Episodes

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A Few Don'ts2021032820210329 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archives and selects A Few Don'ts featuring the poetry of Ezra Pound.

The poet Lavinia Greenlaw reappraises Ezra Pound's manifesto, A Few Don'ts by an Imagiste.

A century on, what can his lively don'ts do for today's poets? His passion to make poetry as modern as, say, Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring (first performed in the same year, 1913) drives him to pronounce on adjectives, ornament, metronomes and abstraction and in praise of the Image.

With fellow poets Frances Leviston, Andrea Brady and Richard Price, and with the visual artist Cornelia Parker, psychologist Sophie Scott and composer John Woolrich, Lavinia explores the dos and don'ts of good poetry and the ins and outs of writing manifestos about it.

Producer: Frances Byrnes
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2012.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A Foreigner Everywhere2017012220170123 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces a profile of poet Elizabeth Bishop.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits BBC's radio archive with a profile of poet Elizabeth Bishop.

In 'A Foreigner Everywhere', Paul Farley explores the American's extraordinary years in Brazil, and how her rootless, traveller's condition inspired her creativity.

Elizabeth Bishop has been called the poets' poets' poet', and her work, often complex and multi-layered, examines the big themes of home, travel and identity. Though she's regarded as an American poet, for nearly two decades Bishop lived in Brazil, where she wrote much of her best work. Essentially an orphan from the age of five, and a constant observer, a 'foreigner everywhere', she speaks to our modern rootless condition, asking how and where we find a sense of 'home'.

Paul explores how Bishop tackles questions of travel, and how she challenged approaches to other cultures in the early days of mass tourism. Bishop met the love of her life in Brazil, became deeply involved in the Brazilian political tumult of the 1960s, and made the trip of her life up the Amazon River. But her Brazil years also ended in tragedy.

In many ways a poet of our times, Paul explores how her often overlooked Brazil years offer a new way into Bishop's work and its relevance - a constant observer, portraying life in all its nuanced complexity.

Producer: Jo Wheeler

Made for BBC Radio 4 by Brook Lapping Productions and first broadcast in 2012.

A House Divided: The Poetry Of The American Civil War2011040320180708 (BBC7)
20180709 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'A House Divided - American Civil War'.

The war inspired poets from Whitman to Dickinson. Southern author Allan Gurganus considers the role of poetry in understanding that conflict.

On the 12th of April 1861 Confederate forces attacked the US Military's Fort Sumter, thus beginning the bloodiest war in American history. It is this conflict, more than the American Revolution or Second World War that has had the most dramatic impact on the nation's character.

In a war of brother against brother; the conflict created a tragic human drama as the country struggled to define itself. America's most distinguished poets were affected by unprecedented levels of carnage. Herman Melville wrote a chronological, impressionistic volume of poetry on the Civil War.

Walt Whitman, a volunteer nurse during the war wrote heart-wrenching poems about wounded soldiers beside piles of amputated limbs. Emily Dickinson was most productive during this time, though she never wrote directly about the war. However, her meditations on death, violence and the bloody landscape provide a deep insight into the nation's character.

Featuring music and poetry from before, during and after the war.

Slaves like George Moses Horton who sold poetry in the hopes of buying his own freedom reflects on the meaning of liberty. Soldiers like Obediah Ethelbert Baker who wrote for his wife back home, talks about the righteousness of the Union cause. Northern abolitionist Quakers regale the noble Northern mission and the "poet laureate of the Confederacy", Henry Timrod, recalls the birth of a new nation.

Producer: Colin McNulty
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

Allan Gurganus considers the role of poetry in the American Civil War.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Producer: Colin McNulty
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

A Notebook On Aim㩀 C㩀saire20160417 (BBC7)
20160418 (BBC7)

Daljit Nagra introduces A Notebook on Aimé Césaire, a portrait of Martinique's famous son.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'A Notebook on Aime Cesaire'

When poet and politician Aimé Césaire died at the age of 94 in 2008, it robbed the Caribbean island of Martinique of its most articulate and powerful voice. He was a prolific writer - of poetry, plays and essays - and served as Mayor of Martinique's capital Fort-de-France for over 50 years, as well as representing Martinique in the French National Assembly for 45 years. Aimé Césaire dedicated his life, in print and in public, to his people and his island.

Featuring Christian Lapousiniere, director of the Césaire Study and Research Centre, filmmaker Euzhan Palcy, anthropologists Richard and Sally Price, and Dominique Taffin, director of the Martinique National Archive.

Includes readings by John Norton.

Producer: Martin Williams

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

A Notebook On Aime Cesaire2013120820160417 (BBC7)
20160418 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces A Notebook on Aim\u00e9 C\u00e9saire, a portrait of Martinique's famous son.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A Poet's Song2008010620170514 (BBC7)
20170515 (BBC7)
Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra chooses A Poet's Song, with Paul Farley and Jo Shapcott.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'A Poet's Song' as Paul Farley and Jo Shapcott swap writing poems for song lyrics.

Are lyrics harder to write than poems? Every few years the subject of poetry and song lyrics rears its head. Has our need for the poetic been fulfilled by the musical? Paul and Jo try their hand at writing lyrics for two very different musicians - British rapper Doc Brown, and the singer/songwriter and pianist Jamie Cullum.

The programme follows the progress of these collaborations - recounting the highs and lows along the way - and reveals what musicians can learn from poets, and what poets can learn from their musical counterparts.

Producer: Ella-Mai Robey

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

A Sea Shanty For Charles Causley2021020720210208 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects A Sea Shanty for Charles Causley.

When we look at the sea, W.H. Auden wrote: 'all that we are not stares back at what we are.'

Jane Darke goes in search of the sea's truths as told by the Cornish poet Charles Causley. He was born and lived in the centre of the county and went to sea only during the Second World War as a sailor and yet the marine world shaped and defined his work.

The filmmaker and writer Jane Darke lives in and works from a house just above a beach on the north Cornish coast. Her rooms are filled with salvaged objects from the shore. She has made a film about Charles Causley. For this poetry feature the filmmaker and the poet put out to sea and we find their sea lives and their land lives running together like a tide up a beach.

With performances of poems by Jim Causley and Julie Murphy, by Natalie Merchant and by the poet himself.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adelia Prado - Voice Of Brazil20210110
Adelia Prado: Voice Of Brazil2021011020210111 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC poetry archives and selects Adelia Prado - Voice of Brazil. An immersive portrait of the Brazilian poet who was discovered aged 40 living in provincial Minas Gerais.

This is a rare encounter with one of Brazil's most extraordinary poets. Adélia Prado has shunned the spotlight since her discovery in 1976 – then a 40-year-old mother of five. Now aged 80, her sensual, devout, sometimes provocative poetry is read and admired around the world.

For this programme, in the company of her long-time translator and fellow poet Ellen Doré Watson, she invites us into her home to talk about her life and work.

Adélia Prado was discovered by Brazil's foremost modern poet, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, who launched her literary career with the announcement that St Francis was dictating verses to a housewife in the backwaters of the interior state of Minas Gerais. She writes about the transcendent in ordinary life, of how the human experience is both mystical and carnal. She has been called one of the major voices of the Americas, who 'would remind you of Emily Dickinson if she didn't keep reminding you of Walt Whitman'.

With Poetic Licence, Denouement, Seduction, Neighbourhood and Day from The Alphabet in the Park: Selected Poems of Adélia Prado, published by Wesleyan. Copyright 1990 Adélia Prado and Ellen Doré Watson. The Mystical Rose and Spiritual Exercise from Ex-Voto: Poems of Adélia Prado, published by Tupelo Press. Copyright 2013 Adélia Prado and Ellen Doré Watson. Adélia Prado, The Mystical Rose: Selected Poems, translated by Ellen Doré Watson (Bloodaxe Books, 2014). Used with permission.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archives.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Casabianca2020112220201123 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra explores the BBC's poetry archive and selects Adventures in Poetry - Casabianca by Felicia Hemans - the poem which is best known for its first line: - "The boy stood on the burning deck....".

This poem was written about a true episode that happened during the Battle of the Nile in the Napoleonic wars by a poet who in her time was as popular as Wordsworth, Coleridge and Byron.

Peggy Reynolds talks to critics, a world-famous yachtsman, a naval historian and trainee officers about its impact.

Producer - Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Daffodils By William Wordsworth2020040520200406 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Adventures in Poetry – Daffodils by William Wordsworth.

Peggy Reynolds looks at the lasting impact of one of the best-known poems in the language with the help of an academic, a Lake District writer, the poet's most recent biographer, the secretary of the Daffodil Society, a rap artist, a teacher, her pupils and the poet Gillian Clarke. From the series exploring the background, effect and lasting appeal of some of our best-loved and most familiar poems.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2000.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Dear Mr Lee By Ua Fanthorpe2019030320190304 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Adventures in Poetry - Dear Mr Lee by UA Fanthorpe.

Peggy Reynolds explores the appeal of UA Fanthorpe's poem Dear Mr Lee, written in the voice of a school pupil who has been studying Laurie Lee's classic memoir Cider With Rosie.

In the poem, Fanthorpe has captured the enthusiasm and despair of adolescence, as the pupil confesses to 'Laurie' that she loves everything about his book, except the essays she's had to write about it. Part of the poem's success lies in the fact the Fanthorpe herself taught English for many years, and demonstrates an unusual empathy with a student struggling with the demands of the exam system and a rather tenuous grasp of literary criticism.

Peggy Reynolds talks to Lee's biographer Valerie Grove, to UA Fanthorpe's partner Rosie Bailey, to poets Michael Rosen and Wendy Cope, to several of Fanthorpe's notable ex-students including MP Fiona MacTaggart, and to some current students of GCSE English and their inspiring teacher, who all bring their own enthusiasms to the poem.

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

Daljit Nagra selects Adventures in Poetry - Dear Mr Lee by UA Fanthorpe.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Donal Og2018112520181126 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Adventures in Poetry – Donal Og.

Donal Og, an Irish song, translated by Lady Augusta Gregory of Coole Park, is a ballad that speaks of love and loss.

With poets and dreamers, and an old man who met WB Yeats and Lady Gregory as they gathered Kiltartan stories from the Irish speakers of Galway and Aran.

Presented by Peggy Reynolds.

Producer: Sara Davies.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2005.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry - Donal Og.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Not Waving But Drowning2010120520160814 (BBC7)
20160815 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry featuring Stevie Smith and her powerful poem.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with an episode of Adventures in Poetry.

Peggy Reynolds asks what it is about Stevie Smith's poem 'Not Waving but Drowning' which has kept it relevant since 1957. The phrase itself turns up endlessly in newspapers, both red-tops and broadsheets, and is particularly loved by writers on sports pages - not, you might think, the obvious place to look for soul-searching poetry. But underneath the snappy economy of the first line runs a complex and universal emotional truth, examined here by a Samaritan, a sports writer and Stevie Smith's biographer.

Adventures in Poetry is a series focussing on classic poems whose lines or images have entered our national consciousness.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry featuring Stevie Smith and her powerful poem Not Waving But Drowning. From December 2010.

Adventures In Poetry - Ode On A Grecian Urn2021022120210222 (BBC7)To mark 200 years since the death of the poet John Keats, Poet Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Adventures In Poetry - Ode On A Grecian Urn.

Peggy Reynolds talks to classical scholars, artists, and scientists about the resonance and meaning of Keats's masterpiece about a Greek vase, beauty and truth.

Producer - Sara Davies.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Snow By Louis Macneice2019121520191216 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Adventures in Poetry: Snow - featuring the poem by Lous MacNeice.

Paul Muldoon, Michael Longley, Tom Paulin, Anthony Thwaite and Jill Balcon, with MacNeice's biographer Jon Stallworthy, join Peggy Reynolds to explore the background, effect and lasting appeal of this poem. The reader is Stephen Rea.

Producer: Frances Byrnes

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - The Farmer's Bride2018081220180813 (BBC7)
20200419 (BBC7)
20200420 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra introduces a discussion of the poem of unrequited rural longing.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Adventures in Poetry - The Farmer's Bride by Charlotte Mew.

A poem of unrequited rural longing first published in 1912 which still has powerful echoes today.

Peggy Reynolds explores its background effect and lasting appeal.

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - The Gate Of The Year2018122320181224 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Adventures in Poetry - The Gate of the Year'.

Peggy Reynolds hears the story behind the poem King George VI quoted in his first Christmas broadcast on 25th December 1939.

Written by the unknown Minnie Louise Haskins - it takes her from an unassuming suburb of Bristol to Sandringham, via the correspondence pages of The Times and the hand of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.

The poem has also popped up at the opening of two world wars and on countless tea towels, internet sites and books of inspirational verse.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2010.

Peggy Reynolds on how a young woman from Bristol put words into the mouth of a King.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - The Listeners2008112320160821 (BBC7)
20160822 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces the classic poem The Listeners by Walter de la Mare.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces the classic poem The Listeners by Walter de la Mare. From November 2008.

Adventures In Poetry - The Oxen2005122520171217 (BBC7)
20171218 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Adventures in Poetry: The Oxen, Thomas Hardy's nostalgic poem.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - The Tyger2019090820190909 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Adventures in Poetry: The Tyger exploring the inspiration for William Blake's poem.

Programmes exploring the language and lasting impact of poetry. Duncan Wu presents William Blake's The Tyger. With Kathleen Raine, Peter Ackroyd and Michael Horovitz.

Producer Sara Davies.

First broadcast on BBC Radio in 1998.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry: The Tyger.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Adventures In Poetry - Timothy Winters2006091020170820 (BBC7)
20170821 (BBC7)
Peggy Reynolds explores the lasting appeal of Charles Causley's poem Timothy Winters.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Adventures in Poetry' featuring Charles Causley's poem 'Timothy Winters'.

A programme from the series that explores the background, effect and lasting appeal of some well-loved poems.

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

African Performance - It's All About Me2018011420180115 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and this week chooses 'African Women - It's All About Me' recorded on location in Namibia with poets Ingrid Kinda, Luna Rampaga, Nepeti Nicanor, Deseree Isak and Elizabeth Ikhaxas.

First broadcast on World Service in 1999.
Producer: Jackie Chambers.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects 'African Women - It's All About Me'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Alfred, Lord Tennyson2019111020191111 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects:

Tennyson As I Remember Him;

First broadcast on the Light Programme in 1951.

Tennyson reads The Charge of the Light Brigade from 1890.

Time for Verse: Poets Laureate - Tennyson.

Produced by Margaret Bradley.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1987.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects programmes from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

An Anthology Of Summer Poems2020071220200713 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry back catalogue.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses: An anthology of summer poems, old and new, for the middle of the year, read by poets and actors.

Noma Dumezweni reads William Blake, Siobhan Redmond reads Adam Zagajewski, Katrina Porteus reads her poem 'Dunstanburgh', Alex Jennings reads Philip Larkin, Anton Lesser reads Rudyard Kipling, Bill Paterson reads Edwin Morgan, Simon Russell Beale reads Edward Thomas; Lavinia Greenlaw reads her poem 'Heliotropical', Daljit Nagra reads a new commissioned seasonal poem, Don Paterson reads his poem 'The Air', Kathleen Jamie reads her poem 'Lochan', Sinead Cusack reads William Morris, Juliet Stevenson reads William Shakespeare, and Seamus Heaney (in an archive recording) reads his poem 'St Kevin and the Blackbird'.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

And You, Helen2019071420190715 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses And You, Helen featuring writer Helen Thomas and her tempestuous marriage to poet Edward Thomas and her role in keeping his flame alive after his death in World War One.

Presented by poet Deryn Rees-Jones who travels to Liverpool, south London and Steep in Hampshire, in the footsteps of this incredibly spirited, progressive woman, who scandalised Thomas' friends with her candid accounts of her relationship with Edward in her memoirs, As It Was and World Without End. Deryn talks to playwright Nick Dear, poet Alison Brackenbury, critic Edna Longley and members of the Edward Thomas Fellowship about Helen's extraordinary life, her response to the tragedy of Edward's death and her talents as a writer.

Deryn also reads from her own poetic sequence, 'And you, Helen' - a response to Edward Thomas' poem of the same name.

Readings by Elaine Claxton and Wilf Scolding

Produced by Emma Harding

And you, Helen by Edward Thomas

And you, Helen, what should I give you?
So many things I would give you
Had I an infinite great store
Offered me and I stood before
To choose. I would give you youth,
All kinds of loveliness and truth,
A clear eye as good as mine,
Lands, waters, flowers, wine,
As many children as your heart
Might wish for, a far better art
Than mine can be, all you have lost
Upon the travelling waters tossed,
Or given to me. If I could choose
Freely in that great treasure-house
Anything from any shelf,
I would give you back yourself,
And power to discriminate
What you want and want it not too late,
Many fair days free from care
And heart to enjoy both foul and fair,
And myself, too, if I could find
Where it lay hidden and it proved kind.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Deryn Rees-Jones looks at the passionate life of Helen Thomas, wife of poet Edward Thomas.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Presented by poet Deryn Rees-Jones who travels to Liverpool, south London and Steep in Hampshire, in the footsteps of this incredibly spirited, progressive woman, who scandalised Thomas' friends with her candid accounts of her relationship with Edward in her memoirs, As It Was and World Without End. Deryn talks to playwright Nick Dear, poet Alison Brackenbury, critic Edna Longley and members of the Edward Thomas Fellowship about Helen's extraordinary life, her response to the tragedy of Edward's death and her talents as a writer.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Andrew Motion And Lavinia Greenlaw1998070520171105 (BBC7)
20171106 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra revisits Fine Lines, with Andrew Motion and Lavinia Greenlaw.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Andrew Motion And Lavinia Greenlaw20171105Daljit Nagra revisits Fine Lines, with Andrew Motion and Lavinia Greenlaw.
Andrew Motion And U.a. Fanthorpe2017050720201018 (BBC7)
20201019 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with two choices: ‘Poetry Proms' with Andrew Motion from 2000 and Tribute to UA Fanthorpe on ‘Last Word' from 2009.

At a live event Jo Shapcott introduces poets Andrew Motion and UA Fanthorpe who read selections from their work.

In Last Word, Matthew Bannister and Elizabeth Sandy provide a fitting tribute to UA Fanthorpe following her death in 2009.

Producers: Kate Rowland and Neil George.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Daljit Nagra chooses programmes featuring Andrew Motion and UA Fanthorpe.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Anne Stevenson: The Living Poet And Front Row Interview2018110420181105 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with ‘Anne Stevenson – The Living Poet'.

Anne shares some of her poetry and inspirations for writing.

Plus an interview from BBC Radio 4's ‘Front Row' featuring Anne Stevenson talking to Mark Lawson shortly after winning the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award.

From 1984 and 2007.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Anne Stevenson - The Living Poet.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Asj Tessimond2010041120170716 (BBC7)
20170717 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces 'Lost Voices': ASJ Tessimond, the Birkenhead poet.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Lost Voices: ASJ Tessimond'.

Poet Brian Patten showcases the undeservedly forgotten poet Arthur Seymour John Tessimond - known to his friends as Tessy - who died in 1962.

The details of his life are now almost entirely consigned to oblivion, but his poetry lives on, largely in anthologies or as requests on Poetry Please, and Brian Patten was determined to find out as much as he could about the man who wrote some beautiful poetry about love. And cats. And, oddly, Luton.

For a man who never found the love he dreamed of, he was conspicuously tenacious in looking for it - but, as a Tessimond researcher explains in Lost Voices, he had a fatal tendency to seek love from unsuitable women - chorus girls and nightclub hostesses. Nevertheless, Tessimond is clearly a man who inspired affection - what will Brian make of Tessy?

Poems read by Nigel Anthony.
Producer: Christine Hall.
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Ask Me: The Poetry Of William Stafford2014033020170430
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20170501 (BBC7)
20201011 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Ask Me - the Poetry of William Stafford'.

William Stafford's achievement is extraordinary. He wrote over 20,000 poems, 4,000 of which have been published, in more than 80 books and 2,000 periodicals. But it's the quality of his work that distinguishes him. Stafford was the poetry consultant to the Library of Congress - the post that became the Poet Laureate of the United States, for years he was Oregon's Laureate and he won the National Book Award.

Stafford was born in Kansas in 1914, growing up during the Depression. A conscientious objector, he spent the Second World War in camps, working in forestry. Too exhausted after work he took to rising early to write, and he continued this practice of daily writing until his death in 1993. For Stafford it was the act of writing that mattered most. Writers who got stuck he advised to, "Lower your standards - and carry on."

His poems are mostly short and accessible, but acquire great depth. They can be tough, too. He was sensitive to landscape, people, animals, nature and history. So it's not surprising that Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath were both admirers.

Poet Katrina Porteous visits Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, where for decades Stafford taught, wrote and developed his ideas. His son Kim takes her to the huge William Stafford Archive, as Katrina hears recordings of his readings, meets people who knew him, and students and poets he continues to influence. And she goes out into the wilderness of Oregon to investigate and reflect on the life, outlook and work of this great American poet.

Producer: Julian May
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

William Stafford wrote a poem every day. Katrina Porteous explores his life and his work.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Katrina Porteous talks to the people who knew the extraordinarily prolific poet.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Ask Me - the Poetry of William Stafford'.

Producer: Julian May
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Autumn Poems2019101320191014 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Four Seasons: Autumn Poems old and new read by actors and poets to mark the equinox and the new season.

Despite our centrally heated and waterproofed lives, seasonal change still operates on the country's imagination and the national mood. Poets are writing about the weather and the turning year as much as ever.

Poems from Helen Mort, Zaffar Kunial, Choman Hardi, Liz Berry and Robin Robertson join celebrated and loved poems by Edward Thomas, Keats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Bronte, WB Yeats and Seamus Heaney, which are read by Anton Lesser, Sinead Cusack and Noma Dumezweni.

To end the anthology Simon Russell Beale sings Feste's bittersweet song, The Rain it Raineth Everyday, from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Four Seasons: Autumn Poems old and new read by actors and poets to mark the turning year.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Despite our centrally heated and waterproofed lives seasonal change still operates on the country's imagination and the national mood. Poets are writing about the weather and the turning year as much as ever. Poems from Helen Mort, Zaffar Kunial, Choman Hardi, Liz Berry and Robin Robertson join celebrated and loved poems by Edward Thomas, Keats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Bronte, W. B. Yeats and Seamus Heaney which are read by Anton Lesser, Sinead Cusack and Noma Dumezweni. To end the anthology Simon Russell Beale sings Feste's bitter-sweet song, The Rain it Raineth Everyday, from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

Batter My Heart: Growing Up And Growing Old With John Donne2014081020181028 (BBC7)
20181029 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Batter My Heart: Growing Up and Growing Old with John Donne'.

Novelist Ed Docx grew up with John Donne's love poems and found them useful billets doux with his early girlfriends. Now not so young he has been surprised by how as he has grown up so the poetry of Donne has kept him company.

Talking to three scholars - a young reader of Donne, a middle aged one and an elderly one, and armed with a stack of Bob Dylan records (another artist good for all ages) - Ed Docx discovers how Donne batters the heart of us all through life.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Batter My Heart: Growing Up and Growing Old with John Donne.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Beacons And Blue Remembered Hills2016061920160620 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills - the poetry of AE Housman.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills'.

An examination of the enduring popularity of AE Housman in a journey through the Shropshire of his most famous sequence of poems.

Actor, poet and broadcaster Elvis McGonagall (aka Richard Smith) takes Housman's longest sequence (written when he was in London) to the places that the poet was remembering as he explored some of the themes at the core of his work. At the heart of 'A Shropshire Lad' is a real sense of Englishness, unusual in a collection that concerns itself with personal and political themes in such a raw and vulnerable way - loss, grief, suicide, sexuality, nature and joy. What did the settings of 'A Shropshire Lad' - Shropshire and Worcestershire - mean to Housman?

Elvis visits many of the locations that inspired Housman's verse - London, Bromsgrove, Bredon Hill, Ludlow, The Wrekin and talks to people along the way about these evocative landscapes, asking them to read their favourite poems on the way.

Contributors include Andrew Motion, Martin Newell, Wendy Cope, Colin Dexter, Antique Roadshow's Henry Sandon and the many Housman fans of Worcestershire and Shropshire. Elvis attempts to meet Housman himself, listens to the bells of Bredon, goes in search of the loveliest of cherry trees and even finds poetry in a Brewery.

Producer: Frank Stirling

An Unique production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

Daljit Nagra introduces Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills - the poetry of AE Housman. With Elvis McGonagall. From September 2011.

Benjamin Zephaniah/gavin Ewart2008021620180506 (BBC7)
20180507 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive to select two programmes:

To mark his colleague's 60th birthday - Time for Verse with Benjamin Zephaniah - reading his poems and talking to Carol Ann Duffy (the current Poet Laureate). From 1991.

Time for Verse with Gavin Ewart - a poet who fought in the Second World War - in conversation with George MacBeth. From 1998.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Poet Daljit Nagra celebrates Benjamin Zephaniah at 60 with an edition of Time for Verse.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Betjeman20171001 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects programmes featuring John Betjeman.
Betjeman's Banana Blush2019041420190415 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Betjeman's Banana Blush - an album made by Sir John Betjeman in 1974.

Jarvis Cocker uncovers the hidden treasure Betjeman's Banana Blush. The 1974 LP featured the then Poet Laureate reading twelve poems while accompanied by music composed by Jim Parker.

Betjeman's Banana Blush was released on the progressive rock label Charisma - the home of Genesis, Lindisfarne and Van Der Graf Generator - and tracks from it were regularly featured on John Peel's Radio 1 programme. A Shropshire Lad was named single of the week by New Musical Express and the paper featured an interview with the poet.

For those reasons, the album reached an audience beyond Sir John's usual readers. Suggs from Madness fell in love with the LP: 'I first heard the album in 1979. We'd be listening to Syd Barrett, The Clash...and then Banana Blush would go on. It seemed equally psychedelic in its own strange way. I fell in love with it straight away.' Suggs chose 'On A Portrait Of A Deaf Man' from the album as one of his Desert Island Discs.

Before working on the album, Jim Parker had been a member of Doggerel Bank, writing music to accompany the poems of William Bealby-Wright. Following Betjeman's Banana Blush, he wrote award-winning scores for TV series and films, including Miss Marple, Moll Flanders, Midsomer Murders and Foyle's War.

His compositions provide perfect settings for Sir John's poems, which range in subject matter from the charming innocence of Indoor Games Near Newbury to the deeply moving 'A Child Ill'. In the programme, Jim plays piano and explains how the album was made.

Producer: Kevin Howlett
A Howlett Media production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Jarvis Cocker uncovers an album made by Sir John Betjeman in 1974.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Between Stones And Stars2019072120190722 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Moon Landing selects Between Stones and Stars featuring Canadian Rebecca Elson and her passion for geology and the universe.

Rebecca Elson was a remarkable poet and an astronomer. She died in 1999 aged 39, leaving behind a collection of inspiring poems which cover subjects as diverse as Dark Matter, her husband's boxer shorts and the cancer which was killing her. This celebration of her work and life was presented by David Constantine, with contributions from friends and colleagues, readings by Theresa Gallagher and penny whistle, performed specially by Michael Donaghy.

Producer Beaty Rubens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2003.

Daljit Nagra selects Between Stones and Stars from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Rebecca Elson was a remarkable poet and an astronomer. She died in 1999 aged 39, leaving behind a collection of inspiring poems which cover subjects as diverse as Dark Matter, her husband's boxer shorts and the cancer which was killing her. This celebration of her work and life was presented by David Constantine, with contributions from friends and colleagues, readings by Theresa Gallagher and penny whistle, performed specially by Michael Donaghy.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Between The Ears: Crex Crex2004012420170709 (BBC7)
20170710 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses Between the Ears with Kathleen Jamie.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Between the Ears: Crex, Crex', featuring a poem to a special bird.

Kathleen Jamie, poet and birder, travels to the Isle of Coll to hear male corncrakes as they "crex crex" their way through the Hebridean summer night. She enlists the help of the birds themselves, the island's RSPB warden Sarah Money and the Coll Drummers.

Producer: Tim Dee
First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2004.

Blake Morrison And Glyn Maxwell1999082920180520 (BBC7)
20180521 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Fine Lines' with Blake Morrison and Glyn Maxwell.

Poets Blake and Glyn discuss their different approaches to shaping a new collection of poems.

Presented by Christopher Cook.

Producer: Melanie Harris

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1999.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Blake Morrison and Glyn Maxwell on themes of identity.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1999.

Blithe Spirits - 4/5 Low Life And Time For Verse - Poets Laureate: Henry Pye2021030720210308 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Time for Verse: Poets Laureate - Henry Pye and Blithe Spirits - Low Life ep 4.

Time for Verse - Poets Laureate: Henry Pye (1745 - 1813)
From a series about some famous and some forgotten holders of the office.
Compiled and presented by Sean Street.
Readers: Martin Jarvis, Adrian Cairns and David Goodland
Produced by Margaret Bradley.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1987.

Blithe Spirits Low Life ep 4

From John Donne's flea to William Blake's fly, the lower forms of life have always fascinated poets. but were they interested in the creatures themselves or for what they represented? Joanna Pinnock gets under the skin of these great authors and discovers why small things have often inspired great verse
Presenter: Joanna Pinnock
Interviewees Jonathan Bate
Prof Ashton Nichol
Erica Fudge
Cameron Milne
Christine Hall
Producer: Brett Westwood

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Blithe Spirits: Beasts And Time For Verse: Poets Laureate - Wordsworth2020032920200330 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Blithe Spirits: Beasts on attitudes to mammals and Time For Verse: Poets Laureate - William Wordsworth.

Radio 4
Joanna Pinnock explores attitudes to mammals in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. Through popular verse she reveals the biblical significance of beasts and traces the gradual emergence of animal welfare.

Contributors:
Christine Hall
Erica Fudge
Christine Kenyan-Jones
Ashton Nichol
Cameron Milne

Christine Hall reads To A Young Ass – Coleridge
Christine Hall reads Providence - George Herbert
Christine Hall reads The Hunted Hare – Cavendish
Cameron Milne reads To A Mouse – Burns

Producer - Brett Westwood

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2001.

Time for Verse
Poets Laureate – William Wordsworth
Radio 4
From the series about some famous and some forgotten holders of the office, compiled and presented by Sean Street

Readers Martin Jarvis, Adrian Cairns And David Goodland

Producer Margaret Bradley

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 1987.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Blood, Sweat, Tears And Poetry2019010620190107 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Blood, Sweat, Tears and Poetry with Patience Agabi exploring the relationship between poetry and the workplace.

Patience Agbabi and some of her fellow poets explore the relationship between poetry and the workplace. 2008's National Poetry Day theme was 'Work', and Patience talks to poets and the people who welcomed them into the workplace to find out what the experience meant to both parties.

Produced by Simon Evans.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2008.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Blood, Sweat, Tears and Poetry presented by Patience Agabi.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Broken Paradise2017062520170626 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces 'Broken Paradise' - poetry from Sri Lanka's bitter civil war.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Broken Paradise' featuring poetry from Sri Lanka's bitter civil war.

To mark the fourth anniversary of the ending of Sri Lanka's civil war, in May 2009, translator Lakshmi Holmström introduces some of the most powerful Tamil poetry to emerge from the 26 year long conflict, in which an estimated 70,000 people were killed as militant Tamil Tigers fought to establish a separate Tamil state in the north of the island.

These poems bear witness to the atrocities committed by both sides and reflect on some of the war's most significant turning points, from the deadly introduction of female suicide bombers to the final bloody showdown on a beach near Jaffna, where government forces conclusively defeated the Tamil Tigers.

Poets featured include Cheran, probably the most significant living Tamil poet and a former journalist now exiled in Canada, whose poems chart the history of the war and of a landscape once idyllic, now devastated. There is also a poem by S. Sivaramani, a promising young woman poet who committed suicide in 1991. In Oppressed by Nights of War she describes the impact of the violence and fear on children.

Presenter Lakshmi Holmström MBE is a widely acclaimed translator of Tamil fiction and poetry. A collection of her translations of Cheran's poetry is to be published this summer, titled In a Time of Burning.

Readings by Hiran Abeysekara, Vayu Naidu and Vignarajan

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion

A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Can Yr Adar - Song Of The Birds2021010320210104 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Can yr Adar - Song of the Birds featuring singer-songwriter Kizzy Crawford and composer, Gwilym Simcock who describe how they wove words and music out of the landscape and wildlife of Carngafallt nature reserve in Mid Wales.

Kizzy Crawford returns to the RSPB nature reserve at Carngafallt in Mid Wales, where she was inspired to create “Can Yr Adar - Birdsong” with pianist and composer, Gwilym Simcock, and members of Sinfonia Cymru. Kizzy and Gwilym share how they wove music out of Wales's own 'Celtic rainforest', and they open a window on the hidden processes of creation, collaboration and communication that gave birth to a brand new work of art.

Produced by Chris Taylor.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljt Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Carol Ann Duffy, Gillian Clarke, Blithe Spirits2019102720191028 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Time For Verse: Carol Ann Duffy; Three Score and Ten with the former National Poet of Wales Gillian Clarke; and Blithe Spirits looks at verse inspired by birds.

The last of five programmes in which George MacBeth talks with the poet and occasional playwright Carol Ann Duffy.
Reader Lin Sagovsky.
Producer Alec Reid.
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1989.

Three Score And Ten - Gillian Clarke [Radio 3, 29/11/2016]
Ian McMillan with another episode in the series introducing former National Poet of Wales, Gillian Clarke reading her poems The Beginning and Flood from a Twenty Minutes Poetry Prom broadcast in 2002.
Producer: Sharon Sephton
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

Blithe Spirits 1/5
Birds. Our impressions of historical attitudes to wildlife are often gained by reading poetry, but how accurate a picture were the poets painting? Even as Keats and Shelley were writing their verse on skylarks and nightingales, thousands of Shelley's ""Blithe Spirits"" were being caught each year for the pot. Joanna PINNOCK explores the works of the romantic poets and asks whether they really knew their natural history.
Produced by Brett WESTWOOD.
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Three programmes featuring Carol Ann Duffy, Gillian Clarke and birds in poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Charles Tomlinson And Elizabeth Jennings2020020220200203 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive choosing two programmes this week. First - Poet Of The Month - Charles Tomlinson whose poetry draws together the strong influence of the American Modernists with the tradition of English meditative nature poets like Wordsworth. He talks to Kate Flint.

First broadcast on Radio 3 in 1992.

Produced by Kate Flint

And Three Score And Ten - Elizabeth Jennings an archive broadcast of Elizabeth Jennings reading Thunder and a Boy and In a Garden

Produced by Sharon Sephton

Three Score and Ten First broadcast on Radio 3 in 2016 with original archive from The Living Poet from 1983.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

And Three Score And Ten - Elizabeth Jennings an archive broadcast of Elizabeth Jennings reading Thunder and a Boy and In a Garden

Cold War Poet2016050820160509 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra on how Dylan Thomas' poetry sustained a generation of East Germans.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Made for 4 Extra. Daljit Nagra introduces Cold War Poet, exploring how Dylan Thomas' poetry sustained a generation of East Germans. From October 2014.

Coming Home2014110920181111 (BBC7)
20181112 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Coming Home.

In 2014 Andrew Motion visited the British army camp at Bad Fallingbostel, 40 kilometres north of Hanover in Germany. It's where the 7th Armoured Brigade - the Desert Rats - are based and where they returned after Operation Herrick 19, their final tour of duty in Afghanistan.

Here he talked to a range of soldiers, and back in England he also talked to the mother of a soldier who had been killed on duty in Helmand. He has used these conversations as the basis for a series of new poems reflecting on what it is like for British soldiers to come home after their long and dangerous campaign in Afghanistan. The poems explore the particular nature of the Afghan conflict, while showing certain continuities that flow from wars through the generations.

In this programme, the interviews and poems are set side by side, creating a unique poetry event by Andrew Motion to mark Remembrance Day.

Writer & Presenter: Sir Andrew Motion

Contributors:

• Lance Bombardier Stephen North
• Padre David Anderson
• Sharon Anderson
• Major Wendy Faux
• Lance Corp. Ben Johnson
• Sgt. Vicky Clarke
• Margaret Evison

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects Coming Home, a reflection on life as a soldier.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Writer and Presenter: Sir Andrew Motion

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Consorting With Angels2010011720160320 (BBC7)
20160321 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Consorting with Angels, featuring model and poet, Anne Sexton.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Contemporary American Poets - Charles Simic And Louise Gluck1999072020160807 (BBC7)
20160808 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Postscript: Contemporary American Poets featuring Gluck and Simic.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces Postscript: Contemporary American Poets featuring Americans Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. From July 1999.

Conversations On A Bench: Strabane - Maureen Boyle2021031420210315 (BBC7)Anna Scott-Brown hears more stories from the people who stop to sit beside her on benches around the country.

In this edition, Anna sits on a bench in Strabane on the Irish Border. Throughout the programme, a specially commissioned work by the poet Maureen Boyle draws on the voices of those passing by – and sometimes pausing on – the bench in Abercorn Square.

These hidden stories are glimpsed through snatched moments and the painful and beautiful stories people tell Anna in this busy urban setting - the carer who lost a longed for baby during pregnancy and memories of the Troubles in this hot spot on the border, those who smuggled goods across the closed border and whose relatives moved to Northern Ireland via the hiring fair that used to take place in the square.

Once an employment blackspot, how is the town faring now? And what difference will Brexit make here on the border?

Throughout the programme, Maureen Boyle's poem interweaves a personal elegy for her grandfather who worked at the nearby Linen factory in Sion Mills and her own memories of growing up in the area.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna's gentle but insistent, and sometimes extremely direct, questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench.

Presented and Produced by Anna Scott-Brown
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2018.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Coward, The Poet2008082420160911 (BBC7)
20160912 (BBC7)
Friends and fans discuss a selection of Noel Coward's poems.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A regularly overlooked aspect of Noel Coward's remarkable career is the significant amount of poetry he wrote throughout his life. Friends and fans including Anna Massey, Imogen Stubbs, Alistair McGowan discuss a selection of his poems, offering a unique insight into a deeper and somewhat darker aspect of Coward's personal life.

Crazy For Love - Layla And The Mad Poet2016051520160516 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Crazy for Love, one of the greatest Middle East love stories.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Crazy for Love - Layla and the Mad Poet'.

The inspiration for Eric Clapton's seminal pop song, 'Layla and Majnun' is said to be the most beautiful poem in the Arab world and beyond.

Pre-empting Romeo and Juliet by centuries, Layla and Majnun is the classic Middle East love story. Sitting at the heart of pre-Islamic Arab culture, its message is universal and it has since crossed borders and transcended language barriers even spreading as far as India and Turkey.

Based on a tale of thwarted love and poetry sent on the wind, Anthony Sattin tells the tale of its creator - Majnun - whose name is the word for 'mad' or 'crazy' in Arabic and tries to find out if he, or the object of his love, were real or imagined, fact or fiction.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Crex Crex20170709 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses Between the Ears with Kathleen Jamie.
Dannie Abse - Time For Verse Eps 2-3/52018092320180924 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Time for Verse' (episodes 2-3 of 5) featuring Dannie Abse. - GP, memoir writer and poet.

George MacBeth talks to Dannie about his life and poetry.

Poems read by Anthony Hyde.

Producer: Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Time for Verse featuring Dannie Abse, GP, memoir writer and poet

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

David Jones And Edmund Blunden2020011920200120 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Fatigue featuring war poet David Jones and Three Score and Ten Edmund Blunden.

For some years David Jones was engaged on inter-related pieces of writing concerned with Roman soldiers garrisoned in Judaea at the time of the Passion. In this fragment. The Fatigue, the term is used in the Army sense of a fatigue-party detailed haphazardly for a chance duty - in this case, the Crucifixion. Read by the author.

First broadcast on Network Three in 1965.

First World War Poet, Edmund Blunden who battled at Ypres and The Somme, reads his own poems Concert Party and Report on Experience from a broadcast in 1957.

Daljit Nagra chooses the best programmes from the BBC poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

David Walliams On Philip Larkin2016052920160530 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces David Walliams on Philip Larkin.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with David Walliams on Philip Larkin.

Actor David Walliams is a great admirer of Philip Larkin's poetry, and to mark the 25th anniversary of the poet's death, he talked to former Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, who wrote a widely acclaimed biography of Larkin, about why he finds this poetry so appealing.

Walliams chooses a selection of the poems he likes best, some well-known and some far less so, to explore the central themes that recur throughout Larkin's work. It's a fascinating three-way meeting of minds: the actor, the biographer and the poet they both admire.

The poems are read by Philip Larkin, Tom Courtenay and Patrick Romer.

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Derek Jarman And Thom Gunn2019063020190701 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Between the Ears – More than a Desert with Kate Tempest honouring iconic film maker and artist Derek Jarman at Dungeness plus Three Score and Ten featuring English poet Thom Gunn reading from his Forward prize winning collection.

Between the Ears - More than a Desert

More than twenty five years after the death of the iconic filmmaker Derek Jarman, the poet Kate Tempest - only a child when Jarman died - created a new radio poem on the Kent beach where he lived.

Crunching across the shingle of Britain's only desert, poet and playwright Kate Tempest's words are buffeted by the relentless wind of Dungeness - home to two lighthouses, two nuclear power stations, abundant wildlife, and to Prospect Cottage.

Here iconic British filmmaker Derek Jarman spent the last years of his life building his garden, writing diaries, inscribing the words of John Donne on the wall of his cottage. Here the wind whips across the flat, barren shingle, around the fisherman's cottages, out to the open sea where rolling waves meet a vast sky.

Recorded entirely on location in Dungeness, at Jarman's desk and out in the elements, Kate Tempest weaves the words and thoughts of local families and fishermen with rich soundscapes, both natural and man-made. Amidst the quietest sounds of the sanctuary of Prospect Cottage, to the roaring innards of the power station, Tempest crafts vivid new verse, at once intimate and elemental, mapping Dungeness anew.

Features music recorded on the beach by musician Alexander Tucker, and Keith Collins reading from Derek Jarman's "Modern Nature". Includes field recordings from the RSPB nature reserve and inside Dungeness B Nuclear Power Station.

Producer, Peter Meanwell
An Open Audio production for BBC Radio 3 in 2014.

Three Score and Ten - Thom Gunn
Ian McMillan introduces Thom Gunn who reads from his anthology The Man with Night Sweats on the untimely death of friends from the horror of Aids.

Producer: Sharon Sephton;
Research by Caitlin Crawford.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2016 with archive readings from 1993.

Kate Tempest honours iconic film maker Derek Jarman plus poems from poet Thom Gunn.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Here iconic British filmmaker Derek Jarman spent the last years of his life building his garden, writing diaries, inscribing the words of John Donne on the wall of his cottage. Here the wind whips across the flat, barren shingle, around the fisherman's cottages, out to the open sea where rolling waves meet a vast sky.

Here iconic British filmmaker Derek Jarman spent the last years of his life building his garden, writing diaries, inscribing the words of John Donne on the wall of his cottage. Here the wind whips across the flat, barren shingle, around the fisherman's cottages, out to the open sea where rolling waves meet a vast sky.

Derek Mahon2016102320161024 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces the work of the contemporary Irish poet Derek Mahon.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive to highlight the work of Derek Mahon.

Regarded as one of our finest poets writing today, Derek Mahon - born in Belfast in 1941 - talks to Peter Brooke about his background and his attitude to his work.

Producer: Kathryn Porter

First broadcast on BBC Radio Ulster in 1984.

Dorset Rewritten2019031720190318 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Dorset Rewritten featuring the dialect poetry of William Barnes.

Before Thomas Hardy, there was another Dorset poet called William Barnes. Scrape a finger across Hardy's Dorset and you'll find Barnes' underneath. He was Hardy's friend, forebear and inspiration.

William Barnes was fascinated by language and the dialect used by the people around him. But today he's been all but forgotten. Barnes inspired Hardy, Larkin, and Hopkins yet Britain has never taken him to its heart. Barnes was fascinated by language, obsessed even. He was a polymath. He believed in Pure English and wanted to distill words to their Anglo -Saxon origins; 'photograph' for instance, becomes, 'sun-print'. Curious then that while his poetry is thick with dialect, Barnes spent most of his life teaching English in its conventional form, as a curate and a school master.

A former Poet Laureate, a young teacher from Barnes' Blackmore Vale, and a dialect poet from the Black Country reflect on the curious verse of 'the other' Dorset poet.

Presenter: Daljit Nagra.

Produced by Clare Salisbury.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra goes in search of Dorset poet William Barnes.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Down Off The Pedestals2019070720190708 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Down off the Pedestals featuring Simon Armitage.

The nineteenth century witnessed a flourishing of dialect poets in the new industrial centres. Though they were very popular locally, they were typically sneered at by the metropolitan literary establishment, and their reputations have fared badly in the years since.

Now Simon Armitage sets out to explore the lives and works of two writers whose influence in his Pennine home is felt - Samuel Laycock and Ammon Wrigley. Armitage grew up hearing their poems recited as party pieces, and while he initially wanted to, "get past them" and forge his own reputation, he's now keen to show why they deserve more serious attention from the reading public beyond their home turf.

Along the way Armitage speaks with musicians who've helped keep the poems alive as songs, and writers such as Glyn Hughes who have long championed the works. Hughes, sadly, has died since the programme was recorded.

Producer: Geoff Bird
A Somethin Else production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in 2011.

Daljit Nagra selects a programme featuring the new poet laureate, Simon Armitage.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Down off the Pedestals featuring Simon Armitage.

Now Simon Armitage sets out to explore the lives and works of two writers whose influence in his Pennine home is felt - Samuel Laycock and Ammon Wrigley. Armitage grew up hearing their poems recited as party pieces, and while he initially wanted to, "get past them" and forge his own reputation, he's now keen to show why they deserve more serious attention from the reading public beyond their home turf.

Along the way Armitage speaks with musicians who've helped keep the poems alive as songs, and writers such as Glyn Hughes who have long championed the works. Hughes, sadly, has died since the programme was recorded.

Daljit Nagra selects a programme featuring the new poet laureate, Simon Armitage.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Dunstanburgh Castle: A Secret As Old As The Stones2004020920170423 (BBC7)
20170424 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses Katrina Porteus' work about the mysterious castle on the coast.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Dunstanburgh Castle: A Secret as Old as the Stone'.

Featuring the sounds of Dunstanburgh Castle in Northumberland, recorded by poet Katrina Porteous, and drawing on local myth and memories of Scottish raids and the ideal of good lordship.

Performed by Trevor Fox and the children of Seahouses First School.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Dunstanburgh Castle: A Secret As Old As The Stones2017042320201004 (BBC7)
20201005 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses 'Dunstanburgh Castle: A Secret as Old as the Stone'.

Featuring the sounds of Dunstanburgh Castle in Northumberland, recorded by poet Katrina Porteous, and drawing on local myth and memories of Scottish raids and the ideal of good lordship.

Performed by Trevor Fox and the children of Seahouses First School.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra chooses Katrina Porteus' work about the mysterious castle on the coast.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Edinburgh At The Year's Midnight: A Winter Journey In Poetry2017123120180101 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra selects Stewart Conn's Edinburgh at the Year's Midnight.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

For New Year's Eve, poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Edinburgh at the Year's Midnight'.

One of Scotland's most highly-regarded poets, Stewart Conn takes a winter journey in poetry, sound and music through the capital city with actors Gordon Kennedy and Siobhan Redmond.

A fragment from Under The Ice by Stewart Conn, inspired by Raeburn's portrait which hangs in the National Gallery in Edinburgh:

"...Was Raeburn's skating parson
a man of God, poised
impeccably on the brink;
or his bland stare
no more than a decorous front?
If I could keep my cool
like that. Gazing straight ahead,
not at my feet. Giving
no sign of knowing
how deep the water, how thin the ice."

Music arranged and played by Aly Macrae.

Producer: Gordon Kennedy

Director: Marilyn Imrie.

Made for BBC Radio 4 by Absolutely productions and first broadcast in 2016.

Electric Polyolbion2017011520170116 (BBC7)Poet and broadcaster Paul Farley's envisages Michael Drayton's Poly-Olbion.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Electric Polyolbion.

Part-poetry and part-national topological survey with a rich seam of encounters along the way, Paul Farley reimagines Michael Drayton's sprawling, extraordinary Poly-Olbion, first published in 1612.

The term Poly-Olbion suggests 'many Albions', the plurality of place, and Drayton described his own project as...a chorographicall (sic) description of tracts, rivers, mountains, forests, and other parts of this renowned isle... with intermixture of the most remarkable stories, antiquities, wonders, rarities, pleasures and commodities of the same.

Drayton's Poly-Olbion is a remarkable poem: 30,000 lines, arranged in 30 sections or 'songs', describing the geography and history of England and Wales county by county. References to place are clear and precise.

The Electric Poly-Olbion follows the same topographies as Drayton's work, and Paul uses its precursor to create a new version out of our contemporary landscape that incorporates and synthesizes historical, scientific, political, literary, pop-cultural and autobiographical dimensions into the imaginative region of the long poem.

As he travels the country and meeting other local writers along the way, Paul writes his own long form verse in and around the places and references of Drayton's original: the same landscapes, two wildly different time frames.

Producer: Simon Hollis

Made for BBC Radio 4 by Brook Lapping Productions. First broadcast in 2010.

Elizabeth Jennings And Fleur Adcock2021013120210201 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects The Living Poet - Elizabeth Jennings. A series which features interviews with poets - and Three Score and Ten with Fleur Adcock reading some of her work.

The Living Poet - Elizabeth Jennings
“Until about seven years ago I'd thought of myself as a lyric poet in perhaps rather a traditional way. Then, quite suddenly, a new type of subject-matter happened in my poems”. Elizabeth Jennings introduces a selection of work.
Producer - Fraser Steel

First broadcast on Radio 3 in 1983

Three score and Ten
Ian McMillan introduces Fleur Adcock who reads two of her poems subtly exploring stereotyping and sexual politics from The Living Poet 1985.

Producer - Sharon Sephton

First broadcast on Radio 3 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Emily Dickinson, Fred D'aguiar, Grace Nichols And John Agard2019092220190923 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Twenty Minutes: Fred D'Aguiar on Emily Dickinson; plus poems from Three Score and Ten featuring Grace Nichols, John Agard and Fred D'Aguiar.

Twenty Minutes: Fred D'Aguiar on Emily Dickinson
The American poet Emily Dickinson was very reclusive and spent most of her adult life in her room in Amherst, Massachusetts where, after her death, her extraordinary poems were discovered. When Aaron Copland composed the settings of her poems to music he spent many hours there trying to capture something of the spirit of Emily Dickinson. Someone who knows the room well is the poet Fred D'Aguiar, who lived in Amherst for several years. He reflects on Emily Dickinson's room, the place where he himself writes, and the significance of "The Poet's Room".

Reader - Christine Kavanagh.

Producer – Julian May.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2010.

Three Score and Ten: Grace Nichols, John Agard and Fred D'Aguiar.

Three Score and Ten features archive recordings from the last seven decades of the Third Programme and Radio 3, with 70 remarkable poets reading their own poems.

Ian McMillan continues with three poets originally from the Caribbean. Reading their new poems from Poetry Now 1982 Grace Nichols reads 'Night is Her Robe', John Agard 'Pan Recipe' and Fred D'Aguiar extracts from his 'Mama Dot' sequence.

Producer: Sharon Sephton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2016.

From 2010.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Twenty Minutes: Fred D'Aguiar on Emily Dickinson; plus poems from Three Score and Ten featuring Grace Nichols, John Agard and Fred D'Aguiar.

Twenty Minutes: Fred D'Aguiar on Emily Dickinson
The American poet Emily Dickinson was very reclusive and spent most of her adult life in her room in Amherst, Massachusetts where, after her death, her extraordinary poems were discovered. When Aaron Copland composed the settings of her poems to music he spent many hours there trying to capture something of the spirit of Emily Dickinson. Someone who knows the room well is the poet Fred D'Aguiar, who lived in Amherst for several years. He reflects on Emily Dickinson's room, the place where he himself writes, and the significance of "The Poet's Room".

Reader - Christine Kavanagh.

Producer – Julian May.

Producer – Julian May.

Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind2021012420210125 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind featuring poet Alexander Pope. Presented by John Sessions.

Actor and writer John Sessions goes in search of his poetical hero Alexander Pope.

His battered copy of Pope's poems in hand, John talks to 21st century poets and satirists, such as Peter Porter and Ian Hislop, about how Pope continues to inspire and influence their work today.

Many of us have quoted Pope without even knowing it. Phrases such as "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread", "A little learning is a dangerous thing", "To err is human, to forgive divine." And though they sound like quotes from Shakespeare or the Bible, they were in fact coined by that great 18th century poet and satirist, Alexander Pope.

Pope's work fell out of fashion soon after his death, dismissed as too formal and cerebral. And he's remained unfashionable ever since. But John Sessions argues that behind the formality of Pope's heroic couplets is a passionate and often angry heart.

Pope's belief in the power of the pen meant that he was never afraid to take on the rich and powerful. His ferocious satires, condemning corruption and cultural mediocrity, made him many enemies. In later years, he wouldn't leave his house without two loaded pistols in his pocket and the company of his dog, Bounce.

Recorded on location in Pope's Grotto in Twickenham and on the site of Pope's preferred coffee house in Covent Garden, John talks to contemporary poets, academics, local historians and fellow Pope aficionados to construct a very personal and affectionate portrait of a famous - but much neglected - poet.

Produced by Emma Harding.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Extinctions2014113020171029 (BBC7)
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Paul Farley listens to old and new poetry of extinction.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Extinctions20171030Paul Farley listens to old and new poetry of extinction.

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Echo Chamber - Extinctions'.

Paul Farley listens to old and new poetry of extinction 100 years after the death of Martha, the last ever passenger pigeon.

With poems from Fleur Adcock, Sean O'Brien, WS Merwin and David Harsent and the sounds of X-ray audio, the samizdat music of the Soviet Union that used black-market plates of skulls and ribcages to capture the beginnings of rock n' roll.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Ezra Caged2016101620161017 (BBC7)Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Ezra Caged, presented by Jeremy Harding.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Ezra Caged, presented by Jeremy Harding.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Ezra Caged.

Jeremy Harding reads and explores the Pisan Cantos, the poems written by the American Modernist poet Ezra Pound during his time in prison in Italy at the end of the Second World War.

He had been arrested towards the end of the war after making pro-Mussolini radio broadcasts, and for a time was held in a wire cage at a detention camp near Pisa. It was in these conditions that he drafted what have gone on to be regarded as the finest section of his long Cantos sequence.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2008.

Fine Lines - David Dabydeen And Katrina Porteous1999031420170910 (BBC7)
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Poet-in-residence Daljit Nagra chooses Fine Lines with David Dabydeen and Katrina Porteous

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Fine Lines' featuring poets, David Dabydeen and Katrina Porteous,

David and Katrina talk to Christopher Cook about their connection to the sea. David Dabydeen sees it as an historical archive whilst for Katrina Porteous, the sea is a source of life and a living for the fishermen of Northumberland.

Producer: Melanie Harris.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1999.

Fine Lines - Hugo Williams And Amanda Dalton2000071620170806 (BBC7)
20170807 (BBC7)
Hugo Williams and Amanda Dalton talk about their contrasting experiences of school.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Fine Lines': featuring Hugo Williams and Amanda Dalton

Christopher Cook's guest poets discuss how their contrasting experiences of school influenced their work.

Producer: Lindsay Leonard.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2000.

Fine Lines - Jean Binta Breeze And Michael Donaghy2018020420180205 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting 'Fine Lines' with Jean Binta Breeze and Michael Donaghy on the subject of homeland.

Jamaica and New York's South Bronx as seen through the eyes of poets living in Britain.

Presented by Christopher Cook.

Producer: Lindsay Leonard

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2000.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Fine Lines with Jean Binta Breeze and Michael Donaghy.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Fine Lines - Moniza Alvi And George Szirtes2019020320190204 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Fine Lines: George Szirtes and Moniza Alvi.

From Budapest to Pakistan - Homelands and Identity. Guest poets Moniza Alvi and George Szirtes in conversation with Christopher Cook.

Produced by Felicity Goodall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects Fine Lines with poets George Szirtes and Moniza Alvi.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Fine Lines - Seamus Heaney20170604 (BBC7)
20170605 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses chooses 'Fine Lines' with Nobel Prize-winning writer Seamus Heaney.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Fine Lines' showcasing Seamus Heaney.

Nobel Prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney talks about his book, Electric Light, which travels widely in time and space visiting sites of the classical world and revisiting the poet's childhood. Presented by Christopher Cook.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Fine Lines - Tony Harrison And Sean O'brien20170416 (BBC7)
20170417 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra selects Fine Lines, featuring Tony Harrison and Sean O'Brien.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Fine Lines' featuring Tony Harrison and Sean O'Brien.

Poets Tony and Sean are in conversation with Christopher Cook in Newcastle.

Fine Lines was a series looking at contemporary poetry,

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Fine Lines- Selima Hill And Matthew Sweeney2002021720170611 (BBC7)
20170612 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses Fine Lines with writers Selima Hill and Matthew Sweeney.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Fine Lines' with Selima Hill and Matthew Sweeney.

Tales of surreal suitcases, flying wardrobes and a bizarre poker game with a corpse. Poetry and conversation with Christopher Cook and Whitbread poetry prize winner, Selima Hill, and Irish poet Matthew Sweeney.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

Fine Lines: Linda France And Roy Fisher1998072620170730 (BBC7)
20170731 (BBC7)
Christopher Cook and his guests look at the connections between jazz and poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Christopher Cook and his guests look at the connections between jazz and poetry.

Fine Lines: Seamus Heaney2001032520170604 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra chooses chooses 'Fine Lines' with Nobel Prize-winning writer Seamus Heaney.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Fine Lines: Tony Harrison And Sean O'brien1998062120170416 (BBC7)
20170417 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra selects Fine Lines, featuring Tony Harrison and Sean O'Brien.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Found At Sea2019102020191021 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Found at Sea - Andrew Greig's powerful sequence of poems about two men's voyage to a remote Orkney island. On the way they tell stories, share haunting revelations and their hopes for the future.

Andrew Greig recounts, in poetic sequence, the tale of his open dinghy voyage from Stromness in Scapa Flow to an overnight stay on Cava island.

In a small boat in open waters, he found a new element to live in and a new metaphor for life. He captures it in a poetry sequence of moving simplicity, "in the middle of life, halfway over, we pitch on a gurly sea."

Written in six weeks, Found at Sea is a 'very wee epic', as Andrew calls it himself, about sailing, male friendship and a voyage to find a way through the rest of life by recalling the lives they've lived before.

Narrator....Andrew Greig
Skip....Lewis Howden
Crew....Tam Dean Burn
Musician....Rachel Newton

Sound Design Lee McPhail
Director Marilyn Imrie

Producer Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects Found at Sea from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Four Seasons - An Anthology Of Summer Poems2020071220200713 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses: An anthology of summer poems, old and new, for the middle of the year, read by poets and actors.

Noma Dumezweni reads William Blake, Siobhan Redmond reads Adam Zagajewski, Katrina Porteus reads her poem 'Dunstanburgh', Alex Jennings reads Philip Larkin, Anton Lesser reads Rudyard Kipling, Bill Paterson reads Edwin Morgan, Simon Russell Beale reads Edward Thomas; Lavinia Greenlaw reads her poem 'Heliotropical', Daljit Nagra reads a new commissioned seasonal poem, Don Paterson reads his poem 'The Air', Kathleen Jamie reads her poem 'Lochan', Sinead Cusack reads William Morris, Juliet Stevenson reads William Shakespeare, and Seamus Heaney (in an archive recording) reads his poem 'St Kevin and the Blackbird'.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry back catalogue.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Four Seasons - Poems For The Winter Solstice2020120620201207 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Four Seasons: Poems for the Winter Solstice to mark the year's turning point.

A collection of seasonal poems for the winter solstice by Margaret Atwood, D H Lawrence, James Fenton, Bertolt Brecht, WH Auden, Edna St Vincent Millay and Thom Gunn.

Readers are Juliet Stevenson, Anton Lesser, Harriet Walter, Bill Paterson, Siobhan Redmond, Stephen Fry, Noma Dumezweni and Simon Russell Beale.

Joining them are more recent pieces read by the poets Sinead Morrissey, Aonghas MacNeacail, Gerda Stevenson and Jacob Polley as well as former Radio 4 poet-in-residence, Alice Oswald.

And a new poem specially commissioned for the day by Imtiaz Dharker.

Producer: Sarah Addezio.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A collection of seasonal poems for the winter solstice by Margaret Atwood, D H Lawrence, James Fenton, Bertolt Brecht, WH Auden, Edna St Vincent Millay and Thom Gunn.

Readers are Juliet Stevenson, Anton Lesser, Harriet Walter, Bill Paterson, Siobhan Redmond, Stephen Fry, Noma Dumezweni and Simon Russell Beale.

Joining them are more recent pieces read by the poets Sinead Morrissey, Aonghas MacNeacail, Gerda Stevenson and Jacob Polley as well as former Radio 4 poet-in-residence, Alice Oswald.

And a new poem specially commissioned for the day by Imtiaz Dharker.

A collection of seasonal poems for the winter solstice by Margaret Atwood, D. H. Lawrence, James Fenton, Bertolt Brecht, W. H. Auden, Edna St Vincent Millay and Thom Gunn. Readers are Juliet Stevenson, Anton Lesser, Harriet Walter, Bill Paterson, Siobhan Redmond, Stephen Fry, Noma Dumezweni and Simon Russell Beale. Joining them are more recent pieces read by the poets Sinead Morrissey, Aonghas MacNeacail, Gerda Stevenson and Jacob Polley as well as former Radio 4 poet-in-residence, Alice Oswald. And a new poem specially commissioned for the day by Imtiaz Dharker.

And a new poem specially commissioned for the day by Imtiaz Dharker.

Fred's Archive2008033020180325 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Fred's Archive' - a unique collection of recorded poets explored by Joan Bakewell.

Back in the crazy days of the 1960s, Fred Hunter began to record some of the great poets of his time, including Tom Raworth, Lee Harwood, Robert Duncan, Edward Dorn, Anselm Hollo, Stuart Montgomery and Basil Bunting.

Producer: Neil Rosser

An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2008.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Fred's Archive - a unique collection of recorded poets.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

From Mumbai To Machynlleth2020070520200706 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Ghazal, the love song of Indian Classical music, has its roots in 7th-century Arabic poetry.

It carried to the medieval courts of Persia and later to the palaces of the Mughal Emperors of India, was adopted by Sufi mystics along the way, and came to be seen as the highest form of expression of love, for subjects both divine and earthly.

In its latest incarnation, Ghazal has met and been enmeshed with a seemingly alien tradition - the anonymous 'hen benillion' or old verses of rural Wales. While the poets of Ghazal used only to be heard by Indian high society, the Welsh poems, some of which also date back to medieval times, are nuggets of wisdom handed down by ordinary men and women. But both deal in themes of longing and impossible love.

The project 'Ghazalaw', a collaboration between Indian and Welsh musicians, searches for affinities between these centuries-old poetic and musical forms, connects the languages of Urdu and Welsh (which both have their roots in Sanskrit), and attempts to bring communities together. Ghazal still holds to the tenets of Sufism, calling for acceptance, tolerance, and forgiveness - the call of the hour, as the singer and composer Tauseef Akhtar points out: the message is love.

Produced by Megan Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Gone For A Burton2019052620190527 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Gone for a Burton about the town that lives and abides by water.

"These are the wild geographies of yeast..." Poet Jean Sprackland visits the breweries and tap-rooms of her home town, Burton-upon-Trent, to write a radio poem about the centuries-old art of brewing, and its rich linguistic legacy. She talks to brewers, beer-drinkers, coopers and landladies about Burton's place in brewing history, and the recent flowering of microbrewers and micropubs in the town.

Produced by Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

A new radio poem from Jean Sprackland on her home town, brewing capital, Burton-upon-Trent

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Grace Nichols1997051020180429 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Stanza on Stage' featuring the poetry of Grace Nichols.

Grace talks to Simon Armitage about her long poem 'Sunris', which she reads with John Agard as Montezuma and accompanying steel drum music by Aubrey Bryan.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1997.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'Stanza on Stage', featuring the poetry of Grace Nichols.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1997.

Gwyneth Lewis - How To Knit A Poem 1/22017021920170220 (BBC7)Gwyneth Lewis explores the appeal of the craft in How to Knit a Poem.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Gwyneth Lewis explores the appeal of the craft in How to Knit a Poem.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive of Gwyneth Lewis in 'How To Knit A Poem'.

Considering the poem to be as complex as a piece of woven material - in the first of two programmes, Gwyneth gets to grips with the craft - as she looks at the links between knitting, poetry and the wider world, as well as writing some new poems.

Producer: Penny Arnold

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

Gwyneth Lewis - How To Knit A Poem 2/22017022620170227 (BBC7)Gwyneth Lewis connects maths, knitting and poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive of Gwyneth Lewis in 'How To Knit A Poem'.

With more from her original series, poet Gwyneth asks what is scientific about knitting and hears how artists are using knitting to challenge preconceptions about society.

Producer Penny Arnold

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

Gwyneth Lewis connects maths, knitting and poetry.

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra chooses How to Knit a Poem in which Gwyneth Lewis connects maths, knitting and poetry. From 2006.

Hadraawi: The Shakespeare Of Somalia2020071920200720 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Hadraawi: The Shakespeare of Somalia.

BBC Africa Editor Mary Harper meets Somalia's most beloved poet in a rare glimpse into the country's soul.

In Hargeisa, the capital of the self-declared Republic of Somaliland, everyone knows the nation's most famous living poet – Hadraawi. They call him their Shakespeare. His work over the last 50 years has given voice to Somalis' desire for love, freedom, justice and peace.

The poetry of Mohamed Ibrahim Warsame ‘Hadraawi' holds a mirror up to all aspects of life. Hadraawi's poetry tells the story of modern Somalia.

Now in his 70s, this encounter with Hadraawi at his home in Somaliland was recorded just as the first rains fell after the devastating three-year drought. The self-declared republic is rarely seen by the outside world, as the shadow cast by the ongoing violence in Somalia to the south is long. But it's a place Mary Harper has come to know and love during 25 years writing about and reporting on Somalia for the BBC.

It is a nation of poets, where poetry is woven deep into the fabric of everyday life.

Poems featured are from Hadraawi: The Poet and the Man, published by Ponte Invisible/Redsea Online/The Poetry Translation Centre. Clarity translated by WN Herbert and Said Jama Hussein, and The Killing of the She-Camel translated by WN Herbert, Said Jama Hussein and Maxamed Xasan 'Alto'.

Producer: Eve Streeter

A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2017.

Daljit Nagra chooses the best programmes from the riches of the BBC's poetry sound archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Helen Dunmore And Dannie Abse2018060320180604 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with two selections:

To mark one year after her death - The Verb featuring Helen Dunmore in conversation with Ian McMillan about her award winning poem 'The Malarkey'.

Producer - Faith Lawrence.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2012

And Time for Verse: with Dannie Abse interviewed by George MacBeth.

Producer: Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Daljit Nagra introduces The Verb featuring Helen Dunmore and Time for Verse: Dannie Abse.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Hilda Doolittle2020061420200615 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive and this week selects: Hilda Doolittle.

It is more than one hundred years since the American poet Hilda Doolittle came to live in London. She lived through explosive changes in twentieth century culture with her dramatic life often overshadowing her work.

Considered for decades as Ezra Pound's Imagiste acolyte, she held her own through psychoanalysis with Freud, travelled extensively, had numerous long term relationships with both men and women, and an intense emotional and artistic connection with DH Lawrence.

Yet it was her poetry that was the core of her being. Though her early Imagist poems are her best known work, it was World War 2 that saw her at the height of her powers. Breaking from the Imagist tradition, in Trilogy, her epic poem, she reports on the war torn city from a pacifist perspective. The life of the bombed city is central and Doolittle redefines the heroic in terms of the suffering of ordinary people. Her trilogy is ranked alongside and Eliot's Four Quartets and Pound's Pisan Cantos as among the greatest civilian poetry of war in the 20th century.

Writer and broadcaster Diana Collecott is our guide to the world of Hilda Doolittle and Sara Kestelman reads a selection of her poetry.

Producer: Merilyn Harris
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2011.

Hiraeth2019112420191125 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses ‘Hiraeth' in which poet Mab Jones explores the concept in the poetry of Wales and further afield.

Hiraeth, a central theme of Welsh language poetry and song, is a feeling of something lost, a long time ago, whether national identity or a once-important language.
It has deep roots - some link it to the loss of self-determination in 1282. It has no equivalent in English, often translating as ‘homesickness', but incorporating an aspect of impossibility: the pining for a home, a person, even a national history that may never have actually existed.

To feel hiraeth is to experience a deep sense of incompleteness. Longing and absence has infused Welsh songs and poetry for centuries, so perhaps in the national temperament there's a perpetual tension between staying and leaving, a yearning for something better, a grief for something left behind. But there are equivalents in other languages - in Portuguese, 'saudade' is an impossible longing for the unattainable, so there are occurrences of the sentiment across a wide cultural spectrum.

But if the English don't have a word for it, does that mean they don't feel it, or that they don't need it? For some, like Mab's former Professor at Swansea, M Wynn Thomas, ‘hiraeth' can function as a default nostalgia button, and a dangerous tendency to believe things were better in the past. It's an experience characteristic of the powerless, the dispossessed; it's the signature tune of loss, but is this hopeless and persistent longing holding this small nation back?

Mab Jones is a poet and performer both humorous and deeply serious. She stands outside the Welsh language tradition, claims she doesn't feel hiraeth (not for Wales anyway - possibly for Japan). She questions and pokes at the concept, visiting the National Eisteddfod for the first time in an attempt to put her finger on exactly what it is.

Exploring the concept through poetry that expresses it, from the poets Menna Elfyn and Ifor ap Glyn she hears poems and songs that deal with aspects of Welsh history that might explain the continued existence of the word in Welsh - forced removals from much loved homes through industrialisation and military eviction. And she talks to writers who live between two worlds and struggle with a sense of belonging: Pamela Petro, an American writer who fell in love with the landscape of Wales in her twenties, and Eric Charles Ngalle, a Cameroonian poet and refugee, who made a life in Wales while unable to turn his mind to his original home, and the trauma that made him leave his family aged 17.

Produced by Megan Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Poet Mab Jones explores the concept of 'Hiraeth' in the poetry of Wales

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

'how Do I Love Thee... ?' By Eb Browning1999040420180527 (BBC7)
20180528 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Adventures in Poetry - How do I love thee?' The love poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Peggy Reynolds counts the ways in which the nation's favourite love poem, Browning 's Sonnet 43 from the Portuguese, has had a lasting impact.

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Daljit Nagra features the sonnet by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

How To Write A Poem 1/22020110820201109 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra searches the BBC's poetry archive and chooses How to Write a Poem ep 1/2 in which Glyn Maxwell leads a masterclass at a literature festival with an impressive line-up.

The poet Glyn Maxwell finds himself in a strange village. He has been invited there to teach a poetry masterclass at a literature festival with some impressive names on the line-up. Could that really be John Keats reading in the back room of the pub? Is that John Clare wandering the lanes? Is Emily Dickinson really doing a Q&A in the village hall? And isn't that Lord Byron propping up the bar?

With Glyn are three new poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley and Dominic Fisher - who share their own poems-in-progress. The students put their questions on writing directly to the greats and Glyn shares his own advice on writing better poetry – from facing the blank page and developing ideas, to the intricacies of rhyme, metre, form and line break.

All words spoken by Keats, Clare, Dickinson and Byron are taken verbatim from their poems, letters and diaries.

Written and presented by Glyn Maxwell
Produced by Mair Bosworth & Chris Ledgard

CAST
Barmaid - Sally Phillips
John Keats - Tom Stuart
John Clare - Tom Meeten
Student Poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley, Dominic Fisher

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

How To Write A Poem 2/22020111520201116 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra explores the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects part 2 of How to Write a Poem featuring the poet Glyn Maxwell.

Glyn Maxwell is in a strange village. He's been invited there to teach a poetry masterclass at a literature festival with some impressive names on the line-up. Could that really be John Keats reading in the back room of the pub? Is that John Clare wandering the lanes? Is Emily Dickinson really doing a Q&A in the village hall? And isn't that Lord Byron propping up the bar?

With Glyn are three new poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley and Dominic Fisher - who share their poems-in-progress. The students put their questions on writing directly to the greats and Glyn shares his own advice on writing better poetry – from facing the blank page and developing ideas, to the intricacies of rhyme, metre, form and line break.

All words spoken by Keats, Clare, Dickinson and Byron are taken verbatim from their poems, letters and diaries.

Barmaid - Sally Phillips
Emily Dickinson - Amy Rose
Lord Byron - Adam Harley
Student Poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley, Dominic Fisher

Written and presented by Glyn Maxwell.
Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

I'm A Lumberjack2017032620170327 (BBC7)
20200906 (BBC7)
20200907 (BBC7)
BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'I'm A Lumberjack' featuring peripatetic English writer, James Lasdun.

When James moved to wooded New York State his wife gave him a chainsaw. He had to either learn to chop down trees or risk his home and garden being taken over by the resurgent forests of the eastern states of the USA.

But how should a clumsy townee, good with his words but not with his hands, take to the woods? With help from some of the champion axemen of the Lumberjack World Championships at Hayward, Wisconsin, he learns the underhand chop, the standing block chop, the hot saw, and much of the wisdom and lore of the world of tall trees and tough men.

Produced in Bristol by Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

Daljit Nagra chooses 'I'm A Lumberjack' featuring peripatetic Englishman James Lasdun.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

In Memoriam - Conversations On A Bench2019051220190513 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects In Memoriam: Conversations on a Bench.

Anna Scott-Brown hears stories of love, loss and hope from the strangers and friends she sits beside on 'Rosie's Bench' in a park in Oxford. The inscription, Rest Awhile and Remember Happy Times Together, draws out reflections and revelations which Michael Symmons Roberts weaves into a poem, specially commissioned for the programme.

Gradually, the story behind the inscription is revealed by Rosie herself as she remembers her husband Chris, whose life the bench commemorates. The experience of others, mixed with her own, turns Rosie's tale into a heartfelt and emotional acknowledgement of the need to stop and communicate with people around us, as life rushes by.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna Scott-Brown's gentle - but insistent and sometimes extremely direct questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench to 'Rest Awhile'.

Producer: Adam Fowler

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Anna Scott-Brown hears tales of loss and hope, turned to poetry by Michael Symmons Roberts

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

In Praise Of Limestone2018021820180219 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'In Praise of Limestone' featuring WH Auden's famous poem about the remote Pennine Dales.

After reading it at school, poet Ian McMillan fulfils his ambition to explore the limestone scenery that inspired the poem. Ian walks in Auden's footsteps, revisiting the places that so moved Auden when he was a boy and young man.

Ian meets Tony Sharpe from Lancaster University, who has looked at how the area impacted on Auden's development as a poet. He also meets local writer and Auden enthusiast Robert Forsythe peering down the deep shaft at Haggs Mine, then venturing on in search of the places described in Auden's wartime New Year Letter from America.

Ian meets mining historian Ian Tyler and local poet Josephine Dickinson, whose own work is rooted in the countryside.

Producer: Andrew Carter
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra introduces In Praise of Limestone featuring Auden's famous poem.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

In Pursuit Of Edward Thomas2020041220200413 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects In Pursuit of Edward Thomas.

The poet Edward Thomas died at the Battle of Arras just over one hundred years ago on 9th April 1917. He'd been a poet for little more than two years and his collected works amount to only a slim volume. Nevertheless he is regarded as among the greatest of English poets. What made him so? Poet and editor, Matthew Hollis, follows a journey Thomas made by bike in the spring of 1913 from London into south west England. It was a journey that produced a prose book for Thomas, In Pursuit of Spring, but it was also a journey that turned him towards poetry.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

In Search Of The Wantley Dragon2019022420190225 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'In Search of the Wantley Dragon' - about the the bawdy 17th-century comic poem.

Starting at Barnsley train station, presenter and poet Ian McMillan uncovers long-forgotten violent disputes, a knight clad in locally-made armour, pantomimes, operettas and the eerily quiet dragon's den.

Ian meets the dragon's descendants and learns that, in its day, this Yorkshire-based story was as famous as that of Robin Hood.

Producer: Russell Crewe.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Daljit Nagra introduces In Search of the Wantley Dragon.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

India's Beats: The Hungry Generation2018040820180409 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'India's Beats: The Hungry Generation'.

Allen Ginsberg arrived in early 1960s Calcutta to discover a collective of angry young poets whose anti-establishment antics were uncannily reminiscent of his own past.

Over 50 years later, we follow in the footsteps of the Beat Generation to the literary centre of India and go in search of the Hungryalist poets. Who were they? Where did they fit with a rich Bengali literary tradition that includes the great Rabindranath Tagore? What eventually led to their arrests, imprisonment and disbandment?

Eventually the authorities had enough. They were rounded up and arrested on charges of obscenity and conspiracy against the state. Ginsberg attempted to intervene, sending letters of support. US literary journals carried the story and printed Hungryalist poetry. The movement floundered.

But despite this, we discover that the Hungryalist anti-establishment spirit is very much still alive in modern-day Calcutta today.

Producer: Dom Byrne

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'India's Beats: The Hungry Generation'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

It's Just Like Watching Brazil1998081720180715 (BBC7)
20180716 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'It's Just Like Watching Brazil'.

Written in verse by Ian MacMillan, this drama documentary charts Barnsley Football Club's first season in the Premiership League.

With Barrie Rutter and Michelle Hardwick.

Producer: Marc Jobst

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the verse written by Ian MacMillan and featuring Barnsley FC.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

James Berry - A Story I Am In2020020920200210 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses A Story I Am In featuring Jamaican poet James Berry, OBE. With Hannah Lowe. From 2015.

Hannah Lowe looks at the poetry of James Berry OBE, who came to the UK from Jamaica in 1948.

Berry started to write about his experiences and came to play a key role in bringing Caribbean voices into British poetry, editing two seminal anthologies, "Bluefoot Traveller" and "News for Babylon". At the time of recording Berry had just turned 90, and is slipping into the hidden depths of Alzheimer's Disease but, as A Story I Am In shows, he is aware of people and nature around him.

Next Generation poet and academic Hannah Lowe, herself of part-Jamaican origin, explores how James Berry's poems look to his childhood in rural Jamaica, and reflect on the shock of an England that didn't always know how to accept him. In 1981, he won the Poetry Society's National Poetry Competition for the best poem of the year.

Fellow poets John Agard, Grace Nichols and Linton Kwesi Johnson explain how Berry's work and the man himself came to have such a strong influence on them, while Hannah Lowe finds that the poems have helped her trace her own father's journey from Jamaica to London.

As James Berry developed ways to talk of his experiences both in Standard English and Jamaican Patois, the poets discuss how these ways of writing express different feelings and outlooks.

Using archive of Berry reading his own poems and talking about how he came to write poetry, Hannah Lowe seeks out the man and poet. What shines through is a man of great mental strength - genial, kind and acutely aware of the flash points between people.

Producer: Emma-Louise Williams

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Fellow poets John Agard, Grace Nichols and Linton Kwesi Johnson explain how Berry's work and the man himself came to have such a strong influence on them, while Hannah Lowe finds that the poems have helped her trace her own father's journey from Jamaica to London.

James Berry, Sir William D'avenant And Wendy Cope2020080920200810 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects three short programmes this week: Time for Verse: James Berry; Poets Laureate: Sir William D'Avenant and Three Score and Ten: Wendy Cope. From 1988; 1987 and 2016.

Time For Verse: James Berry, Ep 5/Time for Verse: Poets Laureate - Sir William D'Avenant/Three Score & Ten: Wendy Cope 1/3 -

Time For Verse: James Berry 5/5 R4, 13/4/1988 The last of five programmes in which George MacBeth talks to James Berry about his life and his poetry. Poems: "Banana And Mackerel"; "Mek Drum Talk Man"

Reader - Mona Hammond P
Producer - Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

2/3 - Time for Verse: Poets Laureate - Sir William D'Avenant R4, 17/6/1987

Ten programmes about some famous and some forgotten holders of the office. Compiled and presented by Sean Street. 2 Sir William D'Avenant (1606-68).

Readers - Martin Jarvis and David Goodland

Producer - Margaret Bradley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1987.

3/3 - Three Score & Ten - Wendy Cope R3, 10/11/2016

Ian McMillan continues with Wendy Cope who reads three of her poems from programmes The Living Poet and Poetry Now, both broadcast in 1988.

Three Score and Ten features archive recordings from the last seven decades of the Third Programme and Radio 3, with 70 remarkable poets reading their own poems.

Producer - Sharon Sephton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 1988.

Daljit Nagra chooses extracts from the BBC's poetry archive, including Wendy Cope.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Jean Binta Breeze And John Cooper Clarke2002031720180617 (BBC7)
20180618 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Fine Lines showcasing Jean Binta Breeze and John Cooper Clarke.

'Dub poet' Jean Binta Breeze meets the 'punk poet' John Cooper Clarke.

Presented by Christopher Cook.

Producer: Katherine Beacon

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

Daljit Nagra introduces Fine Lines: Jean Binta Breeze and John Cooper Clarke.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces Fine Lines: Jean Binta Breeze and John Cooper Clarke.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

John Betjeman - Poets On Music And Let's Find Out2017100120171002 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects programmes featuring John Betjeman.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive to showcase the work of Sir John Betjeman (1906-1984) who was made the UK's Poet Laureate in 1972. Featuring:

Poets on Music presented by Elaine Padmore. First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 1974

Let's Find Out hosted by Peter Haigh and featuring teenagers pitching questions to the poet John Betjeman. First broadcast on the BBC Light Programme in 1962.

John Clare: Under The Influence And Thinking On Their Feet2017040220170403 (BBC7)
20200913 (BBC7)
20200914 (BBC7)
BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Under The Influence' and 'Thinking On Their Feet' - featuring the poetry of John Clare.

* Under The Influence:
Alison Brackenbury describes how her lifelong admiration of Northamptonshire poet John Clare has influenced her own verse. First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2009.

* Thinking On Their Feet:
Novelist Richard Francis walks in the footsteps of the poet John Clare and visits Helpston in Northamptonshire. Joined by academic and writer Simon Koveshi, they discuss John's life and work and how walking helped inspire his poetry. First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2002.

Daljit Nagra chooses the poetry of John Clare.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

John Dryden, Jean Binta Breeze And Spike Milligan2019081820190819 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses three programmes from the BBC archive : Time for Verse - Poets Laureate: John Dryden presented by Sean Street ; Three Score and Ten featuring Jean Binta Breeze and Time for Verse with Spike Milligan with George MacBeth.

Time for Verse - Poets Laureate: John Dryden - presented by Sean Street
Produced by Margaret Bradley
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1987

Three Score and Ten featuring Jean Binta Breeze presented by Ian McMillan
Produced by Sharon Sephton
First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2016

Time for Verse with Spike Milligan presented by George MacBeth
Produced by Alec Reid.
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Daljit Nagra selects John Dryden, Jean Binta Breeze and Spike Milligan.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

John Heath-stubbs And Vernon Scannell2021041120210412 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Poet of the Month: John Heath-Stubbs and Three Score and Ten featuring archive recording of Vernon Scannell from 1960.

Poet Of The Month – John Heath-Stubbs

Described by C H Sissons as 'a Johnsonian with a Miltonic disability', the poet John Heath-Stubbs is also a translator and critic. Clive Wilmer talks to him about his work.

Producer Fiona McLean

First broadcast on Radio 3 in 1991.

Three Score and Ten - Vernon Scannell

Ian McMillan with another episode in this fifty part series. From Radio 3's The Poet's Voice, broadcast in 1960, Vernon Scannell reads 'Dejection' and 'A Case of Murder'.

Producer: Sharon Sephton

First broadcast on Radio 3 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Ko Un - The People's Poet Of Korea2013122920160403 (BBC7)
20160404 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra looks abroad for inspiration and introduces Ko Un - People's Poet of Korea.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Ko Un - The People's Poet of Korea'

In South Korea, former Zen monk Ko Un is revered as the people's poet. To mark his 80th birthday, Mike Greenwood explored his prolific output, in particular his epic masterwork, Ten Thousand Lives (Maninbo), in which he has written a poem about everyone he has ever met. Conceived when he was imprisoned in the 1980s for rebelling against the military dictatorships then controlling South Korea, Maninbo has been published in 30 volumes in Korean. Now, for the first time, the first 10 volumes have been translated into English.

Producer: Eve Streeter

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Landlocked In Krakow2018120920181210 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Landlocked in Krakow.

Every February, Krakow hosts a Shanties festival. But why in a city that's 800 miles from the sea?

Poet John Hegley tries to fathom out the popular appeal of shanties and the Polish love affair with them.

Producer: Gary Brown

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2007.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Landlocked in Krakow with John Hegley. From 2007.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Landmark Poetics2015032920180722 (BBC7)
20180723 (BBC7)
An exploration of the increasing amount of poetry in Britain's outdoors.

In the early 90s, for a bet, Lemn wrote a poem for one of his favourite pubs - Hardy's Well in Rusholme, Manchester. Since then, he and many other poets have written more and more for public spaces in Britain - both urban and rural. Travelling to Hebden Bridge, Little Sparta in Lanarkshire, Manchester and London, he asks what these poems are doing in the outdoors, if they really belong there, and who they are for?

Interviews include Simon Armitage talking about the Stanza Stones poems he wrote for the Pennine Watershed, text artist Robert Montgomery, Canal Laureate of the UK Jo Bell, and the letter carver Pip Hall.

Producer: Philippa Geering
Sound Design: Charlie Brandon-King

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects Lemn Sissay's meditations on the public role of poetry outdoors.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.

Learning To Love Dafydd2020030120200302 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Learning to Love Dafydd about the Welsh language Chaucer - Dafydd ap Gellym. Presented by Gwyneth Lewis.

Gwyneth Lewis, the first Welsh Poet Laureate whose giant words light up the front of the Wales Millennium Centre, has never been able to come to terms with the great Welsh language poet Dafydd ap Gwilym.

He's the Welsh equivalent of Chaucer or Shakespeare and has been hugely influential on contemporary Welsh poetry, from Dylan Thomas to the bardic competitions on Radio Cymru. But Gwyneth's teenage self found him sexist and laddish and a representative of a tradition she rebelled against.

As a Welsh language poet Gwyneth feels she can't avoid Dafydd any longer and needs to face him head on. She visits the ruined abbey at Strata Florida in West Wales where he worked and was buried, meets songwriter and former lead singer of Catatonia Cerys Matthews and Welsh poet and language activist Menna Elfyn, and goes in search of him in the poetry competitions at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Actor Steffan Rhodri brings Dafydd ap Gwilym's poetry to life.

Gwyneth tries to come to terms with her heritage and learn to love Dafydd - and see if she can write a poem directly to him.

Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

Daljit Nagra selects Learning to Love Dafydd about the Welsh language Chaucer.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Les Murray And Kit Wright2018031820180319 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'Stanza on Stage' featuring Les Murray and Kit Wright.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lindisfarne: Poetry In Progress2013102720180902 (BBC7)
20180903 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lindisfarne: Poetry in Progress'.

After four centuries - the Lindisfarne Gospel-book returned to the North-East of England in in 2013 - not as far as the island itself, but to Palace Green Library in Durham.

To mark the occasion, the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts commissioned 12 poets to respond to the book and to the almost-island on which it was created.

Beaty Rubens followed the poets' progress - sharing crab sandwiches and beer on a coach-trip to the island back in the spring and hearing about their progress over the summer and early autumn as they each wrote and recorded their poems.

Finally, she hears from the digital artist who created two installations where the poems could be enjoyed by the public.

This is the story of their Poetry in Progress.

Producer: Beaty Rubens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Daljit Nagra introduces the responses of twelve poets to the Lindisfarne Gospel.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lindisfarne: Poetry In Progress2018090220200510 (BBC7)
20200511 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces the responses of twelve poets to the Lindisfarne Gospel.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lindisfarne: Poetry in Progress'.

After four centuries - the Lindisfarne Gospel-book returned to the North-East of England in in 2013 - not as far as the island itself, but to Palace Green Library in Durham.

To mark the occasion, the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts commissioned 12 poets to respond to the book and to the almost-island on which it was created.

Beaty Rubens followed the poets' progress - sharing crab sandwiches and beer on a coach-trip to the island back in the spring and hearing about their progress over the summer and early autumn as they each wrote and recorded their poems.

Finally, she hears from the digital artist who created two installations where the poems could be enjoyed by the public.

This is the story of their Poetry in Progress.

Producer: Beaty Rubens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Lines Of Resistance2020110120201102 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra delves into the BBC's poetry archives and selects Lines of Resistance.

Writer and poet Bridget Minamore explores how women – particularly women of colour – have pushed back against the poetry establishment to create their own literary narratives.

Poetry as an escape from oppression and as a way to amplify the voices of the overlooked is nothing new. But, so often, resistance writers are male.

How have women in general and women of colour resisted dominant narratives in poetry? And how have they challenged those established voices of dissent to create their own literary spaces for resistance?

The themes explored in the programme range from 21st-century Peckham to ancient Iraq and the slave plantations of the Caribbean, as Bridget goes on a journey to uncover the lines of resistance followed by women throughout history. She talks both to established writers and teenage poets struggling to make their mark.

At the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton, south London, poet Malika Booker tells Bridget, "Story is in our DNA”. The women of the Octavia poetry collective explain how the internet both helps and hinders the process of creative resistance. With the help of Arabic literature specialist Dr Marlé Hammond and British-Egyptian writer Sabrina Mahfouz, Bridget draws links from Muslim women writing in 11th-century Spain to how Muslim women write in Britain today.

And in a surprising exchange with history professor Eleanor Robson, Bridget discovers that a writer of poetry from 4,000 years ago, long cherished by contemporary feminists, isn't all that she seems to be.

With poems by Sarah Lasoye, Warsan Shire, Malika Booker, Enheduana, Wallada bint al-Mustakfi, Seema Begum and Bridget Minamore herself.

Produced by Matthew Teller
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2017.

Daljit Nagra chooses the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Listen To Them Breathing2019031020190311 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Listen to Them Breathing – an exploration into the Quakers and poetry.

Presenter Sibyl Ruth is a poet who is also a practising Quaker. For many years she thought her poetry had little to do with her Quaker background. But then, after a meeting with the poet and Quaker Dorothy Nimmo, she began to see connections between her Quaker beliefs and the poetry that spoke most clearly to her.

In this programme she goes in search of other poets who are Quakers, to try and find out if there is a relationship between their belief in the Quaker ministry and their writing. She talks to Rosie Bailey about her late partner UA Fanthorpe; to publishers Anne and Peter Sansom about the writing workshops they organise which draw on many of the principles of Quaker meeting; to Gerard Benson, the co-founder of Poems on the Underground, who became a Quaker quite late in life; and to Philip Gross, a line from whose poem 'The Quakers of Pompeii' provides the programme's title.

Producer: Sara Davies

The poems included in the programme are:

Friends Meeting House, Frenchay by UA Fanthorpe
The Black Parrot by Dorothy Nimmo
Pottery Lesson by Dorothy Nimmo
Zero by Philip Gross
Song of Jean by Sybil Ruth
The Quakers of Pompeii by Philip Gross

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Poet Sibyl Ruth explores the connections between the Quakers and poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Liz Lochhead: 'robert Burns' And 'time For Verse'2018012120180122 (BBC7)With Burns Night in mind, poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with The Elephant in the Poetry Reading with Liz Lochhead on the influence of Robert Burns.

The Elephant In The Poetry Reading:
Liz Lochhead recalls her youth in a Motherwell state school, where reading, memorising, and performing in competitions instilled an appreciation of the work of Robert Burns.
Producer Dave Batchelor.
First heard on BBC Radio 3 in 2009.

Liz Lochhead: Time For Verse 5
George MacBeth concludes his conversation with Liz Lochhead on her life and work.
Reader: Janette Foggo.
Producer - Alec Reid.
First heard on BBC Radio 4 in 1998

Produced for 4 Extra by Sarah Wade.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects The Elephant in the Poetry Reading.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lord Byron And The Hebrew Melodies2021041820210419 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Lord Byron and the Hebrew Melodies, featuring Byron's best loved works, including She Walks in Beauty.

In 1815, Lord Byron published one of his most famous pieces, She Walks in Beauty. But it didn't appear as part of a collection of poems - in fact it was produced as one of a number of songs in the collection Hebrew Melodies. Byron, tiring of the formula that had brought him huge success in earlier works like Childe Harold's Progress and The Corsair, was approached by Jewish composer Isaac Nathan, who asked him to write religious lyrics to musical settings that were a mixture of contemporary and ancient Synagogue tunes.

Excited by the prospect of examining the Hebrew culture and putting his own deep knowledge of the Old Testament to good use, Byron took up the challenge. He was also keen to impress his future wife, a deeply religious woman who disapproved of his insalubrious lifestyle.

Byron and Nathan struck up a strong relationship and, over the course of the collaboration, produced 29 songs.

Unfortunately for Nathan, Byron's standard publisher, John Murray, wasn't keen to lose their grip on the poet whose work was funding their expansion and, as Michael Rosen discovers, took steps to minimise public recognition of the musical venture, leaving Nathan out of pocket and - for a long time - written out of the Byron story.

Producer: Geoff Bird

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in March 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Lord Byron and the Hebrew Melodies, presented by Michael Rosen featuring Byron's best loved works, including She Walks in Beauty.

In 1815, Lord Byron published one of his most famous pieces, She Walks in Beauty. But it didn't appear as part of a collection of poems - in fact it was produced as one of a number of songs in the collection Hebrew Melodies. Byron, tiring of the formula that had brought him huge success in earlier works like Childe Harold's Progress and The Corsair, was approached by Jewish composer Isaac Nathan, who asked him to write religious lyrics to musical settings that were a mixture of contemporary and ancient Synagogue tunes.

Excited by the prospect of examining the Hebrew culture and putting his own deep knowledge of the Old Testament to good use, Byron took up the challenge. He was also keen to impress his future wife, a deeply religious woman who disapproved of his insalubrious lifestyle.

Byron and Nathan struck up a strong relationship and, over the course of the collaboration, produced 29 songs.

Unfortunately for Nathan, Byron's standard publisher, John Murray, wasn't keen to lose their grip on the poet whose work was funding their expansion and, as Michael Rosen discovers, took steps to minimise public recognition of the musical venture, leaving Nathan out of pocket and - for a long time - written out of the Byron story.

Produced by Geoff Bird

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lost Voices - Anne Ridler2011041020170917 (BBC7)
20170918 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses Anne Ridler, presented by Brian Patten and read by Juliet Stevenson.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lost Voices: Anne Ridler'.

Brian Patten explores the life and poetry of Anne Ridler, whose quiet and lucid observations of 20th century life are often overlooked.

Born into a literary family, Anne's early employment with the publisher Faber meant that she was working to TS Eliot. Her work, however, is very much in her own distinctive voice: quiet, contemplative, but acute in its observation.

Juliet Stevenson reads a selection of Anne Ridler's poems on themes of the natural world, relationships, the rhythms of human life.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Lost Voices - Dom Moraes2016022820160229 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voices featuring Indian poet Dom Moraes.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

'Lost Voices' features Dom Moraes - who arrived in 1950s Soho as an exotic novelty, a beautiful Indian-born poet with a classical English education. He quickly found an outrageous and untameable muse, Henrietta. Their married life together was stormy and ended with Dom literally walking out to buy a packet of cigarettes and moving back to India.

When Brian Patten met him and his third wife there in the mid-1980s, Dom had achieved a kind of peace, but in truth he seemed to be a man who was never quite at home either in India or England. Brian tells Dom's story and presents a selection of his poetry.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2009.

Lost Voices - Harry Fainlight2020010520200106 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Lost Voices: Harry Fainlight who was a young man of rare promise when a trip to America to meet the Beat poets in the early 1960s changed his life forever. He lived a ramshackle, bizarre life but produced sublimely lyrical poetry.

Brian Patten, whose poetry was a celebrated part of the 1960s cultural scene, remembers a contemporary who did not survive the 20th century. Harry Fainlight was a deeply troubled magus and accomplished lyrical poet but he really was his own worst enemy. He upset people, he was upset by imagined slights, he could not bear the thought of publishers selling his work. Brian meets several of Harry's friends and talks to his sister, the successful poet Ruth Fainlight, to get an idea of who Harry really was. He also shares many of Harry's finest poems, all of which are now out of print.

Lost Voices is a series in which poet Brian Patten explores the life and work of lesser-known or forgotten poets.

Reader – Carl Prekopp
Producer – Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Brian Patten, whose poetry was a celebrated part of the 1960s cultural scene, remembers a contemporary who did not survive the 20th century. Harry Fainlight was a deeply troubled magus and accomplished lyrical poet but he really was his own worst enemy. He upset people, he was upset by imagined slights, he could not bear the thought of publishers selling his work. Brian meets several of Harry's friends and talks to his sister, the successful poet Ruth Fainlight, to get an idea of who Harry really was. He also shares many of Harry's finest poems, all of which are now out of print.

Lost Voices is a series in which poet Brian Patten explores the life and work of lesser-known or forgotten poets.

Lost Voices - Herbert Read2011041720171112 (BBC7)
20171113 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voice, Herbert Read, an unsentimental war poet.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lost Voices - Molly Holden2010041820170618 (BBC7)
20170619 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voices featuring image maker Molly Holden.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Lost Voices' showcasing Molly Holden.

From her early youth to her death in 1981, Molly Holden was an acute, unsentimental but lyrical poet of the natural world. She was influenced by Hardy and Edward Thomas but her poetry was distinctively her own. Her inspiration was topography, archaeology and the ties of the present world with the past.

Molly delighted in the outdoors and it was a huge blow when Multiple Sclerosis first slowed her down, then put her in a wheelchair. She continued to write about the world she could see from her window but increasingly the cruel reality of her situation became evident in her poetry.

Written and presented by Brian Patten.The readers are Annette Badland and Nigel Anthony.

Produced in Bristol by Christine Hall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Lost Voices - Padraic Fiacc2010050220190825 (BBC7)
20190826 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Lost Voices: Padraic Fiacc presented by Brian Patten.

Padraic Fiacc was born in Belfast in the mid-1920s and migrated with his family to New York in search of a less violent society - unfortunately they found themselves in the notorious Hell's Kitchen area where social problems were rife and gang warfare raged.

Coming back to Belfast later in his life, Fiacc recognised many of these social problems and was able to write about them with an outsider's eye. His straightforward language and spare, stark style marked him out from the more lyrical poets writing in the great Irish tradition, and for decades he has been cold-shouldered by the literary establishment.

Brian Patten tells the story, illustrated with some of Fiacc's most poignant and sometimes disturbing poems.

Reader: Jonjo O'Neill.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voices presented by Brian Patten featuring Padraic Fiacc.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lost Voices - Patricia Beer2011042420170903 (BBC7)
20170904 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses Brian Patten's re-evaluation of the work of Patricia Beer.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra chooses Brian Patten's re-evaluation of the work of Patricia Beer.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lost Voices: Patricia Beer'.

A fresh evaluation of the work of Patricia Beer by Brian Patten. Her strong, clear poetic voice grew out of a life menaced by insecurity and anger. Her friend, the poet Elaine Feinstein, and her niece, the novelist Patricia Duncker, consider the woman and the poetry.

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Lost Voices - Rosemary Tonks2016030620160307 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voices featuring Rosemary Tonks.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

'Lost Voices' features Rosemary Tonks. For a female poet in the 1960s Rosemary Tonks was unusually candid about adventures in steamy cafes and illicit hotel bedrooms. She published two extraordinary books of poetry which were heavily influenced by the eroticism of 19th century French poets. And then she fell silent. By the end of the 1970s, she'd disappeared from public life. Brian Patten talks to some other poets about Tonks's writing and asks if it has survived the 1960s. Then, right at the end of the programme, he receives some new information.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.

Lost Voices - Wh Davies2009041220160221 (BBC7)
20160222 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Lost Voices featuring the travelling, nature-loving poet WH Davies

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

'Lost Voices' features WH Davies - a very successful poet in the early 20th century, but now remembered, if at all, for one poem - What is this life if full of care, We have no time to stand and stare. But as Brian Patten explains, Davies lived an amazing life as a traveller, a tramp, a dreamer and a lover of the natural world. All this is reflected in his poetry which was admired at the time by George Bernard Shaw and Edward Thomas and which later inspired the 15 year old Brian Patten to write.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.

Lost Voices Of Afghanistan2018111820181119 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lost Voices of Afghanistan'.

When BBC Correspondent Jonathan Charles made an appeal on BBC World Service for Afghan civilians to send in their war poetry, little did he anticipate the flood of writing it would inspire.

Here, he explores a selection of those poems and interviews the authors.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

Jonathan Charles explores the new war poetry written by Afghanistan's civilians.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lost Voices: Robert Service2018012820180129 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Lost Voices' featuring Robert Service.

As a young man, Brian Patten was fascinated by the life and work of Robert Service, who in the early years of the 20th century left a banking job in Glasgow for the excitement of the goldrush in the Yukon. He almost immediately found himself working in a bank again, but he was now in a romantic wilderness. In the bars of Whitehorse he heard wonderful stories of life in the Gold Rush which he transmuted into Kipling-inspired verse, and he was soon the best-paid poet in the western world. Yet despite his huge popularity, he remained the self-described 'man who wouldn't fit in'.

Now, though honoured in Canada, Robert Service's work is almost forgotten.

Poems read by James Cosmo.

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects Lost Voices featuring Robert Service.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Louis Macneice2019060220190603 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting two programmes. First, Third Programme producer, Louis MacNeice reads two of his poems recorded in 1949, Snow and Prayer Before Birth.

Taken from Louis MacNeice: Three Score And Ten a fifty part series in which Ian McMillan presents recordings of poets and poetry to celebrate 70 years of Radio 3's recordings since it was launched as the Third Programme in September 1946.

Producer - Sharon Sephton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2016.

and Twenty Minutes - Homer In A Dudley Accent presented by Paul Farley.

Louis MacNeice lived in Birmingham in the early 1930s teaching Classics at the University. Despite his ambivalent relationship with the city, the years he spent there were to prove critical in both his personal and poetic life. The poet Paul Farley goes in search of MacNeice's “hazy city”.

Producer - Emma Harding.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2004.

Two programmes featuring the radio producer and poet Louis MacNeice.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Lyrical Ballads - 1/5 The Nature Of Inspiration1998101220161106 (BBC7)
20161107 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces a double act in poetry and selects Postscript - Lyrical Ballads.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with a rare double-act in poetry.

October 1798 saw the publication of one of the foundations of British romanticism: Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. Steve Connor begins his exploration of why this slim volume made such a profound impression on English literature and thought.

Producers: Julian May and Abigail Appleton.

First broadcast on Radio 3 in October 1998.

Lyrical Ballads - 3/5 Poverty And Politics2016112020161121 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra continues with a rare double act in poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Poverty and Politics.

Steve Connor explores the effect on English literature and thought of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads.

Producers: Julian May and Abigail Appleton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in October 1998.

Lyrical Ballads - 3/5 The Language Of Man20161120 (BBC7)
20161121 (BBC7)
Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra continues with a rare double act in poetry and selects Postscript - Lyrical Ballads. From October 1998.

Daljit Nagra continues with a rare double act in poetry.

Lyrical Ballads - 4/5 Conversation And Collaboration2016112720161128 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects Postscript - Lyrical Ballads: Conversation and Collaboration.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Conversation and Collaboration.

Steve Connor explores the effect on English literature and thought of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads.

Producers: Julian May and Abigail Appleton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in October 1998.

Lyrical Ballads - 5/5 Man And Nature2016120420161205 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects Postscript - Lyrical Ballads: Man and Nature.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Man and Nature.

Steve Connor concludes his exploration of the effect on English literature and thought of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads.

Producers: Julian May and Abigail Appleton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in October 1998.

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra selects Postscript - Lyrical Ballads: Man and Nature presented by Steve Connor. From October 1998.

Lyrical Ballads - Children And Childhood2016111320161114 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits Lyrical Ballads: Children and Childhood presented by Steve Connor.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Children and Childhood.

Steve Connor explores the effect on English literature and thought of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads.

Producers: Julian May and Abigail Appleton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in October 1998.

Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra revisits Lyrical Ballads: Children and Childhood presented by Steve Connor. From October 1998.

Lyrical Ballads - The Nature Of Inspiration
Maadai-kara2009010420181007 (BBC7)
20181008 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Maadai-Kara - an ancient epic Siberian poem with an oral tradition.

Described as an altai poem which involves throat singing - Benjamin Zephaniah goes on a journey to learn more about the epic, and about the great reciters of the poem.

Producer: Kevin Dawson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Maadai-Kara, an ancient Siberian tale from oral folklore.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Maadai-kara20181007Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Maadai-Kara, an ancient Siberian tale from oral folklore.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Maadai-kara20181008
Make Perhaps This Out Sense Of Can You2020080220200803 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archives and selects Make Perhaps This Sense of Can You with experimental poet Bob Cobbing. With Iain Sinclair. From 2011.

Bob Cobbing's playful experiments with sound and text have inspired a generation of poets, artists and composers. A writer whose work skittered between literature and music, poetry and artwork - he is, perhaps, best remembered for his extraordinary poetry readings. With his operatic, resonant voice he would boom, howl, chant and whisper leaving his audience enchanted and enraged in equal measures.

In this programme we delve into the work of Bob Cobbing - exploring his influence on the publishing world, his role in one of the most turbulent periods at the Poetry Society and the visual poem that outraged Margaret Thatcher.

Revered and reviled - he has been a controversial figure at times. In this feature the writers Iain Sinclair, Peter Finch, Alan Brownjohn and Paula Claire, amongst others, reflect on the musicality of his work, how he challenged the conventional notion of poetry and the surprising controversy sound and visual poetry caused in the Twentieth Century.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2011.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archives.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Man Versus God2019120120191202 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Man Versus God featuring Muhammad Iqbal's Islamic poem Shikwa.

Storyteller Seema Anand explores Shikwa, one of the most famous and enduring works of Islamic literature. The poem is an audacious and heartfelt complaint in lyrical Urdu about all the many ways in which God has let Muslims down.

When it was first recited by Iqbal at a public gathering in Lahore in 1911, a fatwa was issued by Islamic scholars who were shocked by its seemingly outrageous impudence: here was Man daring to challenge the wisdom of God!

Like many works by Iqbal, the poem is presented as a dialogue between Man and God, a quite revolutionary concept in Islamic literature and with echoes of Milton's Paradise Lost. Iqbal felt strongly that Islam should be open to reform and questioning - and many of his ideas are as powerfully relevant today as they were 100 years ago.

Iqbal is often called the spiritual father of Pakistan for using poetry to raise self-awareness amongst Muslims in pre-partition India so that they would eventually rise up and seek a separate nation. His poems are still recited at social gatherings all across the Muslim world (Shikwa is now even available as an iPhone app) but his poetry has a much wider appeal than just for Muslims. It contains many universal ideas about the relationship between Man, Earth and Divinity which resonate to this day.

Seema Anand (who is not Muslim) is learning to translate the poem with the dream that one day she too will be able to recite it and bring it to new audiences in Britain. Despite the challenge of learning a poem in a language she barely knows and with intricate imagery and ideas drawn from earlier Sufi and Persian poets, it's something she pursues because she's convinced the beauty of the verse nourishes the soul.

Contributors: Professor Javed Majeed, Navid Akhtar
Readings by Sagar Arya, Saeed Jaffrey and Pervaiz Alam

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culturewise production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2011.

Daljit Nagra selects Man Versus God featuring Muhammad Iqbal's epic poem Shikwa.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Michael Longley2016103020161031 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Poet of the Month, Michael Longley, presented by Clive Wilmer.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with a profile of Michael Longley.

In Poet of the Month, Michael Longley in conversation with Clive Wilmer, about his poetry career and collection of poems, Gorse Fires

Producer: Fiona McLean

First broadcast on Radio 3 in June 1991.

Mother Tongue - Bodies In Motion2020082320201025 (BBC7)
20201026 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects episode one of Mother Tongue - a globe-trotting poetry series.

Poet Helen Mort hears poetry in Arabic, German and Spanish while thinking about the phrase 'Bodies in Motion'. Helen discovers how movement through space and time filters through the work of some very different poets.

She meet Syrian poet Golan Haji in Paris. He's drawn inspiration from many sources, including Bill Viola's video art and a pet ram. Being multilingual, for him, every piece of writing is an act of translation. They meet up with veteran American poet and translator Marilyn Hacker, to hear her version of a Haji poem and talk about the friendship struck up through this translation partnership.

A journey to the centre of the Earth; watching the Berlin Wall fall on a badly tuned TV; and a futuristic German language, have all inspired poems by the compelling German poet and performer, Ulrike Almut Sandig.

Exploring the fascinating process of translating a poem into another language, Helen takes part in a poetry translation workshop at the Poetry Translation Centre in London.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2017.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Mother Tongue - The Observing Eye2020112920201130 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra explores the BBC's poetry archive and selects Mother Tongue ep 2/6 the globe-trotting poetry series presented by Helen Mort.

Poet Helen Mort explores exciting voices from around the world. This week, she hears poems in Persian, Spanish, German and Chinese - and in translation - all inspired by the everyday objects and people around them. She considers how through the observing eye of poetry, the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

Tea bags, mushrooms and mosquitoes have all inspired German poet Jan Wagner. His poems give surprising perspectives on the most commonplace objects - they are witty, compassionate and novel. Wagner reads from his collection Self-Portrait with a Swarm of Bees, and talks about the process of translation between German and English.

Nicknamed the Poet of Objects in his native Iran, Iraj Ziayi writes about ordinary household items - chairs, slippers - with heightened intensity. In his poem Six Green Polish Chairs, a collection of childhood memories are triggered by the sight of a particular shade of green. Alireza Abiz translates from the Persian.

Helen Mort travels to Oxford to speak to Theophilus Kwek. Kwek is a young poet and translator from Singapore, whose version of Moving House by Malayan-born poet Wong Yoon Wah, recently won second place in the Stephen Spender prize for poetry in translation. Moving House explores the ordinary details of a house move, with a fascinating personal and political subtext.

Finally, there's poetry by Oscar Cruz, direct from the streets of Santiago de Cuba. Speaking to Cruz's translator Serafina Vick, Helen Mort learns about his mission to bring the everyday life and language of his city - in all its frank reality - into his poems. Muy caliente!

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

First broadcast in 2017.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Mother Tongue - Tracks Of Time2021022820210301 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Mother Tongue the globe-trotting poetry series presented by Helen Mort.

Poet Helen Mort explores exciting voices from around the world. This week, she hears poems in Macedonian, Old Norse and Russian - and in translation. Reflecting on the phrase 'tracks of time', she discovers how memory and history play a part in the work of these three poets.

Helen travels to Berlin to meet the Macedonian poet Nikola Madzirov. Described as one of most powerful voices in contemporary European poetry, he writes with great lyrical depth, insight and originality. In his collection 'Remnants of Another Age', he reflects on the history of his Balkan homeland and on ideas of shelter and nomadism with a restless, timeless intelligence.

Heading up the North Sea coast to Aberdeen, we hear Scottish poet Ian Crockatt reading his fresh versions of the Old Norse verses of Rognvaldr, Earl of Orkney. The collection, 'Crimsoning the Eagle's Claw', is a treasure trove of vivid snapshots of the life of this twelfth century poet, lover, nobleman and sailor. Like meeting a Viking face-to-face.

Finally, Helen travels to Oxford to meet one of Russia's foremost contemporary poets, Maria Stepanova and her translator, Sasha Dugdale. Stepanova writes formally inventive and thoughtful poetry, teeming with references from her country's cultural memory and political history. Through her journalism and editorship of an independent, crowdfunded site, she is also an important liberal voice.

Producer: Caroline Hughes
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Murmur2020012620200127 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting 'Murmur' in which Julia Blackburn reads her poem about the death of her husband and flocks of winter starlings.

Not long after her husband died she found herself drawn to write a series of poems about his last years and his life. At the same time near their Suffolk home Julia watched the great seething and pulsing of winter starling murmurations. Without expecting it she also found that the starlings flew into her poem and began to help her make sense of her husband's death.

Her book of poems is called: Murmurations of Love, Grief and Starlings. She reads it, talks about her husband and tries to hear the sound of ten thousand starlings wheeling through the dusk of a winter's day.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting 'Murmur' in which Julia Blackburn reads her poem about the death of her husband and flocks of winter starlings.

Not long after her husband died she found herself drawn to write a series of poems about his last years and his life. At the same time near their Suffolk home Julia watched the great seething and pulsing of winter starling murmurations. Without expecting it she also found that the starlings flew into her poem and began to help her make sense of her husband's death. Her book of poems is called: Murmurations of Love, Grief and Starlings. She reads it, talks about her husband and tries to hear the sound of ten thousand starlings wheeling through the dusk of a winter's day.

Produced by Tim Dee

National Poetry Day 20162016100220161003 (BBC7)Sarah Howe, Maura Dooley and Denise Riley join Daljit Nagra to mark National Poetry Day.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Made for 4 Extra. Poets Sarah Howe, Maura Dooley and Denise Riley join our Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra to celebrate National Poetry Day 2016.

No Coward Soul By Emily Bronte2019061620190617 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Adventures in Poetry - No Coward Soul by Emily Bronte.

Peggy Reynolds finds out how Emily Bronte's bold and haunting poem 'No Coward Soul' makes its impact and discusses its role in the myth that has grown up around the author.

Contributors: Brian Blessed, Prof Isabel Armstrong, Prof Steven Connor, Stevie Davies, Ann Dinsdale, Alice Arnold.

Producer – Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry - No Coward Soul by Emily Bronte. From 2001.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Adventures in Poetry - No Coward Soul by Emily Bronte.

Peggy Reynolds finds out how Emily Bronte's bold and haunting poem 'No Coward Soul' makes its impact and discusses its role in the myth that has grown up around the author.

Contributors: Brian Blessed, Prof Isabel Armstrong, Prof Steven Connor, Stevie Davies, Ann Dinsdale, Alice Arnold.

Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry - No Coward Soul by Emily Bronte. From 2001.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Nobody Told Me To Oil My Boots2008110920170205 (BBC7)
20170206 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces Nobody Told Me To Oil My Boots, presented by Sir Antony Sher.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Nobody Told Me To Oil My Boots, presented by Sir Antony Sher. From November 2008.

No-one Left And No-one Came2001062820170409 (BBC7)
20170410 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra selects Edward Thomas's No-One Left and No-One Came.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Edward Thomas died exactly 100 years ago on the battlefields of the First World War. To commemorate that moment, BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Thomas's uneventful poem about inactivity and solitude 'No One Left and No One Came'.

In Edward Thomas's poem Adlestrop a train stops, there's a hiss of steam, someone clears his throat and a blackbird sings. And that's it. Yet this 16 line poem is one of the best-loved in English, inspiring articles, pilgrimages to the Cotswold village and many other poems.Anne Harvey tells the story of how it came to be written and explores the fascination of a short poem in which nothing happens but which deals with large themes: memory, time, naming, sound - and fear.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

No-one Left And No-one Came2017040920200920 (BBC7)
20200921 (BBC7)
Edward Thomas died exactly 100 years ago on the battlefields of the First World War. To commemorate that moment, BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Thomas's uneventful poem about inactivity and solitude 'No One Left and No One Came'.

In Edward Thomas's poem Adlestrop a train stops, there's a hiss of steam, someone clears his throat and a blackbird sings. And that's it. Yet this 16 line poem is one of the best-loved in English, inspiring articles, pilgrimages to the Cotswold village and many other poems. Anne Harvey tells the story of how it came to be written and explores the fascination of a short poem in which nothing happens but which deals with large themes: memory, time, naming, sound - and fear.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2001.

Daljit Nagra selects Edward Thomas's No-One Left and No-One Came.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Norn But Not Forgotten - Sounds Of Shetland2010082920171015 (BBC7)
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Kathleen Jamie discovers the appeal of the local dialect for poets in the Shetland Islands

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Norn But Not Forgotten, Sounds of Shetland'.

The dialect of the Shetland Islands is one of the most distinctive spoken within the British Isles: heavily accented, and studded with words left over from the now extinct Norn language which was spoken on the islands until the late 18th century. Even now, reaching for expressions to describe the natural world, places, the seasons of the year, food, tools, colours, moods or states of agitation or excitement, Shetlanders will often use Norn words.

Kathleen Jamie visits Shetland to meet up with the poets who revel in the language, both those born on the island and those who've moved there.

Shetland, and its distinctive accents and words, has proved surprisingly receptive to poets from mainland Scotland and England who have chosen to make it home. What is it about the Shetland dialect that so excites and fascinates poets? Kathleen asks the TS Eliot award-winning poet Jen Hadfield, who was born in Cheshire, and Raman Mundair, who was born in Ludhiana in India and came to live in Glasgow at the age of five, about choosing to write about Shetland's distinctive landscape, people and way of life in its own tongue.

Kathleen also meets acclaimed Shetland language poet Christine De Luca who was raised on the island and who has made the opposite journey, leaving the rugged landscape of the island to live and work on the mainland.

Rich with the sounds - and not just the language - of the islands, Kathleen Jamie explores how this dense linguistic community has managed to excite and engage some of Britain's leading poets.

Producer: Mark Rickards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

North: Catherine Heaney On Seamus Heaney2018090920180910 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra talks to Catherine Heaney about her father. Plus 'North' with Seamus Heaney.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra welcomes Catherine Heaney into 4 Extra's Poetry Extra studio to discuss life growing up with her father, the Nobel Prize winning poet Seamus Heaney.

And we hear 'North' featuring Seamus Heaney, first broadcast on BBC Radio Ulster in 1975.

Producer: Sarah Wade

Made for BBC Radio 4 Extra and first broadcast in September 2018.
Daljit Nagra welcomes Catherine Heaney into 4 Extra's Poetry Extra studio to discuss life growing up with her father, the Nobel Prize winning poet Seamus Heaney.

Made for BBC Radio 4 Extra and first broadcast in September 2018.

Produced by Sarah Wade for BBC Radio 4 Extra and first broadcast in September 2018.

Oh What A Lively War2010110420101114 (BBC7)
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Martin Sorrell explores the work of French First World War poet Guillaume Apollinaire.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits BBC radio's poetry archive with 'Oh What a Lively War' profiling First World War poet, Guillaume Apollinaire.

One of the most famous lines in French poetry was written by Guillaume Apollinaire in the summer of 1915. His Ah Dieu! que la guerre est jolie is roughly translated as Oh! What a lovely war!, but unlike the famous English musical, Apollinaire's line was devoid of irony. Here was a young poet revelling in the excitement, the sheer modernism, of warfare. It's a sentiment very much at odds with our British legacy of war poetry from that time, and it's one that Martin Sorrell, translator of Apollinaire, unpicks with Professors Susan Harrow and Tim Kendall, and American poet Brian Turner, who served in the US army in Iraq.

Apollinaire was already a well-known poet and leading champion of Cubism when he enlisted in December 1914. His war came to an end in March 1916, when he received a shrapnel wound to the head. He was invalided out, trepanned, made only a partial recovery, and died in November 1918, almost the same day as Wilfred Owen,

His early war poetry of 1914 and 1915 is infused with the marvel and spectacle of war, and continues the experiments with form that made him one of France's great literary innovators. It also celebrates his rich, complicated love life. His letters to the two women with whom he was simultaneously involved are fascinating records of a passionate patriot and an equally passionate lover. It was only as the war progressed and he experienced his own horrifying injury that the poems began to recognise the misery of the trenches and horror of technological warfare.

Reader: Paul McGann

Producer: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

One of the most famous lines in French poetry was written by Guillaume Apollinaire in the summer of 1915. His Ah Dieu! que la guerre est jolie can be roughly translated into English as Oh! What a lovely war!, but unlike the famous English musical, Apollinaire's line was devoid of irony. Here was a young poet revelling in the excitement, the sheer modernism, of warfare. It's a sentiment very much at odds with our British legacy of war poetry from that time, and it's one that Martin Sorrell, translator of Apollinaire, unpicks in this programme with the help of Professors Susan Harrow and Tim Kendall, and the American poet Brian Turner, who served in the US army in Iraq.

His early war poetry, written in 1914 and 1915, is infused witrh the marvel and spectacle of war, and continues the experiments with form that made him one of France's great literary innovators. It also celebrates his rich, complicated love life, pursued as and when possible. His letters to the two women with whom he was simultaneously involved are fascinating records of a passionate patriot and an equally passionate lover. It was only as the war progressed and he experienced his own horrifying injury that the poems began to recognise the misery of the trenches and the horror of technological warfare.

Apollinaire's poems are read by Paul McGann

Presenter Martin Sorrell is Emeritus Professor of Modern Languages at Exeter University.

Produced by Sara Davies.

Old Possum's Book Of Practical Cats - 1/22020121320201214 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects part one of TS Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

On Christmas Day 1937, nearly two years before book publication, five of TS Eliot's Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio. The Radio Times wrote:

'For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name'.

Now one of our greatest actors, Oscar winning Jeremy Irons revisits the original five poems along with the further ten that make up the Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

You'll hear much-loved familiar characters like Growltiger, Mungojerrie, Rumpleteaser, Old Deutoronomy, Mr Mistoffelees, Macavity Gus and Skimbleshanks. These notorious cats lurk in shadows, baffle Scotland Yard, dance by the light of the moon and who must not be woken. They're found on trains, in the theatre, in the high street. They juggle, sleep, conjure, are curious and bore - but all show another side of one of our most important British poets.

TS Eliot's poems have been enjoyed by many in Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical Cats, but here we return to the poems without any music and celebrate the inventiveness in the original words.

* The Naming of Cats
* Skimbleshanks The Railway Cat
* Growltiger's Last Stand
* The Rum Tum Tugger
* The Song of the Jellicles
* Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer
* Old Deuteronomy
* Of the Awefull Battle of the Pekes and the Pollicles
* Mr Mistoffelees
* Macavity: The Mystery Cat

Directed at BBC Salford by Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Now one of our greatest actors, Oscar winning Jeremy Irons revisits the original five poems along with the further ten that make up the Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

Directed at BBC Salford by Susan Roberts

Directed at BBC Salford by Susan Roberts

Old Possum's Book Of Practical Cats - Part 12020121320201214 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects TS Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats. Part One.

On Christmas Day 1937, nearly two years before book publication, five of T.S Eliot's Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio. The Radio Times wrote 'For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name'.

Over 75 years later, one of our greatest actors, Oscar- winning Jeremy Irons re-visits the original five poems along with the further ten which make up the Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

In this treat you will find familiar much-loved characters including Growltiger, Mungojerrie, Rumpleteaser, Old Deutoronomy, Mr Mistoffelees, Macavity Gus and Skimbleshanks. These are cats who are notorious, lurk in shadows, baffle Scotland yard, dance by the light of the moon and who must not be woken. They are found on trains, in the theatre, in the high street. They juggle, sleep, conjure, are curious and bore but they all show another side of one of our most important British poets.

TS Eliot 's poems have been enjoyed by many in the musical Cats, but here we return to the poems without any music and celebrate the inventiveness in the original words.

The Naming of Cats
Skimbleshanks The Railway Cat
Growltiger's Last Stand
The Rum Tum Tugger
The Song of the Jellicles
Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer
Old Deuteronomy
Of the Awefull Battle of the Pekes and the Pollicles
Mr Mistoffelees
Macavity:The Mystery Cat

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Old Possum's Book Of Practical Cats - Part 2/letters To A Young Poet: Moniza Alvi2020122020201221 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects two programmes this week. Firstly part 2/2 of Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats read by Jeremy Irons and The Essay featuring Moniza Alvi: Letters To A Young Poet.

On Christmas Day 1937, nearly two years before book publication, five of T.S Eliot's Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio. The Radio Times wrote' For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name'. Over 75 years later, one of our greatest actors, Oscar- winning Jeremy Irons re-visits the original poems.

In part two you can hear five poems featuring Gus: The Theatre Cat, The Old Gumbie, CatBustopher Jones: The Cat about Town, Cat Morgan introduces himself and The Ad-dressing of Cats.

Producer: Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Christmas Day 2015.

The Essay - Moniza Alvi: Letters To A Young Poet

Taking Rilke's classic correspondence as inspiration, leading poets write a personal letter to a young poet to pass on life experience and thoughts about the poetic art..
Today, Pakistan-born Moniza Alvi.

The original Letters to a Young Poet is a compilation of letters by Rainer Maria Rilke, written between 1902 and 1908 to a 19-year-old officer cadet called Franz Kappus. Rilke's letters touch on poetry and criticism, but they range widely in subject matter from atheism and loneliness, to friendship and sexuality.

Moniza Alvi was born in Pakistan and grew up in Hertfordshire.

Producer - Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Old Possum's Book Of Practical Cats 2/2/letters To A Young Poet: Moniza Alvi2020122020201221 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects two programmes this week. Firstly part 2/2 of Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats read by Jeremy Irons and The Essay featuring Moniza Alvi: Letters To A Young Poet.

On Christmas Day 1937, nearly two years before book publication, five of T.S Eliot's Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio. The Radio Times wrote' For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name'. Over 75 years later, one of our greatest actors, Oscar- winning Jeremy Irons re-visits the original poems.

In part two you can hear five poems featuring Gus: The Theatre Cat, The Old Gumbie, CatBustopher Jones: The Cat about Town, Cat Morgan introduces himself and The Ad-dressing of Cats.

Producer: Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Christmas Day 2015.

The Essay - Moniza Alvi: Letters To A Young Poet

Taking Rilke's classic correspondence as inspiration, leading poets write a personal letter to a young poet to pass on life experience and thoughts about the poetic art..
Today, Pakistan-born Moniza Alvi.

The original Letters to a Young Poet is a compilation of letters by Rainer Maria Rilke, written between 1902 and 1908 to a 19-year-old officer cadet called Franz Kappus. Rilke's letters touch on poetry and criticism, but they range widely in subject matter from atheism and loneliness, to friendship and sexuality.

Moniza Alvi was born in Pakistan and grew up in Hertfordshire.

Producer - Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects two programmes this week. Firstly part 2/2 of Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats read by Jeremy Irons and The Essay featuring Moniza Alvi: Letters To A Young Poet.

On Christmas Day 1937, nearly two years before book publication, five of T.S Eliot's Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio. The Radio Times wrote' For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name'. Over 75 years later, one of our greatest actors, Oscar- winning Jeremy Irons re-visits the original poems.

Producer: Susan Roberts.

The original Letters to a Young Poet is a compilation of letters by Rainer Maria Rilke, written between 1902 and 1908 to a 19-year-old officer cadet called Franz Kappus. Rilke's letters touch on poetry and criticism, but they range widely in subject matter from atheism and loneliness, to friendship and sexuality.

Producer - Emma Harding

Particle Poets And Molecular Metaphors2018120220181203 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Particle Poets and Molecular Metaphors.

From Einstein's theory of molecular relativity to the hunt for the Higgs Boson, atomic science has influenced poetry more than any other social, economic or political force over the last century.

With the help of the former Welsh laureate, Gwyneth Lewis, Professor Peter Middleton, poet Gitte Broeng, Nobel physicist Murray Gell-Man, and Thomas Otto from CERN, and examples of poems by James Joyce, Arthur Sze and David Ignatow, Anna McNamee explores the strong connections between physics and poetry.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Atomic science as poetic inspiration.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Paul Celan In Mapesbury Road2016052220160523 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Paul Celan in Mapesbury Road - Europe's master elegist.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Paul Celan in Mapesbury Road'.

What brought one of the most compelling modern European poets to a perfectly ordinary street in North London? Who did he visit there? And what made him write a poem about the experience? Writer Toby Litt investigates this most improbable of brief encounters between Paul Celan, the master elegist of 20th century Jewish experience and Britain at the end of the Sixties.

Producer: Zahid Warley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

Paul Durcan - Christmas Day2016121220161211 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects Paul Durcan's reading of his poem Christmas Day.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra selects Paul Durcan's reading of his poem Christmas Day. From 1997.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Paul Durcan's Christmas Day.

In three parts, Paul begins reading his book-length poem that sets out a funny, sweetly sad and often irreverent vision of Christmas.

Accustomed to loneliness, Paul accepts his friend Frank's invitation for Christmas lunch.

First broadcast on Radio 3 in December 1997.

Paul Durcan - Christmas Day 2/32016121920161218 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects Paul Durcan's reading of his poem Christmas Day.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Paul Durcan's Christmas Day.

Paul continues reading from his book-length poem that sets out a funny, sweetly sad and often irreverent vision of Christmas.

Paul and his friend Frank continue their melancholic and often subversive Christmas afternoon conversation.

First broadcast on Radio 3 in December 1997.

Paul Durcan - Christmas Day 3/32016122520161226 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects the final part of Paul Durcan's reading of his poem 'Christmas Day'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Paul Durcan's Christmas Day.

Paul continues reading from hi book-length poem that sets out a funny, sweetly sad and often irreverent vision of Christmas.

After Christmas lunch, Paul returns to his empty home, and his thoughts range across his life.

First broadcast on Radio 3 in December 1997.

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra selects the final part of Paul Durcan's reading of his poem 'Christmas Day'. From 1997.

Poems For The Spring Equinox2021040420210405 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects a compilation programme: Four Seasons - Poems for the Spring Equinox - a collection of poems to celebrate the arrival of spring, longer days and new beginnings.

With poems by Robin Robertson, Stevie Smith, Louise Gluck, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Charlotte Mew, Ben Jonson, A E Housman and Patrick Kavanagh.

Radio 4's former poet-in-residence, Alice Oswald reads a poem written specially for the vernal equinox, Jackie Kay reads Life Mask and London's Young People's Poet Laureate, Caleb Femi reads his poem about how spring arrives in a concrete environment, Anti-Winter.

Readers include, David Calder, Clark Peters, Noma Dumezweni, Harriet Walter, Simon Russell Beale, Siobhan Redmond, Bill Patterson and Anton Lesser.

Producer: Sarah Addezio.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2018.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poems From The Pennines2017031220170313 (BBC7)
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Poet Simon Armitage takes us on a journey to the Stanza Stones.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poems From The Pennines'.

Poet Simon Armitage walks the route of his 'Stanza Stones' - a series of commissioned poems carved into six stones along the Watershed of the Pennine moorland from Marsden to Ilkley in West Yorkshire. The poems take the theme of water in six different states - rain, mist, snow, puddle, dew, and beck and look at our relationship with water and our moorland. The area is close to Simon Armitage's heart as he grew up in Marsden and still lives locally.

Simon talks about the creative process of writing the poetry and the challenge of writing poems that may be read on the moors for a thousand years to come. He also reveals the history of people carving words on the rocks on the moors and looks at the nature of our relationship with water.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

Made for BBC Radio 4 by White Pebble Media and first heard in 2012.

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poems From The Pennines'.

Made for BBC Radio 4 by White Pebble Media and first broadcast in 2012.

Poet Of Albion2007112720160925 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra on the life of the radical London artist and poet, William Blake.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra on the life of the radical London artist and poet, William Blake.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with The Poet of Albion.

Jenny Uglow presents a profile of Wiliam Blake. Widely misrepresented as a patriotic conformist, the great poet was a passionate dissident, a political artist deeply at odds with his country whose ideas were formed by the turbulent history of the time.

Contributors include Blake's biographer Peter Ackroyd and poet and critic Tom Paulin.

Producers: Susan Marling and Kate Bland.

Made for BBC Radio 4 by Just Radio and first broadcast in 2007.

Poetry And Planets: Simon Armitage1998091020180819 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra introduces a piece by Simon Armitage and an interview from Start the Week.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poetry And Planets: Simon Armitage2018081920180820 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra introduces a piece by Simon Armitage and an interview from Start the Week.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poetry and Planets' featuring Simon Armitage plus an interview from 'Start the Week' where he discusses his inspiration.

'Poetry and Planets': When poet Simon Armitage invested in a powerful Russian telescope to scan the night skies above his native Huddersfield, he produced a sequence of almost 90 poems about the constellations and their modem imaginative resonances. Simon introduces and reads his favourite poems from the sequence.

Producer: Robert Ketteridge. From 1998

'Start The Week': Simon Armitage talks about his collection CloudCuckooLand with Melvyn Bragg.

Producer: Olivia Seligman. From 1997.

Poetry And The Russian Soul2016082820160829 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Poetry and the Russian Soul, presented by Martin Sixsmith.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

'And Poetry Awakes in Me': Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Poetry and the Russian Soul, presented by Martin Sixsmith. From July 2008.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Poetry and the Russian Soul.

A short but epic adventure through the heart and soul of Russia's poetry. Martin Sixsmith explores the 'strange kind of love' - often fatal - that Russia's poets have had for their homeland. And asks can you understand Russia better through its verse?

and poetry awakens in me (Vasili Pushkin- Autumn) Poetry is uniquely linked to Russian identity and nationhood. Effectively a creation of the 18th century, it was vital in creating a natural language and form of expression as modern Russia forged a separate identity from the old world of the Slavonic church.

Pushkin was its first hero and remains the archetype of the brilliant but doomed poet whose quest for the essential truth of his nation and people carries with it fatal consequences. Russia, after all, is one of the few countries where writing poetry can amount to a death sentence.

Producer: Mark Burman

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

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'Set the hearts of men on fire with your word.' Poetry and the Russian Soul.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

'Set the hearts of men on fire with your word.' Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra introduces the final part of Poetry and the Russian Soul, presented by Martin Sixsmith. From 2008.

Poetry For The Spring Equinox2020030820200309 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Four Seasons – Spring to mark the spring equinox and the new season.

The programme features an anthology of old and new poems read by actors and poets for Radio 4's Four Seasons. Poems by Charlotte Mew, William Wordsworth, Louis MacNeice, Christopher Marlowe, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney and Edward Thomas are read by Juliet Stevenson, Noma Dumezweni, Ray Fearon, Simon Russell Beale, Sinead Cusack, Alex Jennings and Anton Lesser. Alice Oswald, Gillian Clarke and Patience Agbabi read their own work.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljit Nagra selects Four Seasons - Spring - an anthology of old and new poems.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poetry Idol2016062620160627 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Poetry Idol - a contest to find the best poet in the Middle East.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poetry Idol'.

Poetry's always had an essential role to play in Arab literature, and the tradition is thriving in unexpected ways. Shahidha Bari travels to Abu Dhabi to join the audience of 'Million's Poet', a massive televised competition to find the best poet across the Middle East.

Every year this huge contest takes place under the spotlight of the cameras in Abu Dhabi. Million's Poet is broadcast live with a huge following, as judges and viewers both have the chance to vote. There's plenty at stake, as the top prize is an eye-watering five million United Arab Emirate dirhams, a figure getting close to one million pounds.

So how did this TV contest begin and why do people tune in to hear poets reading their work? It's not the sort of show that would be likely to take off in the west. Judges, competitors and the audience all offer clues to the secret of the success of Million Poet's.

Producer: Mark Rickards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Poetry In Translation2013051620180826 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poetry in Translation' looking at the global poetry scene.

Just how do you translate a poem? Daljit Nagra himself explores the different approaches that poets take, and there's more to it than just knowing another language.

The Magazine Modern Poetry in Translation was founded by Ted Hughes and Daniel Weissbort in 1965. It's hard to believe that before this, British poetry had no real access to work beyond its borders. We hear from former editor David Constantine and his replacement Sasha Dugdale about the magazine's history and future.

Daljit speaks to poets Jo Shapcott, Pascale Petit, WN Herbert and Yang Lian, who share the pleasures and pitfalls of their methods of translation.

Producer: Jessica Treen

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Poet-in-residence Daljit Nagra dives into the archive to look at the global poetry scene.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Poetry In Translation2018082620200503 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra dives into the archive to look at the global poetry scene.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poetry in Translation' looking at the global poetry scene.

Just how do you translate a poem? Daljit Nagra himself explores the different approaches that poets take, and there's more to it than just knowing another language.

The Magazine Modern Poetry in Translation was founded by Ted Hughes and Daniel Weissbort in 1965. It's hard to believe that before this, British poetry had no real access to work beyond its borders. We hear from former editor David Constantine and his replacement Sasha Dugdale about the magazine's history and future.

Daljit speaks to poets Jo Shapcott, Pascale Petit, WN Herbert and Yang Lian, who share the pleasures and pitfalls of their methods of translation.

Producer: Jessica Treen

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Poetry Of David Gascoyne2017021220170213 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces A Burning Sound: The Poetry of David Gascoyne.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces A Burning Sound: The Poetry of David Gascoyne. From January 1995.

Poetry Of Gold And Angels 1/2 San Francisco2013081820180729 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with the first part of 'Poetry Of Gold and Angels: San Francisco'.

San Francisco is a place where a thousand stories meet - a port city where many cultures and races mix, the birthplace of counterculture and political ideologies, and now home to the high-tech revolution.

Poet, educator and weaver Kim Shuck was born in the city and has Tsalagi, Sauk and Fox and Polish ancestor's. She takes us on a tour of her San Francisco including North Beach and China Town and discusses how poets have been inspired by the city. The local poetry scene is so much more than the San Franciscan Beat poets - so here's a chance to hear some of the other poems coming out of the city.

Kim talks to poets including Devorah Major who was Poet Laureate of San Francisco and takes us to Marcus Books, the oldest Black book shop in America. And Jack Hirschman, part of the Beat generation and social activist, explains how music and jazz have influenced the city's poetic voice.

Other guests include poets Genny Lim, David Brazil, Micah Ballard and David Buuck.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Introduced by poet Daljit Nagra, San Franciscan Kim Shuck presents the poetry of her city.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poetry Of Gold And Angels 2/2 Los Angeles2013082520180805 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with second part of 'Poetry Of Gold and Angels: Los Angeles.

Los Angeles poet and lyricist Stephen J. Kalinich looks to find the real poetic voice of the city - a voice he believes is to be found in the poetry of the streets.

Stephen worked with the Beach Boys as a lyricist in the '60s and also recorded a poetry album with Brian Wilson, 'A World of Peace Must Come' inspired by Vietnam. Indeed peace has been his major theme as a writer. He recited poetry at a concert of 'Sugarman' Sixto Rodrigez. As well as reciting some of his own work, Stephen is on a quest to discover the true poetry of LA.

On his journey round the city, he encounters poets such as SA Griffin, from the poetry group Carma Bums who talks about his work also to promote peace with his tour of a 'poetry bomb' - a real bomb filled with poems. He also talks about the harshness of living in a town dominated by the movie industry and a desire to be famous from his experience of working as an actor.

And acclaimed song writer PF Sloan talks about his music and difference between writing lyrics and poetry. He also explains how living in LA can sometimes seem like being at a party, being really hungry and the fruit in the fruit bowl is plastic.

And meet Gingee, a poet and DJ from the Filipino community who talks about the issues she has encountered and why she needs to represent her community in her work.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Introduced by poet Daljit Nagra, Stephen Kalinich takes us on a poetic tour of Los Angeles

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Poetry Of History - Di Great Insohreckshan20151115 (BBC7)
20151116 (BBC7)

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'The Poetry of History' written in the aftermath of great historic events, Jonathan Bate brings us close to our own times and the Brixton riots of 1981. He talks to Linton Kwesi Johnson whose poem Di Great Insohreckshan now stands alongside TV and radio archive as a primary source, helping future generations understand the cultural and political upheaval that spilt onto the streets of south London in April 1981.

Producer: Tom Alban

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2007.

Linton Kwesi Johnson's poem explains Brixton's cultural and political upheaval of 1981.

Jonathan Bate talks to Linton Kwesi Johnson, whose poem explains Brixton's cultural and political upheaval of April 1981.

Jonathan Bate talks to Linton Kwesi Johnson, whose poem explains Brixton's cultural and political upheaval of April 1981.

Poetry Of The Forgotten People2017112620171127 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces 'Poetry of the Forgotten People' featuring Oodgeroo Noonuccal.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Poetry of the Forgotten People' featuring Australian poet Oodgeroo Noonuccal.

Greta Scacchi pays a personal tribute to this extraordinary poet - formerly known as Kath Walker - who, when the aeroplane she was travelling on was taken hostage, used poetry to appeal to the hostage takers.

A pioneer of Aboriginal poetry, she was the first Indigenous Australian woman to have her work published, which was a milestone in Australian history.

She was also a trailblazing Aboriginal Rights campaigner and environmental activist, who paved the way for contemporary Aboriginal artists and political campaigners.

Joining Greta are close friends and family, who share their memories and discuss her impact not only on their lives but on millions of Australians too.

Oodgeroo's poems are read by Aboriginal actress, Roxanne McDonald.

Produced by Charlotte Austin and Diana Bentley
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.

Poetry Please: Altered States20151129 (BBC7)
20151130 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces an edition featuring poetry to take you into altered states.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'Poetry Please', Roger McGough presents poetry to take you into altered states, reveries and waking dreams - including Tennyson's strange and magical Lotus-Eaters and Coleridge's Kubla Khan.

The readers are Tim Pigott-Smith and Indira Varma.

Producer: Beth O'Dea

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Poetry Please: Goblin Market20151122 (BBC7)
20151123 (BBC7)
An edition featuring works by Christina Rossetti, including Goblin Market.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'Poetry Please' Roger McGough features the poems of Christina Rossetti. Shirley Henderson gives a beguiling rendition of what is arguably Rossetti's most famous poem 'Goblin Market', published in 1862. It's a heady fairy tale about temptation involving two sisters, Laura and Lizzie. The poem has a sexual undertone and a menacing quality that lurks among the persistent pleas of the fruit selling Goblin men to 'come buy, come buy.' Visits to your greengrocer may never be the same again.

There is also a reading of another of Rossetti's much requested and moving poems 'Remember,' as well as a lesser known poem of pilgrimage, 'Up-hill'.

Producer: Sarah Langan

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Poetry Please: The Ballad Of Reading Gaol20151206 (BBC7)
20151207 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces an edition featuring Oscar Wilde's The Ballad of Reading Gaol.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'Poetry Please', Roger McGough introduces Oscar Wilde's The Ballad of Reading Gaol, read by Alex Jennings.

In May 1897 Oscar Wilde was released from Reading Gaol. That month he began to write The Ballad of Reading Gaol - to express his horror and outrage at what he had witnessed during his years in prison. The poem memorialises a fellow prisoner, who was hanged for murder in 1896.

Wilde wrote it in exile in Dieppe, then Naples. He finished it in October that same year, and it was published the following year, 1898. The author's name was given simply as C. 3. 3., Wilde's number in Reading Gaol, his cell being the third on the third floor of Block C.

Producer Beth O'Dea

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

Poetry Please: The Eve Of St Agnes20151213 (BBC7)
20151214 (BBC7)
BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'Poetry Please', Roger McGough introduces Keats's erotic and magical poem The Eve of St Agnes read by actress Lindsay Duncan.

January 20th is the Eve of St Agnes.

Producer Beth O'Dea

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Daljit Nagra introduces Lindsay Duncan reading Keats's erotic and magical poem.

Daljit Nagra introduces Poetry Please in which actress Lindsay Duncan reads Keats's erotic and magical poem The Eve of St Agnes. Presented by Roger McGough.

Poetry Postcards2019060920190610 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Poetry Postcards.

In 2014 Glasgow hosted the Commonwealth Games. For this programme a poet from each participating nation and territory were invited to send a poem to Glasgow for the Games.

Razia Iqbal discusses the common themes arising from the collection with four of the participating poets: Sasenarine Persaud from Guyana; Nigerian journalist and poet Tolu Ogunlesi; Toni Stuart, a performance poet from South Africa; and Trinidadian Vahni Capildeo.

Produced by Liza Greig.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Razia Iqbal shares poetry from around the Commonwealth. From 2014.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poetry Proms: Andrew Motion And Ua Fanthorpe2000071920170507 (BBC7)
20170508 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra selects Poetry Proms with Andrew Motion and UA Fanthorpe and Last Word.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with two choices: 'Poetry Proms' with Andrew Motion from 2000 and Tribute to UA Fanthorpe on 'Last Word' from 2009.

At a live event Jo Shapcott introduces poets Andrew Motion and UA Fanthorpe who read selections from their work.

In Last Word, Matthew Bannister and Elizabeth Sandy provide a fitting tribute to UA Fanthorpe following her death in 2009.

Producers: Kate Rowland and Neil George.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Poetry Societies - The Gujarati Writers Forum2019080420190805 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Poetry Societies – The Gujarati Writers Forum.

In this series Judith Palmer joins enthusiasts who meet up and down the country to celebrate their love of poetry.

The Gujarati poets love to celebrate their literary heritage but want to make it relevant for the younger generation. In this episode Judith Palmer goes to Batley in West Yorkshire to join in a lively meeting and hear about their latest translation project.

Producer Viv Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 2006.

From the BBC archive Daljit Nagra selects Poetry Societies \u2013 The Gujarati Writers Forum.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

In this series Judith Palmer joins enthusiasts who meet up and down the country to celebrate their love of poetry.

The Gujarati poets love to celebrate their literary heritage but want to make it relevant for the younger generation. In this episode Judith Palmer goes to Batley in West Yorkshire to join in a lively meeting and hear about their latest translation project.

Poetry Societies - The Yeats Society Of Sligo2019012720190128 (BBC7)80 years since the death of WB Yeats (28 January 1939), Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Poetry Societies – The Yeats Society of Sligo about the Nobel winning poet and his home. From 2006.

Presenter Judith Palmer spends a day on the West Coast of Ireland with the Yeats Society as they celebrate the poet's birthday [13th June 1865 ].

Produced by Viv Beeby.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2006.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Poetry Societies \u2013 The Yeats Society of Sligo.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

80 years since the death of WB Yeats (28 January 1939), Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Poetry Societies – The Yeats Society of Sligo about the Nobel winning poet and his home. From 2006.

Presenter Judith Palmer spends a day on the West Coast of Ireland with the Yeats Society as they celebrate the poet’s birthday [13th June 1865 ].

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2006.

Poetry Societies - Thomas Lovell Beddoes2020060720200608 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Poetry Societies - Thomas Lovell Beddoes Society.

As part of a series looking at groups up and down the country that meet to celebrate their love of poetry, Judith Palmer spends an evening with the Beddoes Society at the Dead Poets Pub in Belper, Derbyshire, where the poet's family, together with their friends, gather to raise a glass to their brilliant but flawed ancestor.

Producer Viv Beeby.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

Postcards From The Village: An East-west Dialogue2015120620180513 (BBC7)
20180514 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Postcards From the Villages: An East-West Dialogue.

An exchange of two villages at the margins of Europe - one in Transylvania, one in Oxfordshire - inspires new poems from Romanian poet Ioana Ieronim and UK poet Fiona Sampson.

Both have written extensively about their own villages - Rasnov and Coleshill - so what happens when they visit each other's 'great good place'? Ioana and Fiona find some curious parallels between two villages that on first encounter seem very different.

Producer: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects Postcards From the Villages: An East-West Dialogue.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Provincial Pleasures - Norman Nicholson2014010520171022 (BBC7)
20171023 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra introduces the Cumbrian writer Norman Nicholson in Provincial Pleasures.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Provincial Pleasures' - a profile of Cumbrian poet Norman Nicholson.

Born in January 1914, Norman Nicholson lived all bar two of his 73 years in the same small industrial town - most of them in the same house.

Millom (Cumbrian dialect for "At the mills") is not the Lake District of Hawkshead or Windermere. It's a place where industry failed and unemployment was disproportionately high. Yet it was here, in isolation from the literary world, that Norman Nicholson became a world-class poet. He wrote about quarrying and iron works, slag banks and granite. He was one of the first to argue that industrial heritage should be valued on a par with our cultural heritage.

Championed in his early life by TS Elliot, Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney, Nicholson chose to focus his energies on a non-literary audience, spending his evenings lecturing at the Workers Educational Association. During the 1970s, his poem Windscale about a nuclear accident became an environmentalist's anthem.

Eric Robson visits Millom, the town Norman Nicholson dedicated his life to. What do the locals think of the poet who did more than anyone else to reflect the soul of this Cumbrian village? When poets are often restless people, what motivated Nicholson to live his entire life in an apparently depressed provincial town?

Contributors include Melvyn Bragg (chairman of the Norman Nicholson Society), poet Paul Kingsnorth, academic David Cooper (Manchester Metropolitan University) and author Kathleen Jones.

Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Radio Heaney2014011220160410 (BBC7)
20160411 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces the County Derry poet Seamus Heaney and his love for the wireless.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

'Radio Heaney' is a compilation of many of the poet's greatest radio moments.

In his acceptance speech as newly-anointed Nobel Laureate, Seamus Heaney recalled how vital a role the wireless had played in his early life growing up on a farm in Mossbawn Co. Derry. On the radio, he heard dispatches from the front line during the Second World War, was gripped by Dick Barton Special Agent and revelled in the musicality of the Shipping Forecast.

As an up and coming published poet, Heaney wrote and presented many programmes for schools in Northern Ireland, exploring and celebrating fellow writers and the local landscape. He also made for a compelling contributor and interviewee to any discussion on the purpose of poetry and was ultimately crowned with the medium's greatest accolade, an invitation to Radio 4's Desert Island.

Presented by John Toal.

Producer: Owen McFadden

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Rilke's Sonnets To Orpheus - Dancing The Orange2016042420160425 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces the story of a great modern masterpiece.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus - Dancing the Orange.

Leading us through the nuances of their meaning, Karen Leeder alerts us to the beauty and power

of one of the great modernist works of literature of 1922.

After a lifetime wandering about Europe Rilke was at last able to settle when his patron, Werner Reinhart, bought the Château de Muzot in the Swiss Valais so that he could live there, and write. His aim was to complete his monumental work, 'The Duino Elegies'. But this plan was interrupted in February when, 'completely unexpected' the 'Sonnets to Orpheus' broke upon him'. Within three weeks he had completed 55 poems, of great variety, but all sonnets.

Rilke didn't like English and never visited Britain. Yet the 'Sonnets to Orpheus' have fascinated English language readers and writers ever since they appeared - with translations every decade.

With writers Martyn Crucefix and Don Paterson, plus German scholar and poet Rüdiger Görner, Karen Leeder teases out the major issues the poems address; death, love and, the creation and role of poetry - for Rilke a song of praise for life, and even death, in a creation without God, through which meaning is accomplished.

Karen visits the Château de Muzot and with Nanni Reinhart, who lives there now, to considers its impact on the composition of the poems.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Rites Of Passage - Baby Remembrance2019032420190325 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Rites of Passage – Baby Remembrance.

Ian McMillan travels around the country, meeting ordinary people who turn to poetry for inspiration or solace at key moments in their lives.

McMillan speaks to the Rev Sarah Brewerton, a minister who turned to poetry as a way of expressing her grief after her baby died at 28 weeks.

Producer - Liz Leonard

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra selects Rites of Passage \u2013 Baby Remembrance. Presented by Ian McMillan.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Rites Of Passage - Changing Schools2021042520210426 (BBC7)Poet Dajlit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Rites of Passage - Changing Schools featuring poems from children leaving primary.

Ian McMillan meets people who turn to poetry for inspiration or solace at key moments in their lives. Changing Schools. McMillan visits Year 6 at Hoyland Springwood Primary School in Barnsley, Yorkshire, where he encourages the children to write a poem about going up to "big" school.

Producer Liz Leonard

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Rites Of Passage - Hindu Wedding2019111720191118 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Rites of Passage from a series in which Ian McMillan travels the length and breadth of the country, meeting people who turn to poetry for inspiration or solace at key moments in their lives.

In this episode - Hindu Wedding - McMillan travels to Bhaktivedanta Manor in Hertfordshire (made famous in the 70s when George Harrison donated it to the Hare Krishna Movement) for a Hindu wedding. He talks to the newlyweds about the place of poetry in their lives and to a Hindu priest about the poetic nature Of Sanskrit.

Producer Liz Leonard

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Rites Of Passage - Stonehenge2004082220181021 (BBC7)
20181022 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Rites of Passage' as Ian McMillan joins Druids to watch the sunrise at Stonehenge.

Ian is initiated as a Druidic bard, listens to some poems and talks to his fellow celebrants about why words matter.

Producer: Geoff Bird

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Daljit Nagra chooses 'Rites of Passage' in which Ian McMillan joins Druids at Stonehenge.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Siegfried Sassoon - A Friend2018010720180108 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Siegfried Sassoon - A Friend'

Dennis Silk recalls his 13-year friendship with the war poet and shares a precious private recording he made in the 1960s of Siegfried Sassoon reading his own work, including The General, Base Details, Died of Wounds and several other poems.

Producer: Tom Alban

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2004.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects 'Siegfried Sassoon - A Friend' with Dennis Silk.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2004.

Sir Ian Mckellen Reads The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner2019122220191223 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - the atmospheric poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Read by Sir Ian McKellen.

A young wedding guest is detained with a 'glittering eye' and a strange tale of the supernatural events he experienced on a long sea voyage.

Specially recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere.

Producer: Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Christmas Day in 2006.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Soul Music - In The Bleak Midwinter2019122920191230 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and makes a seasonal choice: Soul Music – In the Bleak Midwinter.

Originally a poem by Christina Rossetti. this carol came into being when Vaughan Williams asked Holst to set the words to music for the English Hymnal. Peggy Reynolds, Ian Bradley and Raymond Head tell the story of a Christmas favourite.

The reader is Cathryn Bradshaw.

Producer: Sara Conkey

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

South Of My Days2016091820160919 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces South of My Days, featuring Australian poet Judith Wright.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with South of My Days.

Greta Scacchi presents a portrait of the Australian poet Judith Wright, who died in 2000, after breaking new ground in celebrating the arresting beauty of the Australian landscape - and lamenting the troubled relationship between Australia's colonial settlers and its indigenous people.

Wright's daughter, friends and colleagues discuss her life and work.Kerry Fox is the reader.

Producers: Charlotte Austin and Diana Bentley.

A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2009.

Stanza On Stage - Paul Durcan2020021620200217 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Stanza on Stage with poet Paul Durcan reading at the Triskel Art Centre, Cork.

Featuring poems by Paul Durcan:
Tullynoe
The Cabinet Table
Sister Agnes Writes to her Beloved Mother
Michael Mac Liammoir
The Centre of the Universe
Nessa
A Snail in My Prime

Produced by Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 1993.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Stonehenge2004082220181021 (BBC7)
20181022 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses 'Rites of Passage' in which Ian McMillan joins Druids at Stonehenge.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Stopping By Woods2020122720201228 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects ‘Stopping By Woods' by Robert Frost.

The poem 'Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening' was written about nightfall on the shortest day of the year, though it was actually put to paper at dawn on June 21st, 1922 - the longest day. This has always puzzled Kenneth Steven, a poet captivated by Robert Frost's seemingly effortless mastery of rhyme, metre, language and imagery.

Kenneth Steven visits the poet's home in Shaftesbury, Vermont, now a museum. He talks to the curator there, Carole Thompson, and a pair of Frost scholars, Lea Newman and David Sanders, and he walks the very woods that are possibly evoked by the horseman who pauses to watch the snow settle, despite having "promises to keep/And miles to go before I sleep".

He makes a pilgrimage to Frost's final resting place in a New England cemetery - his gravestone covered in glinting pennies left by fellow pilgrims - and he reveals compelling new insights into the origins and impact of the poem which Frost himself considered his "best bid for remembrance".

Producer: Alan Hall

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2011.

Kenneth Steven explores Robert Frost's iconic poem, Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The poem 'Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening' was written about nightfall on the shortest day of the year, though it was actually put to paper at dawn on June 21st, 1922 - the longest day. This has always puzzled Kenneth Steven, a poet captivated by Robert Frost's seemingly effortless mastery of rhyme, metre, language and imagery.

Kenneth Steven visits the poet's home in Shaftesbury, Vermont, now a museum. He talks to the curator there, Carole Thompson, and a pair of Frost scholar, Lea Newman and David Sanders, and he walks the very woods that are possibly evoked by the horseman who pauses to watch the snow settle, despite having "promises to keep/And miles to go before I sleep".

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2011.

Kenneth Steven explores Robert Frost's iconic poem, Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening.

Kenneth Steven explores Robert Frost's iconic poem, Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening.

Street Reach Girls1999082320170319 (BBC7)
20170320 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses 'Street Reach Girls', presented by Barnsley poet Ian MacMillan.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Street Reach Girls'.

At a drop-in centre in Yorkshire prostitutes get more than just condoms, health advice, showers and tea: they get Barnsley poet Ian McMillan to help them write poems about their life.

A documentary with verse that tells their story, written by Ian and the Street Reach Girls.

Produced in Bristol by Mark Jobst.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1999.

Street Reach Girls2017031920200830 (BBC7)
20200831 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Street Reach Girls'.

At a drop-in centre in Yorkshire prostitutes get more than just condoms, health advice, showers and tea: they get Barnsley poet Ian McMillan to help them write poems about their life.

A documentary with verse that tells their story, written by Ian and the Street Reach Girls.

Produced in Bristol by Mark Jobst.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1999.

Daljit Nagra chooses 'Street Reach Girls', presented by Barnsley poet Ian MacMillan.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Surtsey And Me2017070220170703 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces 'Surtsey and Me', about a new island near Iceland.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'Surtsey and Me' about the emergence of a new island.

Out of the icy seas off the south-west coast of Iceland in November 1963, a massive volcanic eruption gave birth to the island of Surtsey. The same year in West Yorkshire, the poet Simon Armitage was born. They had never met until 2004. More than five decades later, island and poet get together to compare how it's going.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2004.

Tagore At 1502011071720160612 (BBC7)
20160613 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra on an event marking the anniversary of the poet's birth at Dartington Hall.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tagore at 150'.

Poets, singers and ecological activists share their favourite verse at the Tagore Festival at Dartington Hall in Devon marking the 150th anniversary of the poet's birth in 2011.

Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel prize for literature in 1913 for his collection Geetanjali (The Song Offerings). He wrote more than 1,000 poems and 2000 songs and his work has been translated into all the major languages of the world.

UNESCO declared 2011 as the Year of Tagore with events throughout the world celebrating his life and work.

Devon's Dartington Hall is a centre for poetry, music, arts and crafts that was founded at the suggestion of Tagore himself.

We hear from poets such as William Radice, Ketaki Kushari Dyson and former Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, singers Debashish and Rohini Raychaudhuri, environmentalist Jonathon Porritt and internationalists such as Clare Short and Satish Kumar, Artistic Director of the Festival who is a devotee of Tagore's ecological teachings as well as his poetry.

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion

A Culture Wise production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Tales From Ovid - Arethusa; Salamacis And Hermaphroditus; Actaeon;tiresias1998042420160731 (BBC7)
20160801 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces stories including Tiresias retold from Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tales of Ovid'.

Poet Ted Hughes continues reading from his award-winning reworking of Ovid's Metamorphoses - stories of the teeming underworld and overworld of Romanised Greek myth and legend.

Featuring 'Arethusa','Salamacis and Hermaphroditus', 'Actaeon' and 'Tiresias', this highly praised collection won the 1997 Whitbread prize for poetry and WH Smith Literary Award.

Ted Hughes: born: 1930 and died: 1998.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast in two-parts on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Tales From Ovid: Arachne; Midas2016071020160711 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Arachne and Midas, stories retold from Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tales of Ovid'.

Poet Ted Hughes continues reading from his award-winning reworking of Ovid's Metamorphoses - stories of the teeming underworld and overworld of Romanised Greek myth and legend.

Featuring 'Arachne' and 'Midas', this highly praised collection won the 1997 Whitbread prize for poetry and WH Smith Literary Award.

Ted Hughes: born: 1930 and died: 1998.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast in two-parts on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Tales From Ovid: Echo And Narcissus And Callisto And Arcas1998042220160703 (BBC7)
20160704 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces a prize-winning retelling of tales from Ovid's Metamorphoses.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tales of Ovid'.

Poet Ted Hughes begins reading from his award-winning reworking of Ovid's Metamorphoses - stories of the teeming underworld and overworld of Romanised Greek myth and legend.

Starting with 'Echo and Narcissus' and 'Callisto and Arcas', this highly praised collection won the 1997 Whitbread prize for poetry and WH Smith Literary Award.

Ted Hughes: born: 1930 and died: 1998.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast in two-parts on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Tales From Ovid: Pyramus And Thisbe; Erysichthon1998050220160724 (BBC7)
20160725 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces tales from Ovid's Metamorphoses, including' Pyramus and Thisbe'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tales of Ovid'.

Poet Ted Hughes continues reading from his award-winning reworking of Ovid's Metamorphoses - stories of the teeming underworld and overworld of Romanised Greek myth and legend.

Featuring 'Pyramus' and 'Thisbe; Erysichthon', this highly praised collection won the 1997 Whitbread prize for poetry and WH Smith Literary Award.

Ted Hughes: born: 1930 and died: 1998.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast in two-parts on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Daljit Nagra introduces tales from Ovid's Metamorphoses, including' Pyramus and Thisbe' and 'Erysichthon'. Written and read by Ted Hughes. From May 1998.

Tales From Ovid: Semele; Peleus And Thetis; Pygmalion; The Birth Of Hercules1998042520160717 (BBC7)
20160718 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces stories retold from Ovid's Metamorphoses including Pygmalion.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Tales of Ovid'.

Poet Ted Hughes continues reading from his award-winning reworking of Ovid's Metamorphoses - stories of the teeming underworld and overworld of Romanised Greek myth and legend.

Featuring 'Semele', 'Peleus and Thetis' and 'Pygmalion and the Birth of Hercules', this highly praised collection won the 1997 Whitbread prize for poetry and WH Smith Literary Award.

Ted Hughes: born: 1930 and died: 1998.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast in two-parts on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Tennyson's Ulysses Revisited2019040720190408 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Tennyson's Ulysses Revisited.

Alfred Tennyson's much-loved and frequently anthologised poem, Ulysses has always been a favourite of the award-winning poet Sean O'Brien, but he has never fully analysed why.

The poem starts with the Greek hero on the shores of Ithaca, justifying his reasons for leaving his faithful wife Penelope once more, to set off and travel again. It ends with the famously rousing lines "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield".

2009 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Tennyson and Sean O'Brien set out on his own journey to learn more about the poem and its enduring appeal.

He hears from Homer scholar Oliver Taplin and Dante scholar Martin McLaughlin about Tennyson's sources for the poem and its surprisingly ambiguous hero, and then learns from Victorian experts Seamus Perry, Robert Douglas Fairhurst and Linda Hughes about the tragedy in Tennyson's young life that led him to write this poem about an old man when he himself was just 24.

This is a poem about bereavement and death but, as the poet Vicki Feaver explains, it is also about the personal struggle in each of us between comfort and adventure, between the familiar and the unknown, between accepting life as it is and striving ever onward.

Anton Lesser provides a powerful new reading of Ulysses.

Produced by Beaty Rubens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Alfred Tennyson's great poem Ulysses, explained and explored.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Bards Of Somalia2010082220180916 (BBC7)
20180917 (BBC7)
20180923 (BBC7)
20180924 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Bards of Somalia' featuring the country's news-reporting poets.

What could Britain learn from Somalia - a country where poetry is nothing less than the main means of cultural communication?

Portrayed abroad as a land beset by gunmen, pirates and famine, it is also known by those who live there as a Nation of Poets. Somalia had no written language until 1972 and poetry has always been the country's core form of mass communication - whether the spoken word or, more recently, via cassettes and radios.

Verse has, in many areas, taken the place of history books, newspapers and television as the main means of spreading news and comment. Poets who have real skill - the true bards - have the power to shape current events and receive both social and political privileges.

Can we integrate any of these elements into British poetry? Instead of one Laureate, should we have hundreds of bards reflecting the diversity of our nation - people we can turn to for everything from the poetic equivalent of a Times leader to the latest gossip around the parish pump? Can poetry be integrated into our daily lives as successfully as in Somalia?

In discussion with presenter Rageh Omaar, poets from the Somali community in Britain and expert translators wonder if - through the medium of everything from the spoken word to text messaging - Somalia's bards might provide the germ of a new form of information sharing in Britain.

Producer: Neil Cargill

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.

Daljit Nagra chooses the country's news-reporting poets, as presented by Rageh Omar.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.

The Bards Of Somalia2018091620200524 (BBC7)
20200525 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses the country's news-reporting poets, as presented by Rageh Omar.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Bards of Somalia' featuring the country's news-reporting poets.

What could Britain learn from Somalia - a country where poetry is nothing less than the main means of cultural communication?

Portrayed abroad as a land beset by gunmen, pirates and famine, it is also known by those who live there as a Nation of Poets. Somalia had no written language until 1972 and poetry has always been the country's core form of mass communication - whether the spoken word or, more recently, via cassettes and radios.

Verse has, in many areas, taken the place of history books, newspapers and television as the main means of spreading news and comment. Poets who have real skill - the true bards - have the power to shape current events and receive both social and political privileges.

Can we integrate any of these elements into British poetry? Instead of one Laureate, should we have hundreds of bards reflecting the diversity of our nation - people we can turn to for everything from the poetic equivalent of a Times leader to the latest gossip around the parish pump? Can poetry be integrated into our daily lives as successfully as in Somalia?

In discussion with presenter Rageh Omaar, poets from the Somali community in Britain and expert translators wonder if - through the medium of everything from the spoken word to text messaging - Somalia's bards might provide the germ of a new form of information sharing in Britain.

Producer: Neil Cargill

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.

The Bards Of Whitelocks Bar2013041420180401 (BBC7)
20180402 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Bards of Whitelocks Bar'.

Poet Jean Sprackland visits the characterful Leeds city centre bar, Whitelocks, famous for its poetic punters from Betjeman to TS Eliot.

In the company of poets Ian Duhig, Jon Glover, Rommi Smith and Antony Dunn, she explores the legacy of the post-war Leeds poetry renaissance that produced such eminent poets as Geoffrey Hill, Tony Harrison and Jon Silkin.

Producer: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces The Bards of Whitelocks Bar, famous for its poetic punters.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Dub Poetry Of Linton Kwesi Johnson2008072220161009 (BBC7)
20161010 (BBC7)
Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Dread, Beat an' Blood.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra introduces Dread, Beat an' Blood, presented by Benjamin Zephaniah. From July 2008.

The Echo Chamber - City Streets And Seashores2017111920171120 (BBC7)Poets Roy Fisher and Michael Longley talk to Paul Farley. Introduced by Daljit Nagra.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses 'The Echo Chamber' - poets Roy Fisher and Michael Longley talk to Paul Farley. From 2013.

Paul Farley meets poets Roy Fisher and Michael Longley. City streets and the seashore sing loud in their poems. Roy Fisher's long sequence, City about Birmingham, is the best poetic account of modern urban life. Michael Longley has been writing lyric poems about a short stretch of the coastline of County Mayo for decades.

Producer: Tim Dee.

The Echo Chamber - Clive James2016010420160103 (BBC7)Clive James reads his staring-death-in-the-face poems with Paul Farley.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'The Echo Chamber', Clive James talks to Paul Farley and reads his staring-death-in-the-face poems.

Clive James has been a poet throughout his life as well as a literary critic, memoirist and television pundit. He didn't expect to be alive for this collection, after illness and old age took him in their grip a couple of years ago. But, against the odds, he's still with us. And his recent poems are extraordinarily clear-eyed and fearlessly moving. He manages to be light throughout whilst remaining, as one critic put it, deadly serious.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

The Echo Chamber - Contains Strong Language Festival2021011720210118 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects a programme featuring a nominee for this year's TS Eliot prize. This special edition of the Echo Chamber is presented by Paul Farley and was recorded at the BBC Contains Strong Language festival in Hull.

Jacob Polley, Caroline Bird, Wayne Holloway-Smith and Mary Jean Chan share poems about beginnings, arrivals and coming of age.

Presenter: Paul Farley
Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2018.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Echo Chamber - Craig Raine2020062820200629 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Echo Chamber - Craig Raine.

Paul Farley meets Craig Raine at his home to hear new and old poems from a famous Martian.

'A Martian Sends A Postcard Home' (1979) was Craig Raine's second collection and its poems defined and encapsulated a way of looking afresh at the familiar world. Since then Raine has taught English literature, written novels, edited Fabers' poetry list and started and run magazines of criticism and new writing. He has written poetry throughout.

'How Snow Falls' appeared in 2010 and he has published a book on the writing and reading of poetry called 'My Grandmother's Glass Eye'. He talks about arguing about poetry and reads a suite of new poems as well as some old ones.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2016.

The Echo Chamber - Daisy Fried And Brenda Shaughnessy2019021720190218 (BBC7)A mixtape of new poems from two American poets: Daisy Fried and Brenda Shaughnessy.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Echo Chamber - Fiona Benson2020011220200113 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Echo Chamber featuring the poetry of Fiona Benson, who takes Paul Farley to her favourite swimming spot on the River Exe and shares work from her collection Vertigo + Ghost - poems of domestic life set against the backdrop of horrific world events, and of depression, motherhood and renewal.

Fiona Benson won an Eric Gregory Award in 2006 and a Faber New Poets Award in 2009. She lives in Devon with her husband and their two daughters. Her first collection, Bright Travellers, was shortlisted for the T. S. Eliot Prize and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. It won the 2015 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and the 2015 Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry Prize for First Full Collection.

Both Fiona and Paul Farley have been shortlisted for the T.S Eliot prize in 2019. Fiona also won the Forward Prize in 2019.

With music by The Cabinet of Living Cinema.

Presenter: Paul Farley
Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2018.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Echo Chamber featuring the poetry of Fiona Benson, who takes Paul Farley to her favourite swimming spot on the River Exe and shares work from her collection Vertigo + Ghost - poems of domestic life set against the backdrop of horrific world events, and of depression, motherhood and renewal.

Fiona Benson won an Eric Gregory Award in 2006 and a Faber New Poets Award in 2009. She lives in Devon with her husband and their two daughters. Her first collection, Bright Travellers, was shortlisted for the T. S. Eliot Prize and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. It won the 2015 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and the 2015 Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry Prize for First Full Collection.

Both Fiona and Paul Farley have been shortlisted for the T.S Eliot prize in 2019. Fiona also won the Forward Prize in 2019.

Presenter: Paul Farley
Producer: Mair Bosworth

The Echo Chamber - Michael Donaghy2019091520190916 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Echo Chamber: Michael Donaghy presented by Paul Farley.

Paul Farley remembers the poet Michael Donaghy with other poets ten years after his death. Greta Stoddart, Sean O'Brien and Don Paterson read his poems and read poems of their own that speak to their memory of the poet and teacher.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast in BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses the very best from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Echo Chamber - Middle Age20151227 (BBC7)
20151228 (BBC7)
Are the middle years tough for poets? With poems from Muldoon and Kathleen Jamie.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'The Echo Chamber', Paul Farley asks whether the middle years are tough for poets. With Paul Muldoon, Kathleen Jamie and Hugo Williams.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

The Echo Chamber - Ocean Vuong And Mark Pajak2021021420210215 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects The Echo Chamber featuring the Vietnamese-American poet and the Manchester-based poet Mark Pajak.

Paul Farley meets the Vietnamese-American poet and essayist Ocean Vuong, who was awarded the Felix Dennis Prize for Best First Collection for his remarkable debut collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds at the 2017 Forward Prizes, and who is shortlisted for the 2017 T.S. Eliot Prize. And talks to Manchester-based Mark Pajak, a rising talent to watch, about his pamphlet Spitting Distance.

Ocean Vuong's writings have been featured in The Atlantic, Harper's, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Village Voice, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Selected by Foreign Policy magazine as a 2016 100 Leading Global Thinker, alongside Hillary Clinton, Ban Ki-Moon and Warsan Shire, Ocean was also named by BuzzFeed Books as one of "32 Essential Asian American Writers". Born in Saigon, Vietnam, he lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, where he serves as an Assistant Professor in the MFA Program for Poets and Writers at Umass-Amherst. He is currently at work on his first novel.

Mark Pajak was born in Merseyside. His work has appeared in The London Review of Books, Poetry London, The North, The Rialto and Magma. He has been awarded a Northern Writer's Award, an Eric Gregory Award, first place in The Bridport Prize and has been commended in the National Poetry Competition. His first pamphlet, Spitting Distance, was selected by Carol Ann Duffy as a Laureate's Choice and is published with smith

doorstop.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Echo Chamber - Solsticial2016011720160118 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces The Echo Chamber with Alice Oswald's poem 'Tithonus'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'The Echo Chamber', Paul Farley introduces a poem called Tithonus for the year's midnight from Alice Oswald - a poem which lasts as long as dawn - plus music from nykelharpist Griselda Sanderson.

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

The Echo Chamber - The Body2017052120170522 (BBC7)Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces The Echo Chamber - about the shapes of poems.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with an edition of 'The Echo Chamber'.

Paul Farley looks at the body in question - the shapes of poems and the people in them. How does a poet decide on the form of their poem? What do different poetic forms do to the subject of a poem? The programme travels the country and anatomises its poetic body. With found poems and field-notes, a diary of failure and success, the sound of the world being taken down in rhyme, and a look into a hive of dead bees in midwinter.

With poems from Sean Borodale, Don Paterson and Alice Oswald.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

The Echo Chamber - The Knowledge20151220 (BBC7)
20151221 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces The Echo Chamber in which Paul Farley does the Knowledge.

Daljit Nagra introduces The Echo Chamber in which Paul Farley does the Knowledge, collecting taxi poems and sounds from all over London.

The Echo Chamber - The Poet, The Poem, And The Savannah2016011020160111 (BBC7)Glyn Maxwell, poet and author of On Poetry, discusses his work. Presented by Paul Farley.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Glyn Maxwell, poet and author of On Poetry, discusses his work. Presented by Paul Farley.

Daljit Nagra introduces The Echo Chamber, with Glyn Maxwell, poet and author of On Poetry, discussing his work. Presented by Paul Farley.

The Echo Chamber: Liz Berry And Helen Mort2015080920170813 (BBC7)
20170814 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses The Echo Chamber, with Paul Farley, Liz Berry and Helen Mort.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'The Echo Chamber' with Liz Berry and Helen Mort.

Two of the most striking and original first poetry collections in the last few years have been Division Street by Helen Mort and Black Country by Liz Berry. Both books are steeped in the places they were made in: West Yorkshire and the West Midlands. With Paul Farley, both poets have travelled towards one another and taken some poems back to their source. Helen Mort in the Peaks, on Sheffield streets, and then the memorably twisted spire of the church in Chesterfield. Liz Berry in a Black Country pigeon loft, an echoing canal tunnel and an ancient geological treasure trove. The heart of England is remade in these new poems. The poets end up half way between one anothers' places in a hotel that W H Auden (great poet of the unloved world) said served the best martinis in the land.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

The Echo Chamber: Translations2017082720170828 (BBC7)Can a poem be transplanted from one language to another?

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Echo Chamber': Translations
Adventures in strong language from the best of contemporary poetry. Paul Farley with translations of all sorts and hoping to topple the Tower of Babel. Can you transplant a poem from one language to another? Can a man be a woman? A fox a thought?

Featuring poems by Robin Robertson, Leontia Flynn, and Jamie McKendrick and poems journeying into English from Ancient Greece, Rome, Italy, Spanish and German.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with 'The Echo Chamber': Translations.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

The Fisher Poets Gathering2019012020190121 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting The Fisher Poets Gathering in which Katrina Porteous visits Astoria, Oregon, where each February commercial fishermen and women gather for a festival of poems, songs and stories they've written about their lives.

Fisher poets come from all over America - Florida, Maine, Chesapeake Bay, Alaska. These tough characters, who all know someone who has drowned, stand up and read their poems. Hundreds listen: there are sessions in bars and readings all over town. There are workshops, exhibitions, and the community radio station broadcasts proceedings, live.

In 2014, a poet came from beyond the United States. Katrina Porteous lives in the Northumbrian fishing village of Beadnell. For years she has worked with, recorded and written about her local fishing people.

She hears astonishing work from Dave Densmore, on his boat Cold Stream; from Moe Bowstern, an extraordinarily prolific writer about the lives of fisher women; from Richard King who fishes in Alaska, and farms in Hawaii. She meets, too, Lloyd Montgomery, an Aleut fisher poet. And wherever they are from, Katrina discovers, fisher poets share concerns over sustainability - of fish stocks, their communities, their way of life.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra selects The Fisher Poets Gathering presented by Katrina Porteous.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Great Libraries - Aberystwyth2020072620200727 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Great Libraries - The National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth.

From a series in which Joan Bakewell seeks out the most treasured poetry in some of the UK's great libraries. In this programme - The National Library of Wales Joan Bakewell journeys to Aberystwyth to look at some of the oldest Welsh poetry in existence.

With Rhidian Griffiths, Dr Maredudd ap Huw and Nia Mai Daniel.

Poetry read by Gwyneth Lewis.

Producer: Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2007.

Daljit Nagra chooses the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The House I Grew Up In2017012920170130 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces The House I Grew Up In, featuring Jackie Kay in Glasgow.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces The House I Grew Up in featuring Jackie Kay in Glasgow.

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces The House I Grew Up in featuring Jackie Kay in Glasgow. From August 2007.

The Kalevala - Finland's National Epic2009122720181230 (BBC7)
20181231 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Kalevala: Finland's National Epic.

Storyteller and musician Nick Hennessey travels to Finland to explore the mythical world of the country's national poem, The Kalevala.

First published in 1835, this 50-chapter epic inspired a 19th-century artistic awakening and remains a cornerstone of contemporary Finnish culture. Speaking to musicians and critics, Hennessey finds out how the poem helped shape the nation.

Produced by Phil Smith and Simon Jacobs.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2009.

A Unique Broadcasting Company Production for BBC Radio.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces The Kalevala: Finland's National Epic.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Storyteller and musician Nick Hennessey travels to Finland to explore the mythical world of the country's national poem, The Kalevala.

Produced by Phil Smith and Simon Jacobs.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The King's Muse2021050920210510 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects The King's Muse - featuring poetry written by a young Henry VIII.

In The King's Muse, Peggy Reynolds explores the world of the Tudor court, through the poetry of Henry VIII. Held at the British Library is a songbook that includes poetry and compositions by this Tudor monarch. These were not written by an aged despot with a fondness for divorcing and executing his wives, but instead by a youth who came to the throne as a teenager. These poems were penned by an educated young King who enjoyed games, hunting, and performing his own works in front of his courtiers. Henry's early court was one of the most brilliant in Europe, and a centre for culture and pageantry.

Historian David Starkey joins Peggy Reynolds to put these poems into context, lifting the lid on this cultured youthful King, long overshadowed by the machinations of the older tyrant he was to become. Peggy's journey begins at the British Library, where she is joined by musicologist Professor David Fallows as they leaf through this songbook compiled in the sixteenth century. Professor Raymond Siemens discusses the importance of this poetry in the development of Tudor literature, and delves into some of the reoccurring themes including love and politics, foreshadowing the more complicated monarch that would emerge.

Produced by Luke Whitlock.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects The King's Muse - featuring poetry written by a young Henry VIII.

In The King's Muse, Peggy Reynolds explores the world of the Tudor court, through the poetry of Henry VIII. Held at the British Library is a songbook that includes poetry and compositions by this Tudor monarch. These were not written by an aged despot with a fondness for divorcing and executing his wives, but instead by a youth who came to the throne as a teenager. These poems were penned by an educated young King who enjoyed games, hunting, and performing his own works in front of his courtiers. Henry's early court was one of the most brilliant in Europe, and a centre for culture and pageantry.

Historian David Starkey joins Peggy Reynolds to put these poems into context, lifting the lid on this cultured youthful King, long overshadowed by the machinations of the older tyrant he was to become. Peggy's journey begins at the British Library, where she is joined by musicologist Professor David Fallows as they leaf through this songbook compiled in the sixteenth century. Professor Raymond Siemens discusses the importance of this poetry in the development of Tudor literature, and delves into some of the reoccurring themes including love and politics, foreshadowing the more complicated monarch that would emerge.

Produced by Luke Whitlock.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Lady Of Shalott2017100920171008 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Adventures in Poetry featuring Tennyson's Lady of Shalott.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive choosing Adventures in Poetry - The Lady of Shalott.

Peggy Reynolds explores the lasting impact of the poem by Lord Alfred Tennyson.

The time and land of Camelot, a cursed lady must weave in a tower, but never look from the window. But when Sir Lancelot passes by, singing "tirra lira" by the river, she can bear it no longer - the Lady of Shalott wants to see.

Why is this much loved, much recited, much sung poem still intriguing people: historians, painters, weavers and American indie pop singers?

Featuring songs by Rufus Wainwright and an archive reading of the poem by Dame Peggy Ashcroft from 1967.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

The Lament Of Swordy Well2020032220200323 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Lament of Swordy Well in which Paul Farley explores ecology, Englishness and `home' through John Clare's landmark poem.

'My name will quickly be the whole
That's left of Swordy Well.'

So wrote John Clare in the 1830s, before he was committed to the asylum, in one of his most moving and proto-ecological poems. Swordy Well, a tract of limestone heath near Clare's home in Northamptonshire, is not just the subject though - astonishingly it's also the narrator. Through Clare, the place gained a voice - a rarity even today in English poetry.

The site - now Swaddywell - is presently one of scientific interest, and has been preserved for its wildlife and habitat. However following Clare's time - and his poem's catalogue of the place's neglect and abuse following enclosure - the area found itself being used as a racetrack for stock cars, a site for illegal raves and parties, and even became a fly tipping eyesore.

Poet Paul Farley, who has edited John Clare's poems, goes back to the original location and takes the poem back to its source too, meeting with fellow writers, conservationists and locals who remember the partying and racing in Swordy Well. How would the place speak now, nearly two centuries after enclosure?

Responding with a new poem of Paul Farley's, and with a vivid soundscape, The Lament of Swordy Well reflects on the nature of location, ecology, `home' and voice in the English landscape poem.

Producer: Aasiya Lodhi

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Living Poet - Fleur Adcock1985081120170528 (BBC7)
20170529 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra chooses 'The Living Poet', featuring New Zealand poet, Fleur Adcock.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry with archive featuring New Zealand born poet, Fleur Adcock.

"I've written a lot about places - too much, I sometimes think. It seems to have something to do with my wandering childhood". In 'The Living Poet', Fleur Adcock introduces and reads a selection from her work.

Plus, in an interview from BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour, Fleur talks to Martha Kearney about her personal life.

Producers: Fraser Steel and Olive Clancy.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1985 and 2008.

The Lost Poets Of The Raincoat Shop2019092920190930 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Lost Poets of the Raincoat Shop presented by Ian MacMillan.

Ian McMillan tells the story of lost poets through the letters, diaries and scattered pages of poetry found in a derelict raincoat shop in Sheffield. The papers were found by an engineer who saved them from the skip and took them home to read. Fascinated by the story they revealed, he donated them to the Sheffield Archive.

Ian McMillan looks through the dust covered pages that still, he says, give off a faint whiff of raincoat. The letters document the friendship between the shop owner and an uneducated man who were brought together by a love of words and writing. Ian says, 'It's an extraordinary tale of friendship, and what is left behind.'

He talks to John Gregory who devoted his lunchtimes to going through the derelict shop gathering together the pages before they were put in a skip, and to Tim Knebel, the archivist who has created order out of the scattered pages.

Ian also talks to historian Helen Smith about the uniqueness of Sheffield during the early years of the 1900s, when uneducated steelworkers yearned to better themselves by learning about philosophy and poetry.

Finally, Ian contributes to the amount of words generated by the two men by composing his own work based on the daily takings recorded in the cash book of the raincoat shop.

Producer: Janet Graves
A Pennine production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

Ian McMillan discovers lost poets through notes found on the floor of a derelict shop.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Namer Of Clouds2018061020180611 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Namer of Clouds' showcasing Luke Howard.

Poet Lavinia Greenlaw composes a tribute to the amateur meteorologist who in 1802 devised the cloud classification system and inspired the Romantics.

Luke Howard, often called "the father of meteorology" was a chemist, whose ideas for cloud classification were stirred when he was a schoolboy. In his late 20s, he composed the influential 'Essay on the Modification of Clouds', which was delivered at the Askesian Society, a fortnightly London science meeting.

Howard's influence upon art and poetry is as impressive as his meteorological discoveries. His essay became the subject of poems by Goethe and Percy Bysshe Shelley and he's believed to have inspired some of John Constable's landscapes.

Before composing a new poem dedicated to Luke Howard, Lavinia goes cloud spotting in Somerset with Gavin Pretor-Pinney, founder of The Cloud Appreciation Society. Richard Hamblyn, Luke Howard's biographer, describes how he gave the Romantics a new scientific language and Constable expert Anne Lyles examines Luke Howard's impact on the visual arts.

Producer: Paul Smith
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Daljit Nagra selects a poem about Luke Howard, who named the clouds and inspired Romantics

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Poem Of The Cloak2019042820190429 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting The Poem of the Cloak. Presenter Shamshad Khan explores the Qasidah Burda, or The Poem of the Cloak, arguably the most memorised and recited poem in the Muslim world. The poem is recited by Nadim Sawalha.

Producer - Nicola Humphries

The first broadcast in BBC Radio 4 in 2007.

Daljit Nagra introduces The Poem of the Cloak, the most recited poem in the Muslim world.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Poet And The Murderer2015042620180415 (BBC7)
20180416 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Poet and the Murderer'.

Simon Worrall reveals how convicted double murderer Mark Hofmann forged an Emily Dickinson poem so perfect it fooled leading scholars and experts. A gripping true story of poetry, murder and the art of forgery.

Dickinson famously lived much of her life as a recluse, producing her works of concentrated brilliance from the bedroom of her father's house in Amherst, Massachusetts. She chose not to publish during her lifetime and hand-sewn booklets containing some 1,800 poems were discovered in a locked box in her room after her death.

Why does Dickinson continue to fascinate, and what might Hofmann's fake poem tell us about the true poet's work and life?

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio in 2015.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'The Poet and the Murderer'.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Poet Of Sparty Lea. In Search Of Barry Macsweeney2009090620170108 (BBC7)
20170109 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra selects The Poet of Sparty Lea spotlighting Northumberland's Barry MacSweeney

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and spotlights Barry MacSweeney.

Young poet Tom Chivers reclaims the reputation of counter-cultural poet Barry MacSweeney, who wrote his first poem at seven, began a lifelong struggle with solitary hard drinking at 16 and was nominated for the Oxford Poetry Chair at 18.

A protege of Northumbrian poet Basil Bunting, he was a regular at the Morden Tower in Newcastle along with Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Allen Ginsberg, and Ed Dorn. MacSweeney was a man of contradictions; a Romantic poet, a political journalist who raged against the world but also a naturalist whose writing was rooted in the Northumbrian landscape. His refusal to engage with the Establishment was incompatible with commercial or mainstream success, and he died an alcoholic's death, on the fringes of the poetry scene.

A 16-year-old Tom Chivers encountered MacSweeney at what would turn out to be his final poetry reading; a week later he was dead. Now Tom goes on a personal journey to explore the life and work of his hero. Travelling to the Northumbrian landscape which anchored MacSweeney's work, Tom investigates why his radical style was never palatable to the mainstream but also why his work still appeals to a new generation of poets today.

Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Daljit Nagra selects The Poet of Sparty Lea spotlighting Northumberland's Barry MacSweeney. From September 2009.

The Poetic Spark2019100620191007 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses The Poetic Spark featuring the novelist and poet Muriel Spark. Presented by AL Kennedy.

The inscription on Muriel Spark's tombstone in Tuscany reads 'Muriel Spark. Poeta'.

Surprising perhaps: because, despite the fact that Spark always referred to herself as a poet, it's her reputation as a novelist, and the creator of the charismatic Jean Brodie, for which she's better known.

Before Muriel was anywhere near her prime, she'd established a reputation as a poet. Aged just fourteen, she won a prestigious poetry competition celebrating the centenary of Walter Scott. Later, she published several collections to glowing reviews and completed a controversial stint as Editor of the Poetry Review, during which time she gathered as many enemies as her fictional alter-ego, Jean Brodie (notably Marie Stopes about whom she famously quipped: 'I used to think it a pity that her mother rather than she had not thought of birth control')!

Muriel Spark kept writing poetry throughout her life. 10 years after her death, AL Kennedy, a long term admirer of her novels and short stories, wonders what new insights the poems might lend to her writing and character.

Produced by Lynsey Moyes.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Poetry Of Aran2018031120180312 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Poetry of Aran'.

For centuries The Aran Islands, three limestone rocks of the west coast of Ireland, have been an inspiration to writers, artists and intellectuals, in search of an authentic Irish experience.

As the future of the Irish language in Ireland is far from secure, Daljit visits the islands where Irish is still the first language, and explores their rich poetic heritage.

He speaks to the poet Seamus Heaney about why he wrote three poems about the Aran Islands in his first collection and Heaney reads some poetry in Irish for the first time around 40 years; Daljit also visits the cottage where Anglo-Irish playwright John Millington Synge wrote his influential journal of island life - a mouthpiece for the Gaelic-seeking spirit of the Irish literary revival.

We also hear from a local poet who continues the tradition of oral poetry on the islands; and explore the life of one of the key modern, Irish language poets, Máirtín Ó Direáin, who took his inspiration from his birthplace on Aran.

Producer: Jo Wheeler

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

Poet Daljit Nagra explores why generations of writers have been drawn to Aran.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.

The Poetry Of History - Peterloo And Shelley2019081120190812 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Poetry of History – Peterloo and Shelley.

Jonathan Bate investigates the connections between historical events and the poems they inspired.

Jonathan travels to Manchester, scene of the 1819 Peterloo massacre that provoked Shelley's ferocious attack on the government of the day, The Mask of Anarchy.

Poet Tom Paulin and historian Clive Emsley are on hand to measure the weight of the poem as history and verse and watch it roll down the 19th century as a clarion call to the Chartists and a warning about the brutality of the industrial revolution.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2006.

Daljit Nagra chooses The Poetry of History - Peterloo and Shelley.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner2019122220191223 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - the atmospheric poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Read by Sir Ian McKellen.

A young wedding guest is detained with a 'glittering eye' and a strange tale of the supernatural events he experienced on a long sea voyage. Specially recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere.

Produced by Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Christmas day in 2006.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Slow Machine2016061920190331 (BBC7)
20190401 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with The Slow Machine featuring the former Canal Laureate, Jo Bell.

Jo Bell's 67ft narrowboat 'Tinker' has been her floating, roving home for 13 years. As she prepares to leave Tinker for a new boat, she writes a poem series about her years afloat. Elderflower, coal smoke and diesel. Ducks, engines and ratcheting locks.

The Slow Machine weaves soundscape and words into a documentary poem of canal life.

'Jo Bell is one of the most exciting poets now writing and no time is wasted in the company of her work.' - Carol Ann Duffy.

With music by The Cabinet of Living Cinema.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Daljit Nagra chooses a run of poems featuring Poet Laureates. First, Jo Bell.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Sonnet And The Sword2013081120180701 (BBC7)
20180702 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'The Sonnet and The Sword'.

Peggy Reynolds explores the world of the Elizabethan Court, through the poetry written by its courtiers - evoking a world where rivalry between them was common, and flattering the Queen often involved much spectacle.

Poetry during the reign of Elizabeth I developed into a national literature, with courtiers as the elite consumers judging literary developments, and often being at the forefront of innovations themselves.

Professor Steven May discusses the merits of this output, which often influenced those outside the court, such as Shakespeare. Dr Susan Doran helps examine the bigger picture, including religious intolerance, the war with Spain, and concern over the royal succession. These national themes are very present in the poetry of the court.

Producer: Luke Whitlock

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces the rivalrous flattering of Elizabeth I through poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

The Still Life Poet20200816Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects The Still Life Poet featuring the extraordinary life and work of little known Scottish poet, William Soutar who spent the last 13 years of his life in a bed.

Scotland's National Poet, Liz Lochhead, came across one poem of Soutar's that gave her the shivers, but she knows very little about the man and the rest of his work.

William Soutar produced many collections of poetry, most of which he wrote in one room and in what was to become his deathbed. Soutar had developed a debilitating condition of the spine which paralysed him from the waist down. Unable to move and with only a window to see the world, he became a Still Life Poet.

In his final years, Soutar wrote diaries which show a man with a wicked sense of humour, caricaturing his numerous bedside visitors and turning his ailments into playful rhymes. We also discover a mind that dissects everything from war, religion, sex and mortality, through to the songs sung by the blackbirds outside his window.

William Soutar was arguably one of Scotland's greatest poets and a key figure of the Scottish Literary Renaissance but why has his name been buried?

Liz Lochhead travels to the Soutar house in his hometown of Perth to find out and to assess how this sense of place, along with his disability, shaped his writing with the help of people who believe his name and work should be remembered.

Readings by Monty d'Inverno

Producer: Emily Smallman

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.

Daljit Nagra selects The Still Life Poet about William Soutar who spent 13 years in bed.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Whitsun Weddings2013120120180930 (BBC7)
20181001 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin.

This was the title poem of the collection published in 1964 that made Larkin famous. Poet Jean Sprackland, who teaches Larkin and whose father, a librarian, met him professionally, retraces the train journey at the heart of the poem.

She considers Larkin's views about marriage, about class and about the 'state of Britain', against the background of the poet's own seemingly quiet life in the provincial town of Hull.

For many, Whitsun Weddings is Philip Larkin's most characteristic poem, expressing his detachment from the crowd and from love and marriage of the ordinary sort.

With James Booth, Andrew Motion, John Osborne and Larkin's surviving mistress, the 'third woman' Betty Mackereth.

Producer: Susan Marling

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Whitsun Weddings20180930Poet Daljit Nagra chooses The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

The Whitsun Weddings20181001
The Women Of Rainer Maria Rilke2009051020170305 (BBC7)
20170306 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra introduces The Women of Rainer Maria Rilke, presented by Hayley Radford.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces The Women of Rainer Maria Rilke, presented by Hayley Radford.

Poet-in-Residence Daljit Nagra introduces The Women of Rainer Maria Rilke, presented by Hayley Radford. From 2009.

Thomas Hardy And Selima Hill2020053120200601 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects the very best from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Word on the Street - Dorset.

Poet Jackie Kay travels to Dorset to visit Max Gate , Thomas Hardy 's last home, where Hardy wrote much of his poetry in later life. And she meets Selima Hill , an award-winning poet who lives on the Dorset coastline.

Producer Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2003.

Thomas Lynch's Season Of Innocence2009122020181216 (BBC7)
20181217 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with Thomas Lynch's Season of Innocence.

Essayist, poet and funeral director, Thomas Lynch presents poems that reveal the relationship between poets and their children.

Producer: Kate Bland

A Just Radio production first broadcast on Radio 4 in 2009.

Poet Daljit Nagra chooses Thomas Lynch's Season of Innocence.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Thomas Lynch's Season of Innocence. Essayist, poet and funeral director, Thomas Lynch presents poems that reveal the relationship between poets and their children.

Produced by Kate Bland of Just Radio Ltd. First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2009.

Time For Verse - Carol Ann Duffy2019090120190902 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Time for Verse: Carol Ann Duffy

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - Episodes 1 And 220170924 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses Time for Verse: Liz Lochhead, presented by George MacBeth.
Time For Verse - Gavin Ewart2018042220180423 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Time for Verse' featuring Gavin Ewart.

Poet Gavin Ewart (1916-1995) talks about his life and range of work including reflections on fighting in the Second World War.

Presenter: George MacBeth

Producer: Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces Gavin Ewart in conversation with George MacBeth.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - James Berry 1-2/52020031520200316 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses the first two of five episodes of Time for Verse featuring James Berry in conversation with George MacBeth about his life and poetry.

Poems: In God's Greatest Country, 1945; On An Afternoon Train From Purley To Victoria, 1955; White Child Meets Black Man.

Producer - Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

James Berry: Time For Verse - ep 2

The second of five programmes in which George MacBeth talks to James Berry about his life and his poetry.
Poems: Travelling As We Are; It's Me Man; Two Black Labourers On A London Building Site; In-a Brixtan Markit

Daljit Nagra selects Time for Verse featuring James Berry. From 1988.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - James Berry 3-4/52020062120200622 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Time for Verse: James Berry episodes 3 and 4 in which George MacBeth continues his conversation with the Caribbean poet about his life and work.

Poems: "Earth And Air"; "Flame And Water"; "Dialogue Between Two Large Village Women"; "Thoughts On My Mother"; "You Two".
Poems: “From Lucy, Englan' Lady”; “From Lucy: A Favour”; “From Lucy: We Women”.

Reader: Mona Hammond

Produced by Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Time For Verse - Liz Lochhead 3 To 4/52017121020171211 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'Time for Verse' - George MacBeth talks with Liz Lochhead.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces 'Time for Verse' - George MacBeth talks with Liz Lochhead.

Time For Verse - Liz Lochhead: 1-2/52017092420170925 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses Time for Verse: Liz Lochhead, presented by George MacBeth.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - Liz Lochhead: Episodes 1 And 220170925 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses Time for Verse: Liz Lochhead, presented by George MacBeth.
Time For Verse - Poets Laureate: Ben Jonson And Colley Cibber2019042120190422 (BBC7)With the imminent announcement of a new Poet Laureate in 2019, poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Time for Verse Poets Laureate: Ben Jonson and Colley Cibber.

Sean Street presents two programmes about past Poet Laureates - one the first, and the other, arguably, the worst.

Produced by Margaret Bradley.

Readers - Martin Jarvis and David Goodland.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1987.

Daljit Nagra selects Time for Verse featuring the first and worst Poet Laureates.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - Spike Milligan2019021020190211 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces two episodes of Time for Verse with Spike Milligan.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse - Spike Milligan2019051920190520 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting Time for Verse with Spike Milligan in conversation with George MacBeth.

Featuring episodes 3 and 4, Spike talks about his life and poetry, with examples of his poems read by Tony Robinson.

Poems:

What The Wiggle Woggle Said
Tell Me Little Woodworm
Dr. David Mantle
Revenge
From Harry Secombe
Failure
Grandad's Bedtime Story
Two Funny
The Future
2B Or Not 2B

Producer – Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1988.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best from the BBC's Poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Archive radio poetry

Time For Verse: Carol Ann Duffy2019040720190623 (BBC7)
20190624 (BBC7)
Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Time for Verse (episodes 1 and 2) featuring Carol Ann Duffy in conversation with George MacBeth.

They talk of growing up in Liverpool and the public and political poetry of Duffy's early writing years.

Produced by Alec Reid

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1989

Daljit Nagra continues a series featuring Poet Laureates. This week, Carol Ann Duffy.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Time For Verse: Dannie Abse2019050520190506 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces Time for Verse - Dannie Abse. Presented by George MacBeth.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

To My Dear And Loving Husband By Anne Bradstreet2009111520181014 (BBC7)
20181015 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'Adventures in Poetry' featuring the story behind Anne Bradstreet's poem 'To My Dear and Loving Husband'.

Anne's poem has been anthologised in many collections of love poetry. How did a near-invalid woman, enduring not only the privations of migrating to the New World but also the stifling Puritan ethic established there, manage to write something so warm and personal that it still speaks to us today?

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces the story behind the poem To My Dear and Loving Husband.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.

Tony Harrison And Sean O'brien2017041620200927 (BBC7)
20200928 (BBC7)
BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with ‘Fine Lines' featuring Tony Harrison and Sean O'Brien.

Poets Tony and Sean are in conversation with Christopher Cook in Newcastle.

Fine Lines was a series looking at contemporary poetry.

Producer: Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1998.

Daljit Nagra selects Fine Lines featuring Tony Harrison and Sean O'Brien.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Tracy K Smith And Patricia Lockwood2016071720180211 (BBC7)
20180212 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive selecting The Echo Chamber with Tracy K Smith and Patricia Lockwood.

Outside of a few famous names, recent British poetry has made little impact on American life and letters. The same might be said in reverse: though we speak the same language, our poetries are oddly discrete.

Paul Farley hears from two younger female American voices:

Tracy K Smith's book 'Life on Mars' won a Pulitzer Prize for her poems about space and race and David Bowie.

Patricia Lockwood's writing-life on Twitter is watched from around the world and her 'sexts' and her 'Rape Joke' poem brought her a celebrity very rare in poetry.

Both poets read from their groundbreaking books and share some new poems too.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Paul Farley hears new work from two young American poets.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Both poets read from their groundbreaking booPortrait [reading]

Ts Eliot's India - Many Gods, Many Voices2013080420171203 (BBC7)
20171204 (BBC7)
Poet Daljit Nagra explores the often overlooked Indian element to TS Eliot's poetry.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'TS Eliot's India - Many Gods'

Daljit himself explores the often overlooked Indian element to TS Eliot's poetry.

TS Eliot once wrote that the great philosophers of India 'make most of the great European philosophers look like schoolboys'. And although he's more often remembered as an establishment figure, somewhat conservative and deeply Christian, Eliot also wrote about and studied Indian philosophy, language and culture. He incorporated it into his most famous poems, and even considered becoming a Buddhist.

Daljit Nagra grew up in Britain among both Christian and Indian Sikh traditions, became intrigued at school by Eliot's poem The Waste Land, which ends with the Sanskrit mantra 'Shantih, shantih, shantih'. How did these Indian words find their way into what is, on the face of it, a very western poem? And how does this imagery square with the idea of Eliot the bank clerk in a bowler hat, who converted to High Anglicanism?

Daljit discovers a deep, overlooked vein of Indic ideas in Eliot's poetry, right up until his masterpiece Four Quartets, including references to The Bhagavad Gita, The Upanishads, the Yoga Sutras and Buddhism. But was he merely perpetuating a romantic, exotic image of India, or was Eliot a truly global poet, who found a language to transcend the traditional divisions between eastern and western thought?

Featuring interviews with Eliot's nephew, the poets Jeet Thayil and Maitreyabandhu, Daljit uncovers the overlooked Indian imagery in Eliot's work and considers how far, as a poet steeped in Christian and classical traditions, he really understood it.

Producer: Jo Wheeler
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.

First broadcast in 2013.

Two Poets2019072820190729 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses ‘Two Poets' featuring Les Murray to commemorate the Australian writer who died in April 2019.

The poetry of Australian Les Murray opens up a new world for Daniel Tammet, an autistic savant for whom words are filled with colour and numbers have become friends.

”Belonging is something that other people decide for you,” says the internationally acclaimed author Daniel Tammet, who is on the highly functional end of the autism spectrum. ”I wanted desperately to belong when I was growing up.”

This feature is about the power of poetry. And about seeing the world differently from everyone around you. In Daniel's world, four is shy, six a little sad. Numbers and words come easy to him. And he never forgets - once, he recited 22154 digits of Pi from memory. On another occasion, he learned Icelandic in a week.

We meet Daniel in Paris where he lives as an author, poet and translator. We hear about his early life in suburban London, about getting lost in his own mind while walking to school, trying to learn social skills as he would later learn a language. Then, one day, he stumbles across a book by the Australian poet Les Murray.

It transforms his life.

Les Murray's poetry gives him a language he understands. He recognises himself completely in Murray's words and sets about translating his poems into French. As a consequence, there's suddenly the possibility of the two poets meeting up, in person in Paris, when Les Murray asks Daniel to translate a poem about autism.

Presented and produced by Martin Johnson
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2017.

Daljit Nagra chooses 'Two Poets' from the BBC's poetry archive featuring Les Murray.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses ‘Two Poets' featuring Les Murray to commemorate the Australian writer who died in April 2019.

The poetry of Australian Les Murray opens up a new world for Daniel Tammet, an autistic savant for whom words are filled with colour and numbers have become friends.

”Belonging is something that other people decide for you,” says the internationally acclaimed author Daniel Tammet, who is on the highly functional end of the autism spectrum. ”I wanted desperately to belong when I was growing up.”

We meet Daniel in Paris where he lives as an author, poet and translator. We hear about his early life in suburban London, about getting lost in his own mind while walking to school, trying to learn social skills as he would later learn a language. Then, one day, he stumbles across a book by the Australian poet Les Murray.

Les Murray's poetry gives him a language he understands. He recognises himself completely in Murray's words and sets about translating his poems into French. As a consequence, there's suddenly the possibility of the two poets meeting up, in person in Paris, when Les Murray asks Daniel to translate a poem about autism.

Daljit Nagra chooses 'Two Poets' from the BBC's poetry archive featuring Les Murray.

Ursula Vaughan Williams, Poet And Muse2017010120170102 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra chooses creative collaborator Ursula Vaughan Williams.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects a love story.

Ursula Vaughan Williams was most famous for being the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams's second wife. However, she was a published poet who contributed poems for her husband to set and collaborated creatively on various occasions with him and other composers.

The writer Irma Kurtz tells her story and looks at her poetry with the help of the Vaughan Williams' friends and colleagues. She discovers a true love story. Ursula met Vaughan Williams when they were both married to other people. He was much older than her. Her husband died during the war and Ralph's wife spent much of her life in a wheel chair. Ursula became the lover and creative collaborator of the composer, even moving into his marital home with the blessing of his first wife. When Adeline Vaughan Williams died, Ralph and Ursula could be married.

Ursula's poetry speaks of love, nature and memory. Her masterpiece, The Dictated Theme was written in the days after Vaughan Williams died and she described the feeling that he was with her, dictating the verse.

Until her own death in 2007, aged 96, Ursula remained a leading figure on the artistic and social scene of London and continued her husband's work supporting English music.

Interviews include Michael Kennedy, biographer of Ralph Vaughan Williams; close friends Joyce Kennedy and Eva Hornstein; Stephen Connock, editor of Ursula Vaughan Williams' collected poems; and Hugh Cobbe, formerly Head of Music Collections for the British Library.

Readings by Isla Blair.

Producer: Laura Parfitt

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4

First broadcast in 2013.

Walker Of The Downs2021032120210322 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra visits the BBC's poetry archive and selects Walker of the Downs featuring the Sussex Downs- the inspiration for the 1960s poet Ted Walker.

Martin Sorrell walks the Sussex Downs which, in the 1960s, provided nature poet Ted Walker with inspiration for some of his best work. He is joined by Mike Russell from the Sussex Wildlife Trust, who helps to evoke the essence of the land that Walker loved. Plus Patrick Romer reads a selection of Walker's poems.

Producer - Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

Daljit Nagra chooses the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Walking With Whitman2009070520160327 (BBC7)
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Daljit Nagra introduces the father of American Literature, Walt Whitman.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces the father of American Literature, Walt Whitman.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

'Walking With Whitman' features the father of American Literature who blew away the cobwebs of dusty imitation.

The Lancashire Moors are the unlikely setting for a celebration of the acclaimed poet, Walt Whitman. Every year Whitman's devotees gather for the annual Whitman Walk, to recite his works and share from the loving cup.Stuart Maconie joins this happy band of walkers and Whitmanites to discover why the American, who never visited this northern mill town, is still celebrated around Bolton some 120 years later.

Producer: Russell Crewe

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.

We Real Cool - The Poetry Of Gwendolyn Brooks2016050120160502 (BBC7)The poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks with the voices of her friends and family.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces We Real Cool: The poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks with the voices of her friends and family. From April 2015.

We Will Arise And Go Now2020022320200224 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses We Will Arise and Go Now marking the birth of WB Yeats.

On the 150th anniversary of WB Yeats' birth, Irish Chair of Poetry Paula Meehan, selects three Irish poets who will arise and go with presenter Marie-Louise Muir to The Lake Isle of Innisfree in County Sligo, a location made famous by Yeats's iconic poem of the same name.

Elayne Harrington, aka 'Temper-Mental Miss-Elayneous' is a hip-hop poet and spoken word artist from Dublin; Stephen Sexton a PhD student at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry in Belfast; Paula Cunningham was brought up in Omagh, County Tyrone, and works as a part-time dentist.

While Yeats's poem speaks of a desire to build 'a cabin of clay and wattles' on Innisfree, Marie-Louise and our three poets will be sleeping under canvas and cooking on a campfire. As they discover if the reality of this tiny uninhabited island on Lough Gill lives up to the bucolic idyll which Yeats so famously portrayed, they'll ask if 'peace comes dropping slow' in the 'bee loud glade' as they each reflect on how The Lake Isle of Innisfree resonates with them and come up with their own poetic responses to it.

Produced by Conor Garrett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best riches from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

What I Read To The Dead - Wladislaw Szlengel2013042120180624 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'What I Read to the Dead' with poetry by Wladislaw Szlengel.

In the last months and days of the Warsaw Ghetto, Wladislaw Szlenge's poetry was an urgent shout of defiance for himself and for those who recited his words and prepared to die.

Writer Eva Hoffman explores the extraordinary verse and his little known life. Before the war and the Nazi invasion of Poland, he'd written poetry in his native tongue and witty lyrics for popular tunes sung in the nightclubs of Warsaw. But confinement in the Warsaw Ghetto and its increasingly tragic circumstances changed Szlengel's work into urgent bulletins for both fellow Jews, trapped inside the walls of their prison city, and his former Polish neighbours.

Szlengel wrote until his last days which came with the discovery of their hiding place in April 1943.

People read aloud Szlengel's verses in their hiding places. In them they recognized not just their plight but their own humanity as family and friends continued to be deported. His poetry survived in versions committed to memory by a handful of survivors, in a small cache of poems kept safe and buried in a unique, secret archive and, decades later, in the form of a sheaf of pages found hidden inside a table marked for firewood.

"'I am looking through and sorting the poems that were written to those who are no more. Read it. This is our history. This is what I read to the dead."

Reader Elliot Levey

Producer Mark Burman

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

Poet Daljit Nagra introduces poetry by Wladislaw Szlengel.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.

What Sweetness Touched Your Tongue2021050220210503 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's poetry archive and selects 'What Sweetness Touched Your Tongue?' inspired by Edwardian recipes written by poet Alison Brackenbury's grandmother.

The poet Alison Brackenbury came across a black oilskin notebook that had belonged to her grandmother, Dorothy Eliza Barnes.

The notebook is full of her recipes, for 'Aunt Margaret's Pudding', 'Flamberries Pudding' and other steamed delights, but also bramble vinegar, pork pie filling, wines, even embrocation.

Dot, born in 1894, was a cook to an Edwardian family. Later she married a Lincolnshire shepherd, moving from one remote cottage to another. Her role, her life, was to sustain her family - and feed men.

Brackenbury was inspired to write a sequence of poems in response to the recipes.

In this programme we hear the poems and The Kitchen Cabinet's food historian, Dr Annie Gray, cooks, following the recipes. These dishes are very evocative of Dot's era and her life. Helped by notes in the family Bible, family reminiscence and her own memories of her grandmother (read by the actor Emma Hands), Brackenbury uncovers a life that was full, marked by losses, long and fascinating.

In the 1930s hungry itinerants came to the farm, looking for work, and Dot fed them. Dot kept cooking to the end, dying with her shelves well stocked. She once remarked to her grand-daughter that what they said about the summer before the Great War was true, it was unusually beautiful.

'What Sweetness Touched Your Tongue' is a culinary biography, a radio sketch of an era - in verse. A century on Alison Brackenbury, maginatively establishes a relationship with her grandmother through the recipes and the poems they evoke.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2018.

Daljit Nagra selects the best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

What The Donkey Saw: Ua Fanthorpe's Christmas Poems2017122420171225 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra selects 'What the Donkey Saw' - UA Fanthorpe's Christmas poems.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits BBC radio's poetry archive with 'What the Donkey Saw' - UA Fanthorpe's Christmas poems.

Starting in 1972, UA Fanthorpe wrote a Christmas poem every year. Sheila Hancock reads a selection, with an introduction by UA's partner, Rosie Bailey, who designed and printed the cards they sent.

Fanthorpe was witty, original, and she reworked the Christmas story from quirky angles. These were so popular with recipients that a collection was published.

Featuring some of those on this very special poetical Christmas card list, including Carol Ann Duffy, Lawrence Sail and Jackie Kay. For them receiving the poem was important - a funny but thoughtful beginning to Christmas.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

Winter Poems2019120820191209 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and selects Four Seasons: Winter - an anthology of seasonal poems originally broadcast on Winter Solstice 2016.

Memorable and much loved verse by Robert Burns, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Louis MacNeice and Walter De la Mare, read by Simon Russell Beale, Noma Dumezweni, Bill Paterson and Anton Lesser, join recent poems read by the poets, Kathleen Jamie, Liz Lochhead, Don Paterson, Simon Armitage and Carol Ann Duffy. There is rain and snow and frost and a robin sings its winter song. And joining these is a new poem by Kayo Chingonyi remembering a teenage winter in Dagenham.

The poems, originally broadcast on Winter Solstice 2016 across the schedule on Radio 4, are gathered together and broadcast here in this compilation programme.

Up in the Morning Early by Robert Burns
Read by Bill Paterson

Extract from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by Simon Armitage

Birds at Winter Nightfall
By Thomas Hardy
Read by Sinead Cusack

In the mid midwinter by Liz Lochhead
From new book published by BIRLINN

Rain by Don Paterson.
From Rain published by Faber and Faber

Now Winter Nights Enlarge
By Thomas Campion
Read by Juliet Stevenson

Snow by Carol Ann Duffy.
Was published in The Guardian 24/12/210.

A Robin by Walter de la Mare
Read by Noma Dumezweni

Perfect Day by Kathleen Jamie
from the Queen of Sheba published by Bloodaxe
Read by Kathleen Jamie

Snowman (also referred to as Winter Song) by Kayo Chingonyi
Read by Kayo Chingonyi
Specially commissioned

Snow by Louis MacNeice
From Collected Poems published by Faber and Faber
Read by Anton Lesser

The Twelve Months
By George Ellis
Read by Bill Paterson

Frost at Midnight by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Read by Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Tim Dee.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.

Poet Daljit Nagra selects the very best programmes from the BBC's poetry archive.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

With Great Pleasure - Don Paterson2016012520160124 (BBC7)Daljit Nagra introduces 'With Great Pleasure' from the Summer 2006 Ledbury Poetry Festival

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces 'With Great Pleasure' from the Summer 2006 Ledbury Poetry Festival with poet-in-residence Don Paterson.

With Great Pleasure - Jo Shapcott2016013120160201 (BBC7)Poet Jo Shapcott's favourite literature read by Christian Rodska and Mark Meadows.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Poet Jo Shapcott's favourite literature read by Christian Rodska and Mark Meadows.

BBC Radio 4's Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive.

In 'With Great Pleasure' from the 2003 Ledbury Poetry Festival, Jo Shapcott presents some of her literary favourites read for her by Christian Rodska and Mark Meadows.

Her choices range from medieval poem Piers Plowman to war poet Ivor Gurney via Galileo, Emily Dickinson and the ascent of Kilimanjaro.

Producer: Viv Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2003.

With Great Pleasure - Les Murray2016021420160215 (BBC7)Les Murray's pick of prose and poetry read by Sean Barrett and Sally Cookson.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces 'With Great Pleasure'. Les Murray's pick of prose and poetry read by Sean Barrett and Sally Cookson.

With Great Pleasure - Les Murray20160215
With Great Pleasure - Sean O'brien2002010320160207 (BBC7)
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Sean O'Brien's pick of prose and poetry read by Julia Watson and Deka Walmsley.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Daljit Nagra introduces 'With Great Pleasure'. Sean O'Brien's pick of prose and poetry read by Julia Watson and Deka Walmsley.

Woods Beyond A Cornfield2019110320191104 (BBC7)Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive and chooses Woods Beyond a Cornfield.

A beautiful, dark poem by Stanley Cook - a Yorkshireman - about events in the edgelands where he grew up. It evokes the translucent beauty of South Yorkshire and its harshness - especially the inhabitants' hard working lives. Threaded through it is the murder of a local girl who, "lost for something to do", plays truant one day, only to be killed by a local man.

Cook couldn't abide poverty being romanticised. He cared about people who suffered hardship and returned home from his Oxford scholarship with clear-sighted passion. He has influenced Yorkshire writers including his publisher, Peter Sansom of the Poetry Business in Sheffield, who was mentored and taught by Cook.

Liz White, Richard Stacey, Ruby-May Martinwood and the folk musician and political activist, Ray Hearne, read Stanley Cook's heartfelt poem - with a soundtrack recorded in South Yorkshire through the Autumn.

Producer: Frances Byrnes

A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.

A poem by Stanley Cook - a girl's murder and a bruised and beautiful landscape.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

01New Lyrical Ballads2019062320180225 (BBC7)
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Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'New Lyrical Ballads' featuring 26 leading poets reading work inspired by the originals.

In the first of two programmes, Britain's current poets read their own work inspired by Wordsworth and Coleridge's original Lyrical Ballads.

That slim volume of poetry, published in Wine Street in Bristol, is renowned for its radical preface and considered to have marked the beginning of the English Romantic movement in literature.

Featuring: Fleur Adcock, Patience Agbabi, John Burnside, Gillian Clarke, Paul Farley, David Harsent, Kathleen Jamie, Liz Lochhead, Ian McMillan, Andrew Motion, Sean O'Brien, Alice Oswald, Ruth Padel, Don Paterson, Jean Sprackland and Michael Symmons Roberts.

Introduced by festival director, Andrew Kelly.

Recorded at the Bristol Festival of Ideas which commissioned the work and gathered all the poets together to read their work to an expectant audience.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

02New Lyrical Ballads2019063020180304 (BBC7)
20180305 (BBC7)

Poet Daljit Nagra revisits the BBC's radio poetry archive with 'New Lyrical Ballads' featuring 26 leading poets reading work inspired by the originals.

Second of two programmes, Britain's current poets read their own work inspired by Wordsworth and Coleridge's original Lyrical Ballads.

That slim volume of poetry, published in Wine Street in Bristol, is renowned for its radical preface and considered to have marked the beginning of the English Romantic movement in literature.

Featuring: Fleur Adcock, Patience Agbabi, John Burnside, Gillian Clarke, Paul Farley, David Harsent, Kathleen Jamie, Liz Lochhead, Ian McMillan, Andrew Motion, Sean O'Brien, Alice Oswald, Ruth Padel, Don Paterson, Jean Sprackland and Michael Symmons Roberts.
Recorded at the Bristol Festival of Ideas which commissioned the work and gathered all the poets together to read their work to an expectant audience.

Introduced by festival director, Andrew Kelly.

Producer: Tim Dee

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.

04Zaffar Kunial2017042320190113 (BBC7)
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Paul Farley hears new poems by Zaffar Kunial in the places they were made.

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive

Weekly opportunity for listeners to revisit the riches of the BBC radio poetry archive