Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
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20181222

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Caroline Gill listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Vivaldi's Gloria,

Although Vivaldi wrote 3 settings of the Gloria (RV588-RV590), it is RV589 that has become known simply as 'The Vivaldi Gloria', owing to its enduring popularity. It is thought to have been composed in 1715 for the Pio Ospedale della Pietà, the orphanage, convent and music school in Venice in which Vivaldi taught. Not only is the Vivaldi Gloria strongly influenced by the operatic style of the day, but it also mimics the prevalent concerto grosso style in its alternating episodes for tutti choir and solos. Above all, Vivaldi's Gloria has gained its popularity because of its vibrant musical personality.

11.00
Andrew McGregor discusses new and recent releases of organ music with Oliver Condy.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Vivaldi's Gloria RV589.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

20190112

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Kate Molleson listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No.1,

Prokofiev began sketching his Violin Concerto No.1 in 1915 against a backdrop of war, and composed the bulk of it in the turbulent revolutionary year of 1917. It proved to be one of his first mature works. The Violin Concerto is a virtuosically brilliant work, that also captures the lyrical quality of the violin with searing melodies that rise above the orchestra. It was premiered on 18th October in 1923 by violinist Marcel Darrieux under Serge Koussevitzky at the Paris Opera, but was somewhat overshadowed in that concert alongside a performance of Stravinsky's Octet.

11.00
In this the 90th birthday year of conductor, composer and arranger André Previn, Andrew McGregor discusses with Andrew Mellor a new 55-CD collection from Sony Classical of the artist’s classical RCA and CBS discography, ranging from the early 1960s to the mid-1990s.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No 1.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

20190202

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Natasha Loges listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Schubert's song cycle Schwanengesang ('Swan Song'), D.957,

Schubert's Schwanengesang is a collection of songs that were written toward the end of his life and not published until after his death. It was Schubert's publisher, Tobias Haslinger, who intriguingly titled the collection Schwanengesang, or Swan Song, thereby giving the impression that the songs were Schubert's musical farewell to the world. Haslinger said that the songs were ‘the final blooms of Schubert’s creative muse. Schubert took the texts from poems written by Ludwig Rellstab, Gabriel Seidl and Heinrich Heine.

Although Schwanengesang might not be a song-cycle in the vein of Winterreise, it does contain some of Schubert's greatest music. There are two sets of songs which are linked thematically, telling stories of nature, love, separation and despair.

11.00
Stephen Johnson and Lucy Parham review some of the most exciting new releases of the concerto repertoire, from Gautier Capucon's new Schumann disc to Nicolas Hodges and Carolin Widmann performing Pascal Dusapin.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Schubert's Schwanengesang, D597

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Macgregor With Roger Parker And Anna Picard20190119

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Roger Parker listens to and compares the available recordings of Handel's opera Ariodante.

Handel's operas were the talk of the smart set in early 18th Century London. The exotic mix of temperamental prima donnas and castrati with Handel's sublime music was a potent combination. And Ariodante was one of the very best of his operas. It contains a series of extraordinary arias for the title role from the mournful aria, "Scherza infida" to the joyful "Dopo notte" with exciting vocal acrobatics.

10.30
Andrew is joined by Anna Picard to discuss a group of recent orchestral releases by Chopin, Mendelssohn and Mozart; including a cycle of the Beethoven Piano Concertos from soloist Mitsuko Uchida and the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra conducted by Simon Rattle.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Handel's opera Ariodante

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor And Edward Seckerson20180818

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Proms Composer: Tchaikovsky
This week Marina Frolova-Walker chooses five indispensable recordings of Proms Composer Tchaikovsky and explains why you need to hear them.

10.30
Edward Seckerson delves into recordings by Leonard Bernstein

11.45
Proms Recording: Ravel's Introduction and Allegro with the Melos Ensemble.

Marina Frolova-Walker chooses five indispensable recordings of Proms composer Tchaikovsky.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor And Laura Tunbridge20180811

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Proms Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams
This week Mark Lowther chooses five indispensable recordings of Proms Composer Vaughan Williams and explains why you need to hear them.

10.30
Laura Tunbridge unpacks some recordings of operas by Tchaikovsky

11.45
Proms Recording: Prokofiev Piano Concerto No 3 with pianist Vladimir Krainev, and The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra under the conductor, Dmitri Kitayenko.

Mark Lowther chooses five indispensable recordings of Proms composer Vaughan Williams.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Alexandra Coghlan And David Owen Norris20180331

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Tallis's Lamentations of Jeremiah with Alexandra Coghlan

Thomas Tallis set the first and second lessons of Tenebrae for Maundy Thursday in the 1560s at a time when it was popular to make musical settings of the Holy Week readings from the Book of Jeremiah. These haunting settings are among Tallis's most performed pieces. Composed during the turbulent years of the mid 16th Century, Tallis's Lamentations have most often been read as a personal and private lament on the state of English religious life.

10.45
David Owen Norris reviews reissues of the great Chilean pianist Claudio Arrau known for his interpretations of a wide repertoire including especially Bach, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann etc.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Tallis's Lamentations of Jeremiah; plus reissues of Claudio Arrau.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Alexandra Coghlan And Harriet Smith20181006

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Alexandra Coghlan surveys the recordings of music by Orlando Gibbons and makes a recommendation.

Orlando Gibbons was a leading English composer in the early 17th century. He wrote a large number of keyboard works, fantasias for viols, anthems and madrigals (of which the best-known is "The Silver Swan"). His best-known verse anthem is "This Is the Record of John".

10.30
Andrew talks to Harriet Smith about new recordings of chamber music by Beethoven and Mendelssohn.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library survey on the works of Orlando Gibbons

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Alexandra Coghlan and Sara Mohr-Pietsch20170708

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Andrew Mellor and Anna Picard20190518

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Andrew Mellor compares recordings of Sibelius's Lemminkäinen Suite.

Named after the mythical hero of the Finnish epic poem The Kalevala, Siblelius's Lemminkäinen Suite features colourful and evocative orchestral writing and conjures up a range of moods from thrilling and heroic to atmospheric and mysterious. First performed in the 1890s, two of its numbers, The Swan of Tuonela and Lemminkäinen’s Return, were among the works with which Sibelius made his international breakthrough at the beginning of the 20th century but, stung by criticism after its premiere, Siblelius's definitive four movement suite wasn't published until 1954.

10.40
Anna Picard reviews new orchestral discs, including Tchaikovsky from Kirill Peternko in Berlin, Schumann symphonies from Christian Thielemann in Dresden, period instrument Mahler from François-Xavier Roth and Les Siècles, and Tippett symphonies from Martyn Brabbins in Scotland.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

The best new classical releases, plus Building a Library on Sibelius's Lemminkainen Suite

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Andrew Mellor and Caroline Gill20180407

new releases of chamber music including Brahms Cello Sonatas with Caroline Gill
with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Widor's Organ Symphony no 5 with Andrew Mellor

Charles-Marie Widor composed the Symphony for Organ No. 5 in F minor in 1879. It's fifth movement, known as Widor's Toccata is one of the most famous pieces for organ, a favourite choice of recessional music at wedding ceremonies. Following Widor's example, this style of toccata became a very popular movement type in French Romantic organ music. The rest of this organ symphony is well worth hearing as well.

10.45
Andrew talks to Caroline Gill about new releases of chamber music including Beethoven Cello Sonatas

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Widor's Organ Symphony no 5; plus new releases of chamber music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Anna Picard20180929

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Anna Picard listens to some of the available recordings of Ravel's L'enfant et les sortilèges and makes a recommendation.

Maurice Ravel's 1925 one act L'enfant et les sortilèges - The Child and the Spells - portrays a spoiled, violent and surly child who gets his comeuppance from all the things he's abused, destroyed and killed. In a stream of surreal set-pieces, inanimate objects (including an armchair, teapot, wallpaper and a clock) and animals (among them a bat, cats, a squirrel, a frog and a dragonfly) lead the child to a genuine sense of remorse and empathy. At once funny and moving, Freudian allusion rubs shoulders with Ravel's take on American musical comedy, and the opera demands a top-flight orchestra, conductor and cast for it to take wing.

10.55
Jeremy Summerly rounds up recent releases of choral music.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library: Ravel's surreal and poignant one act opera, L'enfant et les sortileges

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Anna Picard and Andrew Mellor20171021

Building a Library on Puccini's opera Il Tabarro and Andrew Mellor on organ music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Ben Walton and Anna Picard20170204

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Ben Walton And Marina Frolova-walker20181117

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Ben Walton surveys the available recordings of Rossini's Petite messe solennelle.

The great opera composer Rossini died 150 years ago this week. According to popular legend he more or less stopped composing after completing his operatic masterpiece William Tell and spent his final years in a sybaritic and depressed retirement. However he did compose two glorious works of religious music during this final period: the Stabat mater and the Petite messe solennelle. The Mass is famously neither little nor solemn. It is a large-scale work with a stream of lyrical arias and energetic choruses. Originally scored for 12 voices, 2 pianos and a harmonium; it is also sometimes performed in a fully orchestrated version. Rossini said of his final masterwork, "Dear Lord, here it is finished, this poor little mass. Have I just written sacred music, or rather, sacrilegious music? I was born for opera buffa, as you well know. Not much technique, a little bit of heart, that’s all. Blessings to you and grant me Paradise."

10.30
Marina Frolova-Walker reviews a recording of the sacred opera, Moses by Anton Rubenstein and recent releases of Russian orchestral music including symphonies by Tchaikovsky, Shostakovich and Weinberg.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Rossini's glorious late work, the Petite messe solennelle.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Caroline Rae, Plus Caroline Gill And Simon Heighes20180623

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Debussy's Violin Sonata by Caroline Rae.

Debussy's Sonata for Violin was written in 1917 and was intended as the third in a cycle of six sonatas for various instruments. It follows the sonatas that he wrote for cello, for flute and for viola and harp, but turned out to be the last major work that he would complete before cancer prematurely ended his life. The premiere took place on 5th May 1917 with Debussy himself at the piano accompanying the violinist Gaston Poulet. Debussy was profoundly affected by the First World War and his Sonata for Violin begins with an elegiac movement. The final movement, inspired by Hungarian gypsy music, does however bring the sonata to a more optimistic close.

10.45
Andrew talks about new choral releases with Caroline Gill and Simon Heighes from Buxtehude sung by Vox Luminis and Lassus from Gallicantus, to Arcangelo's Charpentier and Tenebrae's Lukaszewski.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a library on Debussy's Violin Sonata plus a review of new choral releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With David Owen Norris20180922

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Vaughan Williams' On Wenlock Edge.

Vaughan Williams' song cycle, On Wenlock Edge, was premiered in London in November 1909 and sets six poems from the Victorian poet A. E. Housman's 1896 collection, A Shropshire Lad. His orignal setting of the Housman poems was particularly novel because of the scoring for tenor, piano and string quartet and, in 1924, he made an orchestral version of the cycle. The six poems from A Shropshire Lad that Vaughan Williams set are On Wenlock Edge, From Far, from Eve and Morning, Is My Team Ploughing, Oh, When I Was in Love with You, Bredon Hill, Clun.

10.45
Andrew talks about new releases of early music with Caroline Gill.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a library on Vaughan Williams's On Wenlock Edge. Plus reviews of new releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with David Owen Norris and Kate Molleson20190615

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: David Owen Norris compares recordings of Edward Elgar's Violin Sonata in E minor, Op. 82 and picks a favourite.

During the First World War Elgar dutifully did his king-and-country bit with a succession of tub-thumping patriotic numbers. But Elgar was profoundly affected by the war and as it drew to its end he embarked on a series of three often intimate, restrained and enigmatic chamber works including the Violin Sonata. Technically difficult but not overtly virtuosic, perhaps the subtlety of its emotional world prevented it from becoming a staple of the repertoire until relatively recently and even now it has fewer recordings than most other major late-Romantic violin sonatas.

10.40
Kate Molleson has been listening to a complete set of Beethoven Symphonies from Ádám Fischer with the Danish Chamber Orchestra, and Jordi Savall's recording of Mozart's last three symphonies with Le Concert des Nations.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best new classical releases, plus Building a Library on Edward Elgar's Violin Sonata.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Edward Seckerson and Alexandra Coghlan20191221

9.30
Building a Library: Edward Seckerson compares recordings of Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker - and picks a favourite.

Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker, has become an annual Christmas crowd-pleaser around the World,. Particularly popular is the Suite that Tchaikovsky created from the second act of the ballet, which includes many of his most-loved tunes like the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the Waltz of the Flowers. The ballet is based on a highly simplified version of ETA Hoffmann's story 'The Nutcracker and the Mouse King', adapted for the ballet stage by Alexandre Dumas.

The ballet was originally premiered on 18th December 1892 at the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg, and it was choreographed by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov. Despite its popularity today, Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker was received with mixed views at its premiere, not least because critics didn't believe the libretto to be faithful to the Hoffmann tale. Whilst the dancing was criticised, Tchaikovsky's score was praised for its richness and melodic ingenuity throughout.

10.50
Music journalist and critic, and author of 'Carols from Kings', Alexandra Coghlan reviews this year's crop of new Christmas releases.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Edward Seckerson And Alexandra Coghlan20191221

9.30
Building a Library: Edward Seckerson compares recordings of Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker - and picks a favourite.

Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker, has become an annual Christmas crowd-pleaser around the World,. Particularly popular is the Suite that Tchaikovsky created from the second act of the ballet, which includes many of his most-loved tunes like the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the Waltz of the Flowers. The ballet is based on a highly simplified version of ETA Hoffmann's story 'The Nutcracker and the Mouse King', adapted for the ballet stage by Alexandre Dumas.

The ballet was originally premiered on 18th December 1892 at the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg, and it was choreographed by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov. Despite its popularity today, Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker was received with mixed views at its premiere, not least because critics didn't believe the libretto to be faithful to the Hoffmann tale. Whilst the dancing was criticised, Tchaikovsky's score was praised for its richness and melodic ingenuity throughout.

10.50
Music journalist and critic, and author of 'Carols from Kings', Alexandra Coghlan reviews this year's crop of new Christmas releases.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Tchaikovsky's ballet music, The Nutcracker

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Edward Seckerson and Flora Willson20170225

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Edward Seckerson and Harriet Smith20190427

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Edward Seckerson listens to and compares recordings of Gershwin's opera, Porgy and Bess.

Porgy and Bess is an opera by George Gershwin. First performed in 1935 it featured a cast of classically trained African-American singers. After a slow start, the work has gradually gained popularity, and it is now one of the more frequently performed operas.

The story tells of Porgy, a disabled black street-beggar and his attempts to rescue Bess from Crown, her violent lover, and Sportin' Life, her drug dealer. Some of the numbers in the opera, such as "Summertime", have become popular, frequently recorded songs. In recent times the trend has been toward productions more faithful to Gershwin's original intentions.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Harriet Smith about recent releases of chamber music by Mozart, Schumann, Brahms and Britten.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Latest recordings with Andrew McGregor and Building a Library on Gershwin's Porgy and Bess

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Edward Seckerson, Katy Hamilton and Chris O'Reilly20180421

with Andrew McGregor, plus guests Katy Hamilton and Chris O'Reilly who mark Record Store Day with their selection of new releases and a discussion about the various ways of consuming recorded classical music.

9.30
Building a Library: Leonard Bernstein's Candide with Edward Seckerson.

Based on Voltaire's 18th-century satirical novel about the misadventures of the pure-hearted and naive Candide and his much more worldly mate Cunégonde, Leonard Bernstein's 1956 operetta isn't just another Broadway show. It opened during the infamous witch hunts of Senator McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee, which Bernstein and and book author Lillian Hellman had experienced firsthand. So alongside the blend of wit, sophistication and comedy, including brilliant parodies of operatic forms like 'Glitter and be Gay', the references to the Spanish Inquisition - 'What a day, what a day for an auto-da-fe' - and the irony of Candide's mantra that everything is for the best in the best of all possible worlds give the work a dark undercurrent.

That Candide never had the lasting success he thought it deserved really bugged Bernstein who tinkered with it on-and-off until the end of his life, resulting in multiple versions and the question of which, if any, is definitive.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Building a Library on Leonard Bernstein's comic operetta Candide, with Edward Seckerson.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Elin Manahan Thomas and Katy Hamilton20190608

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Elin Manahan Thomas compares recordings of Leoš Janáček's Glagolitic Mass and picks a favourite.

There is nothing quite like Janáček's Glagolitic Mass, the crowning glory of the extraordinary creative final decade of his life. With its elemental energy and power - wild organ solos, flashing brass fanfares and powerful speech-based rhythms - it's easy to imagine not only the storm that Janacek said had inspired him but also his vision of a Mass being celebrated in nature within a forest cathedral with star-capped treetops as candles. The text is based on Old Church Slavonic (with its Glagolitic script) rather than the traditional Latin, reflecting Janáček's Pan-Slavism sympathies and, as well as chorus, large orchestra and organ, the scoring includes a solo vocal quartet. This monumental work is demanding for everyone, performers and recording engineers alike.

10.50
Ahead of next week's Take Five, Radio 3's five-day focus on the musical worlds of young people, Katy Hamilton picks some recent releases featuring youthful performers.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best new classical releases, plus Building a Library on Jan\u00e1\u010dek's Glagolitic Mass.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Elin Manahan Thomas and Simon Heighes20200215

The best new classical releases: Building a Library: Elin Manahan Thomas compares recordings of Poulenc's Gloria and picks a personal favourite.

9.30am
Building a Library
Singer Elin Manahan Thomas discusses a shortlist of recordings of a 20th-century choral masterpiece, Poulenc's Gloria, whittling it down in order to pick her personal choice of the ultimate library choice.

10.40am
Simon Heighes discusses two new box sets with Andrew: Bach harpsichord and violin concertos from Concerto Copenhagen; and a set of Italian violin concertos by composers from Vivaldi to Paganini.

11.15am
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Poulenc's Gloria as well as concertos by Bach and Italian composers.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Elin Manahan Thomas And Tom Mckinney20180630

with Andrew McGregor.

9.30
Building a Library on Gerald Finzi's Dies natalis with Elin Manahan Thomas.

Begun in the mid-1920s but not premiered until 1940, Finzi's cantata for solo voice and string orchestra sets the words of 17th century English poet, Thomas Traherne. By turns ecstatic and pastoral, this most celebrated of Finzi's works is but modestly represented in the recording catalogue, and then almost exclusively by British musicians.

10.55
Tom McKinney rounds up recent releases.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Building a library on Gerald Finzi's solo cantata, Dies natalis, with Elin Manahan Thomas.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Enigma Variations And New Year, New Music20200104

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Elgar's "Enigma" Variations and a round-up of recent contemporary classical releases.

9.30am
Building a Library
Kate Kennedy discusses a wide range of approaches to Elgar's much-loved Variations on an Original Theme, his so-called "Enigma" Variations and recommends the key recording to have.

10.45am
As part of Radio 3's annual series New Year, New Music, Andrew looks at a clutch of recent discs of music from the last few years.

11.15am
Disc of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out.

The must-have Enigma Variations recording and recent contemporary classical releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Enigma Variations and New Year, New Music20200104

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Elgar's "Enigma" Variations and a round-up of recent contemporary classical releases.

9.30am
Building a Library
Kate Kennedy discusses a wide range of approaches to Elgar's much-loved Variations on an Original Theme, his so-called "Enigma" Variations and recommends the key recording to have.

10.45am
As part of Radio 3's annual series New Year, New Music, Gillian Moore joins Andrew to look at a clutch of recent discs of music from the last few years.

11.15am
Disc of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out.

The must-have Enigma Variations recording and recent contemporary classical releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Erica Jeal And Errollyn Wallen20190126

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Erica Jeal picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Robert Schumann's String Quartet in A major Op. 41, No. 3.

Dedicated to his friend Mendelssohn, Schumann's three Op. 41 quartets come from an intensive two months in 1843, before which Schumann had assiduously studied the string quartets from the great masters of the medium: Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. The third quartet betrays none of Schumann's frustration and gloomy moods as he struggled to come to terms with the shadow cast by his wife of nearly 3 years, the celebrated pianist (and main breadwinner) Clara.

11.00
Errollyn Wallen reviews the groundbreaking 1970s CBS Masterworks Black Composers Series, newly reissued for the first time on CD.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Including Building a Library on Schumann's String Quartet No 3 in A, Op 41.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Erica Jeal and Rob Cowan20170603

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Flora Willson And Simon Heighes20180317

9.30
Building a Library: Massenet's Manon with Flora Willson.

Based on the 1731 novel L'histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut by the Abbé Prévost, Manon is probably still Massenet's most popular opera. It was first performed at the Opéra-Comique in Paris in 1884, and it has never been out of the repertory since its creation. It is full of charm and vitality with a complex central character who develops from the ingenue of Act 1 to someone altogether more manipulative at the end of the drama.

10.45
Simon Heighes reviews new releases of baroque music including works by Bach, Handel and William Hayes

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Massenet's opera Manon; Simon Heighes reviews new baroque releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Flora Willson and William Mival20190223

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Flora Willson listens to and compares recordings of Verdi's opera La forza del destino

La forza del destino, or The Force of Destiny, is an opera written and conceived on the grandest scale. An accidental death in the first scene ignites a drama of retribution in which the heroine, Leonora and her lover, Don Alvaro, are stalked by Leonora's vengeful brother Don Carlo. This dark tale is offset by lively scenes of daily life in military encampments and monastic orders than in many ways anticipates the great epic tableaux of Russian opera.

10.30
Andrew talks to William Mival about new releases of symphonies by Sibelius, Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Verdi's Force of Destiny.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Flora Wilson and Jan Smaczny20191207

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Flora Willson choose her favourite recordings of Delibes' opera Lakme

Written in the early 1880s and set in the British India of the mid-19th century, Lakmé is based on the novel Le Mariage de Loti by Pierre Loti. The opera includes the ever-popular Flower Duet sung by Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika. It's most famous aria is the Bell Song in Act 2. Like other French operas of the 19th Century, Lakmé projects a view of the Orient seen through Western eyes. However as a piece of well-crafted escapism with gorgeous tunes and lavish scenic backdrop it is an opera well worth discovering.

10.50
Jan Smaczny joins Andrew to discuss resissues of the great Czech pianist Rudolf Firkusny who studied with the composers Janáček and Suk, and later with the legendary pianists Alfred Cortot and Artur Schnabel. He escaped the Nazis in 1939, fled to Paris, later settled in New York and eventually became a U.S. citizen. He had a broad repertoire and became known especially for his performances of the Czech composers Smetana, Dvořák, Janáček, and Martinů.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week

Andrew McGregor with Delibes's Lakme plus reissues of Czech pianist Rudolf Firkusny.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Flora Wilson And Jan Smaczny20191207

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Flora Willson choose her favourite recordings of Delibes' opera Lakme

Written in the early 1880s and set in the British India of the mid-19th century, Lakmé is based on the novel Le Mariage de Loti by Pierre Loti. The opera includes the ever-popular Flower Duet sung by Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika. It's most famous aria is the Bell Song in Act 2. Like other French operas of the 19th Century, Lakmé projects a view of the Orient seen through Western eyes. However as a piece of well-crafted escapism with gorgeous tunes and lavish scenic backdrop it is an opera well worth discovering.

10.50
Jan Smaczny joins Andrew to discuss resissues of the great Czech pianist Rudolf Firkusny who studied with the composers Janáček and Suk, and later with the legendary pianists Alfred Cortot and Artur Schnabel. He escaped the Nazis in 1939, fled to Paris, later settled in New York and eventually became a U.S. citizen. He had a broad repertoire and became known especially for his performances of the Czech composers Smetana, Dvořák, Janáček, and Martinů.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week

Andrew McGregor with Delibes's Lakme plus reissues of Czech pianist Rudolf Firkusny.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Gerard McBurney and Laura Tunbridge20171111

Gerard McBurney discusses Shostakovich Symphony 11, and Laura Tunbridge talks Lieder.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Gillian Moore and Anna Picard20170520

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Gillian Moore and Marina Frolova-Walker20190323

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Gillian Moore introduces and surveys the music of György Kurtág and recommends the essential recordings. Still active in his tenth decade, Hungarian-born Kurtág is one of the most highly regarded composers of our times, as well as a remarkable pianist, whose often fragmentary and brief works paradoxically pack and an intensely emotional punch.

1050
Marina Frolova-Walker has been listening to new releases of Russian music including chamber works by 20th-century Soviet composer, Mieczysław Weinberg and a box set of the complete piano music of Tchaikovsky.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Gillian Moore surveys the recordings of Gyorgy Kurtag's music

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Hannah French20200307

9.30
Building a Library: Hannah French compares recordings of Vivaldi's set of 12 concertos, Op.3, better known as L'estro armonico - and picks a favourite.

Vivaldi's reputation across Europe was at its height in 1711 when the Amsterdam-based publisher Estienne Roger published twelve of his concertos for strings as Opus 3 under the title L'estro armonico. The popularity of L'estro armonico was instant and new editions soon appeared in London and Paris. Quantz was impressed by the novelty of Vivaldi's Op.3 and J.S. Bach arranged a dozen of them for keyboard instruments. The 12 concertos together put on a dazzling display of virtuosity, baroque drama, rhythmic energy and intense harmonic development. L'estro armonico, which translates roughly as 'musical rapture', encapsulates Vivaldi's inventiveness in the collection as a whole.

10.50
On the eve of International Women's Day, Andrew McGregor reviews the most recent releases of music by female composers.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

In Building a Library, Hannah French compares recordings of Vivaldi's L'estro armonico.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Hannah French and Mark Lowther20180505

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Corelli's Violin Sonatas Op 5 with Hannah French.

These exhilarating and inventive sonatas by Arcangelo Corelli were published in Rome in 1700 . They are subdivided into church sonatas and chamber sonatas and the last sonata is the famous "Follia", which contains 23 variations for solo violin.

10.45
Andrew talks to Mark Lowther about new releases of music by Mozart and Haydn etc.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Corelli's Violin Sonatas Op 5; plus new releases of music by Mozart.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Hannah French and Sarah Walker20190525

09.30
Building a Library: Hannah French listens to and compares recordings of Bach’s Ascension Oratorio ‘Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen‘ BWV 11.
Composed probably in 1735 for the feast of the Ascension, the text of Bach’s oratorio comprises several biblical sources, free poetry and chorales. It tells the narrative of Christ’s ascension to Heaven, as told in the Gospels of Luke and Mark, and in the Acts of the Apostles. As is often the case in Bach’s music, several of the movements from the Ascension Oratorio are re-workings of parts of earlier cantatas, while the alto aria was used again much later for the plangent Agnus Dei of his Mass in B minor.
10.50
Sarah Walker reviews a wide-ranging selection of new piano music recordings.
11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Bach\u2019s Ascension Oratorio, and new piano music discs reviewed.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Harriet Smith20181124

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Harriet Smith listens to some of the available recordings of Mendelssohn's String Quartet No.2 in A minor, Op.13,

Mendelssohn was still a teenager when in 1827 he composed his 2nd String Quartet in A minor, Op.13, yet he had already written a number of other impressive chamber works including his much-loved and celebrated Octet. This String Quartet No.2, written the year in which Beethoven died, represents Mendelssohn's first mature string quartet. The influence of Beethoven on Mendelssohn can also be heard in this string quartet. It is a highly passionate work and its four movements (Adagio - Allegro vivace; Adagio non lento; Intermezzo & Presto - Adagio non lent) are unified by a theme 'ist es wahr?' (is it true?) first heard in the opening bars.

11.00
Andrew McGregor discusses new and recent releases of baroque music with Suzanne Aspden, including music by Handel, Vinci and Soler.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Mendelssohn's String Quartet No 2 in A minor, Op 13.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Harriet Smith And Simon Heighes20180203

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Harriet Smith makes a personal choice from among the available recordings of Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109.

Like all the major works from the extraordinary final decade of Beethoven's life, his Piano Sonata No. 30 breaks the mould of conventional form in the quest for ever-deeper personal expression. This, the first of his final three piano sonatas, is a technical and interpretative challenge every major pianist has wanted to take on, reflected in an exceptionally rich and varied recorded legacy going back to the 1930s.

10.55
Simon Heighes assesses recent releases of Baroque music.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library focuses on Beethoven's Piano Sonata No 30 in E, Op 109.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Helen Wallace And Claire Booth20180217

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Helen Wallace makes a personal choice from among the available recordings of Haydn's String Quartet in G minor Op 20 No 3

The six string quartets Opus 20 by Joseph Haydn were a milestone in his journey to become "the father of the string quartet". The quartets were composed in 1772 at a time of turmoil in Haydn's life, and also when he was coming into contact with the new philosophical and political ideas sweeping Europe.

10.30
Claire Booth joins Andrew to discuss some new releases of music by contemporary composers.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Andrew McGregor presents, as Building a Library focuses on Haydn's Quartet No 3 in G minor

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Helen Wallace and Hilary Finch20170415

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Helen Wallace and Nicholas Kenyon20190504

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Helen Wallace listens to and compares recordings of Beethoven's Piano Trios Op. 1

Beethoven's Opus 1 is a set of three piano trios (written for piano, violin, and cello), first performed and published in 1795. The wit, creativity and sheer energy of these works is astonishing. Clearly Beethoven waited until he had three substantial works he was happy with to publish as his first Opus number. They must have made quite a splash at the time, and remain infectiously vital pieces today.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Nicholas Kenyon about the first releases of Haydn 2032, an ambitious project to record all the Haydn symphonies before the 300th anniversary of his birth in 2032.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Latest recordings with Andrew McGregor. Building a Library on Beethoven's Piano Trios Op 1

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Iain Burnside and Elin Manahan Thomas20170617

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Iain Burnside And Flora Willson20181208

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Iain Burnside picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Haydn's Piano Sonata in Eb, H 16:52

Written in 1794, this is the last and one of the greatest of Haydn's piano sonatas. In this piece Haydn expanded the sonata structure beyond its normal scope, explored unusual harmonies and developed his thematic material with unusual rigour. Haydn wrote it for the outstanding pianist Therese Jansen, who lived in London at the time of his visits there in the 1790s.

1030
Andrew and Flora Willson discuss the latest batch of new opera releases including Verdi's Macbeth and Wagner's Gotterdammerung

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Building a Library on Haydn's Piano Sonata in E flat HOB XVI:52

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Iain Burnside And Natasha Loges20200125

9.30
Building a Library: Iain Burnside compares recordings of Chopin's four scherzi for piano, Opuses 20, 31, 39 and 54 - and picks a favourite.

Scherzo No 1 in B minor Op 20
Scherzo No 2 in B flat minor Op 31
Scherzo No 3 in C sharp minor Op 39
Scherzo No 4 in E major Op 54

Chopin's four scherzi, much loved and oft recorded by the world's greatest pianists, are a feat of technique, lyricism and musical story-telling. Each is a mini drama and they were written for concert performance rather than the salon. The scherzi also span Chopin's own compositional journey. Whilst the first scherzo is defiant and assertive, demonstrating the youthful energy of the composer, the fourth, written towards the end of his life, is more elusive. Together with the ballades, Chopin's four scherzi stand supreme amongst his entire output for solo piano.

10.50
Natasha Loges reviews the newest releases of Lieder and songs.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

In Building a Library, Iain Burnside compares recordings of Chopin's four scherzi.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Iain Burnside and Natasha Loges20200125

9.30
Building a Library: Iain Burnside compares recordings of Chopin's four scherzi for piano, Opuses 20, 31, 39 and 54 - and picks a favourite.

Scherzo No 1 in B minor Op 20
Scherzo No 2 in B flat minor Op 31
Scherzo No 3 in C sharp minor Op 39
Scherzo No 4 in E major Op 54

Chopin's four scherzi, much loved and oft recorded by the world's greatest pianists, are a feat of technique, lyricism and musical story-telling. Each is a mini drama and they were written for concert performance rather than the salon. The scherzi also span Chopin's own compositional journey. Whilst the first scherzo is defiant and assertive, demonstrating the youthful energy of the composer, the fourth, written towards the end of his life, is more elusive. Together with the ballades, Chopin's four scherzi stand supreme amongst his entire output for solo piano.

10.50
Natasha Loges reviews the newest releases of Lieder and songs.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

In Building a Library, Iain Burnside compares recordings of Chopin's four scherzi.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Iain Burnside And Nicholas Baragwanath20180324

9.30
As part of "Debussy's Paris" marking the 100th anniversary of the composer's death this weekend, Building a Library is a live discussion between Andrew and Iain Burnside on Book 1 of Debussy's Piano Preludes.

Book I was written in a matter of months between 1909 and 1910. The titles of the preludes are all very descriptive, and, unusually, they were placed at the end of each work, which encourages the performer to experience each unique sound world with open ears, without being prejudiced by Debussy's titles.

10.45
Andrew talks to Nicholas Baragwanath about new DVDs of operas by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Giordano and Monteverdi

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Book 1 of Debussy's Piano Preludes; a review of new opera DVDs.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Iain Burnside and Nigel Simeone20190713

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Iain Burnside listens to and compares recordings of Richard Strauss's Four Last Songs.

Strauss composed his great swansong for the female voice when he was 84. They are settings of the German poets Hermann Hesse and Joseph von Eichendorff and the themes of death and reconciliation are portrayed in music of the most aching wistfulness and melancholy. They were more or less his final completed works and are among the most popular pieces in the orchestral song repertoire. The list of sopranos who have recorded these songs is a roll call of the most beautiful voices of the last 70 years. Iain Burnside has a very difficult choice to make.

10.30
Andrew McGregor talks to Nigel Simeone about new releases of orchestral music by Sibelius, Saint-Saens, Debussy and Copland.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor and Building a Library on Strauss's Four Last Songs

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Ivan Hewett and Laura Tunbridge20170610

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Ivan Hewett and Natasha Loges20180428

with Andrew McGregor, plus guest Natasha Loges with her selection of new releases of lieder and songs.

9.30
Building a Library: Brahms; Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.68, with Ivan Hewett.

Brahms' 1st Symphony begins in struggle, in C minor, and progresses from the turbulent searing string line kept in check by the powerful, persistent timpani beat in the opening bars to a triumphant finale in C major by the end. The whole symphony feels in a sense like a battle. Although Brahms began to compose the first movement of his 1st Symphony in 1862, he took the best part of fourteen years to complete the whole symphony. During the intervening years, he composed the Variations on a Theme by Haydn, his Sextet and many solo piano pieces. When the 1st Symphony was finally premiered in 1876, it was hailed as the most significant since Schumann. There are echoes too of Beethoven's 5th Symphony which likewise progresses from C minor to C major.

10.30
Natasha Loges with new releases of lieder and songs from Schubert to Faure and Reynaldo Hahn.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Building a Library focuses on Brahms' Symphony No 1 in C minor, Op 68, with Ivan Hewett.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Ivan Hewett, Kirsten Gibson and Kate Kennedy20190330

Live from Sage Gateshead with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Ivan Hewett picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Dmitri Shostakovich's Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57.

Shostakovich hoped the clear, tunefully muscular style of his 1940 Piano Quintet would mark another step on the way to rehabilitation with the Soviet authorities. But Shostakovich himself couldn't have predicted the enormous popular and critical success of the work. The bitterest and sweetest icing on the cake came the following year when the Quintet won the Stalin Prize (Category One).

10.50
Kirsten Gibson and Kate Kennedy reflect on how recordings have documented ever-changing fashions in performance styles. Does what was considered a moving performance in the past still communicate to us now, or does it just sound ridiculous and weird?

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Building a Library on Shostakovich's Piano Quintet.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Jan Smaczny and Laura Tunbridge20190928

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
A guide to the best of Martinu on disc.
Jan Smaczny presents his five favourite recordings of a 20th Century Czech composer who really deserves to be in every collection. Bohuslav Martinů wrote 6 symphonies, 15 operas, 14 ballet scores and much else besides. His style is eclectic and full of high-energy, propulsive rhythms . Among his operas, Julietta and The Greek Passion are thrilling works. Many of his orchestral works have hints of jazz mixed in with Bohemian and Moravian folk melodies.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Laura Tunbridge about a new cycle of the Beethoven symphonies from Andris Nelsons and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor and a guide to the best of Martinu on disc.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Jan Smaczny And Laura Tunbridge20190928

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
A guide to the best of Martinu on disc.
Jan Smaczny presents his five favourite recordings of a 20th Century Czech composer who really deserves to be in every collection. Bohuslav Martinů wrote 6 symphonies, 15 operas, 14 ballet scores and much else besides. His style is eclectic and full of high-energy, propulsive rhythms. Among his operas, Julietta and The Greek Passion are thrilling works. Many of his orchestral works have hints of jazz mixed in with Bohemian and Moravian folk melodies.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Laura Tunbridge about a new cycle of the Beethoven symphonies from Andris Nelsons and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor and a guide to the best of Martinu on disc.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew McGregor with Jeremy Summerly and Harriet Smith20191116

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Jeremy Summerly is in the hot seat, sifting through recordings of Stravinsky's austerely beautiful Symphony of Psalms.

A choral symphony from the composer's 'neoclassical' period, Stravinsky's compact, three-movement work has been fortunate on record with a wide range of interpretations from all round the world. It inhabits a unique sound world, omitting as it does clarinets, violins and violas, and comparisons are guaranteed to be fascinating.

10.50
Harriet Smith joins Andrew for a round-up of recent virtuoso piano recordings, including Alkan from Paul Wee, Rachmaninov from Daniel Trifonov and Prokofiev from Alexander Melnikov.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Andrew McGregor with Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms plus Russian and French piano music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Jeremy Summerly And Harriet Smith20191116

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Jeremy Summerly is in the hot seat, sifting through recordings of Stravinsky's austerely beautiful Symphony of Psalms.

A choral symphony from the composer's 'neoclassical' period, Stravinsky's compact, three-movement work has been fortunate on record with a wide range of interpretations from all round the world. It inhabits a unique sound world, omitting as it does clarinets, violins and violas, and comparisons are guaranteed to be fascinating.

10.50
Harriet Smith joins Andrew for a round-up of recent virtuoso piano recordings, including Alkan from Paul Wee, Rachmaninov from Daniel Trifonov and Prokofiev from Alexander Melnikov.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Andrew McGregor with Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms plus Russian and French piano music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew Mcgregor With Jeremy Summerly And Lucy Parham20181103

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Jeremy Summerly surveys recordings of Stravinsky's Mass

Stravinsky's Mass was written between 1944 and 1948 and is one of the most austere and archaic works of his neoclassical period. Stravinsky incorporated elements of his Russian Orthodox faith but chose to set the text of the Catholic Mass out of a desire to create a liturgical work - an impossibility in the Russian Orthodox tradition, which forbids the use of instruments in church. The Mass is one of only a few of Stravinsky's works not to have been commissioned, which suggests that the work came about as a result of the composer's own renewed religious consciousness.

10.30
Lucy Parham reviews recent releases of piano music by composers including Debussy, Beethoven and Bartok.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Jonathan Cross and Erica Jeal20190706

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Jonathan Cross listens to and compares recordings of Stravinsky's ballet music, The Rite of Spring.

Stravinsky's music for The Rite of Spring is arguably his most iconoclastic work and one of the masterpieces of twentieth-century orchestral music. It had originally been written for the 1913 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes company, for which he had composed both the Firebird and Petrushka as a young and unknown composer. The premiere at the Theatre des Champs-Élysées on 29 May 1913 caused such a 'riot' that the Rite of Spring has gone down in the history books as much for its notoriety as its influence. The Rite of Spring is subtitled 'Pictures of Pagan Russian in Two Parts' and expresses primitive rituals to celebrate the advent of spring. Its most notorious scene is that in which a young girl is chosen as a sacrificial victim and dances herself to death. The music is raw with savage harmonies, otherworldly melodies, and driving primitive rhythms that pulsate through the orchestra. It is a work that is so influential that it is now more often heard as a concert piece than in its original ballet setting.

10.50
Andrew McGregor discusses new recordings of chamber music with Erica Jeal.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, plus the latest recording news.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Jonathan Freeman-Attwood and Harriet Smith20171202

Building a Library: Jonathan Freeman-Attwood on Bruckner's motets a review of Alkan.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Kate Kennedy20180512

with Andrew McGregor.

9.30
Building a Library: Britten's Winter Words, Op 52, with Kate Kennedy.

Britten composed Winter Words, his eight setting of Thomas Hardy, in 1953 at a time when he was also working on his operas Gloriana and The Turn of the Screw. The style of Winter Words does, however, contrast with that of the two operas in its austere textures, while allowing the Hardy texts to be projected with particular clarity. After the opening song, Day Close in November, comes Midnight on the Great Western, which even includes train-whistle noises. Then comes The Wagtail and Baby, The Little Old Table and The Choirmaster's burial (or The Tenor Man's Story), in which the departed master's favourite hymn-tune 'Mount Ephraim' is woven into the texture. Proud Songsters is followed by At the Railway Station, Upway (or The Convict and the Boy With the Violin), and the whole cycle ends with Before Life and After, a powerful expression of Britten's fascination with the conflict between innocence and experience.

10.30
Andrew McGregor discusses the new 61-CD box set Esa-Pekka Salonen: The Complete Sony Recordings with critic Andrew Mellor.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Building a Library on Britten's Winter Words, Op 52 with Kate Kennedy and Andrew Mellor.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Kate Molleson and Harriet Smith20180526

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex with Kate Molleson.

Stravinsky's "Opera-oratorio after Sophocles" is scored for orchestra, speaker, soloists, and male chorus. Jean Cocteau's French libretto was translated by Abbé Jean Daniélou into Latin but the narration is performed in the language of the audience. This dramatic and exciting work is from the beginning of Stravinsky's neoclassical period, and is one of the his finest works.

10.45
Andrew talks to Harriet Smith about new releases of piano music by Haydn and Mozart, including a new cycle of the Beethoven piano sonatas.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week

Producer Clive Portbury

Presenter ANDREW MCGREGOR.

Building a library on Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex, plus new releases of piano music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Kate Molleson and Kirsten Gibson20170318

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Katy Hamilton and Alexandra Coghlan20171125

In Building a Library, Katy Hamilton focuses on Brahms's 3rd String Quartet.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Katy Hamilton and Nigel Simeone20191026

09.30
Building a Library: Katy Hamilton compares recordings of Antonín Dvořák's ever-popular Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor 'Dumky' and picks a favourite.

Dvořák's music, suffused with the rhythms and melodic inflections of Bohemian and Moravian folk traditions might never have gained international recognition beyond his Czech homeland but for the enthusiastic and public endorsement of a certain Johannes Brahms. After that, Dvořák sometimes reined in the freshness and charm of his music in favour of a more serious and occasionally portentous Teutonic style. But when it came to his final piano trio, Dvořák happily returned to his Slavic folk roots, aiming to write an unashamedly popular work. Made out of six movements, each modelled on the dumka (an instrumental folk form with two contrasting sections) Dvořák hit the spot with his public and today the Dumky trio is still a great favourite with audiences -- and recording companies.

10.50
Nigel Simeone reviews new orchestral recordings including Beethoven from Masaaki Suzuki and Bach Collegium Japan, Bruckner with Simon Rattle and the LSO, and Debussy from Mark Elder in Manchester.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Dvo\u0159\u00e1k's 'Dumky' Piano Trio

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Katy Hamilton And Nigel Simeone20191026

09.30
Building a Library: Katy Hamilton compares recordings of Antonín Dvořák's ever-popular Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor 'Dumky' and picks a favourite.

Dvořák's music, suffused with the rhythms and melodic inflections of Bohemian and Moravian folk traditions might never have gained international recognition beyond his Czech homeland but for the enthusiastic and public endorsement of a certain Johannes Brahms. After that, Dvořák sometimes reined in the freshness and charm of his music in favour of a more serious and occasionally portentous Teutonic style. But when it came to his final piano trio, Dvořák happily returned to his Slavic folk roots, aiming to write an unashamedly popular work. Made out of six movements, each modelled on the dumka (an instrumental folk form with two contrasting sections) Dvořák hit the spot with his public and today the Dumky trio is still a great favourite with audiences -- and recording companies.

10.50
Nigel Simeone reviews new orchestral recordings including Beethoven from Masaaki Suzuki and Bach Collegium Japan, Bruckner with Simon Rattle and the LSO, and Debussy from Mark Elder in Manchester.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Dvo\u0159\u00e1k's 'Dumky' Piano Trio

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew McGregor with Kirsten Gibson and Anna Picard20191130

09.30
Building a Library: Kirsten Gibson compares recordings of Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas and picks a favourite.

Uncertainty surrounds the origins Purcell's Dido and Aeneas. It's thought to be from the late 1680s, towards the end of Purcell's short life, and some evidence points to a Chelsea girls' school as the unlikely venue of its premiere. Unlikely because the exceptional quality of its music and drama make the English court a more probable location for one of the greatest of all English musical stage works. Based on part of Virgil's Aeneid, love, abandonment and despair are its eternal themes, all of which are devastatingly portrayed in its most famous number, Dido's lament 'When I am laid in earth', an aria which has always attracted some of the most starry singers.

The current catalogue shows Dido is an internationally acknowledged masterpiece and the preserve of period performance specialists, but its recorded history began in the 1930s, long predating both of those aspects.

11.50
Anna Picard has been listening to recent recordings of Haydn, Beethoven and Schumann, including a complete set of the Beethoven Piano Concertos from Jan Lisiecki and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Kirsten Gibson And Anna Picard20191130

09.30
Building a Library: Kirsten Gibson compares recordings of Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas and picks a favourite.

Uncertainty surrounds the origins Purcell's Dido and Aeneas. It's thought to be from the late 1680s, towards the end of Purcell's short life, and some evidence points to a Chelsea girls' school as the unlikely venue of its premiere. Unlikely because the exceptional quality of its music and drama make the English court a more probable location for one of the greatest of all English musical stage works. Based on part of Virgil's Aeneid, love, abandonment and despair are its eternal themes, all of which are devastatingly portrayed in its most famous number, Dido's lament 'When I am laid in earth', an aria which has always attracted some of the most starry singers.

The current catalogue shows Dido is an internationally acknowledged masterpiece and the preserve of period performance specialists, but its recorded history began in the 1930s, long predating both of those aspects.

11.50
Anna Picard has been listening to recent recordings of Haydn, Beethoven and Schumann, including a complete set of the Beethoven Piano Concertos from Jan Lisiecki and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Kirsten Gibson and Elin Manahan Thomas20171028

Andrew McGregor presents as Elin Manahan Thomas reports on a recording of Mozart's Requiem

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Kirsten Gibson And Nicholas Kenyon20181027

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Kirsten Gibson surveys the recordings of Purcell's King Arthur

King Arthur, or The British Worthy is a semi-opera by Henry Purcell with a libretto by John Dryden, first performed at the Queen's Theatre, Dorset Garden, London, in 1691. It is based on the battles between the Britons and the Saxons and contains some of Purcell's most melodic and adventurous music.

10.30
Andrew talks to Sir Nicholas Kenyon about Bach 333. Said to be the largest project of its kind in the history of recorded music, Deutsche Grammophon in collaboration with a number of other labels present every known note written by J S Bach 333 years after his birth.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week

Building a Library: Kirsten Gibson surveys the recordings of Purcell's King Arthur.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Laura Tunbridge and Jeremy Summerly20190629

09.30
Building a Library: Laura Tunbridge listens to and compares recordings of Mozart’s piano auartets.

Mozart received a commission for three piano quartets in 1785 from the publisher Franz Anton Hoffmeister. This rather neglected instrumental combination inspired him to compose the first quartet, which was – according to Hoffmeister - so intricate and difficult for the amateur market, that he released Mozart from his obligation to write the other two. Such was Mozart’s enthusiasm for this ensemble that he wrote a second quartet regardless, and together with the first, they form the earliest masterpieces of the genre.

10.50
Jeremy Summerly reviews a wide-ranging selection of new baroque recordings.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Mozart\u2019s piano quartets and new recordings of baroque music reviewed

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Laura Tunbridge And Sarah Walker20180609

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Schubert's Die Schone Mullerin by Laura Tunbridge

Schubert's famous song cycle is based on poems by Wilhelm Müller. Along with his other great song cycle, Winterreise, it is one of the summits of the Lieder repertoire. The recordings are a roll-call of nearly all the great Lieder singers who have made recordings over the years.

10.45
Andrew talks to Sarah Walker about new releases of music by contemporary composers.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a library on Schubert's Die sch\u00f6ne M\u00fcllerin and releases of contemporary music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Laura Tunbridge And Tom Mckinney20190105

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Laura Tunbridge picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Debussy's String Quartet

Claude Debussy wrote his only string quartet in 1893 when he was 31 years old. After abandoning his opera Rodrigue et Chimène, he planned to write two string quartets. But this was the only one he completed. It is full of sensual and impressionistic harmonies. Debussy wrote that "any sounds in any combination and in any succession are henceforth free to be used in a musical continuity."

1030
Andrew and Tom McKinney discuss the latest batch of new releases of music by contemporary composers

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Building a Library on Debussy's String Quartet

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Lucy Parham and Sarah Lenton20190420

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Lucy Parham listens to and compares recordings of Schumann's Piano Concerto.

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 was finished in 1845 and is Schumann's only piano concerto. The piece has the character of a fantasy. The work is suffused with a sense of yearning and happiness; of two people in love. It seems in some ways to portray his attempt to woe and finally marry Clara, the daughter of his famous piano teacher, Friedrich Wieck. The main motif of the first movement recalls Florestan's prison aria in Beethoven's opera Fidelio. In Schumann's case this possibly symbolises his struggle for personal freedom and happiness.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Sarah Lenton about recent opera productions that have been released on DVD including Cavalli's Giasone, Verdi's Stiffelio and Berg's Wozzeck

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Latest recordings with Andrew McGregor and Building a Library on Schumann's Piano Concerto

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Mahan Esfahani and Natasha Loges20191019

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Mahan Esfahani listens to and compares recordings of Verdi's opera La Traviata

The tale of the consumptive courtesan rescued from a life of reckless and meaningless pleasure by an idealistic and ardent lover is one of the most popular operas in the repertoire. Written by Verdi in the white heat of his middle period when he was creating one masterpiece after another and forging an ever closer relationship between music, text and drama, La Traviata has attracted some of the best sopranos who ever went into a recording studio.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Natasha Loges about a new set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas from Igor Levit.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor plus Building a Library on Verdi's opera La Traviata.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Mahan Esfahani And Natasha Loges20191019

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Mahan Esfahani listens to and compares recordings of Verdi's opera La Traviata

The tale of the consumptive courtesan rescued from a life of reckless and meaningless pleasure by an idealistic and ardent lover is one of the most popular operas in the repertoire. Written by Verdi in the white heat of his middle period when he was creating one masterpiece after another and forging an ever closer relationship between music, text and drama, La Traviata has attracted some of the best sopranos who ever went into a recording studio.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Natasha Loges about a new set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas from Igor Levit.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor plus Building a Library on Verdi's opera La Traviata.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew Mcgregor With Mahan Esfahani And Simon Heighes20181013

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Mahan Esfahani surveys the recordings of Franck's Violin Sonata

The Sonata in A major by César Franck is one the greatest sonatas for violin and piano ever written. It was written in 1886, when César Franck was 63, as a wedding present for the 31-year-old violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. The piece is cyclic in that all the movements share common thematic threads. And it has attracted some of the finest violin and piano duos into the recording studio over the years

10.30
As part of National Album Day Andrew talks to Simon Heighes about the history of the classical record album from its early days as a physical album in which to store your 78s, to the recording of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto by Nathan Milstein in 1948 which was the first classical long-playing record. With the expansion in playing time, artists and producers were suddenly able to play around with themes, concepts and narratives which gave us some much loved albums which remain in the catalogue to this day. They discuss some classic albums of the past and ponder on the continuing popularity of the album in the age of streaming where in theory the whole catalogue of recorded classical music is now at our finger tips.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week

This programme is part of BBC Music’s support for the first ever National Album Day, which takes place on Saturday 13th October with programming on Radio 1, 1Xtra, Radio 2, Radio 3, Radio 4, 5 Live, 6 Music, BBC One and BBC Four across the week or on the day itself.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Mahan Esfahani and Suzanne Aspden20170923

Andrew McGregor focuses on Cesar Franck's Symphony in D minor for Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Marina Frolova-walker20181229

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Marina Frolova-Walker picks her favourite from among the recordings of Sergei Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor.

After the disastrous 1897 premiere of his First Symphony Rachmaninov had a nervous breakdown and went into years of depression, unable to compose. In 1900 his doctor prescribed intensive courses of hypnotherapy and psychotherapy and the Second Piano Concerto was the breakthrough piece. Premiered in 1901 it's become one of the most popular of all piano concertos, represented in the catalogue by a seemingly never-ending list of performers, a veritable who's who of pianists, beginning with the composer himself.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No 2.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Marina Frolova-Walker and Alexandra Coghlan20190921

09.30
Building a Library: Marina Frolova-Walker compares recordings of Prokofiev's Symphony No 1 'Classical'.

Composed following the model of the symphony established by Haydn (the 'Father of the Symphony'), Prokofiev's first foray into the genre is widely known as the 'Classical Symphony', a name given to it by the composer. One of the earliest examples of 'neoclassicism', the symphony premiered in 1918 in Petrograd, conducted by Prokofiev himself, and together with Peter and the Wolf, is has become one of his most popular works.

10.50
Alexandra Coghlan reviews a wide-ranging selection of new choral recordings, including Daniel Harding's recent account of Brahms' German Requiem and Italian Baroque music from Le Poème Harmonique.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Prokofiev's 'Classical' Symphony and new choral recordings reviewed.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Marina Frolova-walker And Alexandra Coghlan20190921

09.30
Building a Library: Marina Frolova-Walker compares recordings of Prokofiev's Symphony No 1 'Classical'.

Composed following the model of the symphony established by Haydn (the 'Father of the Symphony'), Prokofiev's first foray into the genre is widely known as the 'Classical Symphony', a name given to it by the composer. One of the earliest examples of 'neoclassicism', the symphony premiered in 1918 in Petrograd, conducted by Prokofiev himself, and together with Peter and the Wolf, is has become one of his most popular works.

10.50
Alexandra Coghlan reviews a wide-ranging selection of new choral recordings, including Daniel Harding's recent account of Brahms' German Requiem and Italian Baroque music from Le Poème Harmonique.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Prokofiev's 'Classical' Symphony and new choral recordings reviewed.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew McGregor with Marina Frolova-Walker and Caroline Gill20170506

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Marina Frolova-walker And Stephen Johnson20180616

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Marina Frolova-Walker.

Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk is one of the operatic masterpieces of the twentieth century and was highly praised at its 1934 premiere. Stalin, however, found the opera highly objectional, when he saw it in 1936, and subsequently banned it. In four acts, the opera is based on the startling novella of the same name by the idiosyncratic Russian novelist and short-story writer Nikolai Leskov. Although it departs slightly from its original literary context, it tells the tragic tale of Katerina, a bored and lonely heroine who falls in love with one of her husband's workers, the manipulative Sergey. Their treachery leads to a gruesome series of murders and ultimately to her own devastating end. In grappling with the subordinate role expected of women in 19th century society, adultery and pre-meditated murder, there are echoes in both Leskov and Shostakovich of Shakespeare's Lady Macbeth.

10.45
Andrew talks about new releases of Bruckner's music with Stephen Johnson.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a library on Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and new Bruckner releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Mark Lowther20181020

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Mark Lowther listens to some of the available recordings of Bach's seven keyboard concertos, BWV.1052 to BWV.1058, and makes a recommendation.

Bach's collection of concertos for solo keyboard are the only collection of concertos in his entire oeuvre aside from the Brandenburg Concertos. These 7 concertos, BWV.1052 to 1058, are thought to have been written in Leipzig during the 1730s, using arrangements made from earlier concertos that Bach wrote while he was still living in Köthen. They are amongst the earliest concertos written for keyboard.

11.00
Kate Molleson sifts through recent releases of orchestral works.

11.45
Tom chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Bach's Concertos for Keyboard , BWV.1052 to BWV.1058.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Mark Lowther and Kate Kennedy20191102

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Bach's Violin Concerto in E, BWV 1042 with Mark Lowther

Johann Sebastian Bach's E Major Concerto is one of the evergreen concertos of the violin repertoire. It's in three movements and based on the Venetian concerto model. It's written for violin, strings, and continuo. Bach later re-used the concerto as the model for his Harpsichord Concerto in D major, BWV 1054.

10.45
Andrew McGregor talks Kate Kennedy about new recordings of string quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Shostakovich

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor and Building a Library on Bach's Violin Concerto in E.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Mark Lowther and Sophie Yates20171209

Building a Library focuses on Elgar's The Dream of Gerontius and new baroque music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Natasha Loges and Sarah Devonald20170930

Andrew McGregor and Natasha Loges on Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder for Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Natasha Loges and Toks Dada20170429

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Natasha Loges, Elin Manahan Thomas & Andrew Mellor20171216

Andrew McGregor and Record Review's critics choose their favourite CD releases of 2017.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton & Kate Molleson20191214

Andrew McGregor is joined in the studio by Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton and Kate Molleson to discuss which new releases they have most enjoyed this year. They champion music ranging from Chausson and Britten to Cassandra Miller and Gesualdo.

0930
Building a Library: David Owen Norris joins Andrew to explore recordings of Schubert's Trout Quintet

The Trout Quintet is Schubert's Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667. It was composed in 1819, when he was 22 years old. Its joie de vivre and infectious melodies have made this piece one of the treasures of the chamber music repertoire. Rather than the usual piano quintet line-up of piano and string quartet, the Trout Quintet is written for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass.

1030
Andrew McGregor and his three guests Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton and Kate Molleson continue to share and discuss the merits of their releases of 2019.

Andrew McGregor and Record Review's critics choose their favourite releases of 2019.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton And Kate Molleson20191214

Andrew McGregor is joined in the studio by Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton and Kate Molleson to discuss which new releases they have most enjoyed this year. They champion music ranging from Chausson and Britten to Cassandra Miller and Gesualdo.

0930
Building a Library: David Owen Norris joins Andrew to explore recordings of Schubert's Trout Quintet

The Trout Quintet is Schubert's Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667. It was composed in 1819, when he was 22 years old. Its joie de vivre and infectious melodies have made this piece one of the treasures of the chamber music repertoire. Rather than the usual piano quintet line-up of piano and string quartet, the Trout Quintet is written for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass.

1030
Andrew McGregor and his three guests Natasha Loges, Katy Hamilton and Kate Molleson continue to share and discuss the merits of their releases of 2019.

Andrew McGregor and Record Review's critics choose their favourite releases of 2019.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Nicholas Baragwanath and Erica Jeal20170311

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Nicholas Baragwanath and Sarah Walker20190406

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Nicholas Baragwanath listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Mahler's 4th Symphony.

Mahler wrote his 4th Symphony on the very cusp of the Twentieth Century and it was premiered in Munich on 25th November 1901. Since Mahler's death, his 4th Symphony has come to be recognised as one of his most 'classical' and approachable of his symphonic works, although it was considered to be a sacrilegious modernist work at the time of its premiere. It completes the tetralogy of his first four symphonies, his 'Wunderhorn' symphonies, so called because they each reversion music from his orchestral Wunderhorn songs. In the case of the Fourth Symphony, it is the disquieting song 'Das himmlische leben' that permeates the entire work and then comes to the fore when solo soprano joins forces with the orchestra for the final movement.

Mahler's 4th Symphony is not scored for a very large orchestra and includes neither trombones nor tuba. In it, Mahler also makes wonderful use of 'Klangfarben', voices emerging from one another within the orchestra.

1050
Sarah Walker reviews the new DG 35-CD box set 'LA Phil Centenary Edition', which includes recordings from Stravinsky to Dudamel and Giulini to Esa-Pekka Salonen.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Mahler's Symphony No 4 and the LA Phil at 100.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Nicholas Baragwanath, Caroline Rae And William Mival20180224

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Nicholas Baragwanath makes a personal choice from the available recordings of Berlioz's The Damnation of Faust.

Faust is a work for solo voices, chorus and orchestra, inspired by a translation of Goethe's dramatic poem Faust and like the Goethe it is a piece that defies easy categorization. It's part-oratorio and part-opera. Berlioz ultimately called it a dramatic legend. And it is full of Berlioz's characteristically eccentric style and colourful orchestration. It is a thrilling work.

10.30
Caroline Rae and William Mival join Andrew to review two sets of classic Debussy recordings.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Berlioz's The Damnation of Faust with Nicholas Baragwanath.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Nicholas Kenyon and Chi-chi Nwanoku20170211

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Nicholas Kenyon And Gillian Moore20180707

with Andrew McGregor.

9.30
Building a Library on Mozart's Don Giovanni with Nicholas Kenyon.

The Marriage of Figaro had been a sensational success with Prague audiences. So, forsaking the fickle Viennese, Mozart wrote his new opera Don Giovanni especially for Prague where he anticipated - and received - another rapturous reception.

When it comes to gratifying his lust, Don Giovanni is a man who never takes no for an answer and he only gets his comeuppance when, as a consequence of his latest encounter, he has to confront the supernatural and descends, defiantly unrepentant, to hell. With its compelling drama and characterisation bound up in a succession of unforgettable musical numbers, Don Giovanni is among Mozart's greatest stage works; it sometimes feels as if the total of its recordings (by some of the finest musicians of this and the last century) adds up to the same number as Giovanni's sexual conquests.

10.55
Gillian Moore reviews rounds up recent releases of Mahler songs and symphonies.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Building a library on Mozart's Don Giovanni with Nicholas Kenyon.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Nicholas Kenyon and Sarah Walker20190209

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Sir Nicholas Kenyon listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.5 in E flat major, Op.73, 'Emperor'.

Beethoven's 5th Piano Concerto in E flat major, Op.73, nicknamed the 'Emperor' is the grandest and even the most symphonic of Beethoven's concertos. It is also the best known of Beethoven's five piano concertos and the most often performed. From the very first bars, the orchestra and soloist engage in what sounds like an heroic battle.

The Emperor Concerto, as it has come to be known, was begun in 1808 and dedicated to Beethoven's friend and student, the Archduke Rudolf who gave its Leipzig premiere in 1811. The piano had become a more expressive instrument through new technological developments, and the Emperor Concerto therefore quickly became very popular. Carl Czerny gave its Vienna premiere in 1802 and Franz Liszt also loved to play the concerto.

11.00
Sarah Walker reviews some of the most exciting new releases of chamber music.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.5 in E flat major, Op. 73 'Emperor'

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Oliver Condy and Natasha Loges20190601

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Oliver Condy listens to and compares recordings of Mendelssohn's Italian Symphony

Mendelssohn sketched his Symphony No. 4 in A major, commonly known as the "Italian", on his tour of Europe from 1829 to 1831. From Rome he wrote to his sister Fanny: "The Italian symphony is making great progress. It will be the jolliest piece I have ever done, especially the last movement. I have not found anything for the slow movement yet, and I think that I will save that for Naples." The symphony was finished in 1833, but despite its success, Mendelssohn remained dissatisfied with it. It was not published until 1851; which is why it is numbered as his "Symphony No. 4", even though it was in fact the third he composed.

10.50
Andrew McGregor talks to Natasha Loges about new song recordings: recent discs of German Lieder and French melodies.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New recordings with Andrew McGregor, Building a Library on Mendelssohn's Italian Symphony.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Richard Morrison and Elin Manahan Thomas20180414

9.30
Building a Library: Dvorak's Second Piano Quintet in A major, with Richard Morrison.
Written amid the wooded countryside at Dvorak's summer house to the south west of Prague, the A major Piano Quintet open-hearted masterpiece is both joyful and poignant.

10:45
Elin Manahan Thomas reviews new releases of music from the Baroque including recordings on clavichord, harpsichord and piano of music by Louis and Francois Couperin and CPE Bach.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Dvorak's Second Piano Quintet; Elin Manahan Thomas on Baroque music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Richard Morrison and Marina Frolova-Walker20170701

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Richard Sisson, Marina Frolova-Walker and Nicholas Baragwanath20171118

Richard Sisson talks on Rodgers & Hammerstein's Oklahoma; also, reissues of Russian music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Richard Wigmore and Iain Burnside20171007

Handel's 'Concerti grossi' in Building a Library, and restored Maria Callas recordings.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Richard Wigmore and Tom McKinney20190309

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Richard Wigmore discusses with Andrew recordings of Mozart's Clarinet Quintet.

Mozart's Clarinet Quintet, was written in 1789 for the clarinettist Anton Stadler. Like the Clarinet Concerto, also written for Stadler, it was actually written for the basset clarinet, which has an extended lower range, and so there are various decisions to be made about exactly what instrument you play it on. This is one of the great pieces of Mozart's last years, full of a mellow yearning which suits the sound to the clarinet to perfection.

10.30
Andrew talks to Tom McKinney about two big boxes of Berlioz reissues that have been brought out by Warner Classics and DG to mark the 150 years since the composer's death.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Mozart's Clarinet Quintet in A.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Roger Parker, Jeremy Sams and Harriet Smith20170401

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Tom McKinney20171223

Building a Library: Bach's Brandenburg Concertos, plus a review of contemporary music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Devonald20181201

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Devonald picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Dvorak's Wind Serenade in D minor.

'It would be difficult to discover a finer, more refreshing impression of really abundant and charming creative talent', wrote no less an authority than Johannes Brahms about Dvorak's Wind Serenade. Inspired by Mozart's great Wind Serenade for 13 wind instruments, this 1878 work is suffused both with the spirit of Czech folk music and Dvorak's distinctive blend of sunniness and wistful nostalgia. The Serenade's wonderfully idiomatic instrumental writing (including three horns, cello and double bass) still sounds fresh and delightful and it was one of Dvorak's earliest successes, helping to carry his reputation to the rest of Europe and beyond. Recordings cover 60+ years and range from rustic and characterful to refined and ultra-sophisticated.

11.00
Jeremy Summerly separates the plums from the turkeys from among the Christmas releases.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Building a Library on Dvorak's Wind Serenade in D minor.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Devonald and Elin Manahan Thomas20191012

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Devonald compares recordings of Mozart's Serenade No.10 in B-flat, 'Gran Partita', K.361/370a - and picks a favourite.

'Gran Partita' as a subtitle implies that Mozart's Serenade No.10 is a large ambitious work, and although the work is clearly conceived as a whole 'cycle', it was not ascribed to the score by the composer himself. Mozart's vast 7-movement work for 13 wind instruments has an elusive compositional history and was thought for a long time to have been composed in 1780 or 1781 for a performance in Munich. No mention of the Serenade appears in any of Mozart's letters from that time and, in the 1970s, when the new critical edition of Mozart's works was published, after exhaustive studies of the autograph, it is now believed that the work was first performed in 1784 at a benefit concert for the Vienna-based basset-horn player Anton Stadler. The Serenade also bears the hallmarks of Mozart's later writing and certainly postdates the two wind serenades in E flat and C minor that were definitely composed in 1782.

The mysterious circumstances of both the subtitle 'Gran Partita' and the many versions of the score give the performer some interesting challenges, which Sarah Devonold discusses with Andrew McGregor.

10.50
Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas reviews some new and recent recordings of Baroque music, including Handel's Brockes-Passion, Purcell's King Arthur and Bach's Suites for solo cello.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Mozart's Serenade No.10 in B-flat, 'Gran Partita', K.361/370a.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Devonald And Elin Manahan Thomas20191012

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Devonald compares recordings of Mozart's Serenade No.10 in B-flat, 'Gran Partita', K.361/370a - and picks a favourite.

'Gran Partita' as a subtitle implies that Mozart's Serenade No.10 is a large ambitious work, and although the work is clearly conceived as a whole 'cycle', it was not ascribed to the score by the composer himself. Mozart's vast 7-movement work for 13 wind instruments has an elusive compositional history and was thought for a long time to have been composed in 1780 or 1781 for a performance in Munich. No mention of the Serenade appears in any of Mozart's letters from that time and, in the 1970s, when the new critical edition of Mozart's works was published, after exhaustive studies of the autograph, it is now believed that the work was first performed in 1784 at a benefit concert for the Vienna-based basset-horn player Anton Stadler. The Serenade also bears the hallmarks of Mozart's later writing and certainly postdates the two wind serenades in E flat and C minor that were definitely composed in 1782.

The mysterious circumstances of both the subtitle 'Gran Partita' and the many versions of the score give the performer some interesting challenges, which Sarah Devonold discusses with Andrew McGregor.

10.50
Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas reviews some new and recent recordings of Baroque music, including Handel's Brockes-Passion, Purcell's King Arthur and Bach's Suites for solo cello.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Mozart's Serenade No.10 in B-flat, 'Gran Partita', K.361/370a.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Devonald And Jeremy Sams20180127

with Andrew McGregor

930
Dvořák's Serenade for Strings in E major with Sarah Devonald.

In his early thirties and with a newborn son, Antonín Dvořák was struggling to make ends meet, a professional viola player and virtually unknown as a composer, without even a piano to his name. But in 1874 he won a state competition which not only came with a very welcome cash prize but also the recognition and enthusiastic endorsement of one of the most influential names in music, Johannes Brahms. The sunny and genial five-movement Serenade for Strings is one of a clutch of new works from the following year and marks the beginning of Dvořák's international reputation.

1100
2018, the centenary of Claude Debussy's death, promises to be a good year for recordings of his music. Jeremy Sams sifts through recent releases of Debussy solo piano works from a handful of leading pianists, including Cathy Krier, Steven Osborne, Seong-Jin Cho, Michael Korstick and Stephen Hough.

1145
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Andrew McGregor looks at Dvorak's String Serenade and new releases of Debussy piano music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Devonald and Stephen Johnson20170325

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Devonold And Elin Manahan Thomas20191012

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Devonold compares recordings of Mozart's Serenade No.10 in B-flat, 'Gran Partita', K.361/370a - and picks a favourite.

'Gran Partita' as a subtitle implies that Mozart's Serenade No.10 is a large ambitious work, and although the work is clearly conceived as a whole 'cycle', it was not ascribed to the score by the composer himself. Mozart's vast 7-movement work for 13 wind instruments has an elusive compositional history and was thought for a long time to have been composed in 1780 or 1781 for a performance in Munich. No mention of the Serenade appears in any of Mozart's letters from that time and, in the 1970s, when the new critical edition of Mozart's works was published, after exhaustive studies of the autograph, it is now believed that the work was first performed in 1784 at a benefit concert for the Vienna-based basset-horn player Anton Stadler. The Serenade also bears the hallmarks of Mozart's later writing and certainly postdates the two wind serenades in E flat and C minor that were definitely composed in 1782.

The mysterious circumstances of both the subtitle 'Gran Partita' and the many versions of the score give the performer some interesting challenges, which Sarah Devonold discusses with Andrew McGregor.

10.50
Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas reviews some new and recent recordings of Baroque music, including Handel's Brockes-Passion, Purcell's King Arthur and Bach's Suites for solo cello.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library focuses on Mozart's Serenade No 10 in B flat, 'Gran Partita'.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Lenton And Katy Hamilton20180120

with Andrew McGregor

0930
Building a Library: Sarah Lenton considers the available recordings of Donizetti's evergreen comic opera, L'elisir d'amore or The Elixir of Love. It is one of the few Donizetti operas that has never been out of the repertoire since its first performance and that is largely because of the seemingly endless stream of melodies as well as an unusually well-crafted libretto from Felice Romani. The recordings spotlight the best of bel canto singing from the last few decades with singers such as Pavarotti, Domingo and Carreras, just to stick with the tenors. In fact the hit aria "Una furtiva lagrima" is a perfect demonstration of Donizetti's uncanny knack of writing effectively for the tenor voice.

1045
Andrew talks to Katy Hamilton about a fascinating group of new chamber music releases including music by Reger from Trio Lirico, the little-known Georg Witte from the Mozart Piano Quartet, and Dvorak and Tchaikovsky from the Escher Quartet.

1145
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Donizetti's opera L'elisir d'amore. Katy Hamilton on chamber music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Lenton and Tom McKinney20170527

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Walker and Caroline Gill20191123

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Walker joins Andrew in the studio to discuss and recommend a recording of Haydn's Symphony No 102.

The tenth of Haydn's so-called 'London' symphonies, it was specially commissioned for performance in the city. In the hands of an insightful interpreter, it can be in turns joyous, incisive, and moving - Sarah guides us to the ultimate must-have version.

10.50
Caroline Gill pops in to talk about a brace of recent releases of chamber music and concertos by Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Sarah Walker joins Andrew to recommend a recording of Haydn's Symphony No 102.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Sarah Walker And Caroline Gill20191123

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Walker joins Andrew in the studio to discuss and recommend a recording of Haydn's Symphony No 102.

The tenth of Haydn's so-called 'London' symphonies, it was specially commissioned for performance in the city. In the hands of an insightful interpreter, it can be in turns joyous, incisive, and moving - Sarah guides us to the ultimate must-have version.

10.50
Caroline Gill pops in to talk about a brace of recent releases of chamber music and concertos by Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Sarah Walker joins Andrew to recommend a recording of Haydn's Symphony No 102.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Walker and Verity Sharp20170408

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Sarah Walker, Gillian Moore and Anna Picard2017091720170916 (R3)

Building a Library on Mozart's Horn Quintet, and Simon Rattle on Record.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Schumann's Dichterliebe and Bruckner from Berlin20191228

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's poignant song cycle "Dichterliebe" and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle from the Berlin Philharmonic

9.30am
Building a Library
Laura Tunbridge discusses a wide range of approaches to Schumann's searing Heine cycle recommends the key recording to keep for posterity

10.45am
Marina Frolova-Walker joins Andrew and unboxes a handsome new set of the nine Bruckner symphonies in which the Berlin Philharmonic is led by not one but eight different conductors, recorded recently in concert

11.15am
Disc of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out

The must-have recording of Dichterliebe and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Schumann's Dichterliebe And Bruckner From Berlin20191228

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's poignant song cycle "Dichterliebe" and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle from the Berlin Philharmonic

9.30am
Building a Library
Laura Tunbridge discusses a wide range of approaches to Schumann's searing Heine cycle recommends the key recording to keep for posterity

10.45am
Marina Frolova-Walker joins Andrew and unboxes a handsome new set of the nine Bruckner symphonies in which the Berlin Philharmonic is led by not one but eight different conductors, recorded recently in concert

11.15am
Disc of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out

The must-have recording of Dichterliebe and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's poignant song cycle "Dichterliebe" and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle from the Berlin Philharmonic.

9.30am
Building a Library
Laura Tunbridge discusses a wide range of approaches to Schumann's searing Heine cycle recommends the key recording to keep for posterity.

10.45am
Andrew unboxes a handsome new set of the nine Bruckner symphonies in which the Berlin Philharmonic is led by not one but eight different conductors, recorded recently in concert.

11.15am
Disc of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out.

The must-have recording of Dichterliebe and a star-studded Bruckner symphony cycle.

Andrew Mcgregor With Simon Heighes20181110

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: 350 years to the day since François Couperin's death, Simon Heighes surveys the Leçons de Ténèbres and makes a recommendation.

In 18th century France theatres were closed during the Easter fortnight and fashionable audiences seeking Holy Week's hot ticket flocked to church services, the only available entertainment - and the only place professional opera singers were allowed to perform. Composers took advantage of their resources and Couperin's Leçons de Ténèbres from around 1713 were written as an integral part of the liturgy for the end of Lent, settings of texts from the Old Testament Book of Lamentations.

Although modestly scored for one and two voices and organ, the music makes a deeply expressive and satisfying sequence, by turns meditative, dramatic and contemplative as it deals with the captivity of the Jews and the destruction of the temple of Jerusalem in 587 BC and demands top-flight singers.

10.50
Katy Hamilton reviews a new box set of re-releases featuring legendary Ukrainian-born American cellist Gregor Piatigorsky.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Francois Couperin's meditative and dramatic Lecons de Tenebres.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Simon Heighes and Caroline Rae20171104

Andrew McGregor Caroline Rae about releases of French piano music by Ravel and Franck.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Simon Heighes and Sarah Devonald20180519

with Andrew McGregor.

9.30
Building a Library: Handel's Concerti a due cori with Simon Heighes.

For Handel a concerto was a means to an end, a tempting bonbon to entice an audience to the main event of the evening. His three Concerti a due cori (Concertos for two choirs) were specially written to help sell seats to his 1747 and 1748 Covent Garden oratorio seasons, Handel recycling highlights from his older choral works and operas, stirringly re-scored for two orchestras with prominent wind and horn parts. Thus these concertos are an attractive proposition, packed full of Handel's 'greatest hits', one after another, whose qualities come over especially well in period instrument performances.

10.55
Sarah Devonald rounds up releases of solo and ensemble music for wind and brass, including discs from leading British horn player Alec Frank-Gemmill, the virtuoso French saxophones of Quatuor Morphing and the first in the Royal Norwegian Navy Band's new series of Percy Grainger's complete music for wind band.

11.45
Disc of the Week: Andrew chooses an outstanding new release.

Simon Heighes looks at Handel's Concerti a due cori in Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Simon Heighes, Sarah Walker and William Mival20170624

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Stephen Johnson20180303

with Andrew McGregor.

9.30
Building a Library: Mahler's Symphony No. 7 with Stephen Johnson.

For much of the last century, Mahler's Seventh Symphony was considered a dud, recorded by a handful of die-hard Mahlerians. Even by 1980, distinguished Mahler scholar Deryck Cooke only reflected the consensus when he described it as 'the Cinderella among Mahler's symphonies,' which 'presents an enigmatic, inscrutable face to the world...one which arouses suspicions as to its quality.' If the middle three movements were considered successful, the first and especially the last were beyond hope.

But the symphony is actually full of some of Mahler's greatest music and these days things are very different: any and every self-respecting Mahler conductor has recorded it and the catalogue groans with a huge number of versions.

11.00
Marina Frolova-Walker picks some plums from recent releases of Russian music including Medtner songs and Rachmaninov piano concertos.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Andrew McGregor presents, as Building a Library focuses on Mahler's Symphony No 7.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Stephen Johnson and Sara Mohr-Pietsch20190302

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Stephen Johnson listens to and compares some of the available recordings of Tchaikovsky's string sextet Souvenir de Florence, Op.70.

Tchaikovsky subtitled his String Sextet in D minor, Op.70, 'Souvenir de Florence' because he sketched one of the work's main themes during the 3-month visit he made to Florence in Italy in 1890 during which he mainly devoted his energy to composing his opera, The Queen of Spades. Despite its conception in Italy, the Souvenir de Florence is decidedly Russian in character. It's not a work that Tchaikovsky found easy to complete, partly because of the scoring for 2 violins, 2 violas and 2 cellos, a texture that he found sometimes more orchestral than comprising 6 independent contrapuntal voices. Tchaikovsky composed the Sextet in 31 days and it received its first public performance in December 1890 at the St Petersburg Chamber Music Society, which had commissioned the work. Tchaikovsky was not entirely happy and revised the work during the following 2 years. Its final version was premiered in 1892 at the St Petersburg Imperial Russian Musical Society, by a sextet led by Leopold Auer.

11.00
In the run-up to International Women's Day, Sara Mohr-Pietsch reviews some of the most exciting new releases of the female composers.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Tchaikovsky's string sextet Souvenir de Florence, Op 70.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Stephen Johnson. Proms Composer: Julian Anderson20170722

Andrew McGregor focuses on Proms composer Julian Anderson. Plus Jiri Belohlavek tribute.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Suzanne Aspden And Stephen Johnson20180113

0930
Building a Library on on Handel's oratorio 'Jephtha' with Suzanne Aspden.

'Jephtha' tells the Old Testament story of the warrior who promises God that in gratitude for victory he will, on returning from battle, sacrifice the first person he sees coming out of his house. Of course, it's his beloved only daughter.

Through a dazzling sequence of choruses and solo numbers, which deliver penetrating insights into the human condition and typically subtle characterisation, Handel explores humankind's enslavement to an implacable and inescapable destiny. Handel's final oratorio is a work of huge emotive power, a summation of a lifetime's composing for the stage, and considered by many to be his masterpiece in a genre he had developed further than any other composer.

1100
Stephen Johnson rounds up recent releases of symphonies by Mahler, Scriabin and Rachmaninoff.

1145
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Andrew McGregor presents as Building a Library focuses on Handel's oratorio Jephtha.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Suzanne Aspden and William Mival20190622

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Suzanne Aspden compares recordings of Handel's Israel in Egypt and picks a favourite.

Handel was a very successful composer of Italian opera until a rival opera company split the audience for Italian opera in London. So Handel started looking for new audiences by writing oratorios in English. Israel in Egypt along with Messiah has texts compiled from Biblical verses. Also, like Messiah, it contains more choruses than his other oratorios. This may explain its initial lack of success. In fact, Handel revised the work, adding Italian-style arias of the kind contemporary audiences enjoyed. Today it is these very dramatic and pictorial choruses which ensure its continued popularity with choirs and audiences alike.

10.40
William Mival has been listening to new releases of orchestral music by Bartok, Richard Strauss and Schoenberg, including a new recording of Suk's monumental Asrael Symphony

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best new classical releases, plus Building a Library on Handel's Israel in Egypt.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Tom Mckinney And Caroline Gill20180210

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Tom McKinney joins Andrew to make a personal choice from among the available recordings of Boulez's seminal work Le marteau sans maître.

Pierre Boulez first performed this piece in 1955. It sets the surrealist poetry of René Char for contralto and six instrumentalists. He had already established a reputation as the composer of modernist and serialist works and this has become one of his most enduring compositions. The orchestration allows for a continuum of sonorities. As Boulez said, "a number of features shared by these instruments forms a continuous passage from voice to vibraphone".

10.30
Caroline Gill joins Andrew to discuss some new releases of music by women composers.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Andrew McGregor presents, as Building a Library focuses on Boulez's Le marteau sans maitre

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Tom McKinney and Jeremy Summerly20190511

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Tom McKinney picks a favourite from among the available recordings of Poulenc's Concerto for two pianos.

Francis Poulenc, darling of the most fashionable French aristocratic salons, described himself as 'wildly eclectic', an epithet that exactly fits his 1932 Concerto for two pianos. With its combination of influences including Stravinsky, Balinese gamelan and music-hall, the Concerto's moods range from zany slapstick in the outer two movements to, in the middle Larghetto, a heartfelt homage to Mozart, the composer Poulenc preferred above all others.

10.50
Jeremy Summerly reviews a wide-ranging selection of new choral recordings.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Poulenc's Concerto for two pianos, and new choral discs reviewed.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Tom McKinney, Harriet Smith and David Owen Norris20170218

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Tom Service20171230

Building a Library features Mozart's 'Prague' Symphony.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with Tom Service and Erica Jeal20191005

09.30
Building a Library: Tom Service compares recordings of Richard Strauss's orchestral epic Ein Heldenleben - A Hero's Life - and picks a favourite.

From the mid-1880s until 1915 Richard Strauss established his credentials as one of Europe's leading composers with a series of ten descriptive orchestral tone poems. His subjects ranged from a picture postcard of his Italian summer holidays, through to literary and folk characters and, by 1898, to his favourite subject of all (although he half-heartedly denied it): himself. Strauss's apparently boundless egotism and effrontery outraged contemporary critics, especially when they heard their carping lampooned and then brushed aside by The Hero on his way to more significant and hard-fought victories on life's journey. But it's difficult not to be seduced by the work's swagger and wonderful orchestration, including eight soaring and thrillingly heroic horns, which even today stretches every orchestral player's technique.

Recording Ein Heldenleben has been on every self-respecting Straussian's to-do list, ensuring a never-ending stream of recordings, many from some of the world's great orchestra-conductor partnerships.

10.50
Carnegie Hall, 9 May, 1965. After a 12-year absence from the concert platform, piano legend Vladimir Horowitz makes a triumphant return. The hotly-anticipated recital had been meticulously planned with a series of private concerts at the Hall in the preceding months, given before a handful of friends and family. Erica Jeal has been sifting through Sony's sumptuously presented box set documenting Horowitz's journey to Carnegie Hall, including never-previously-released recordings of the private recitals, to find out if it's worth its £100 price tag.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Richard Strauss's Ein Heldenleben.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With Tom Service And Erica Jeal20191005

09.30
Building a Library: Tom Service compares recordings of Richard Strauss's orchestral epic Ein Heldenleben - A Hero's Life - and picks a favourite.

From the mid-1880s until 1915 Richard Strauss established his credentials as one of Europe's leading composers with a series of ten descriptive orchestral tone poems. His subjects ranged from a picture postcard of his Italian summer holidays, through to literary and folk characters and, by 1898, to his favourite subject of all (although he half-heartedly denied it): himself. Strauss's apparently boundless egotism and effrontery outraged contemporary critics, especially when they heard their carping lampooned and then brushed aside by The Hero on his way to more significant and hard-fought victories on life's journey. But it's difficult not to be seduced by the work's swagger and wonderful orchestration, including eight soaring and thrillingly heroic horns, which even today stretches every orchestral player's technique.

Recording Ein Heldenleben has been on every self-respecting Straussian's to-do list, ensuring a never-ending stream of recordings, many from some of the world's great orchestra-conductor partnerships.

10.50
Carnegie Hall, 9 May, 1965. After a 12-year absence from the concert platform, piano legend Vladimir Horowitz makes a triumphant return. The hotly-anticipated recital had been meticulously planned with a series of private concerts at the Hall in the preceding months, given before a handful of friends and family. Erica Jeal has been sifting through Sony's sumptuously presented box set documenting Horowitz's journey to Carnegie Hall, including never-previously-released recordings of the private recitals, to find out if it's worth its £100 price tag.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Richard Strauss's Ein Heldenleben.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations

Andrew McGregor with Tom Service and Erik Levi20190316

with Andrew McGregor

09.30
Building a Library: Tom Service picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83.

At once majestic and virtuosic, introspective and symphonic, Brahms teasingly described his near hour-long, four-movement concerto as a 'tiny, tiny piano concerto with a tiny, tiny wisp of a scherzo.' It's an endlessly recorded staple of the repertoire, a challenge to soloist, conductor and orchestra alike.

10.50
Erik Levi sifts through 'Wilhelm Furtwängler: The Radio Recordings 1939-1945'. The 22-CD set, issued by the Berlin Philharmonic, the orchestra Furtwängler had led since 1922, includes symphonies and concertos by Beethoven, Brahms, Bruckner and Schubert, plus works by the legendary conductor himself.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

New classical releases and Building a Library on Brahms's Piano Concerto No 2.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With William Mival20181215

Throughout today's programme Andrew McGregor is joined by Record Review regulars Katy Hamilton, Jeremy Sams, Harriet Smith to hear them round up and play their top recordings of 2018.

09.30
Building a Library: William Mival picks a personal favourite from among the recordings of Richard Strauss's Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks).

In an exhilarating tour de force of orchestral writing and musical form, Strauss's 1895 symphonic poem depicts the exploits of the 14th century Till Eulenspiegel. Rascally, foolish and mischievous, courageous and scornful, Till rampages through medieval German society, leaving destruction and outrage in his wake as he confronts and exposes pomposity and hypocrisy. By identifying himself through musical brilliance as an anarchic devil-may-care hero, Strauss was at least in part giving the finger to the musical establishment after the critical dubbing of his recently premiered first opera Guntram. Late in life, Strauss said of Till 'I just wanted to give the people in the concert hall a good laugh for once.' Or was that, too, just another prank...?

An end-of-year round-up and Building a Library on Richard Strauss's Till Eulenspiegel.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew Mcgregor With William Mival And Alexandra Coghlan20180602

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Schumann's Symphony No 4 with William Mival

Schumann's Symphony No. 4 in D minor was first completed in 1841 and then heavily revised in 1851. The composer's widow, Clara, later claimed that the first version had just been a sketch which was only fully orchestrated in the second version. However, it turns out that this was not true, and Brahms, no less greatly preferred the earlier, more lightly scored version.

10.45
Andrew talks to Alexandra Coghlan about new releases of music by women composers including music by Louise Farrenc, Grazyna Bacewicz and Galina Ustwolskaja.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a library on Schumann's Symphony No 4 plus releases of music by women composers.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with William Mival and Anna Lapwood20191109

9.30
Building a Library: William Mival compares recordings of Mahler's 3rd Symphony - and picks a favourite.

Mahler's monumental 3rd Symphony, completed in 1896, remains to this day the longest symphony in the standard repertory, and one of the most powerful, taking around 90 minutes to perform all six movements. Composed largely in Mahler's hut on the edge of the Attersee in Austria, his 3rd Symphony is a musical embodiment of nature and the 6 movements together depict what Mahler wrote to his friend Max Marschalk as 'A Summer's Midday Dream. There are traces of subtitles to each movement, although they were dropped before publication, and the whole symphony opens as 'Pan Awakes' and 'Summer Marches In'. The first movement takes 30 minutes alone and forms Part 1 of the symphony, while the remaining five movements form Part 2. The fourth movement sets words from Nietzsche's 'Thus Spoke Zarathustra', to be sung by mezzo-soprano, and the fifth movement sets words from Das Knaben Wunderhorn.

10.50
Conductor and organist, Anna Lapwood, joins Andrew to discuss new and recent releases of choral music.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Recording of the Week.

Building a Library on Mahler's Symphony No 3, plus new choral releases.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Andrew McGregor with William Mival and Kate Molleson20170422

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Bach's Violin Concerto in E in Building a Library with Mark Lowther and Andrew McGregor20200328

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Mark Lowther discussing the available recordings of Bach's Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042 and making a recommendation.

Johann Sebastian Bach's E major Concerto is one of the evergreen concertos of the violin repertoire, its three movements and based on the Venetian concerto model made famous by Vivaldi.

10.50
Harriet Smith has been listening to recent chamber music recordings.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Mark Lowther recommends a recording of Bach's Violin Concerto in E, BWV1042.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Bach's Violin Concerto In E In Building A Library With Mark Lowther And Andrew Mcgregor20200328

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Mark Lowther's recommendation from among the available recordings of Bach's Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042.

Johann Sebastian Bach's E major Concerto is one of the evergreen concertos of the violin repertoire, its three movements and based on the Venetian concerto model made famous by Vivaldi.

10.50
Harriet Smith has been listening to recent chamber music recordings.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Mark Lowther recommends a recording of Bach's Violin Concerto in E, BWV1042.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Beethoven's First Symphony with Richard Wigmore and Andrew McGregor20200530

Richard Wigmore's recommendation from available recordings of Beethoven's Symphony No 1.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Beethoven's Symphony No 1 with Andrew McGregor and Richard Wigmore20200118

With Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library: Richard Wigmore recommends a version from among the recordings of Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21.

Beethoven was a composer with something to prove, namely that he could best Haydn as the most celebrated living composer. Haydn's mastery of all the most important instrumental genres (he'd virtually invented the string quartet and symphony) was a was a constant spur to Beethoven who, by the mid-1790s, had shown he meant business in the string trio and keyboard sonata but had held off the symphony and string quartet... So the 1800 premiere of this chippy 29-year-old's first symphony was an important moment, even if, witty and dancing, the debt to Haydn is obvious and there are few if any signs of the revolutionary symphonic breakthroughs shortly to come.

Of course, this symphony is very well represented in the catalogue but with a foot in both the 18th and 19th centuries, is it best performed by historically informed period-instrument ensembles or grizzled maestros and bloated symphony orchestras?

10.50
Hannah French has been listening to recent releases of baroque music and shares the most appealing.

11.20
Recording of the week: an outstanding new release.

Richard Wigmore recommends a recording of Beethoven's Symphony No 1 in C.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Bela Bart\u00f3k's Piano Concerto No 3 On Building A Library With Kate Molleson And Andrew Mcgregor20200229

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Kate Molleson chooses her favourite recording of Béla Bartók Piano Concerto No. 3.

In a desperate fight against the clock, Bartók finished his final piano concerto (and but for its last 17 bars, his final completed work) just four days before his death in New York on 26th September 1945. More lyrical and less angular than his first two concertos, the third is much recorded, including by many of the biggest and starriest pianists of our times. Perhaps its most memorable music is the central slow movement, based on Beethoven's 'Heiliger Dankgesang' (Holy song of thanksgiving), the middle movement of his string quartet Op. 132, written by Beethoven after he had recovered from illness. Like the Beethoven, Bartók's music here is apparently simple and serene and features, too, a wonderful example of his night music, including evocative bird calls and a magical blending of orchestra and solo piano.

10.40
Jeremy Summerly has been listening to an eclectic bunch of new choral recordings and shares the best of them.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Kate Molleson chooses her favourite recording of B\u00e9la Bart\u00f3k's Piano Concerto No 3.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Berlioz - The Ultimate Romantic20190216

The best classical releases and Jeremy Sams chooses his five must-have Berlioz recordings.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Brahms's Piano Quintet In F Minor With Andrew Mcgregor And Lucy Parham20200111

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Brahms's Piano Quintet in F minor, Op 34, and a round-up of recent orchestral releases.

9.30am
Building a Library
Lucy Parham discusses a wide range of approaches to Brahms's Piano Quintet in F minor, Op 34, and recommends the key recording to have.

10.45am
Mark Simpson and Andrew review a handful of new releases of orchestral music by Mahler and Shostakovich.

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out.

The must-have recording of Brahms's Piano Quintet in F minor, Op 34.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Brahms's Piano Quintet in F minor with Andrew McGregor and Lucy Parham20200111

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's Piano Concerto and a round-up of recent orchestral releases

9.30am
Building a Library: Schumann's Piano Concerto with Lucy Parham
The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 was finished in 1845 and is Schumann's only piano concerto. The piece has the character of a fantasy. The work is suffused with a sense of yearning and happiness; of two people in love. It seems in some ways to portray his attempt to woe and finally marry Clara, the daughter of his famous piano teacher, Friedrich Wieck. The main motif of the first movement recalls Florestan's prison aria in Beethoven's opera Fidelio. In Schumann's case this possibly symbolises his struggle for personal freedom and happiness.

10.45am
Mark Simpson and Andrew review a handful of new releases of orchestral music by Mahler and Shostakovich

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out

The must-have recording of Brahms's Piano Quintet in F minor, Op 34.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Britten's Turn of the Screw on Building a Library with Simon Heighes and Andrew McGregor20200620

In Building a Library, Simon Heighes compares recordings of Britten's Turn of the Screw.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Bach: Concerto in C minor for Oboe, Violin and Strings, BWV106020160409
Building a Library: Bach: Concerto in C minor for Oboe, Violin and Strings, BWV106020160409

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Bach: Concerto for Oboe, Violin and Strings.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Bach: Funeral Ode for the Queen of Poland20160611
Building a Library: Bach: Funeral Ode for the Queen of Poland20160611

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Bach: Funeral Ode for the Queen of Poland.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Bach's Lutheran Masses;20161119

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Bach's Lutheran Masses.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Barbara Strozzi20161126

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: a survey of music by Barbara Strozzi.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 820160319
Building a Library: Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 820160319

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 8.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Beethoven: String Quartet No 1220170121

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Beethoven: String Quartet No 12.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Beethoven's Symphony No 520160102

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Beethoven: Symphony No 5.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Beethoven's Symphony No 520160102

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Beethoven: Symphony No 5.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Brahms: String Sextet No 1 in B flat20161029

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Brahms: String Sextet No 1 in B flat.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Brahms: Violin Sonata in G, Op 7820160402
Building a Library: Brahms: Violin Sonata in G, Op 7820160402

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Brahms: Violin Sonata in G, Op 78.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Bruckner's Symphony No 320161231

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Bruckner's Symphony No 3.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Cabaret20161015

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Kander and Ebb's Cabaret.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Cavalleria Rusticana20160116

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Cavalleria Rusticana20160116

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Debussy's Nocturnes20160123

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Debussy: Nocturnes.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Debussy's Nocturnes20160123

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Debussy: Nocturnes.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Delius: Sea Drift20160305
Building a Library: Delius: Sea Drift20160305

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Delius: Sea Drift.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Dutilleux 10020160109

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Music by Henri Dutilleux.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building A Library: Dutilleux 10020160109

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Music by Henri Dutilleux.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Elgar: Falstaff20161008

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Elgar: Falstaff.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Faure's Requiem20160702
Building a Library: Faure's Requiem20160702

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Faure's Requiem in D minor, Op 48.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Guillaume de Machaut20160213
Building a Library: Guillaume de Machaut20160213

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: the music of Guillaume de Machaut.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Handel's Alcina20160521
Building a Library: Handel's Alcina20160521

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Handel's Alcina.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Haydn: String Quartet in G, Op 77 No 120160514
Building a Library: Haydn: String Quartet in G, Op 77 No 120160514

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Haydn: String Quartet in G, Op 77 No 1

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Haydn's Symphony No 99 in E flat20161203

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Haydn's Symphony No 99 in E flat.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Hildegard von Bingen20160416
Building a Library: Hildegard von Bingen20160416

Building a Library: Hildegard von Bingen: Symphonia armoniae celestium revelationum.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Lassus: Lagrime di San Pietro20161217

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Lassus: Lagrime di San Pietro.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Mahler: Symphony No 520160618
Building a Library: Mahler: Symphony No 520160618

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Mahler: Symphony No 5.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Martinu: Symphony No 620160507
Building a Library: Martinu: Symphony No 620160507

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Martinu: Symphony No 6.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Mateo Flecha's ensaladas20161022

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Mateo Flecha's ensaladas.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Mendelssohn: Symphony No 520160206
Building a Library: Mendelssohn: Symphony No 520160206

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Mendelssohn: Symphony No 5.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Mozart: Piano Concerto No 2120161224

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Mozart: Piano Concerto No 21.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Mozart's Requiem20160227
Building a Library: Mozart's Requiem20160227

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Mozart Requiem, with Nicholas Kenyon.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Offenbach's Orpheus in the Underworld20160709
Building a Library: Offenbach's Orpheus in the Underworld20160709

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Offenbach's Orpheus in the Underworld.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Puccini's La fanciulla del West20161210

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Puccini's La fanciulla del West.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Rachmaninov: Symphony No 320160312
Building a Library: Rachmaninov: Symphony No 320160312

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Rachmaninov: Symphony No 3.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Schubert's Fantasy in C, D93420170107

With Andrew McGregor. Includes Building a Library: Schubert's Fantasy in C, D934.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Schubert's Piano Trio in E flat, D929.20160430
Building a Library: Schubert's Piano Trio in E flat, D929.20160430

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Schubert's Piano Trio in E flat, D929.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Schumann: Fantasie20160528
Building a Library: Schumann: Fantasie20160528

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Schumann: Fantasie, Op 17.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Schumann: Frauenliebe und -leben20160326
Building a Library: Schumann: Frauenliebe und -leben20160326

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Schumann: Frauenliebe und -leben.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Shostakovich: Symphony No 920160220
Building a Library: Shostakovich: Symphony No 920160220

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Shostakovich: Symphony No 9.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Sibelius's Tapiola20170128

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Sibelius's Tapiola.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress20161105

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 6, Op 74 (Pathetique)20160604
Building a Library: Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 6, Op 74 (Pathetique)20160604

With Andrew McGregor. Building a Library: Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 6, Op 74 (Pathetique).

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Tchaikovsky's Symphony No 420170114

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Tchaikovsky's Symphony No 4.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Vaughan Williams: A London Symphony20161112

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Vaughan Williams: A London Symphony.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Victoria's Masses20160625
Building a Library: Victoria's Masses20160625

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Tomas Luis de Victoria: Masses.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Building a Library: Vivaldi's The Four Seasons20160917

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Vivaldi's The Four Seasons.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Chopin's four Scherzi in Building a Library with Iain Burnside and Hannah French20200606

Iain Burnside recommends a recording of Chopin's four Scherzi in Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Dvorak's 'Dumky' Piano Trio in Building a Library with Katy Hamilton and Andrew McGregor20200404

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Katy Hamilton discussing the available recordings of Dvořák's popular Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, known as the “Dumky".

Dvořák's music, suffused with the rhythms and melodic inflections of Bohemian and Moravian folk traditions might never have gained international recognition beyond his Czech homeland but for the enthusiastic and public endorsement of a certain Johannes Brahms. After that, Dvořák sometimes reined in the freshness and charm of his music in favour of a more serious and occasionally portentous Teutonic style. But when it came to his final piano trio, Dvořák happily returned to his Slavic folk roots, aiming to write an unashamedly popular work. Made out of six movements, each modelled on the dumka (an instrumental folk form with two contrasting sections) Dvořák hit the spot with his public and today the Dumky trio is still a great favourite with audiences -- and recording companies.

10.50
Ivan Hewett reviews new contemporary recordings

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

The best classical releases and Building a Library on Dvorak's 'Dumky' Piano Trio.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Folk Connections - Building A Library: Jerome Kern: Show Boat20160130

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Jerome Kern: Show Boat.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Folk Connections - Building A Library: Jerome Kern: Show Boat20160130

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Jerome Kern: Show Boat.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Grieg's Holberg Suite in Building a Library with Oliver Condy and Andrew McGregor20200222

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Oliver Condy chooses his favourite recording of Grieg's Holberg Suite.

The Holberg Suite is one of Grieg's most popular pieces; a suite of five movements based on 18th-century dance forms, written in 1884 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Dano-Norwegian humanist playwright Ludvig Holberg.

10.45
Anna Lapwood unpacks an exciting batch of new organ releases.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Grieg's Holberg Suite with Oliver Condy and Andrew McGregor20200627

Oliver Condy recommends a recording of Grieg's Holberg Suite in Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

International Women's Day: Andrew McGregor with Kate Kennedy and Alexandra Coghlan20170304

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Janacek's The Cunning Little Vixen On Building A Library With Nigel Simeone And Andrew Mcgregor20200222

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Nigel Simeone chooses his favourite recording of Janacek's opera The Cunning Little Vixen

Composed in the early 1920s, The Cunning Little Vixen was based on a comic-strip novella serialised in Janacek's local newspaper. He poured all of his 70 years of life experience, and also the unreturned love for the much younger, married Kamila Stösslová into the piece. As well as the comedy it is also a melancholy reflection on the cycle of life and death.

10.45
Anna Lapwood unpacks an exciting batch of new organ releases.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Nigel Simeone chooses his favourite recording of Janacek's opera The Cunning Little Vixen.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Monteverdi 450: Andrew McGregor with Jeremy Summerly and Hannah Kendall20170513

Andrew McGregor and guests review the best recordings of classical music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Mozart's Symphony No 39 in E flat on Building a Library with Nicholas Kenyon and Andrew McGregor20200208

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Nicholas Kenyon chooses his favourite recording of Mozart's late, great Symphony No. 39 in E flat major.

Summer 1788. Broke and out of favour with the fickle Viennese public, Mozart completes the remarkable trio of his final three symphonies in just nine weeks. No. 39 is the first of the set, exuberant and full of energy, ending with a characteristically ingenious and playful Mozartian touch: an effervescent moto perpetuo finale whose second theme is the first theme in disguise.

10.45
During his lifetime, conductor Bruno Walter's reputation could hardly have been higher. Born in Germany in 1876, assistant and protégé of Mahler, peer of Toscanini, Walter was a key interpreter of the classical and Romantic Austro-German core repertoire but in the decades since his death in 1962 he seems to have been largely forgotten. Katy Hamilton has been listening to the 77-CDs in Sony's new box of Bruno Walter's US recordings for the Columbia label and makes a contemporary assessment.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Nicholas Kenyon chooses his favourite recording of Mozart's Symphony No 39 in E flat.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Mozart's Symphony No 39 on Building a Library with Nicholas Kenyon and Andrew McGregor20200613

Nicholas Kenyon recommends a recording of Mozart's 39th Symphony in Building a Library

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

New Year New Music: Andrew Mcgregor With Gillian Moore And Hannah French20180106

with Andrew McGregor

0930
Building a Library: As part of New Year New Music Gillian Moore surveys recordings of music by György Ligeti (1923 - 2006). He was born in Hungary, one the most important avant-garde composers in the latter half of the twentieth century. He emigrated to Austria in 1956, and became an Austrian citizen in 1968. His works include Atmosphères for orchestra and the "anti-opera" Le Grand Macabre

1030
Andrew talks to Hannah French about new recordings of Baroque music including Handel's opera, Lotario and recitals from Philippe Jaroussky, Chantal Santon Jeffery and Delphine Galou.

1145
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library: Ligeti survey by Gillian Moore; review of baroque music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Prokofiev's 'Classical' Symphony with Marina Frolova-Walker and Andrew McGregor20200321

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Marina Frolova-Walker discussing the available recordings of Prokofiev's 'Classical' Symphony and making a recommendation.

Composed following the model of the symphony established by Haydn (the 'Father of the Symphony'), Prokofiev's first foray into the genre is widely known as the 'Classical Symphony', a name given to it by the composer. One of the earliest examples of 'neoclassicism', the symphony premiered in 1918 in Petrograd, conducted by Prokofiev himself, and together with Peter and the Wolf, is has become one of his most popular works.

10.50
Kirsten Gibson has been listening to recent early music recordings.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Marina Frolova-Walker recommends a recording of Prokofiev's Symphony No 1, 'Classical'.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Purcell's Dido and Aeneas on Building a Library with Kirsten Gibson and Andrew McGregor20200425

Kirsten Gibson recommends a recording of Purcell's Dido and Aeneas.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Purcell's Dido and Aeneas on Building a Library with Kirsten Gibson and Andrew McGregor20200425

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Kirsten Gibson discussing the available recordings of Purcell's Dido and Aeneas and making a recommendation.

Uncertainty surrounds the origins Purcell's Dido and Aeneas. It's thought to be from the late 1680s, towards the end of Purcell's short life, and some evidence points to a Chelsea girls' school as the unlikely venue of its premiere. Unlikely because the exceptional quality of its music and drama make the English court a more probable location for one of the greatest of all English musical stage works. Based on part of Virgil's Aeneid, love, abandonment and despair are its eternal themes, all of which are devastatingly portrayed in its most famous number, Dido's lament 'When I am laid in earth', an aria which has always attracted some of the most starry singers.

The current catalogue shows Dido is an internationally acknowledged masterpiece and the preserve of period performance specialists, but its recorded history began in the 1930s, long predating both of those aspects.

10.50
Edward Seckerson joins Andrew McGregor to review 'Herbert von Karajan - Complete Decca Recordings', a new 33-disc box set of remastered recordings made by the best-selling conductor in the history of the gramophone.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Kirsten Gibson recommends a recording of Purcell's Dido and Aeneas.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Ravel's String Quartet in Building a Library with Jeremy Sams and Andrew McGregor20200314

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Jeremy Sams chooses his favourite recording of Ravel's String Quartet

Maurice Ravel finished his String Quartet in F major in 1903 at the age of 28. In some way it's modelled on Debussy's String Quartet of 10 years earlier. But it has been described as being "opposite to Debussy's symbolism, abandoning the vagueness and formlessness of the early French impressionists in favour of a return to classic standards." It quickly established itself as a standard work in the chamber music repertory.

10.45
New releases of piano concertos by Beethoven and Rachmaninov

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Ravel's String Quartet In Building A Library With Jeremy Sams And Andrew Mcgregor20200314

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Jeremy Sams chooses his favourite recording of Ravel's String Quartet

Maurice Ravel finished his String Quartet in F major in 1903 at the age of 28. In some way it's modelled on Debussy's String Quartet of 10 years earlier. But it has been described as being "opposite to Debussy's symbolism, abandoning the vagueness and formlessness of the early French impressionists in favour of a return to classic standards." It quickly established itself as a standard work in the chamber music repertory.

10.45
New releases of piano concertos by Beethoven and Rachmaninov

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

9.30
Building a Library
Jeremy Sams chooses his favourite recording of Ravel's String Quartet.

10.45
Lucy Parham reviews new releases of piano concertos by Beethoven and Rachmaninov.

Record Review At Free Thinking20180310

with Andrew McGregor, live from Sage Gateshead as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking festival of ideas.

9.30
Building a Library: Erica Jeal chooses her favourite from among the available recordings of Britten's Piano Concerto, Op 13.

Benjamin Britten, prey to lifelong performance anxiety on stage, famously excelled as pianist in chamber music and as accompanist. So his Piano Concerto, written as a vehicle for himself to play, is unusual in his output. The 24-year-old Britten gave the premiere at the 1938 Proms. In a programme note for the occasion Britten said that the four movements were 'conceived with the idea of exploiting various important characteristics of the pianoforte... it is not by any means a Symphony with pianoforte, but rather a bravura Concerto with orchestral accompaniment', a comment belying the brilliant interplay between piano and orchestra.

10.55
Kirsten Gibson reviews recent releases of 16th- and 17th-century music.

11.45
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library focuses on recordings of Britten's Piano Concerto with Erica Jeal.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Record Store Day: Andrew McGregor, Katy Hamilton and Chris O'Reilly20190413

with Andrew McGregor.

09.30
Building a Library: Katy Hamilton listens to and compares recordings of Brahms' Cello Sonata No.1 in E minor, Op.38.

Brahms composed his first cello sonata between 1862 and 1865, and it was to mark a turning point in his compositional style, away from the exuberant youthfulness of his previous sonata works and towards a more mature character with echoes of the great Austro-German lineage that lay before him. In it Brahms pays homage to Bach, most notably in the fugal finale, which emerges from a theme that echoes the mirror fugues of Contrapunctus numbers 16 and 17 of the Art of Fugue. The first movement is a classic sonata form while the second movement, an Allegretto and Trio, is reminiscent of Mozart. The cello sonata was premiered in Leipzig on 14th January 1871.

10.50
Andrew McGregor marks Record Store Day and is joined in the studio by CEO of Presto Classical, Chris O'Reilly, who brings his pick of the latest releases to hit the shelves of record stores. Andrew McGregor also discusses the story from the High Street with Jim Elliott, who is Head of the Music Department at Foyles, he finds out what consumers are listening to with Katy Hamilton, and gets up to speed on where classical music downloads are with Steve Long, the Director of Signum Records.

11.25
Andrew chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Brahms's Cello Sonata No 1 in E minor, Op 38, plus Record Store Day.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Schubert's 'Trout' Quintet with David Owen Norris and Andrew McGregor20200411

David Owen Norris' 'must have' recommendation for Schubert's delightful 'Trout' Quintet, plus pianist Kenneth Hamilton with a pile of bonkers virtuoso new releases for the instrument.

9.30am
Building a Library
Another chance to hear David Owen Norris sift through recordings of the piano quintet Schubert made around his own song "The Trout", with a recommendation for the ultimate performance to buy, download or stream.

10.45am
Kenneth Hamilton joins Andrew with a rucksack full of virtuoso piano recordings from the less temperate areas of the instrument's repertoire. Expect Samuel Feinberg, Alexey Stanchinsky and Ronald Stevenson to make an appearance, alongside and eight hour - yes, EIGHT HOUR! - set of variations by Kaikhosru Sorabji.

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's choice of the best of this week's new releases.

David Owen Norris's 'must-have' recommendation for Schubert's delightful 'Trout' Quintet

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Schumann's Piano Concerto With Andrew Mcgregor And Lucy Parham20200111

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's Piano Concerto and a round-up of recent orchestral releases

9.30am
Building a Library: Schumann's Piano Concerto with Lucy Parham
The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 was finished in 1845 and is Schumann's only piano concerto. The piece has the character of a fantasy. The work is suffused with a sense of yearning and happiness; of two people in love. It seems in some ways to portray his attempt to woe and finally marry Clara, the daughter of his famous piano teacher, Friedrich Wieck. The main motif of the first movement recalls Florestan's prison aria in Beethoven's opera Fidelio. In Schumann's case this possibly symbolises his struggle for personal freedom and happiness.

10.45am
Mark Simpson and Andrew review a handful of new releases of orchestral music by Mahler and Shostakovich

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out

The must-have recording of Schumann's Piano Concerto.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Schumann's Piano Concerto with Andrew McGregor and Lucy Parham20200111

Andrew McGregor with the must-have recording of Schumann's Piano Concerto and a round-up of recent orchestral releases

9.30am
Building a Library: Schumann's Piano Concerto with Lucy Parham
The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 was finished in 1845 and is Schumann's only piano concerto. The piece has the character of a fantasy. The work is suffused with a sense of yearning and happiness; of two people in love. It seems in some ways to portray his attempt to woe and finally marry Clara, the daughter of his famous piano teacher, Friedrich Wieck. The main motif of the first movement recalls Florestan's prison aria in Beethoven's opera Fidelio. In Schumann's case this possibly symbolises his struggle for personal freedom and happiness.

10.45am
Mark Simpson and Andrew review a handful of new releases of orchestral music by Mahler and Shostakovich

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's recommendation of a superlative new release just out

The must-have recording of Schumann's Piano Concerto.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Sound Frontiers: Building a Library - Chopin's Piano Concerto No 120160924

With Andrew McGregor. Including Building a Library: Chopin: Piano Concerto No 1.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Sound Frontiers: Building a Library - Tallis's Spem in alium20161001

Live from Southbank Centre in London. Including Building a Library: Tallis: Spem in alium.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Sounds of Shakespeare20160423
Sounds of Shakespeare20160423

Including Building a Library: Verdi's Falstaff. Plus recordings of Shakespeare's verse.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms with Jeremy Summerly and Andrew McGregor20200418

Jeremy Summerly discusses the available recordings of Stravinsky\u2019s Symphony of Psalms

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms with Jeremy Summerly and Andrew McGregor20200418

Jeremy Summerly's 'must have' recommendation for Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms, plus organist Anna Lapwood with a pile of new choral releases

9.30am
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Jeremy Summerly discussing the available recordings of Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms and making a recommendation.

A choral symphony from the composer's 'neoclassical' period, Stravinsky's compact, three-movement work has been fortunate on record with a wide range of interpretations from all round the world. It inhabits a unique sound world, omitting as it does clarinets, violins and violas, and comparisons are guaranteed to be fascinating

10.45am
Anna Lapwood joins Andrew for a round-up of recent choral releases

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's choice of the best of this week's new releases

Jeremy Summerly discusses the available recordings of Stravinsky\u2019s Symphony of Psalms

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Stravinsky's Symphony Of Psalms With Jeremy Summerly And Andrew Mcgregor20200418

Jeremy Summerly's 'must have' recommendation for Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms, plus organist Anna Lapwood with a pile of new choral releases

9.30am
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Jeremy Summerly discussing the available recordings of Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms and making a recommendation.

A choral symphony from the composer's 'neoclassical' period, Stravinsky's compact, three-movement work has been fortunate on record with a wide range of interpretations from all round the world. It inhabits a unique sound world, omitting as it does clarinets, violins and violas, and comparisons are guaranteed to be fascinating

10.45am
Anna Lapwood joins Andrew for a round-up of recent choral releases

11.15am
Record of the Week
Andrew's choice of the best of this week's new releases

Jeremy Summerly discusses the available recordings of Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review20170909

Andrew McGregor talks about Walter Gieseking's Bach interpretations from 1950.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review. Andrew McGregor with Jeremy Summerly. Proms Composer: Pascal Dusapin20170715

With Andrew McGregor. Including reissues from the Choir of St John's College, Cambridge.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Andrew McGregor with Caroline Gill. Proms Composers: Peter Maxwell Davies2017081220170902 (R3)

Andrew McGregor includes recent reissues of Renaissance and early Baroque music.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Andrew McGregor with Eric Levi. Proms Composer: James MacMillan20170729

Andrew McGregor focuses on Proms composer James MacMillan.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Andrew McGregor with Hannah French. Proms Composer Gerald Barry20170819

Andrew McGregor presents an anniversary Telemann round-up and a focus on Gerald Barry.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Andrew McGregor with Mark Lowther. Proms Composer Josef Suk20170826

Andrew McGregor debates a recent reissue of classic recordings by Louis Fremaux.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Andrew McGregor with Nicholas Baragwanath. Proms Composers: Judith Weir20170812

With Andrew McGregor, including a recent reissue of a classic recording of Wagner's Ring.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Live from Edinburgh20170805

Andrew McGregor presents live from the Edinburgh Festival.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Live from the Edinburgh Festival20160813

Live at Edinburgh, Andrew McGregor joined by guests and plays Festival recordings.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Alexander Zemlinsky20160827

With Andrew McGregor. Including Handel oratorios and Proms Composer Alexander Zemlinsky.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Emily Howard20160820

With Andrew McGregor. Including Proms Composer Emily Howard.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Galina Ustvolskaya20160716
Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Galina Ustvolskaya20160716

Andrew McGregor with a mix of recent recordings and some of the best recordings of 2016.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Jonathan Dove20160910

With Andrew McGregor. Including Proms Composer: Jonathan Dove.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Kurt Schwertsik20160806

With Andrew McGregor. Including Proms Composer Kurt Schwertsik.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Magnus Lindberg20160723
Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Magnus Lindberg20160723

With Andrew McGregor. Including Proms Composer: Magnus Lindberg.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer - Max Reger20160903

With Andrew McGregor. Including Proms Composer: Max Reger.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Summer Record Review: Proms Composer Portrait - Wolfgang Rihm20160730
Summer Record Review: Proms Composer Portrait - Wolfgang Rihm20160730

Andrew McGregor presents music from the Aurora Orchestra and the Bergen Philharmonic.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin On Building A Library With Nicholas Baragwanath And Andrew Mcgregor20200321

with Andrew McGregor

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Marina Frolova-Walker discussing the available recordings of Prokofiev's 'Classical' Symphony and making a recommendation.

Composed following the model of the symphony established by Haydn (the 'Father of the Symphony'), Prokofiev's first foray into the genre is widely known as the 'Classical Symphony', a name given to it by the composer. One of the earliest examples of 'neoclassicism', the symphony premiered in 1918 in Petrograd, conducted by Prokofiev himself, and together with Peter and the Wolf, is has become one of his most popular works.

10.50
Kirsten Gibson has been listening to recent early music recordings.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Nicholas Baragwanath chooses the must-have recording of Tchaikovsky's opera Eugene Onegin.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Tom Mckinney With Sarah Walker20180915

with Tom McKinney.

09.30
Building a Library: Sarah Walker listens to some of the available recordings of Mozart's Concerto for two pianos E-flat major, K. 365 and makes a recommendation.

Mozart's ebullient and warm-hearted double piano concerto was written for him and his sister to play, a delightful demonstration of the overflowing affection he had for Nannerl. Feelings all the more heartfelt, perhaps, as he grimly returned home to Salzburg. Because the concerto was composed in the wake of a gruelling and bitterly disappointing 18-month tour around Europe during which his mother died, he was jilted by the love of his life, and he failed to secure the much hoped-for appointment which would have saved him from what he called his 'Salzburg slavery'.

11.00
Laura Tunbridge sifts through recent releases of 19th- and 20th-century song.

11.45
Tom chooses an outstanding new release as his Disc of the Week.

Building a Library on Mozart's Concerto in E flat for two pianos, K365

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.

Why Music? The Key to Memory20171014

Andrew McGregor with a live Purcellian Building a Library.

A thorough look at the week's classical music releases, plus news and recommendations.