Power Of Miracles, The [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Heart And Soul2014020820140209 (WS)
20140210 (WS)

The blood miracle of San Gennaro.

Long before the service begins, Neapolitans dressed in their best clothes, file into their beautiful Cathedral, past the TV cameras and the street vendors selling memorabilia. They are there to witness a miracle.

The Cathedral is soon full and the aisles and side chapels are also quickly populated. The faithful are here to witness an event which has taken place for centuries, the liquefaction of the blood of their patron saint San Gennaro, a figure integral to the daily lives of people in this ancient port city.

The blood is held in a silver reliquary, a silver ornate holder, carrying a vial of what Neapolitan’s fervently believe to be the dried blood of Gennaro, who was beheaded for his faith by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the 4th century.

The worshippers wait patiently, praying, singing and urging San Gennaro to reveal his presence through the liquefaction of his blood. They can only relax and celebrate when a white handkerchief is waved from the altar to tell them that the blood of San Gennaro has ‘miraculously’ turned from its normal dry state to liquid.

Locals believe that if the blood doesn’t liquefy then Naples will suffer terrible fortune, so when the white handkerchief is waved, the celebrations are due partly to relief.

In the first of two part series for Heart and Soul, Mark Dowd travels to Naples in southern Italy to witness for himself the blood miracle and to ask why miracles, these mystical, unexplainable super natural events are so vital to Christians and why these unexplainable events which seemingly defy science are signs for worshippers that the heavenly God is a tangible presence on earth.

In the second part, Mark will ask why miracles are so important in sainthood, as the Catholic church prepares to beatify Popes John Paul the 2nd and John the 23rd.

Production was by Richard McIlroy and Flavia Di Consiglio

01Heart and Soul2014020820140210 (WS)
20140209 (WS)

The blood miracle of San Gennaro.

The blood miracle of San Gennaro.

The blood miracle of San Gennaro.

Long before the service begins, Neapolitans dressed in their best clothes, file into their beautiful Cathedral, past the TV cameras and the street vendors selling memorabilia. They are there to witness a miracle.

The Cathedral is soon full and the aisles and side chapels are also quickly populated. The faithful are here to witness an event which has taken place for centuries, the liquefaction of the blood of their patron saint San Gennaro, a figure integral to the daily lives of people in this ancient port city.

The blood is held in a silver reliquary, a silver ornate holder, carrying a vial of what Neapolitan’s fervently believe to be the dried blood of Gennaro, who was beheaded for his faith by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the 4th century.

The worshippers wait patiently, praying, singing and urging San Gennaro to reveal his presence through the liquefaction of his blood. They can only relax and celebrate when a white handkerchief is waved from the altar to tell them that the blood of San Gennaro has ‘miraculously’ turned from its normal dry state to liquid.

Locals believe that if the blood doesn’t liquefy then Naples will suffer terrible fortune, so when the white handkerchief is waved, the celebrations are due partly to relief.

In the first of two part series for Heart and Soul, Mark Dowd travels to Naples in southern Italy to witness for himself the blood miracle and to ask why miracles, these mystical, unexplainable super natural events are so vital to Christians and why these unexplainable events which seemingly defy science are signs for worshippers that the heavenly God is a tangible presence on earth.

In the second part, Mark will ask why miracles are so important in sainthood, as the Catholic church prepares to beatify Popes John Paul the 2nd and John the 23rd.

Production was by Richard McIlroy and Flavia Di Consiglio

01The Power of Miracles - Part One - Heart and Soul2014020820140209 (WS)

Mark Dowd witnesses the Blood Miracle of San Gennaro, the patron saint of Naples

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Long before the service begins, Neapolitans dressed in their best clothes, file into their beautiful cathedral, past the TV cameras and the street vendors selling memorabilia. They are there to witness a miracle.

The cathedral is soon full and the aisles and side chapels are also quickly populated. The faithful are here to witness an event which has taken place for centuries, the liquefaction of the blood of their patron saint San Gennaro, a figure integral to the daily lives of people in this ancient port city.

The blood is held in a silver reliquary, a silver ornate holder, carrying a vial of what Neapolitans fervently believe to be the dried blood of Gennaro, who was beheaded for his faith by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the 4th Century.

The worshippers wait patiently, praying, singing and urging San Gennaro to reveal his presence through the liquefaction of his blood. They can only relax and celebrate when a white handkerchief is waved from the altar to tell them that the blood of San Gennaro has ‘miraculously’ turned from its normal dry state to liquid.

Locals believe that if the blood doesn’t liquefy then Naples will suffer terrible fortune, so when the white handkerchief is waved, the celebrations are due partly to relief.

In the first of two part series for Heart and Soul, Mark Dowd travels to Naples in southern Italy to witness for himself the blood miracle and to ask why miracles - these mystical, unexplainable supernatural events - are so vital to Christians and why these unexplainable events which seemingly defy science are signs for worshippers that the heavenly God is a tangible presence on Earth.

In the second part, Mark will ask why miracles are so important in sainthood, as the Catholic church prepares to beatify Popes John Paul II and John XXIII.

(Photo: Statue of San Januarius, the Saint protector of Naples. Credit: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

01The Power of Miracles - Part One - Heart and Soul2014020820140210 (WS)

Mark Dowd witnesses the Blood Miracle of San Gennaro, the patron saint of Naples

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Long before the service begins, Neapolitans dressed in their best clothes, file into their beautiful cathedral, past the TV cameras and the street vendors selling memorabilia. They are there to witness a miracle.

The cathedral is soon full and the aisles and side chapels are also quickly populated. The faithful are here to witness an event which has taken place for centuries, the liquefaction of the blood of their patron saint San Gennaro, a figure integral to the daily lives of people in this ancient port city.

The blood is held in a silver reliquary, a silver ornate holder, carrying a vial of what Neapolitans fervently believe to be the dried blood of Gennaro, who was beheaded for his faith by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the 4th Century.

The worshippers wait patiently, praying, singing and urging San Gennaro to reveal his presence through the liquefaction of his blood. They can only relax and celebrate when a white handkerchief is waved from the altar to tell them that the blood of San Gennaro has ‘miraculously’ turned from its normal dry state to liquid.

Locals believe that if the blood doesn’t liquefy then Naples will suffer terrible fortune, so when the white handkerchief is waved, the celebrations are due partly to relief.

In the first of two part series for Heart and Soul, Mark Dowd travels to Naples in southern Italy to witness for himself the blood miracle and to ask why miracles - these mystical, unexplainable supernatural events - are so vital to Christians and why these unexplainable events which seemingly defy science are signs for worshippers that the heavenly God is a tangible presence on Earth.

In the second part, Mark will ask why miracles are so important in sainthood, as the Catholic church prepares to beatify Popes John Paul II and John XXIII.

(Photo: Statue of San Januarius, the Saint protector of Naples. Credit: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

01The Power of Miracles - Part One - Heart and Soul20140208

Mark Dowd witnesses the Blood Miracle of San Gennaro, the patron saint of Naples

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Long before the service begins, Neapolitans dressed in their best clothes, file into their beautiful cathedral, past the TV cameras and the street vendors selling memorabilia. They are there to witness a miracle.

The cathedral is soon full and the aisles and side chapels are also quickly populated. The faithful are here to witness an event which has taken place for centuries, the liquefaction of the blood of their patron saint San Gennaro, a figure integral to the daily lives of people in this ancient port city.

The blood is held in a silver reliquary, a silver ornate holder, carrying a vial of what Neapolitans fervently believe to be the dried blood of Gennaro, who was beheaded for his faith by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the 4th Century.

The worshippers wait patiently, praying, singing and urging San Gennaro to reveal his presence through the liquefaction of his blood. They can only relax and celebrate when a white handkerchief is waved from the altar to tell them that the blood of San Gennaro has ‘miraculously’ turned from its normal dry state to liquid.

Locals believe that if the blood doesn’t liquefy then Naples will suffer terrible fortune, so when the white handkerchief is waved, the celebrations are due partly to relief.

In the first of two part series for Heart and Soul, Mark Dowd travels to Naples in southern Italy to witness for himself the blood miracle and to ask why miracles - these mystical, unexplainable supernatural events - are so vital to Christians and why these unexplainable events which seemingly defy science are signs for worshippers that the heavenly God is a tangible presence on Earth.

In the second part, Mark will ask why miracles are so important in sainthood, as the Catholic church prepares to beatify Popes John Paul II and John XXIII.

(Photo: Statue of San Januarius, the Saint protector of Naples. Credit: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

02The Power of Miracles - Part Two - Heart and Soul2014021520140216 (WS)

Miracles and John Paul II

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In the moments after Pope John Paul II's death had been announced, the crowd who had gathered in St Peter's Square started chanting "Santo Subito!", “Saint Now!”. In a few weeks’ time the crowd will get their wish, John Paul II will be made a saint by the Vatican.

In the second part of his series for Heart and Soul exploring the mystery of miracles, Mark Dowd will explore their magic and mystery, the role they play for the church and the faithful and also their importance in the decision to name saints.

In order to be named a saint the church requires evidence of two miracles. In John Paul’s case he was credited with the recovery from a seemingly terminal illnesses - of a French nun, Sister Marie Simon-Pierre, and a Costa Rican lady, Floribeth Mora who was cured of a brain aneurysm after, she tells Heart and Soul, she prayed to John Paul.

Mark hears from Jackie Duffin, a Canadian doctor who was asked to investigate the recovery of a cancer patient proposed as a miracle. She then went back into the archives and was amazed to find that contrary to belief that religion and science were polar opposites, scientific methods and discovery have been integral for centuries to the whole miracle process.

The canonisation of John Paul II is controversial. The decisions to halve the number of miracles needed from four to two was made ironically by John Paul when he was Pope, and the decision to make him a saint has been made very quickly. We find out why.

02The Power of Miracles - Part Two - Heart and Soul2014021520140217 (WS)

Miracles and John Paul II

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In the moments after Pope John Paul II's death had been announced, the crowd who had gathered in St Peter's Square started chanting "Santo Subito!", “Saint Now!”. In a few weeks’ time the crowd will get their wish, John Paul II will be made a saint by the Vatican.

In the second part of his series for Heart and Soul exploring the mystery of miracles, Mark Dowd will explore their magic and mystery, the role they play for the church and the faithful and also their importance in the decision to name saints.

In order to be named a saint the church requires evidence of two miracles. In John Paul’s case he was credited with the recovery from a seemingly terminal illnesses - of a French nun, Sister Marie Simon-Pierre, and a Costa Rican lady, Floribeth Mora who was cured of a brain aneurysm after, she tells Heart and Soul, she prayed to John Paul.

Mark hears from Jackie Duffin, a Canadian doctor who was asked to investigate the recovery of a cancer patient proposed as a miracle. She then went back into the archives and was amazed to find that contrary to belief that religion and science were polar opposites, scientific methods and discovery have been integral for centuries to the whole miracle process.

The canonisation of John Paul II is controversial. The decisions to halve the number of miracles needed from four to two was made ironically by John Paul when he was Pope, and the decision to make him a saint has been made very quickly. We find out why.

02The Power of Miracles - Part Two - Heart and Soul20140215

Miracles and John Paul II

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In the moments after Pope John Paul II's death had been announced, the crowd who had gathered in St Peter's Square started chanting "Santo Subito!", “Saint Now!”. In a few weeks’ time the crowd will get their wish, John Paul II will be made a saint by the Vatican.

In the second part of his series for Heart and Soul exploring the mystery of miracles, Mark Dowd will explore their magic and mystery, the role they play for the church and the faithful and also their importance in the decision to name saints.

In order to be named a saint the church requires evidence of two miracles. In John Paul’s case he was credited with the recovery from a seemingly terminal illnesses - of a French nun, Sister Marie Simon-Pierre, and a Costa Rican lady, Floribeth Mora who was cured of a brain aneurysm after, she tells Heart and Soul, she prayed to John Paul.

Mark hears from Jackie Duffin, a Canadian doctor who was asked to investigate the recovery of a cancer patient proposed as a miracle. She then went back into the archives and was amazed to find that contrary to belief that religion and science were polar opposites, scientific methods and discovery have been integral for centuries to the whole miracle process.

The canonisation of John Paul II is controversial. The decisions to halve the number of miracles needed from four to two was made ironically by John Paul when he was Pope, and the decision to make him a saint has been made very quickly. We find out why.

02 LASTHeart And Soul2014021520140216 (WS)
20140217 (WS)

Former Benedictine priest Mark Dowd explores why miracles are so vital to the faithful.

02 LASTHeart and Soul2014021520140217 (WS)
20140216 (WS)

Former Benedictine priest Mark Dowd explores why miracles are so vital to the faithful.

Former Benedictine priest Mark Dowd explores why miracles are so vital to the faithful.

Former Benedictine priest Mark Dowd explores why miracles are so vital to the faithful.