110315
14/03/201220120315
14/04/200920090415

Synopsis

With Lucy Ash.

On today's programme: Stalked for 13 years; Native Americans - pt 2; and around the world in 80 trades.

Kate Brennan

  • conor woodman comes into the outlook studio to tell lucy ash how he has been trading his way around the world.

    stalked for 13 years; native americans - pt 2; and around the world in 80 trades.

  • imagine being told by an ex partner that he knows where you live and knows where you are all of the time. kate brennan tells outlook what it's been like to be stalked for 13 years.

    native america part 2

  • in the second part of her series looking at what it means to be native american in today's usa, siobhann tighe meets the host of a radio station who is trying to help people discover their 21st century identity.

  • 14/04/200920090416 Stalked for 13 years; Native Americans - pt 2; and around the world in 80 trades.
    14/04/201020100415
    14/04/201120110415
    14/04/201120110418Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: Today, The British girl whose father was killed trying to rescue her from Libya, the people who moved into a radioactive no-go area, and the failed rockstar doomed to forever be in the shadow of his friend - Bono, the frontman of supergroup U2.

    The British girl whose father was killed trying to rescue her from Libya.

    14/05/200920090515
    14/05/201020100515
    14/05/201020100517
    14/06/201020100615
    14/06/201120110615
    14/07/201020100715
    14/07/201120110715Building a road to the outside world - life in one of Pakistan's most remote villages

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, we hear from the village of Shimshal in the Karakoram mountains of Northern Pakistan and its ongoing struggle to remain connected with the outside world.

    Also, the story of the family behind the Rwandan orphanage that saved the lives of 400 people during the genocide.

    And, the American woman made homeless by the recession who blogged her way back. She's now written a book about her experiences called The Girl's Guide to Homelessness.

    14/07/201120110718Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, we hear from the village of Shimshal in the Karakoram mountains of Northern Pakistan and its ongoing struggle to remain connected with the outside world. Also, the story of the family behind the Rwandan orphanage that saved the lives of 400 people during the genocide. And, the American woman made homeless by the recession who blogged her way back. She's now written a book about her experiences called The Girl's Guide to Homelessness.

    Building a road to the outside world. Life in one of Pakistan's most remote villages

    14/08/200920090815
    14/08/200920090817
    14/09/200920090915
    14/09/201120110915
    14/10/200920091015
    14/10/201020101015Michael Morpurgo's campaign to shut down a detention centre for asylum seekers.

    MICHAEL MORPURGO

    The award winning children's writer Michael Morpurgo is campaigning against the detention of child asylum seekers in the UK. His new book tells the story of a young Afghan boy and his mother who are forced to flee from their home country. Eventually the boy and his mother settle in Britain, only to find themselves locked up in a detention centre while the Government tries to send them back to Afghanistan. The book may be fictional - but the Yarl's Wood detention centre where it is set is real enough - and Michael Morpurgo wants it closed down. The UK government says it intends to soon but that's not enough for the author. He tells Matthew why he thinks no child should ever be "imprisoned".

    'Shadow', by Michael Morpugo is out now and published by HarperCollins Children's Books.

    INDIAN MODEL VILLAGE

    As the Commonwealth Games in India draw to a close, the residents of the village of Sultanpur are feeling rather disappointed. Sultanpur is on the outskirts of Delhi and was designated a model village for the duration of the games. The locals wanted to show off their new tidy streets, electric lights and concrete roads to the athletes and tourists who've flocked to India for the games. The village head Manoj Kumar cracked the whip, getting the 300 villagers to tidy their homes and put on a smile. But the only problem is, nobody turned up. Except, that is, our reporter Suhail Haleem.

    14/11/201120111110
    14/11/201120111111
    14/11/201120111115Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, the Afghan girl who was given away to settle a dispute at the age of six - then abused for ten years by her new family.

    Also, the man who was born a woman but went through a sex change and now hopes to become Britain's first transgender Rabbi.

    And the American artist who gave birth in a gallery as part of her exhibition.

    (Image: An unidentified Afghan woman. Credit: AFP/Getty)

    The Afghan girl given away in a debt of honour, then abused for a decade.

    14/12/200920091215
    14/12/201020101215
    14/12/201120111215
    15/01/200920090116
    15/01/201020100116
    15/01/201020100118
    15/02/201020100216
    15/02/201120110216

    15/02/201220120216
    15/03/201020100316
    15/03/201120110316

    15/03/201220120316The Palestinian couple who fell in love despite not being allowed to meet.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, Palestinians Rita Ishaq in Gaza and Taher Musilmani in Northern Israel tell us how they fell in love despite not being able to meet.

    Also, French windsurfing champion Sarah Hebert on why she had to abandon her attempt to cross the Atlantic from Senegal to Guadeloupe.

    And a Somali community worker in London describes how khat has devastated her family.

    15/03/201220120319
    15/04/200920090416
    15/04/200920090417
    15/04/201020100416
    15/05/200920090516
    15/05/200920090518
    15/06/200920090616 Human stories from behind the global headlines with Matthew Bannister.
    15/06/201020100616
    15/06/201120110616
    15/07/200920090716
    15/07/201020100716
    15/08/201120110816
    15/09/201120110916Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, the internationally renowned hairdresser Vidal Sassoon.

    As a child from a poor Jewish family, he was sent to an orphanage at the age of five.

    Later, he fought fascists on the streets of London and defended Israel in 1948.

    He went on to become an icon of swinging sixties London.

    His innovative styles were the foundation for an international business which trains thousands of stylists and sells millions of dollars worth of products that bear his name.

    Vidal Sassoon is now 83 and lives mostly in Los Angeles.

    Life and times of iconic London hairdresser Vidal Sassoon.

    15/09/201120110919
    15/10/200920091016
    15/10/201020101016
    15/10/201020101018
    15/11/201020101116
    15/11/201120111116The Afghan girl given away in a debt of honour, then abused for a decade.

    The mother of a Russian lawyer who died in a Moscow prison calls for a full investigation

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: Today, the mother of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who died in a Moscow prison, calls for a full investigation into his death. She describes seeing his battered body in the mortuary - and accuses the authorities of being involved. Also the emotional moment when a deaf American woman regained her hearing - captured on film, it's become an internet sensation.

    15/12/200820081216
    15/12/200920091216
    15/12/201020101216
    15/12/201120111216
    15/12/201120111219
    16/01/200920090117
    16/01/201220120117
    16/02/200920090217
    16/02/201020100217
    16/02/201120110217

    16/02/201220120217
    16/02/201220120220
    16/03/200920090317

    Synopsis

    With George Arney.

    In this edition: How growing up in Ireland influenced an expert on terrorism; the women from Ethiopia who helped convict a child rapist; and the Arab-Israeli singer representing Israel at the Eurovision song contest.

    Having grown up in Ireland during the troubles, Louise Richardson went on to become a professor at Harvard University in the United States, specialising in international security. In 2006 she wrote a book on the subject entitled 'What Terrorists Want'. Louise tells Outlook's George Arney why she believes America has got its response to the 9/11 attacks "catastrophically wrong". She also tells him about her latest role as Principal of the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

    Also in the programme...

  • angela robson talks to the impoverished slum women from ethiopia who have helped to convict a child rapist. and we hear from the arab-israeli singer who is courting controversy by representing israel in the forthcoming eurovision song contest.

    with george arney.

  • 16/03/201020100317
    16/03/201120110317

    16/04/200920090417
    16/04/200920090418
    16/04/200920090420
    16/04/201020100417Vietnamese air lift baby returns

    35 years ago Viktoria Cowley was plucked from a Vietnamese orphanage and brought to Britain, now she has been back to the country of her birth and she tells presenter Aasmah Mir what she has learnt.

    Ugandan survivors of Lords Resistance Army violence

    Two people whose lives were changed by violent actions of the Ugandan Lords Resistance army tell their stories of survival and forgiveness.

    Celebrating Freedom in Zimbabwe

    We hear from Zimbabwe's generation "born frees", those born after independence on 18th of April 1980. Our reporter in Harare, Steve Vickers, has been finding out how they relate to the independence movement, and how for some the struggle continues.

    Vietnam air lift baby returns; Ugandan survivors of LRA violence; Freedom in Zimbabwe.

    16/04/201020100419Vietnam air lift baby returns; Ugandan survivors of LRA violence; Freedom in Zimbabwe.
    16/04/201220120417A former Taliban commander on why he's now joined the Afghan government.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, Jo Fidgen hears from an Islamic scholar who spent 17 years with the Taliban and has now swapped sides to join the Afghan government.

    Also today, the founder of the Book Caf退 in Harare - a symbol of freedom of speech in Zimbabwe - describes how he's managed to re-open it after being forced to shut down at the end of last year.

    And a white water rafter describes how he helped save people from floods in the Philippines.

    16/05/200920090518
    16/05/201120110517The story of Kate and Gerry McCann, whose daughter Madeleine has been missing four years

    Matthew Bannister meets Kate and Gerry McCann, whose daughter Madeleine has been missing for four years. The couple describe the moment they realised Madeleine had disappeared from their holiday apartment in Portugal, the shock of becoming suspects themselves and their continuing search for their daughter.

    16/05/20122012051620120517Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.
    16/06/201020100617
    16/06/201120110617
    16/06/201120110620
    16/07/200920090717
    16/07/201020100717Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
    16/07/201020100719
    16/08/201020100817
    16/08/201120110817
    16/09/200920090917
    16/10/200920091017
    16/10/200920091019
    16/11/200920091117
    16/11/201020101117
    16/11/201120111117
    16/12/200820081217
    16/12/200920091217
    16/12/201020101217
    17/01/2011
    17/01/201220120118
    17/02/200920090218
    17/02/201020100218
    17/02/201120110218

    17/03/200920090318
    17/03/201020100318
    17/03/201120110318

    17/04/201220120418
    17/05/201020100518
    17/05/201120110518
    17/05/20122012051720120518
    17/06/200920090618
    17/06/201020100618
    17/07/200920090718
    17/07/200920090720
    17/08/200920090818
    17/08/201020100818
    17/08/201120110818Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today the student poet who became a symbol of the protests in Bahrain tells of her arrest and imprisonment.

    Also on the programme we meet the chiropractor from the US who suffered a stroke and woke up a completely different character. He's now a successful artist.

    Ayat al Ghormezi, the poet who became a symbol of the protests in Bahrain

    Hackney's heroine - the grandmother who stood up to looters during the London riots

    Today, the grandmother who stood up to looters during the London riots. Heroine of Hackney, Pauline Pearce, tells Matthew why she felt compelled to challenge youths rampaging through the streets in her east London neighbourhood.

    Also, we report from both sides of the border between Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan.

    And, Muslim athletes preparing for the 2012 Olympics talk about the challenges of training and competing during Ramadan.

    17/09/200920090918
    17/09/201020100918ZIMBABWE'S ORPHANS

    Sister Mercy Mutyambizi runs a Catholic orphanage in Harare which is full of babies and children abandoned by desperate mothers. Her compassionate pragmatism has saved a great many lives. But in spite of the country's slowly improving economic and political situation the number of abandoned children has not fallen.

    ROMA

    A Roma father and a teenage pupil tell us why they feel so badly let down by Slovakia's schools.

    CHINESE MADONNA

    Ayi Jihu is one of the world's biggest selling artists. Her R&B pop numbers have clocked more than 100 million downloads. She has become such a huge star in China that she cannot walk the streets without being mobbed by fans. She tells Outlook how she started out singing to customers in her mother's restaurant.

    Abandoned children in Zimbabwe and the woman determined to give them a brighter future.

    17/10/201120111018
    17/11/200920091118
    17/11/201020101118
    17/11/201120111118
    17/11/201120111121
    17/12/200820081218 With Matthew Bannister.
    17/12/200920091218
    17/12/201020101218
    17/12/201020101220
    18/01/201020100119
    18/01/2011
    18/01/201220120119
    18/02/200920090219
    18/02/201020100219
    18/02/201120110219

    18/02/201120110221A student leader in Prague's Velvet Revolution reflects on the Middle East protests

    SIMON PANEK

    Student groups have been very much at the forefront of the popular uprisings currently spreading across the Middle East. Simon Panek was a student leader in Czechoslovakia's Velvet Revolution in 1989, and his role in changing the course of his country's future had a lasting impact on his life. Following the downfall of Czechoslovakia's Communist leadership he established People In Need, one of the largest non-governmental organisations in Central-Eastern Europe, that provides aid and works to defend democratic freedom in countries around the world.

    FRANCISCO HOLGADO

    15 years ago Juan Holgado was doing an extra shift at the petrol station where he worked in Jerez de la Frontera in southern Spain, when a robbery attempt went badly wrong. Juan was stabbed 30 times and was left dying in a pool of blood. Four suspects have been tried twice and all have been acquitted both times after judges said there was not enough evidence. Through all of these years his father Francisco Holgado, frustrated by the police's failure to bring anyone to book, launched his own investigation into what happened. He went to extraordinary lengths, going deep undercover, for years to see if he could gather the crucial evidence.

    JAMES RHODES

    Most people who make it in the competitive world of the concert pianist have been hot-housed as children and schooled in the best academies. But 36-year-old James Rhodes has followed a very different path. He only started formal piano lessons in his teens, turned down a place at a music academy, was in drugs rehab at 19 and had a mental breakdown in his early 30s that saw him sectioned in mental health institutions. He survived various attempts at suicide, and just a few weeks after leaving hospital a chance meeting with a music agent turned his life around.

    James Rhodes is playing at The Ambassadors Theatre in London on the 2nd and 16th of March.

    18/03/200920090319
    18/03/201020100319
    18/03/201120110319

    18/03/201120110321
    18/04/201120110419
    18/04/201220120419
    18/05/200920090519
    18/05/201020100519
    18/05/201120110519
    18/06/200920090619
    18/06/201020100619
    18/06/201020100621
    18/07/201120110719
    18/08/201020100819
    18/08/201120110819
    18/08/201120110822
    18/09/200920090919
    18/09/200920090921
    18/10/201020101019
    18/10/201120111019
    18/11/200920091119
    18/11/201020101119Aron Ralston, the young American climber who cut his own arm off to save his life

    ARON RALSTON

    What lengths would you go to to avoid your own death?

    The answer to that question from the young American climber Aron Ralston was almost unimaginable. He cut his own arm off with a penknife when he was trapped by a boulder in a narrow canyon in Utah. If Aron hadn't performed the excruciating amputation he would have died. The story - which happened seven years ago - hit the headlines around the world. Now it has been made into a Hollywood movie directed by Danny Boyle who won an Oscar for his previous film "Slumdog Millionaire". The new movie is called "127 Hours" - reflecting the length of time that Aron spent alone in the canyon before making his miraculous escape. He tells Outlook about his extraordinary feat of survival and how he found the physical and mental resolve to amputate his own arm.

    18/12/200820081219
    18/12/200920091219
    18/12/200920091221
    19/01/200920090120
    19/01/201020100120
    19/01/2011
    19/01/201220120120
    19/01/201220120123The Deputy Mayor of the Italian island of Giglio, Mario Pellegrini, tells Matthew Bannister how he rescued passengers from the Costa Concordia.

    The cruise ship sank on 13 January, after hitting a rock on the Italian coast.

    We also bring together Ko Mya Aye, a newly-released Burmese pro-democracy leader in Rangoon with his daughter in London.

    And some lessons in acting tough from Alison de Burgh, the first woman in Britain to be accredited as a stage fight director.

    (Picture: The cruise liner Costa Concordia. Credit: AFP)

    The Italian Deputy Mayor who spent hours rescuing passengers from the Costa Concordia.

    19/02/200920090220
    19/02/201020100220
    19/02/201020100222
    19/03/200920090320

    Synopsis

    With Matthew Bannister.

    19/03/201020100320
    19/03/201020100322
    19/03/201220120320
    19/04/201020100420
    19/04/201120110420
    19/04/201220120420
    19/05/200920090520
    19/05/201020100520
    19/05/201120110520
    19/05/201120110523
    19/06/200920090620 With Ritula Shah.
    19/06/200920090622 With Ritula Shah.
    19/07/201020100720
    19/07/201120110720
    19/08/200920090820
    19/08/201020100820
    19/09/201120110920
    19/10/200920091020
    19/10/201020101020
    19/10/201120111020
    19/11/200920091120
    19/11/201020101120
    19/11/201020101122
    19/12/200820081220
    19/12/201120111220
    20/01/200920090121
    20/01/201020100121
    20/01/201120110121

    20/02/200920090221
    20/02/201220120221
    20/03/200920090321
    20/03/201220120321
    20/04/200920090421
    20/04/200920090422
    20/04/201020100421
    20/04/201120110421
    20/05/200920090521
    20/05/201020100521
    20/06/201120110621
    20/07/200920090721
    20/07/201020100721
    20/07/201120110721
    20/08/200920090821
    20/08/201020100821
    20/08/201020100823The Indian man who risks his life trying to protect couples who marry for love

    PROTECTING COUPLES FROM "HONOUR KILLINGS"

    Sanjay Sachdev risks his own safety to protect those who go against their family's wishes to choose their own partners in India. As the federal government prepares to introduce a tough law aimed at tackling these kinds of murders Sanjay has come up with his own solution, he has set up a helpline to give practical advice and support to young couples.

    RUSSIA'S OBAMA?

    Jean Gregoire Sagbo is the first black person to be elected to public office in Russia, against a backdrop of violent racism in the county. Mr Sagbo left his home in Benin, West Africa, to study in the former Soviet Union 28 years ago. He tells Aasmah Mir that even though he is grateful for his life in his adopted country he will always feel African.

    SWIMMING FROM CUBA TO FLORIDA

    Former record breaking marathon swimmer Diana Nyad tells Aasmah how she is preparing to swim more than 150 kilometres between Cuba and America. It's not only the shark infested waters and huge waves that the 60 year old will have to overcome, but also the diplomatic tensions between the rival countries.

    20/09/201020100921Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.
    20/09/201120110921
    20/10/201020101021
    20/10/201120111021
    20/10/201120111024
    20/11/200920091121Josefina Condori

    Every year hundreds of thousands of young girls from rural areas of Peru are sent to the city to work as domestic servants, one of them was Josefina Condori. At the age of eight she was sent to the capital, Lima, to work. Her childhood experience inspired her to help prevent other girls from falling in to such a life.

    Amazon Road

    Brazilian filmmaker Denise Zmekhol has been back to the Amazon Rainforest to see what impact a new road is having on two Indian tribes she first met in 1987.

    New York's Black Cowboys

    Saddle up for a ride through the urban landscape with New York's black cowboys.

    Peruvian child servants, Amazon road, Black New York cowboys.

    20/11/200920091123 Peruvian child servants, Amazon road, Black New York cowboys.
    20/12/201020101221
    20/12/201120111221
    21/01/200920090122
    21/01/201020100122Khmer Rouge prosecutor; Obama's babies; Italian 'Bamboccioni'.

    Andrew Cayley

    The new international prosecutor of the Khmer Rouge war crimes tribunal tells Matthew Bannister about the challenges of bringing mass murderers to justice.

    Obama's Babies

    One year on, how are the babies named after Barack Obama faring? Peter White has been to meet some of them.

    Italian Bamboccioni

    Dany Mitzman has been to Bologna to find out why many of Italy's twenty and thirtysomethings don't want to leave their parents' nest.

    Carlos Barria

    Photographer Carlos Barria shares his moving story about capturing some of Haiti's devastating moments in the aftermath of the earthquake. While he's talking an aftershock destabilises the rooftop of the hotel where he's on the phone to Outlook. In an emotional interview he promises to keep taking pictures so the people of Haiti won't be forgotten.

    Kenyan Virtuoso

    Up until he was fifteen Dan Abissi thought pianos only existed in cartoons, that was until he found one in his school in Nairobi, Kenya. At first he was scared to touch it, then he wasn't able to stop. Now he's grade eight on piano and plays the trumpet, trombone, saxophone and violin.

    Latvian Brain Drain

    Doctors in Latvia are abandoning their failing hospitals to come to Britain for work. As a result Latvian hospitals are struggling to meet the needs of their patients. Reporter Damien McGuinness talks to a cardiology surgeon in his hospital.

    Stigma of HIV in Vietnam

    Former drug addict Tran Trung Nam, talks about the stigma of living with HIV in Vietnam. His mother was so distressed when she heard he was HIV positive she became ill and his wife left him. Now he's turned his life around and has a new wife and son and is committed to changing people's attitudes about the condition.

    Photographing Haiti; Kenyan teenage virtuoso; Latvian brain drain; and HIV in Vietnam.

    21/01/201120110122
    21/01/201120110124
    21/02/201120110222

    21/02/201220120222
    21/03/201120110322

    21/03/201220120322
    21/04/200920090422
    21/04/200920090423 Zoya Phan; Swaziland's children; and finding happiness in Estonia.

    With Matthew Bannister.

    Zoya Phan

  • born into burma's ethnic karen community, the daughter of resistance fighters, zoya phan, tells the story of her flight to thailand and the murder of her father. now based in the uk, she speaks out for the free burma campaign. her book, 'little daughter', is published by simon and schuster.

    swaziland's children

  • half the population of swaziland is under 18, and many have lost parents and grandparents to aids. bill law hears how they're getting a voice through schools, and a ground-breaking radio programme.

    rainer nolvak

  • matthew bannister talks to the estonian millionaire who found that wealth didn't make him happy. rainer nolvak explains how he's used his money to galvanise estonians into clearing up illegal rubbish tips, and how he's planning to spread his ideas around the world.

    zoya phan; swaziland's children; and finding happiness in estonia.

  • 21/04/201020100422
    21/04/201120110422
    21/05/200920090522 Etan Patz; choosing Japan over the Philippines; and a cycling adventurer.

    With Matthew Bannister.

    On today's programme: Etan Patz; choosing Japan over the Philippines; and a cycling adventurer.

    Thirty years on - why has no-one been brought to justice for abducting six year old Etan Patz? Lisa Cohen is a journalist who has been following the story for twenty years - and Stuart GraBois is the former federal prosecutor who tried to bring the main suspect to trial. Lisa's written the first book about the case - 'After Etan - the missing child case that held America captive'.

    Noriko Calderon

    The 13 year old girl forced to choose between her future - and her parents. Noriko's parents were deported from Japan to the Philippines because they were illegal immigrants. But Noriko was born in Japan, so she was given special permission to stay there with her aunt who is married to a Japanese man.

    Mark Beaumont

    The challenges faced by the Scotsman who knocked 81 days off the record for cycling round the world and the new mission he's about to embark on.

    Mark's book is called 'The Man Who Cycled The World'.

    Venezuela kidnappings; East/West Germany re-visted and the global food industry.

    With Ritula Shah.

    21/05/201020100522On Outlook with Aasmah Mir...

    Shireen Anabtawi and Daniela Norris

    Letters across the divide - how a Palestinian woman and Israeli woman learned to stop hating each other through becoming pen pals after meeting at a party in Switzerland. 'Crossing Qalandiya' is published by Reportage Press.

    California Scheming

    Gavin Bain AKA Brains McLoud on how to trick the music industry into thinking you're American rappers - when you're actually Scottish.

    An Israeli-Palestinian friendship forged in letters; California Scheming.

    21/05/201020100524An Israeli-Palestinian friendship forged in letters; California Scheming.
    21/06/201020100622
    21/06/201120110622
    21/07/201020100722
    21/07/201120110722
    21/07/201120110725
    21/08/200920090822
    21/08/200920090824
    21/09/200920090922
    21/09/201020100922
    21/09/201120110922
    21/10/200920091022
    21/10/201020101022
    21/11/200820081122
    21/11/201120111122
    21/12/200920091222
    21/12/201020101222
    21/12/201120111222
    22/01/200920090123
    22/01/201020100123Photographing Haiti; Kenyan teenage virtuoso; Latvian brain drain; and HIV in Vietnam.
    22/01/201020100125Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.

    Dr Fay Chung

    A veteran of Zimbabwe's liberation struggle, Dr Fay Chung served as a minister in Robert Mugabe's government, but she resigned in 1993. Her latest project is aimed at trying to stop young men from joining the violent political militias which attack opponents of Mr Mugabe's Zanu PF party. She tells presenter Matthew Bannister why she fears Zimbabwe's violent past is repeating itself.

    Haiti DJ

    For Outlook, reporter Jane O'Brien goes to visit the DJ in Washington DC who's Saturday night radio programme has become the focus for Haitians living in America who are desperate for news of relatives and struggling to cope with their own grief.

    Ali Abbas

    Ali became an iconic symbol of the Iraq war when pictures of him were beamed around the world. He had lost both his arms and suffered severe burns when an American rocket hit his house, killing 14 members of his family, including his mother and father. Ali is now eighteen and living in Britain. He has just been back to Iraq to visit his family and see what life is like there now. He tells Outlook's Matthew Bannister about his trip and why he's decided he has to become more independent.

    Dr Fay Chung; Haitian DJ in Washington; Ali Abbas returns to Iraq.

    22/02/201020100223
    22/02/201120110223

    22/03/201020100323
    22/03/201120110323

    22/03/201220120323
    22/04/200920090423 Polygamy in Utah; Moral Policing in Bangalore; and Arctic explorers.

    With Matthew Bannister.

    Polygamy in Utah

    Outlook talks to Travis Kelsh, a carpenter in the American state of Utah, a man who breaks the law by having two wives.... And we also hear from one of his wives.

    Moral Policing in Bangalore

    A high profile attack on a group of young women who had visited a pub in the Indian city of Mangalore has raised the issue of women's safety in that part of India. The debate about moral policing has become a political issue in the elections taking place on Thursday. The Congress Party accuses the Hindu nationalist BJP of supporting the attacks - something denied by the BJP.The BBC's Jyotsna Singh went to find out more.

    Pen Haddow

    Pen Hadow, Martin Hartley and Ann Daniels have been sponsored by the Catlin Arctic Survey to measure the depth of the Arctic sea ice as they make their ninety day journey. When we spoke to them last, they had just spent three days without supplies and Martin had been suffering from frostbite to one of his toes.

    So when Pen Hadow called again on his satellite phone, Matthew asked what progress they'd made in the last month.

    22/04/201020100423
    22/05/200920090523
    22/05/200920090525 Tessa Dunlop returns to Romania to meet the children she used to know in an orphanage.

    With Matthew Bannister.

    On today's programme: Tessa Dunlop returns to Romania to meet the children she used to know in an orphanage.

    On today's Outlook we devote the whole programme to the story of Tessa Dunlop, a freelance journalist retracing her steps to Romania. 18 years ago as a gap-year student Tessa went to the north of Romania to care for orphans there. At that time, the Communist leader Nicolai Ceausescu had just been executed and the fall of his regime allowed a huge social problem to be uncovered: the hundreds and thousands of unwanted children left in orphanages, many of them neglected.

    Her experience at the orphanage stayed with Tessa and she recently returned to Romania to find two of the children she once cared for. Now they are women in their thirties but they are still in an institution. We hear their story and what happened at the reunion.

    22/06/200920090623
    22/06/201020100623
    22/06/201120110623
    22/07/200920090723
    22/07/201020100723
    22/08/201120110823
    22/09/201020100923
    22/09/201120110923
    22/09/201120110926
    22/10/200920091023
    22/10/201020101023
    22/10/201020101025
    22/11/201020101123
    22/11/201120111123
    22/12/200820081223
    22/12/200920091223
    22/12/201020101223
    22/12/201120111223
    23/01/200920090124
    23/01/201220120124
    23/02/200920090224 Global issues from a human perspective.

    Global issues from a human perspective.

    23/02/201020100224
    23/02/201120110224

    23/03/200920090324
    23/03/201020100324
    23/03/201120110324

    23/04/200920090424
    23/04/201020100424
    23/04/201020100426Taking the rap for boss's affair; Ghazi stadium reclaimed; running your own mini-state.
    23/04/201220120424
    23/05/201120110524
    23/06/200920090624
    23/06/201020100624
    23/06/201120110624
    23/06/201120110627Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, the Sicilian journalist who started his own TV station to fight the Mafia. Also a disturbing insight into prejudice against disabled people in the UK. And the South African brother and sister who lost their family in a fire and won the sympathy of the nation.

    The Sicilian who uses his TV station to name and shame the Mafia

    23/07/200920090724
    23/07/201020100724
    23/07/201020100726A former drug addict who's fighting Russia's HIV epidemic.
    23/08/201020100824
    23/08/201120110824
    23/09/200920090924
    23/09/201020100924
    23/10/200920091024
    23/10/200920091026
    23/11/200920091124
    23/11/201020101124
    23/11/201120111124The divided loyalties of one protester in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, the divided loyalties of one protester in Cairo's Tahrir Square. Abdullah Al-Ghaly has an Egyptian mother and a Libyan father and in the past year he has taken part in the uprisings in both countries - he tells Matthew Bannister about his search for his own identity.

    Also today, the Indonesian teenagers who were caught up in Australia's crackdown on people smuggling.

    And the Indian brothers who're taking on the bespoke tailors of London's Saville Row at their own game.

    23/12/200820081224
    23/12/200920091224
    23/12/201020101224

    AQEELA SHERRILLS

    Aqeela Sherrills grew up in Watts, a district in South Central Los Angeles synonymous with crime and violence. Abused as a child, Aqeela saw the gang as a surrogate family and before long was carrying a gun to school. He could have become just another statistic but after seeing his best friend shot and killed on the school campus and then seeing so many other friends killed or jailed he decided it was time for a change.

    Aqeela was the only one of his friends to go to college instead of prison. There he started to read and books by Malcolm X and James Baldwin changed the way he saw the world and the violence he had grown up with and he returned home determined to stop the cycle of retribution that had led to thousands of deaths. In 1992, on the eve of the riots in Los angeles it was Aqeela that helped broker a peace deal between his old gang the Crips and their historic rivals the Bloods.

    But Aqeela's belief in reconciliation rather than retribution was tested to the limit when in 2004 his own young son Terrell was murdered in an apparent gang shooting. He came under pressure from his own community to seek revenge against the murderer but Aqeela stood firm and continues to believe that "where the wounds are, there the gift lies"

    Aqeela Sherrills on breaking away from gang violence in LA to preach reconciliation

    24/01/201120110125
    24/01/201220120125
    24/02/200920090225
    24/02/201020100225
    24/02/201120110225

    24/03/200920090325 Defending justice in China; more gas stories from Ukraine; and living with a lion.

    Synopsis

    With Matthew Bannister.

    Defending justice in China; more gas stories from Ukraine; and living with a lion.

    Outlook hears from China's top human rights lawyer, Li Jinsong. The recent closure of his law firm, Yitong, by the authorities has caused outrage amongst observers and campaigners. Despite this setback, Li Jinsong vows to "defend justice" and not give up.

    You can hear the second part of our series, meeting people who are living along one of Ukraine's gas pipelines. Gabriel Gatehouse goes to the town of Poltava and finds it can't escape the consequences of a battle there 300 years ago, which brought the country under Russia's power.

    And Outlook speaks to the two friends at the heart of an extraordinary tale about the lion who was brought up on the fashionable King's Road in London - and then released into the wild. Anthony Bourke and John Rendell tell the story in their book, 'A Lion Called Christian'.

    Josef Fritzl’s psychiatrist; a gas pipe through Ukraine; and preventing arson on the net.

    Josef Fritzl’s psychiatrist; a gas pipe journey through Ukraine; and preventing arson... over the internet.

    We hear from the Austrian psychiatrist, Dr Heidi Kästner, who carried out pre-trial interviews with Josef Fritzl, the man who repeatedly raped his daughter and kept her locked in a cellar for twenty four years.

    In the third part of his journey across Ukraine, following the route of one of the pipelines which delivers Russian gas to the European Union, Gabriel Gatehouse is in the heart of the countryside, hearing how villages are being deserted by young people seeking a better life in the cities.

    And Outlook's Matthew Bannister talks to Canadian student J.P. Neufeld, who stopped a potential arson attack in Norfolk in the East of England after spotting an online threat while surfing the internet.

    24/03/201020100325
    24/03/201120110325

    Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.

    24/04/200920090425
    24/04/200920090427
    24/04/201220120425
    24/05/201020100525
    24/05/201120110525
    24/06/200920090625
    24/06/201020100625
    24/07/200920090725
    24/07/200920090727
    24/08/200920090825
    24/08/201020100825
    24/08/201120110825
    24/09/200920090925
    24/09/201020100925SRI LANKA

    Thusanthi Weerasinghe lost twenty five members of her family in the Sri Lankan civil war. Kasippillai Manoharan lost his son and was forced to flee the country. The government's Commission on Lessons Learned and Reconciliation will finish next month but many fear the voices of the victims will not be heard.

    LION MAN

    Tony Fitzjohn has devoted the past forty years to reintroducing lions into the wild. He loves the animals and describes them as his friends - even after one tried to kill him.

    The stories behind Sri Lanka's war enquiry commission

    24/09/201020100927
    24/10/201120111025
    24/11/200820081125
    24/11/200920091125
    24/11/201020101125
    24/11/201120111125
    24/11/201120111128
    24/12/200820081225
    24/12/200920091225Today's Outlook is devoted to the unlikely friendship between Bee Rowlatt, a British mum living in London and May Witwit, an Iraqi academic living in war torn Baghdad.

    They were brought together by an email and a love of literature. As the security situation in the Iraqi capital deteriorated and May's life was put in danger, she turned to Bee for help and their two worlds were brought closer than they could have ever imagined.

    May and Bee's extraordinary journey has been turned into a book 'Talking About Jane Austen in Baghdad', which will be published by Penguin in February.

    The unlikely friendship that survived the bombs of Baghdad.

    24/12/201020101225Aqeela Sherrills on breaking away from gang violence in LA to preach reconciliation
    24/12/201020101227

    HANS CHARLES:

    When a massive earthquake struck Haiti on 12th January 2010, the BBC's Mike Thomson was one of the first journalists to report on the devastation it caused. Mike returns to Haiti for Outlook and goes in search of Hans Charles, a young boy he came across who was so badly injured that the doctor treating him feared he would not survive. Hans was eventually flown to a hospital in Miami for emergency surgery, and after months of searching, Mike finally finds him living there. Hans tells Mike about his recovery and Hans' mother Viviane explains why she would find it terribly hard to return to Haiti, where she lost so many members of her family including her three daughters.

    Looking for Hans: the boy who survived the Haiti earthquake but lost 3 of his sisters

    25/01/201020100126Dr Fay Chung; Haitian DJ in Washington; Ali Abbas returns to Iraq.

    Surviving Niagara

    As a seven year old, Roger Woodward was swept over the Niagara Falls, located between Canada and the United States. Fifty years on, he tells us what happened when he, his sister and a family friend were thrown into the river after a boating accident, not far from the brink. He went over, falling one-hundred-and-sixty two feet, but miraculously lived to tell the tale.

    Life in Britain for Karen refugees

    Several refugee families from Burma's Karen community are starting new lives in the city of Sheffield in the north of England. They were relocated from Thailand under a UN scheme, and a documentary called "Moving to Mars" follows two families during their first year. Director Matt Whitecross tells Outlook their stories.

    Surviving Niagara; Karen refugees in Britain.

    25/01/201120110126
    25/01/201220120126
    25/02/200920090226
    25/02/201020100226
    25/02/201120110226

    25/02/201120110228The moment life changed for an Australian taken hostage in the Moscow theatre siege

    GUANTANAMO PRISONER #746

    A former detainee in the US naval base in Guantanamo Bay says he is still fighting for his freedom, more than two years after his return home to Pakistan. Islamic scholar Saad Iqbal Madni has been under tight security restrictions in the Eastern city of Lahore, since his release from Guantanamo in 2008. The BBC's Orla Guerin asks him about his life in Lahore now, his years in prison, and what he was doing in Indonesia.

    UNDER SEIGE IN MOSCOW

    Professor Alex Bobik is a heart and diabetes expert based in Melbourne Australia. In 2002 he had travelled to Russia to share some research and ideas with colleagues who invited him to see a musical one evening. They sat through the first half of the show at Dubrovka theatre and during the interval debated whether they would stay for the second half. They did. Shortly after the play resumed the theatre was stormed by Chechen rebels and what followed was 58-hour siege in which more than 120 hostages died. Alex Bobik describes his ordeal.

    25/03/200920090326
    25/03/201020100326
    25/03/201120110326Personal stories behind the news from all over the world....

    25/04/201120110426
    25/04/201220120426An American mother on the trauma of having her son sent to prison aged thirteen.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world. Today, American mother Grace Bauer tells us why she now campaigns for reform of the youth justice system after her son was sent to a juvenile prison at the age of thirteen. Also today, the disabled Brazilian man who's made it his life's mission to create one of the biggest collections of rare fruit in the world. And a young British woman with Tourette's Syndrome sees the lighter side of a condition that makes her shout out unpredictable words.

    25/05/200920090526
    25/05/201020100526
    25/05/201120110526
    25/06/200920090626
    25/06/201020100626
    25/07/201120110726
    25/08/201020100826
    25/08/201120110826
    25/08/201120110829Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, the testimony of two Iraqis on life in Baghdad one year after US combat troops left the country.

    We hear from a man who lives on the airport road in Baghdad - during the conflict it was dubbed the most dangerous street in the world.

    It became a frequent target for roadside bombs, suicide attacks, and drive-by shootings.

    And, a young doctor describes her experience working in a trauma clinic where vital equipment is missing and visitors are often violent.

    The Iraqi man who lived on the world's most dangerous road.

    Nigel Brennan, held hostage in Somalia and his sister who helped secure his release.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, the experiences of Australian photo-journalist Nigel Brennan. He was kidnapped in Somalia along with a Canadian colleague Amanda Lindhout in 2008 and held hostage for 462 days. Meanwhile his family were desperately trying to raise a ransom of three million dollars. We hear from Nigel and his sister Nicky who negotiated with the kidnappers.

    25/09/200920090926
    25/09/200920090928
    25/10/201020101026
    25/10/201120111026
    25/11/200820081126
    25/11/200920091126
    25/11/201020101126Bloggers from Azerbaijan on satire, friendship and a donkey outfit that got them jailed

    DONKEY BLOGGERS

    Adnan Hajizade and Emin Milli had already become known for their satirical blog posts on Azerbaijan when last year they went a step further. Their nickname refers to a short video they made in which a man in a donkey costume holds a news conference. Several weeks later, they were arrested - and jailed. The sentence caused a storm, and the US President Barack Obama called for them to be released. Newly freed, they told Jo Fidgen their story.

    JONO LANCASTER

    Jono has a rare genetic condition called Treachers Collins; he has no cheekbones, and his face droops as a result. His parents rejected him, saying he looked like a monster - and he's been bullied all his life. But Jono refuses to let it get him down; now 26 he has come to terms with his condition - and now counts himself one of the happiest and luckiest people around.

    25/12/200820081226
    25/12/200920091226 The unlikely friendship that survived the bombs of Baghdad.
    25/12/200920091228Donato Francisco Mattera

    The celebrated South African journalist and poet. Once a prominent gang leader from Sophia Town who has served time in prison, but after Donato began wielding a pen rather than a knife he is now regarded as one of the most significant cultural figures in modern South Africa.

    Donato Francisco Mattera, the celebrated South African journalist and poet

    26/01/200920090127
    26/01/201020100127Surviving Niagara; Karen refugees in Britain.
    26/01/201120110127
    26/01/201220120127
    26/01/201220120130Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, the Indonesian girl who's been reunited with her family - seven years after being swept away by the tsunami. Also Frank Buckley, the Irish artist who's built a house out of used euros. And Ahmed Mansaray from Freetown, who wants Sierra Leone's film industry to rival Nollywood.

    Tsunami girl - back from the dead after seven years

    26/02/200920090227
    26/02/201020100227
    26/02/201020100301Fighting tradition in India; Disappearing in the data age; Kabul's slums; Internet love.

    class="blq-clearfix">

    Fighting for her marriage

    In a culture where arranged marriages are the norm, tales of clandestine weddings by couples determined to choose who they'll marry aren't unusual in India. That wasn't the case for Kavita and her husband Satish, from India's Haryana state. They married quite openly three years ago, and they have a child. But recently, a powerful council of village elders decided their marriage should be annulled. The council told the couple to start living as brother and sister because they belonged to clans which shared the same ancestry some generations ago. Kavita has refused to accept this decision and is fighting back, much to the anger of some of the community.

    Erasing David

    When British film maker David Bond received a letter informing him that his daughter Ivy was among 25 million children whose personal details including names, addresses and dates of birth had been lost by the government's Benefit Office, he was worried. Amid growing fears about how such personal data can be used against you, he decided to find out how much private companies and the government know about him. He attempted to disappear - but asked a team of private detectives to try and track him down using centrally held data. Leaving his pregnant wife and young child behind, he set out on a month long journey hoping to evade the detectives.

    Afghan slums

    Afghanistan's capital Kabul all too frequently makes the headlines with accounts of violence and suicide attacks. Despite this, Afghans continue to flock to the city in search of jobs. The urban population has increased so much that the valley in which the city is built has become full. The new arrivals have begun to make their homes in the slums which are springing up on the surrounding mountains.

    Love in the time of the internet

    Daniel Meadows found love on the internet. After making videos and putting them on YouTube, Australian Daniel connected with Shannon from the US. Over several months the pair posted hundreds of videos for each other and were in touch via email and skype. They were getting on so well that they decided it was time to jump off the information superhighway and head for a face to face encounter. Daniel sold virtually everything he owned and followed his heart across the globe. But could the virtual romance survive the rigours of the real world?

    Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.

    26/03/200920090327
    26/03/201020100327
    26/03/201020100329
    26/03/201220120327
    26/04/201020100427
    26/04/201120110427
    26/04/201220120427
    26/05/200920090527
    26/05/201020100527
    26/05/201120110527
    26/05/201120110530Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, your reactions to our remarkable interview with Ameneh Bahrami the young Iranian woman who had acid thrown on her face by her rejected suitor - she now wants to punish her attacker by pouring acid into his eyes. Also we hear from Senthill, the Indian fisherman who says his brother died after a confrontation with the Sri Lankan navy over fishing rights. And, Takeshi Kanno, the Japanese doctor who risked his life to save his patients during the earthquake and tsunami.

    The Japanese doctor who risked his life to save his patients during the tsunami.

    'I Have a Dream', the man who helped Dr Martin Luther King write that famous speech

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, in a special programme, we meet Clarence B Jones, Dr Martin Luther King's speech writer, lawyer and confidant. Clarence was part of Dr King's inner circle of advisors and helped to organise the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which culminated in the civil rights leader giving his famous 'I have a Dream' speech to a reported 250,000 people. Clarence, who helped to draft the speech, stood behind Dr King as he uttered the words that have gone down in history and says that the atmosphere was like "capturing lightening in a bottle".

    Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech that Transformed a Nation by Clarence B. Jones is published by Palgrave Macmillan.

    26/06/200920090627
    26/06/200920090629
    26/07/201020100727
    26/07/201120110727
    26/08/200920090827
    26/08/201020100827
    26/09/201120110927
    26/10/200920091027
    26/10/201020101027
    26/10/201120111027
    26/11/200820081127
    26/11/200920091127
    26/11/201020101127
    26/11/201020101129
    26/12/200820081227
    26/12/201120111227Matthew Bannister's favourite Outlook interviews from 2011.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world, today highlights from Outlook in 2011.

    Over the past year we've heard from many inspirational and fascinating people.

    Today, presenter Matthew Bannister has picked out some of those that he has found most memorable.

    27/01/200920090128
    27/01/201020100128
    27/01/201120110128
    27/02/200920090228
    27/03/200920090328
    27/03/201220120328
    27/04/200920090428
    27/04/201020100428
    27/04/201120110428
    27/05/200920090528
    27/05/201020100528
    27/06/201120110628
    27/07/200920090728
    27/07/201020100728
    27/07/201120110728
    27/08/200920090828
    27/08/201020100828
    27/08/201020100830One man's fight against injustice in South Africa; healing Haiti's emotional scars

    Jay Naidoo's fight against injustice

    Union leader, Jay Naidoo, was on the frontline of the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. He served in Nelson Mandela's first cabinet and has devoted his life to campaigning for the values that his mother taught him. However, he tells Outlook about the personal price he has had to pay for his commitment to the cause.

    Jay Naidoo's autobiography, Fighting for Justice, is published by Pan MacMillan

    Dr Lynne Jones - Haiti audio diary

    British psychiatrist, Lynne Jones, takes us inside the clinics that have been set up in rural Haiti to help survivors of the country's devastating earthquake deal with mental health problems. This is the first time that many people living in the countryside have been given professional psychological help. Lynne gives us an insight in to the extent of the problem and explains to Outlook how she is trying to make a difference.

    Five years on from Hurricane Katrina - the story of the New Orleans Superdome

    Five years ago this week the American city of New Orleans was hit by Hurricane Katrina in what would become one of the worst natural disasters in US history. Eighteen hundred people died when the city's flood defences - or levees - collapsed and water cascaded though the streets and into houses. In this special edition of Outlook we focus on the story of one iconic building at the heart of the drama five years ago - the city's football stadium - the Superdome. As the hurricane raged, it became a refuge for around twenty thousand people and there were reports of shootings, lootings and rapes as they crammed into what became an insanitary arena. The General Manager of the Superdome - Doug Thornton - tells us about the dreadful conditions there, but also about his own determination after the hurricane to rebuild the Superdome and have it completed by the time the football season opened in September 2006. Astonishingly he and his colleagues achieved their goal and the Superdome became a potent symbol of the city's rebirth. Hear the extraordinary story of the New Orleans Superdome in this special edition of Outlook with Matthew Bannister.

    The story of the New Orleans Superdome, five years after Hurricane Katrina

    27/09/201020100928
    27/09/201120110928Inside the whirlpool - a Japanese tsunami survivor

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, a Japanese woman describes being sucked into a whirlpool when the tsunami overwhelmed her town. Also, two Americans trying to escape the electromagnetic fields which they say are making them ill. And a Kenyan-Somali doctor talks about the challenges he faces in the Dadaab refugee camp.

    27/10/200920091028
    27/10/201020101028
    27/10/201120111028The biologist leading the fight against malaria and the world's champion slackliner

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, molecular biologist Joe Cohen tells of the moment he and his team made a ground-breaking discovery which may pave the way to the world's first malaria vaccine. Also, the wife of a jailed Cuban dissident, Alejandrina de la Riva explains why she and her friends wear white to highlight their cause. And world champion slackliner Andy Lewis on why he risks his life each time he walks the line.

    27/10/201120111031
    27/11/200820081128
    27/11/200920091128Guatemala Bus Drivers

    Guatemala has become one of Latin America's most dangerous countries. Its capital, Guatemala City, has been gripped by fear as criminal gangs terrorise the people who live and work there. Bus drivers have been targeted by gangs trying to extort money out of them - it's believed they make thousands of dollars a day doing this. To make sure the money flows their way they have been ordering the killing of some drivers to intimidate others. A human rights organisation has said that more than one-hundred-and-seventy-five drivers have been killed in 2009 and that figure's expected to rise before the end of the year. Outlook's Sarah Grainger reports from Guatemala City.

    StoryCorps - Your Best Listener

    An organisation called "StoryCorps" is asking people across the USA to record a conversation with someone who's important to them The idea is to build a collection of thousands of personal conversations which will then be stored in the Library of Congress. Over the next week, we'll be running a series of these recordings. Today it's the turn of James Ransome and Cherie Johnson to tell us about a larger than life character from their childhood.

    We're asking you to send us a photo of you with 'Your Best Listener' the person who you most like to sit down with for a good old chat. Our email is outlook@bbc.com

    Women of Zimbabwe Arise

    Two Zimbabwean women have received a prestigious human rights award -- and a kiss from President Obama. Magodonga Mahlangu and Jenni Williams are co-founders of Women of Zimbabwe Arise, or WOZA which means 'come forward' in the local Ndebele language. They've organised hundreds of demonstrations for social justice since they formed in 2003, and although their movement is non-violent, the authorities have often responded in a heavy handed way. Magodonga and Jenni have been arrested at least thirty times each, and ended up in both hospital and prison as a result of their actions. Now their work has been recognised by with the 2009 Robert F Kennedy Human Rights Award. They told Ritula their very personal reasons for taking on the Zimbabwean establishment.

    Guatemala bus drivers; StoryCorps and Women Of Zimbabwe Arise.

    27/11/200920091130 Guatemala bus drivers; StoryCorps and Women Of Zimbabwe Arise.
    27/12/201020101228Looking for Hans: the boy who survived the Haiti earthquake but lost 3 of his sisters

    27/12/201120111228More of Matthew Bannister's favourite Outlook interviews from 2011

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world, today more today highlights from Outlook in 2011. Over the past year we've heard from many inspirational and fascinating people. Today, presenter Matthew Bannister has picked out some of those that he has found most memorable.

    28/01/200920090129
    28/01/201020100129
    28/01/201120110131The British head teacher on overcoming a debilitating stammer.

    MARTIN STEPHEN

    Nominations in this year's Oscars are dominated by the King's Speech - an English film about King George VI learning to overcome a debilitating stammer. Martin Stephen is the head teacher at one of Britain's leading independent schools and has described seeing the film as 'exquisite agony' - because he too had to conquer a stammer which at one point threatened to wreck his dreams of becoming a teacher. He tells Lucy Ash how his speech defect dominated his childhood.

    AZUSA HAYANO

    Aokigihara Forest, which lies beneath the snow capped peaks of Mount Fuji in Japan, is notoriously popular as a place where people commit suicide. The forest is known as the sea of trees because of its vast size - and between fifty and one hundred bodies are found there each year. The geologist Azusa Hayano has spent much of his working life in Aokigihara , researching volcanic activity and the surrounding vegetation. But he also often comes across the bodies of those that have chosen to kill themselves - and meets those who are considering it. For Outlook, the BBC's Japan correspondent Roland Buerk went to meet Hayano in the forest to explore this bizarre and disturbing place.

    Gladys BULINYA

    Gladys Bulinya is thirty five years old and the mother of no less than six sets of twins. She lives in western Kenya and belongs to a tribe which sees twins as a bad omen. As a result, she has been rejected by her family and by the fathers of her children. She's been talking to Muliro Telewa from the BBC's Nairobi bureau about her struggle to make a good life for her family.

    28/02/201120110301

    28/02/201220120229The journalist determined to go on after losing colleagues in the Christchurch earthquake.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: on today's Outlook, we hear from Rob Cope Williams, the TV presenter who was determined to bring Christchurch the news after many of his colleagues died in last year's earthquake. Also today, we hear from the Colombian capital, Bogota, where from February next year, horse drawn vehicles will be banned. And we hear from Chantelle Taylor, the first British woman believed to have killed in combat about why she has no regrets about what she did.

    In a special one-hour edition of Outlook to celebrate the BBC World Service's 80th birthday - Matthew Bannister hears the extraordinary personal stories of some of the people on our doorstep - staff at Bush House.

    In front of a live studio audience in a tent in the courtyard of our London headquarters - he hears from Shaimaa Khalil, an Egyptian journalist who was arrested in Tahrir Square; Seva Novgorodsev, a Russian presenter whose fans brought the airport to a standstill when he returned from exile; Priyath Liyanage, a Sri Lankan Editor who travelled across his country trying to track down a boy with a violin; Najiba Kasraee, an Afghan producer who was a child witness to the assassination of her country's president; and Josephine Hazeley, a Sierra Leonean senior journalist who describes the pressures and pain of covering a bloody civil war from afar.

    Extraordinary personal stories from inside Bush House - home of the World Service.

    28/03/201220120329
    28/04/200920090429
    28/04/201020100429
    28/04/201120110429
    28/04/201120110502Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Canadian hockey star Theo Fleury on the childhood trauma that came back to haunt him. Also the tiger widows of Bangladesh fighting social ostracism, and things to do before you die - meet American 'bucket lister' John Goddard.

    Canadian hockey star Theo Fleury and his troubled past

    A special edition of Outlook devoted to the moon and its effect on all our lives

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world. Today: British writer James Attlee's quest to understand the significance of the moon and the experience of moonlight for people all over the world. We also hear from the American-Iranian academic Haleh Esfandiari on how the moon gave her hope when she was held in solitary confinement as a political prisoner. The moon is vital in Indian culture too, as the science writer Pallava Bagla explains and for the Scottish artist Katie Paterson the moon has been a source of inspiration. She bounced a recording of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in morse code off the surface of the moon.

    James Attlee's book Nocturne - A Journey in Search of Moonlight is published by Hamish Hamilton

    28/05/200920090529
    28/05/201020100529
    28/05/201020100531
    28/06/201120110629
    28/07/201020100729
    28/07/201120110729
    28/07/201120110801Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, Awais Hussain describes being kidnapped by the Taliban in north west Pakistan whilst he was trying to find work. The unemployed 25 year old was shot in the back and held hostage for three months before being released recently. Also, Simon Stephenson, the British man whose brother died in the Asian Tsunami and has now written a book about coming to terms with his grief. And, Zambian sex worker Sandra Mubaya who has become a reality TV star by taking part in a show that hopes to turn prostitutes into good wives.

    Simon Stephenson's book is called, Let Not the Waves of the Sea, published by John Murray.

    The unemployed Pakistani man who was kidnapped by the Taliban as he tried to find work

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, Awais Hussain describes being kidnapped by the Taliban in north west Pakistan whilst he was trying to find work. The unemployed 25-year-old was shot in the back and held hostage for three months before being released recently.

    Also, Simon Stephenson, the British man whose brother died in the Asian Tsunami and has now written a book about coming to terms with his grief. His book is called, Let Not the Waves of the Sea and was published by John Murray.

    The woman imprisoned in Iran's notorious Evin jail when she was just 16

    Today, the story of Marina Nemat who was arrested in 1982 when she was only 16 and taken to Iran's notorious Evin prison.

    There she was tortured, threatened with execution and forced to marry her interrogator.

    She was eventually released in 1984, but it was more than 20 years before she could talk to anyone about what she had gone through.

    She tells Jo Fidgen her remarkable story.

    28/08/200920090829
    28/08/200920090831New Australians

    Sharon Mascall's in Melbourne, where an attack on a 25-year old Indian student in May unleashed a wave of protest as well as accusations of racism and discrimination. She meets migrants who've crossed the globe from Africa, Europe and Asia, to make Australia their home. There's David Vincent, a former child soldier who's helping keep the peace among other Sudanese migrants, Esperance Kalonji, a tailor from the Democratic Republic of Congo who's changing the face of fashion in Brisbane and Rasoul Ahmady from Afghanistan and his team of Afghan refugees.

    Sharon Mascall meets migrants who've crossed the globe to make Australia their home.

    28/09/200920090929
    28/09/201020100929
    28/09/201120110929
    28/10/200920091029
    28/10/201020101029Manuel Gonzalez - the first man down into the San Jose mine to rescue the Chilean miners

    CHILE MINE RESCUE

    Manuel Gonzalez was the first rescuer to reach the thirty three Chilean miners who had been trapped underground for more than two months. He tells Outlook what it was like down the mine and how it felt to be the last man to leave.

    INDIAN WRESTLING SISTERS

    Suhail Haleem travels to a remote village in Haryana state to meet Indian sisters Geeta and Babita who have become national celebrities for taking Commonwealth gold and silver respectively in wrestling.

    HOSTAGE NEGOTIATOR

    Leading FBI hostage negotiator Gary Noesner explains how he deals with the pressures of making life and death decisions. He talks about the infamous Waco siege and the impact it had on him. His book is called "Stalling for Time".

    28/11/200820081129
    28/11/201120111129
    28/12/200920091229 Donato Francisco Mattera, the celebrated South African journalist and poet

    Forgiveness and Reconciliation

    In this programme we hear the stories of people who despite huge personal trauma are using the language of peace and understanding to ease not just their own pain but also that of others

    Park Chun Hwan and Im Bong Taek tell their story of torture, betrayal and reconciliation in South Korea.

    Patrick Magee, a former IRA bomber and Jo Berry the daughter of one of the men he killed who are now firm friends

    Also Israel Rami Elhanan and Palestinian Bassam Aramin who have both lost daughters in the conflict tell us why they're united in working for peace.

    And the Reverend Ruth Scott discusses forgiveness and reconciliation with Matthew.

    Forgiveness and Reconciliation - stories of hope in the face of conflict.

    28/12/201020101229

    MATTHEW'S MEMORABLE MOMENTS OF 2010

    SARAH SHOURD

    In July 2009, Sarah Shourd and her two friends, Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, were detained by Iranian border guards whilst hiking along Iraq's mountainous border with Iran. They were all held in Evin prison and Sarah was only released fourteen months later. She tells Matthew Bannister about conditions in the prison and about the happy moment during their captivity when Shane proposed to her.

    LI CUNXIN

    Li Cunxin was born into a poor peasant family in Chairman Mao's communist China, but as a child he was chosen by Madame Mao's Beijing Dance Academy and went on to become an international ballet star. At the age of eighteen he was allowed to travel to the United States and while he was there he met and married a young American girl. As he tells Matthew Bannister, by marrying her he ended up at the centre of a siege at the Chinese consulate in Houston.

    DR HAWA ABDI AND HER DAUGHTER DR AMINA ADAN

    For the past few years on Outlook we've followed the courageous work of Dr Hawa Abdi. She's the Somali physician who runs a clinic for pregnant women and malnourished children just outside Mogadishu. Dr Abdi tells Matthew how she survived an attack on her clinic by an Islamist militia group in May 2010, and her daughter Dr Amina Adan explains why she sees her mother as a hero.

    PARENTS OF LINDA NORGROVE

    In October 2010 British aid worker Linda Norgrove was killed when American soldiers tried to rescue her from kidnappers in Afghanistan. At first it was thought she'd died when one of her kidnappers detonated a suicide vest, but an official investigation later revealed that she was killed by a grenade thrown by one of her rescuers. Linda's parents John and Lorna tell Matthew about the memories of Linda they will always cherish.

    CURTIS D ROBINSON

    Curtis D Robinson was born into a poor African American family in Alabama. He tells Matthew Bannister how he overcame racism to go from pot-washer to

    multi-millionaire property developer and why he is determined to help the poorest African American men get screening and treatment for prostate cancer.

    28/12/201120111229The Iranian woman blinded by acid who sought "eye for an eye" justice.

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today, a remarkable interview with Ameneh Bahrami. In 2004, she was an independent young woman living in the Iranian capital Tehran. But her life changed forever when a rejected suitor called Majid Mohavedi threw acid into her face, leaving terrible scars and blinding her in both eyes. Ameneh started a campaign for him to be tried under an Islamic law which allows victims to have a say in the punishment of criminals. She wanted Mohavedi to be sentenced to have acid poured into his eyes - and what's more, she wanted to administer the punishment herself.

    29/01/200920090130
    29/01/201020100130Melinda Gates

    The wife of the world's richest man - Bill Gates - tells us about the her plan to spend $10bn over the next decade to fund immunisations in the world's poorest countries.

    Turkish TV Soaps

    Dorian Jones on the Turkish soap opera that's breaking a thirty year silence by dramatising the country's military coup

    Blind Architect

    Christopher Downey from California tells Ritula Shah about the challenges and rewards of working as an architect after losing your sight.

    Melinda Gates; Turkish TV Soap; Blind Architect.

    29/01/201020100201Melinda Gates; Turkish TV Soap; Blind Architect.
    29/02/201220120301Extraordinary personal stories from inside Bush House - home of the World Service.

    In front of a live audience, four guests talk to Matthew Bannister about their life experiences.

    29/03/201020100330
    29/03/201220120330
    29/04/200920090430
    29/04/201020100430
    29/05/200920090530
    29/05/200920090601
    29/06/200920090630
    29/06/201120110630
    29/07/200920090730
    29/07/201020100730
    29/08/201120110830
    29/09/201020100930
    29/09/201120110930
    29/09/201120111003
    29/10/200920091030
    29/10/201020101030
    29/10/201020101101
    29/11/201020101130
    29/11/201120111130
    29/12/200920091230 Forgiveness and Reconciliation - stories of hope in the face of conflict.

    Katie Piper on surviving an acid attack

    Katie Piper was a 24-year old TV presenter when she was attacked with acid. She was left fighting for her life and suffering from terribly disfiguring burns to her face, arms and chest. Following pioneering surgery using artificial skin to re-build her face, she has made a TV documentary about her story. She tells Matthew why.

    40th anniversary of Moonlandings

    In July many Outlook listeners shared their memories of the Moon landings in 1969. We also spoke to some of the lucky few who've been into space, like European astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy and Russian cosmonaut Georgy Grechko.

    Back to school in the Swat Valley

    One of the big stories of the year was the campaign by the Pakistan government to drive the Taleban out of the SWAT valley. Local journalist Adnan Rashid kept Outlook listeners up to date as he and his family fled the city of Mingora. After their return, he sent us this report about local schools reopening and life getting back to normal.

    Dr. Heidi Kastner, Fritzl's Psychiatrist

    Anyone reading about the dreadful crimes committed by the Austrian Josef Fritzl could be forgiven for assuming that he was insane. Yet the forensic psychiatrist Dr. Heidi Kastner came to the clear conclusion that he is sane. It was a crucial piece of expert evidence for the prosecution, meaning that Fritzl could be put on trial and brought to account for his crimes. He is now serving a life sentence in prison. She tells Matthew how the experience has affected her.

    Save Our Sounds - horsehooves in Kyrgystan

    The BBC's Save Our Sounds project tracked down the sounds we would miss most if they disappeared. Abdujalil Abdurasulov reports from Kyrgystan, where the sound of horse hooves reminds him of his childhood.

    Blind children climb in the Himalayas

    For Sabriye Tenberken, being blind is no obstacle to fulfilling her dreams. She tells Matthew why she led an expedition of visually impaired children up a mountain in the Himalayas.

    Muhammad Ali's Irish relatives

    The boxer Muhammad Ali went back to his roots when he visited Ennis in Ireland this summer. He received a very warm welcome from his relatives.

    Joel Grey & Outlook listeners' eyes

    The actor and photographer Joel Grey has published a book of photographs taken with his mobile phone. He inspired Outlook to ask listeners for pictures of their eyes. You can still see the beautiful results on our website.

    Best of 2009: Katie Piper; Swat valley; Fritzl psychiatrist; climbing blind; your eyes.

    29/12/201020101230Matthew's memorable moments of 2010

    REMARKABLE STORIES OF THE YEAR

    INGRID BETANCOURT

    The French Colombian politician was kidnapped by rebels and held in the jungle for six years. She talks frankly about how the guards took pleasure in making her suffer and the awful moment when her attempt to escape was foiled.

    ARON RALSTON

    When Aron was trapped by a boulder in a remote canyon in Utah he was forced to cut off his own arm with a penknife to survive. He describes his five nights alone in the bitter cold and the slow realisation that he might not survive.

    FAWZIA GAILANI

    Her campaign for re-election earlier this year resulted in real tragedy for her when five of her campaign team were kidnapped and then killed. It was a stark reminder of the risks faced by people trying to take part in the democratic process in Afghanistan.

    CRAIG JURISEVIC

    As the Serb forces swept into Kosovo during the Balkan War in the late 1990s, Australian surgeon Craig Jurisevic decided to go there to use his medical skills to help the victims. Along the way he was forced to make a terrible decision.

    SAVING BABY JENNY

    Dr Arthur Fournier broke all the rules to rescue a baby after the earthquake in Haiti

    Some of the people who have inspired and moved Matthew this year.

    29/12/201120111230
    29/12/201120120102Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today, a remarkable interview with Ameneh Bahrami.

    In 2004, she was an independent young woman living in the Iranian capital Tehran.

    But her life changed forever when a rejected suitor called Majid Mohavedi threw acid into her face, leaving terrible scars and blinding her in both eyes.

    Ameneh started a campaign for him to be tried under an Islamic law which allows victims to have a say in the punishment of criminals.

    She wanted Mohavedi to be sentenced to have acid poured into his eyes - and what's more, she wanted to administer the punishment herself.

    The Iranian woman blinded by acid who sought "eye for an eye" justice.

    Life in Dadaab: extraordinary personal stories from the world's biggest refugee camp.

    Today, Outlook hears from some of the people living in the biggest refugee camp in the world - the Dadaab Camp in north-eastern Kenya.

    Initially built as a temporary shelter for those fleeing conflict in the Horn of Africa, over 20 years on, the camp is now home to over four hundred thousand refugees.

    Many of those are long term residents who have spent most of their lives there, and it is their stories that we focus on.

    Reporter Wairimu Gitahi visits the camp and meets a young man who has just won a scholarship to University in Sudan and a woman preparing for her wedding in the camp.

    30/01/200920090131
    30/01/201220120131
    30/03/201020100331
    30/03/2011
    30/04/200920090501 The Egyptian pig farmer; human rights in Nepal; and Frank Gardner. With Lucy Ash.

    With Lucy Ash.

    On today's programme: the Egyptian pig farmer; human rights in Nepal; and Frank Gardner.

    Egyptian Pig Farmer

  • and the bbc's security correspondent, frank gardner, talks about a life-long love affair with travel.

    the egyptian pig farmer; human rights in nepal; and frank gardner. with lucy ash.

  • award winning nepalese human rights lawyer, mandira sharma, tells lucy ash why she risks her life to expose human rights abuses, which she blames on both the country's maoist rebels and the security forces.

    frank gardner

  • with concern over the possibility of a global swine flu pandemic, the egyptian government has planned to cull thousands of pigs in the country. outlook's eva dadrian speaks to a pig farmer who fears for his future.

    human rights in nepal

    egyptian pig farmer

  • 30/04/201020100501Lawrence Grech

    "Pray for me". That's what 37 year old Lawrence Grech said to the Pope when he met him in April. Mr Grech is one of eight men who say they were sexually molested by Catholic priests at an orphanage in Malta. He tells Aasmah Mir about his experiences in the orphanage and meeting the Pope.

    Karakul Hats in Afghanistan

    The Karakul hat is traditionally worn by northern Afghans where the Karakul lambs are reared, but the farming methods are controversial and were banned under the Taliban. Now it's legal again, but the hats are not as popular because they're seen as expensive and old-fashioned. For Outlook, Harun Najafizada has been to the hatters' district of Kabul

    Painting the Queen

    London artist Rupert Alexander has just finished a portrait of Queen Elizabeth. At 35, he is the youngest artist to paint a British monarch in modern times. He talks to Aasmah about the particular problems of painting a national icon.

    Abuse survivor on meeting the Pope; Kabul's Hatters; painting the Queen.

    30/04/201020100503Abuse survivor on meeting the Pope; Kabul's Hatters; painting the Queen.

    Salman Ahmad and Junoon

    The Urdu word junoon means obsessive passion, which is how Pakistan-born Salman Ahmad feels about music, and why he chose that name for his rock band. Salman tells Outlook's Matthew Bannister about a life divided between Pakistan and America, East and West, and how both worlds have influenced his life, beliefs and music.

    Salman Ahmad's autobiography is called "Rock and Roll Jihad", and it's published by Simon and Schuster.

    Pakistani-American Salman Ahmad talks about his mission to bring peace through music.

    30/04/201220120501
    30/05/201120110531
    30/06/201120110701
    30/06/201120110704Extraordinary personal stories from around the world: today; Robin Lim, the midwife in Indonesia who's fighting the hospitals that take babies hostage when their mothers can't pay the bills.

    Also, Wangu Kanja from Kenya on how her ordeal being car-jacked, held hostage and raped convinced her to do something to change attitudes towards rape victims in Kenya.

    And, Parameswaran Subramanyama a Tamil hunger-striker on his court battle against the British newspapers that accused him of secretly eating during his fast.

    The Indonesian mother whose baby was put up for sale because she couldn't pay the midwife

    30/07/200920090731
    30/07/201020100731
    30/07/201020100802
    30/08/201020100831The story of the New Orleans Superdome, five years after Hurricane Katrina
    30/08/201120110831
    30/09/200920091001
    30/09/201020101001Mohammad Mostafaei on his fight against the death penalty in Iran

    MOHAMMAD MOSTAFAEI

    Mohammad Mostafaei is the former lawyer of Sakineh Mohammadi-Ashtiani. She's the Iranian woman who was sentenced to death by stoning for allegedly committing adultery. Her case caused an international outcry and the sentence hasn't yet been carried out. Mohammad was responsible for drawing the world's attention to her plight, but was forced to flee from Iran and has now been given asylum in Norway. He tells Matthew Bannister about his childhood and his long campaign against the death penalty in Iran.

    REINHOLD MESSNER

    Reinhold Messner is considered one of the world's greatest mountaineers. In 1978, he was part of the first team to climb Mount Everest without oxygen and without the help of sherpas. Two years later he repeated that climb by himself, setting another record. He went on to reach the summits of all the other 13 peaks in the world above 8,000 metres, always climbing without oxygen. Now in his sixties, Reinhold Messner is setting up a series of mountain museums in the Alps. For Outlook, Irene Caselli went to meet him in his native valley in the South Tyrol region of northern Italy.

    30/10/200920091031
    30/10/200920091102
    30/11/200920091201
    30/11/201020101201
    30/11/201120111201
    30/12/200920091231 Best of 2009: Katie Piper; Swat valley; Fritzl psychiatrist; climbing blind; your eyes.

    The Hager Family

    Not so long ago, most people in the US were farmers. But now only about one in a hundred works the land. And yet farmers and ranchers are as important as ever - they're the stewards of almost half the land in North America. And most of the country's agriculture is still run by families.

    The Hager family own a 700 acre dairy farm in Massachusetts.

    Chip and Sherry Hager run the farm, along with their daughter Kim and son-in-law Aaron, and another son, Todd. Both Kim and Aaron are college graduates with degrees in agriculture.

    John Biewen (bee-win) of the centre for Documentary Studies at Duke University followed the family through the different farming cycles of the year.

    The Hager family own a diary farm in the USA. We follow their lives through the year.

    30/12/201020101231Some of the people who have inspired and moved Matthew this year.

    MY YEAR IN THE SWAT VALLEY

    Journalist Adnan Rashid works in Mingora, the city in north-west Pakistan which in 2009 became the battleground for the country's offensive against the taliban militants who had taken control there. The bitter fight forced Adnan and his family, as well as 2 million others in the region, to flee. So when a semblance of security was restored, hopes were high for a peaceful 2010. In this edition of Outlook Adnan shares his personal perspective on what turned out to be another turbulent year in Swat.

    The late Spring of 2010 saw Adnan get married in a ceremony attended by 600 guests from all over the region. But the celebrations soon turned to sadness when Pakistan was hit by its worst floods for almost a century. The unprecedented downpour caused death and displacement across the country, and in the Valley - which was hit early on - all twenty-nine bridges were destroyed, over one hundred hotels were lost and whole villages were swept away; in all over 20 million Pakistanis were affected.

    Adnan shares his own and his family's personal experiences during this time, and he and his new wife discuss their expectations and hopes for the year ahead.

    2010: A turbulent year in Pakistan's Swat Valley through the experiences of one man

    31/01/201120110201
    31/01/201220120201
    31/03/201020100401
    31/03/201120110404

    31/05/201020100601
    31/05/201120110601
    31/07/200920090801
    31/07/200920090803

    Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.

    31/08/200920090901
    31/08/201020100901
    31/08/201120110901
    31/10/201120111101
    31/12/200920100101 The Hager family own a diary farm in the USA. We follow their lives through the year.

    Today's Outlook travels to the coast of Somalia for the story of the Ukrainian ship the Faina, held captive for four-and-a-half months in a notorious hijacking by Somali pirates. The BBC's Olga Betko tracks down five former crew members, who share their memories of their ill-fated voyage with a cargo of tanks, rocket-launchers and small arms.

    Life with the pirates. Five Ukrainian sailors tell the story of capture by Somali pirates.

    31/12/2010201101012010: A turbulent year in Pakistan's Swat Valley through the experiences of one man
    31/12/201020110103
    Befriending The Woman I'd Have To Dissect20190312After an elderly woman decided to donate her body to medicine, she befriended anatomist Dr Vic Spitzer – the man who would go on to dissect her. Vic, a pioneer in the field of digitising anatomy, was working with the Visible Human Project to create detailed, three dimensional views of the human body by slicing the body and photographing it. When Susan Potter heard about the project, she was intrigued and reached out to Vic insisting she take part in the project. It was the beginning of a fourteen year friendship that lasted until her death in 2015.

    Caroline Casey found out she was legally blind when she was seventeen. She was born with ocular albinism, an incurable eye condition that leads to severe visual impairment, but for most of her childhood, she had just been told she had bad eye sight. After finding out, she went on to keep it a secret for nearly a decade before ‘coming out’, becoming an elephant handler in India and working to change attitudes towards disability.

    (Picture: Illustration of female anatomy. Credit: Eraxion/Getty Images.)

    How anatomist Vic Spitzer got to know the woman who donated her body to him for research

    True life stories

    Confronting My Racist Past2019031120190312 (WS)S. McEachin Otts - known as Mac - grew up in Greensboro, Alabama. His great great grandfather had slaves and a plantation there, but as Mac grew up he began to go against the racism he was used to and he adopted a mixed race child. Mac has written a book about his life called Better than them: The Unmaking of an Alabama Racist, published by NewSouth Books, Montgomery, Alabama.

    In 2003, a band of expert criminals had masterminded the biggest and boldest jewel heist in history, but Belgian diamond detective Patrick Peys was on their trail. A strange assortment of clues, including a carpet and a salami sandwich, led to a mysterious criminal mastermind and a school for felons. Emily Webb has the story.

    (Image: Mac Otts. Photo courtesy of Mac Otts.)

    Mac Otts unravelled generations of racism in his family

    True life stories

    Fifteen And Alone At Sea2019031320190314 (WS)Susan Berg was on a family fishing trip in Australia when their boat sank and they started to swim to land. As the sun went down, Susan realised that her family had disappeared. Since then, she has fought to come to terms with that day and has even overcome her fear of water by taking on daring swimming challenges. She's written a book about her experience called The Girl Who Lived.

    Wei-shun Yen was a rebellious youngster. While his parents were busy selling noodles in the family restaurant, he was running wild on the streets and was even sent to a Taiwanese prison for manslaughter. It seemed like he was destined for a life of crime, until he had a very influential dream. It inspired him to leave his old ways behind and take up charity work. He is now known around Taiwan for giving noodles to the poor and needy because he donates hundreds of servings each month, with the help of other donors. The BBC’s Taipei correspondent Cindy Sui went to meet the noodle hero, at his family’s restaurant.

    A Hollywood film called 'King Richard' is going to be made about a very determined father who, with no prior knowledge of the game, managed to train up two of the world's greatest tennis players. We look back to 2014 when we spoke to Richard Williams, the father of American tennis titans Venus and Serena Williams about deciding his daughters would be sporting superstars.

    (Photo credit: AzmanL/Getty Images.)

    After a traumatic incident, Australian Susan Berg overcame a fear of water and swam again

    True life stories

    Fighting Ebola In A War Zone2019032120190322 (WS)Dr Jean-Christophe Shako is an epidemiologist who specialises in disease control. He is based in North Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a province that is currently facing a deadly outbreak of Ebola. It's a relentless job: it's the first Ebola crisis in a war zone and the presence of armed groups has seriously affected the response.

    Mexican sound designer Sergio Díaz has been nominated for Best Sound Editing at this year's Academy Awards for his work in Roma, a movie that traced the 1970s childhood memories of director Alfonso Cuarón. Sergio spent 18 months collecting the sounds that transported the viewers back to 70s Mexico, often waiting for days when the city was deserted, like Christmas day, to get those special recordings. Outlook’s Clayton Conn went to meet him.

    In 1976, the Johannesburg township of Soweto erupted into protest. Students were furious with the government decision to make Afrikaans a language of instruction in South African schools. The protests were met with brutal force by the police, and hundreds of students died in the ensuing gunfire. In the midst of the chaos was Dr Edelstein, a white man involved in various humanitarian causes in the township. Students who had fled the gunfire suddenly turned their anger on him, and he was killed in the street. His daughter Janet was just 12 at the time, and she's spent many years trying to find answers about what happened that day.

    Photo: A health worker puts on his personal protective equipment
    Credit: Getty Images

    Facing militias and machetes, the DRC doctor trying to stop Ebola in a war zone

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Finding Freedom In Solitary Confinement2019031920190320 (WS)When Eddy Zheng was 12 years old his family left China and moved to the US. Eddy spoke no English and struggled at school. He fell in with the wrong crowd and at the age of 16 was arrested after a serious incident where he tied up and robbed a local family. Eddy didn't realise at the time but he had been sentenced to life in prison and became the youngest prisoner at San Quentin State Prison. It was in prison and while spending 11 months in solitary confinement that Eddy started the process of turning his life around.

    Yamato is a Japanese Taiko drumming troupe who use their entire bodies to create powerful performances which they tour around the world. Their drumming can be so loud, the vibrations so intense, they once dislodged a filling in a listener's tooth, or at least, so we were told. Outlook's Saskia Edwards went to meet the group, have a go and find out how Yamato began.

    Tsering Deki is 20 years old and Nima Gurung is 18. They have endured gruelling physical and emotional journeys, born in different villages in Nepal, they attended the same school in the far away capital, Kathmandu. The school's called Snowland Ranag Light of Education and is a non-profit organisation which takes kids from remote parts of the Himalayas who wouldn't otherwise get a chance to learn. Most of the children at the school have not seen their families for as long as 12 years. When they graduated, Tsering and Nima made an arduous and lengthy journey across mountains - via the highest inhabited place on the planet - to go back home. Their epic journey was filmed for the documentary Children of the Snowland.

    (Photo: Eddy Zheng. Credit: Samaruddin Kassim)

    Aged 16 Eddy Zheng was sentenced to life in prison but had an awakening behind bars

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Finding Love On Death Row20170501Shujaa Graham fell in love with his nurse, Phyllis, when he was on death row.
    From Child Soldier To Master Knitter20170418Former child soldier Simon Peter Otoyo was blinded by gunshot. He is now a master knitter
    Having A Baby With A Man Who Died Years Ago2019032720190328 (WS)Before Baruch died at 25 years old from cancer he said that he wanted to have a child. So he created something called a 'biological will' and gave a sperm sample. But Baruch didn't have a wife or girlfriend. So after he passed away, his mother began a seven-year campaign to find a woman to have his baby. She found Liat who was 35 years old and single. But there are many emotional and ethical issues involved in posthumous reproduction. So, would they be able to fulfill Baruch's dying wish?

    Michael Fuller was Britain’s first ever black Chief Constable and headed up the police force in the English county of Kent. But to get there he not only had to battle racism on the streets, but in the police force itself.

    (Photo: A mother and child. Credit: Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images)

    How an Israeli man's dying wish to father a child was fulfilled

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Heavyweight Champ Who Didn't Want To Box2019032620190327 (WS)Boxer Michael Bentt never wanted to fight, but he managed to climb to the top of his profession. He became the heavyweight champion of the world in 1993. And that was just the beginning of his remarkable journey.

    Mexican painter Manuel Solano has been seen in big galleries around the world. But the artist doesn't ever get to 'see' the paintings in a way most people would understand. That's because Manuel is legally blind. So how does a person paint, when they can't see the canvas?

    Winchman Kate Willougbhy tells the story of the dramatic rescue of Ben the dog. He was stuck on the top of a Scottish mountain during a wild storm.

    (Image: Tommy Morrison trades blows with Michael Bentt. Photo credit: Mark Morrison/Getty Images.)

    Michael Bentt has made it to the top of his game, but he never actually wanted to box!

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Held Captive By A Cult For 30 Years2019030720190308 (WS)Katy Morgan-Davies spent her entire life living as a virtual prisoner. She'd been born into a Maoist cult, ruled over by a domineering leader called Aravindan Balakrishnan, also known as AB or Comrade Bala. They'd lived not in some remote compound, but in the densely-packed streets of south London. After 30 years of life in the cult, Katy was able to devise her escape.

    Swede Olle Strandberg broke his neck doing an acrobatic jump. Ten years later he reattempted the jump. But this time he did it suspended high in the sky by a hot air balloon.

    There's a workshop in Naples, Italy, which is known for its umbrellas. Four generations of one family have poured their hearts into hand-crafting them. Outlook's Alessia Cerantola went to meet the Talaricos.

    Image: Katy Morgan-Davies
    Credit: BBC/Perry Images

    Katy Morgan-Davies was born into a cult in south London and held as a virtual prisoner

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    I Dressed As A Man To Work In A Mine20170419Pili Hussein disguised herself as a man for 10 years so she could work down a mine
    I Went Through Puberty At Two Years Old2019030620190307 (WS)On the male side of Patrick Burleigh's family is a rare hereditary condition known as precocious puberty. It has been passed down through the generations. It meant Patrick went through puberty when he was two, and by the time he was 12 he was passing as a 16-year-old and getting into serious trouble.

    Ballet is huge in Cuba. Dancers are treated like celebrities. For much of Cuba's modern history, most citizens needed visas to leave the Communist country. Ballet dancers were among the select few who could easily get out to perform around the world. However, many of those dancers defected and never returned. Rolando Sarabia was one of them.

    Presenter: Neal Razzell

    Image: Patrick Burleigh aged 13
    Credit: Patrick Burleigh

    Patrick Burleigh was born with precocious puberty, meaning his body developed too quickly

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Inside The Minds And Chat Rooms Of Is2019032820190329 (WS)Rukmini Callimachi is an American journalist who has to get into the minds of members of so-called IS and win their trust. She's uncovered many secrets about the group for the New York Times, and has even been fat-shamed by IS members. She tells Emily Webb about her career and how it all started when she covered Christmas tree lighting ceremonies in small-town America.

    When Mats Steen was a young child in Oslo, he was diagnosed with a degenerative disease. His parents Robert and Trude were told it was unlikely he would survive long into his 20s. The physical restraints of his illness meant that Mats spent more and more time at home, playing online games, and he had a whole other persona in the game World of Warcraft. When he died at the age of 25, his parents, who had worried that his life had been lonely and friendless, were amazed when many of his close friends from the game started to gather for his funeral.

    Image: Rukmini Callimachi Credit: Andy Mills

    Rukmini Callimachi is a US reporter whose work has brought her close to so-called IS

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Living With A 15-minute Memory20170424A rare insight into how a major stroke affected an American woman at the age of 33.
    My Daughter's Killer Feels Like 'family'2019031820190319 (WS)In April 2011 in a small village in the Netherlands, Eddy Hekman got the worst news of his life. His daughter Renske had been killed by her boyfriend Alasam Samarie. But this didn't square with how Eddy knew Samarie - as a kind and gentle person. Eddy went on a quest for answers about Renske's death, and the results pushed the limits of his tolerance. He's stayed friends with Samarie, and they've even written a book together called Een Coupé Verder. Eddy tells Outlook's Neal Razzell why he considers Samarie to be part of his family.

    The Vaquita is a tiny porpoise that's made headlines around the world because it's on the brink of extinction. Its rise to fame is in part due to one Mexican man, Dr Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, who's been studying these mammals for over 20 years. His work has put his safety under threat from cartel-supported poachers who work in the areas where the porpoises live. Dr Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho met our reporter, Clayton Conn.

    Harriet Glickman is a teacher from California who changed comic book history. In 1968, after the assassination of the civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr, she wrote a letter to Charles Schulz, the creator of the comic strip Peanuts and asked him to add a black character to the story. Outlook's Regan Morris went to meet Harriet to find out how Franklin was created.

    Image: Eddy Hekman's daughter Renske and her boyfriend who killed her
    Credit: Eddy Hekman

    Eddy Hekman has forged an unlikely relationship with the man who killed his daughter

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Outlook20091031Bulgaria's Abandoned Children

    We hear from Kate Blewett who brought to light the bleak lives of the children abandoned in care homes in Bulgaria.

    Cairo's Pigs

    Eva Dadrian reports on the mass killing of pigs in Cairo following swine flu fears. Many of the pigs ate through mountains of rubbish and since they've been culled household waste has been piling up on the streets..

    Maysoon Zayid

    The Palestinian American comedienne makes Audrey Brown laugh at all of the wrong things.

    South African Polygamist

    Mpho Kakaje meets the much married Milton Mbele from South Africa and two of the four women he married all at the same time.

    Bulgarian orphans, Pigs in Cairo, Palestinian comedienne, South African Polygamist.

    Outlook20091102 Bulgarian orphans, Pigs in Cairo, Palestinian comedienne, South African Polygamist.
    Outlook20110725Extraordinary personal stories from around the world. Today, aid worker Abubakar Mohamed describes conditions in Dadaab refugee camp, where thousands of starving Somalis arrive daily having fled famine and drought in their own country. Harry Potter goblin, Christophe Fluder talks about the highs and lows of being a small actor and Pastor Hanns Skoutajan recounts tales of working with immigrants in Canada

    An aid worker on his work in Dadaab refugee camp where hundreds of Somalis arrive daily.

    Outlook20111226Extraordinary personal stories from around the world.

    Today on Outlook, Boy George talks about his extraordinary career as a singer songwriter.

    Known for his flamboyant dress sense and his colourful dreadlocks, his band Culture Club were a vivid splash of colour on the early 1980s music scene but it was his androgynous image that really caught the popular imagination.

    After early success with Culture Club, he battled with a destructive drug habit and even ended up spending time in prison.

    He turned 50 this year and to celebrate he's written a book about his life, called King of Queens.

    (Image: Boy George. Credit: Getty Images)

    British singer songwriter Boy George on music, fashion, jail and turning 50.

    An edition of Outlook devoted to the moon and its effect on all our lives.

    Today, British writer James Attlee's quest to understand the significance of the moon and the experience of moonlight for people all over the world.

    We also hear from the American-Iranian academic Haleh Esfandiari on how the moon gave her hope when she was held in solitary confinement as a political prisoner.

    The moon is vital in Indian culture too, as the science writer Pallava Bagla explains and for the Scottish artist Katie Paterson the moon has been a source of inspiration.

    She bounced a recording of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in morse code off the surface of the moon.

    Outlook - 21/04/201120110425The Canadian-Inuit rapper on forgiving his alcoholic mother after discovering her hidden past, the French walkers who aim to travel the globe on foot, and the Kenyan project using comic books and radio to help prevent inter-tribal conflict among young people.

    The Canadian-Inuit rapper on forgiving his mother after discovering her hidden past

    A British family's agonising choice to end the life of a precious son

    Extraordinary personal stories from around the world. Today, a British family's agonising decision to end the life of a precious son five years after a accident left him in a persistent vegetative state. We hear from Christopher's mother Helen Watson and his identical twin brother Andrew who survived the same car crash with only minor injuries.

    Outlook 23' Tue 1220090616
    Outlook 23' Tue 1220090617
    Outlook 23' Tue 1420090630
    Outlook 23' Tue 1420090701
    Outlook 23' Tue 1520090707
    Outlook 23' Tue 1520090708
    Outlook 23' Tue 1620090714
    Outlook 23' Tue 1620090715
    Outlook 23' Tue 1720090721
    Outlook 23' Tue 1720090722
    Outlook 23' Tue 1820090728
    Outlook 23' Tue 1820090729
    Outlook 23' Tue 1920090804
    Outlook 23' Tue 1920090805
    Outlook 23' Tue 2020090811
    Outlook 23' Tue 2020090812
    Outlook 23' Tue 2120090818
    Outlook 23' Tue 2120090819
    Outlook 23' Tue 2220090825
    Outlook 23' Tue 2220090826
    Outlook 23' Tue 2320090901
    Outlook 23' Tue 2320090902
    Outlook 23' Tue 2420090908
    Outlook 23' Tue 2420090909
    Outlook 23' Tue 2520090915
    Outlook 23' Tue 2520090916
    Outlook 23' Tue 2620090922
    Outlook 23' Tue 2620090923
    Outlook 23' Tue 2720090929
    Outlook 23' Tue 2720090930
    Outlook 23' Tue 2820091006
    Outlook 23' Tue 2820091007
    Outlook 23' Tue 2920091013
    Outlook 23' Tue 2920091014
    Outlook 23' Tue 3020091020
    Outlook 23' Tue 3020091021
    Outlook Weekend: Caged20170422The vet saving zoo animals in Iraq and the ex-prisoner reforming life behind bars
    Outlook Weekend: Going For Gold20170508The family that spent years searching for gold treasure and two Indian women wrestlers
    Outlook Weekend: Lucky You Were Passing20170417Two stories about people whose lives were transformed by a stranger.
    Outlook Weekend: Off Script In North Korea20170501Two stories that expose what life is like in one of the world's most secretive countries
    Soweto Uprising: What Happened To My Dad?2019031720190318 (WS)In 1976, the Johannesburg township of Soweto erupted into protest. Students were furious with the government decision to make Afrikaans a language of instruction in South African schools. Afrikaans was associated with apartheid and white rule by many black South Africans, and not everyone could speak it. The protests were met with brutal force by the police, and hundreds of students died in the ensuing gunfire. In the midst of the chaos was Dr Edelstein, a white man involved in various humanitarian causes in the township. Students who had fled the gunfire suddenly turned their anger on him, and he was killed in the street. His daughter Janet was just 12 at the time, and she's spent many years trying to find answers about what happened that day. After the end of apartheid she spoke at South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, telling her father’s story and giving an emotional plea for more information. Now she’s followed in her father's footsteps, and is working to help young people in Soweto.

    Image and credit: the Edelstein family

    A daughter's quest for the truth about her father's murder

    True life stories

    Taking On America's Rich And Famous2019032020190321 (WS)Gloria Allred is a lawyer who has represented the female accusers of Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby and R Kelly. She reveals how her own experience of sexual assault made her determined to give other women a voice.

    Horatio Chapple had an idea to create a garden at the Spinal Treatment Centre in Salisbury, UK. Before he could bring his idea to life, Horatio tragically lost his life when he was attacked by a polar bear whilst on an adventure holiday to Svalbard, he was only 17. Following his death, his mum Olivia Chapple took on the project. Through the charity she set up in her son's name, Horatio's Garden now has three gardens at spinal injury centres across the UK.

    Photo: Profile picture of women's rights attorney Gloria Allred
    Credit: Getty Images

    Gloria Allred has represented the accusers of Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby and R Kelly

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    The \u2018lion Mama' Who Fought Off Three Rapists20190331When Nokubonga Qampi was told that her daughter was being raped by three men, she took action. One attacker would end up dead, the others seriously injured. Nokubonga was faced with the prospect of prison, but then her story made her famous and she became a hero to many. They called her 'Lion Mama'.

    Presenter: Gavin Fischer
    Producer: Harry Graham

    Image: Nokubonga Qampi
    Credit: BBC

    Nokubonga Qampi stepped in when her daughter was attacked

    True life stories

    The Day The Music Stopped20170417The story of world-famous violinist Min Kym and the crime that broke her heart
    The Detective And The Diamond Heist: Part 12019030320190304 (WS)Part one: The 'heist of the Century'

    In the late 1990s, Belgian detective Patrick Peys joined the Diamond Squad. Based in Antwerp's Diamond District, this was the world's first police unit dedicated to solving diamond crime. And soon, Patrick would face the most baffling case of his career when a group of thieves pulled off what seemed to be the perfect robbery. They broke into one of the most heavily guarded vaults in the Diamond District and stole $100m dollars worth of jewels. It was the biggest diamond robbery in history. No one saw the thieves coming in, or out. But what followed was a trail of strange clues leading to a mysterious criminal mastermind.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Maryam Maruf

    Image: diamonds
    Credit: Olivier Polet/Corbis via Getty Images

    Diamond detective Patrick Peys had to solve the biggest diamond robbery in history

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    The Detective And The Diamond Heist: Part 22019031020190311 (WS)In 2003, a band of expert criminals had masterminded the biggest and boldest jewel robbery in history, but Belgian diamond detective Patrick Peys was on their trail. A strange assortment of clues, including a carpet and a salami sandwich, led to a mysterious criminal mastermind and a school for felons.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Maryam Maruf

    Image: Patrick Peys
    Credit: Emily Webb

    How a salami sandwich led to a mysterious criminal mastermind

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    The Girl Stolen By A Soldier20170420Nina Pinto was one of many children taken from East Timor during Indonesia's occupation.
    The Korean Athlete Exposing Sexual Abuse2019030420190305 (WS)As a child, Eunhee Kim was sexually abused by her coach at a tennis training camp in South Korea. She kept the extent of the abuse a secret for years. But when she was working as a tennis coach herself Eunhee bumped into him at a competition. She decided to go public and tell everyone what had happened to her.

    Tamino Moharam Fouad is a Belgian musician whose grandfather was known as 'the sound of the Nile'. When Tamino discovered his grandfather's original guitar in his old house in Cairo, he realised he could follow in his footsteps and take to the stage. Tamino is currently on tour in Europe and his debut album is called 'Amir.'

    And, what it's like to chase meteorites as they plummet from outer space and land around the world? Saskia Edwards meets Robert Ward and Mike Farmer to get an insight into the lives of two intrepid meteorite hunters and finds out where their space rock adventures have taken them.

    Image and credit: Eunhee Kim

    Former tennis player Eunhee Kim has lifted the lid on sexual abuse in South Korean sport

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    The Man Helping His Father's Killer20170425The Burundian man who has forgiven the people who killed his father.
    The Mormon Mums Of Gay Sons2019031420190315 (WS)Alyson Deussen and Jill Rowe are both members of the Mormon church which opposes gay sex and marriage. But Alyson and Jill have ended up fighting for their gay sons and are part of a group called Mama Dragons - it's made up of members of the Mormon church who want the church to do more, to be more accepting of LGBTQ youth. Not only have they become friends, but when they're not meeting and supporting each other, they're lobbying the church.

    Gerardo Weiss is known as the Beatles barber of Buenos Aires. Since he became obsessed with the Fab Four over 40 years ago, he's been collecting more and more Beatles music, merchandise and memorabilia. His hair salon has now become famous as a shrine to the group.

    Dr John Rice is a retired surgeon whose specialism is the ear and he's known for doing some of the first cochlear implants in Australia. A cochlear implant is an electronic device that can be fitted to your head to help you hear. John has done nearly 60 operations since the early 1990s - mostly on very young children. He told Emily Webb how it all started.

    Image: (L) Jill Rowe and (R) Alyson Deussen
    Credit: Jill Rowe and Alyson Deussen

    We meet the "Mama Dragons" - the Mormon mums 'breathing fire' for their gay sons

    True life stories

    The Nepali Mp's Semi-naked Protest2019032520190326 (WS)Uma Devi Badi was born into a caste that is considered 'untouchable' in Nepal. She has faced discrimination throughout her life, including difficulty marrying someone in a high caste. One day, Uma decided to take a stand in a protest demanding greater rights for her caste. And she thought that the best way to get attention for her cause was to do it semi-naked.

    Hans Wieland is a German man who set up Ireland's first Cloud Appreciation Society.

    When celebrities are in legal trouble, the media swarms. But cameras are banned in many American courtrooms. That's where Jane Rosenberg steps in. She's sketched the likes of Woody Allen, 'El Chapo' and Harvey Weinstein while they've been part of high-profile trials.

    (Image: Uma Devi Badi scaling a government gate during a 2007 protest. Photo credit: STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images.)

    Uma Devi Badi scaled a gate semi-naked to demand rights for her \u2018untouchable' caste

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    The Paralysed Pianist Who Played Again20170426The American pianist who thought he'd never play again after his father attacked him.
    The Pastor Told She Was 'cursed'20170427Kenyan Terry Gobanga was raped by a gang of men on her wedding day
    The Secret World Of Our Dying Son2019032420190325 (WS)When Mats Steen was a young child growing up in Oslo, he was diagnosed with a degenerative disease. His parents Robert and Trude were told it was unlikely Mats would survive long into his 20s, and that he'd become less mobile as time went on. The physical restraints of his illness meant that Mats spent more and more time at home, playing online games. He died when he was 25, and his parents worried that his life had been lonely and friendless.

    Then, in the days before the funeral a mysterious group of people started arriving in Oslo. Robert and Trude didn't know them, but they seemed to know Mats extremely well. They were a close friendship group, the result of a second life Mats had been living in the online game World of Warcraft. Far from being isolated, Mats had been leading a vivid life through the portal of his computer screen.

    A version of this story by Vicky Schaubert was first published in Norwegian by broadcaster NRK.

    Presenter: Maryam Maruf
    Producer: Harry Graham

    Image: Mats Steen's avatar and Mats' father Robert Steen
    Credit: Patrick da Silva Saether/NRK

    Mats Steen found friendship and escape in a fantasy online land

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    Trusting My Pastor Led Me To Death Row2019030520190306 (WS)When Nokwazi Memela's pastor told her about a job importing carpets from Iran she was excited about earning money to support her children. Little did she know she had been tricked into becoming a drug mule.

    In the week of International Women's Day we celebrate some of the many incredible women who've shared their stories with Outlook.

    And we hear from the hugely successful British bookseller, Tim Waterstone, whose own love affair with books helped him escape a difficult childhood.

    Image: Nokwazi Memela
    Credit: BBC/Mpho Lakaje

    Nokwazi Memela was tricked into becoming a drugs mule

    True life stories

    True stories of ordinary people and the extraordinary events that have shaped their lives.

    0109/09/201020100910
    02 LAST
    02 LAST10/09/201020100913The childhood trauma that led an American woman to study the world's most dangerous men.

    JESSICA STERN

    Dr Jessica Stern was once named by Time Magazine as one of seven thinkers whose innovative ideas would "change the world". She studies people who commit acts of terrorism, and flies around the globe interviewing violent extremists. The Pentagon and the CIA have turned to her for advice. She now lectures in terrorism at Harvard University. But Jessica says she didn't understand what was driving her until police reopened their investigation into the rape she suffered as a 15 year old. She wanted to discover his identity - and in doing so, rediscovered herself.

    VINOD THAKUR

    Vinod Thakur is a hip hop dancer with a difference - he was born without legs. The 21-year-old is from a poor part of Delhi, and has been impressing television audiences with his skills on the hit show India's Got Talent. Sadly he is now out of the competition, but the channel hosting the contest has now asked him to perform abroad. Vinod spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen about achieving his dreams.

    PEDRO PAN

    50 years ago 14,000 thousand Cuban children were sent alone to the United States. Their parents hoped to shield them from what they saw as the dangers of growing up under communism. They were known as the Pedro Pan children. Luis Fajardo from the BBC's Latin American section has caught up with some of them to find out how they feel now about what happened to them.

    02 LAST13/09/201020100914
    02 LAST16/09/201020100917
    0310/09/201020100920
    04
    04
    0414/09/201020100915
    0415/09/201020100916
    0416/09/2010
    0417/09/201020100920Abandoned children in Zimbabwe and the woman determined to give them a brighter future.

    Personal stories behind the news from all over the world.