Reith Lectures, The [world Service]

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20070414

1/5. Bursting at the Seams: Hanging Together or Hanging Separately by Jeffrey Sachs. This century will be marked by severely limited resources, and the threat of failed states.

20070415

1/5. Bursting at the Seams: Hanging Together or Hanging Separately by Jeffrey Sachs. This century will be marked by severely limited resources, and the threat of failed states.

20070421

2/5. Science for Survival by Jeffrey Sachs. The biggest obstacle to world co-operation is ignorance, not politics or cultural clashes.

20070421

2/5. Science for Survival by Jeffrey Sachs. The biggest obstacle to world co-operation is ignorance, not politics or cultural clashes.

20070422

2/5. Science for Survival by Jeffrey Sachs. The biggest obstacle to world co-operation is ignorance, not politics or cultural clashes.

20070422

2/5. Science for Survival by Jeffrey Sachs. The biggest obstacle to world co-operation is ignorance, not politics or cultural clashes.

20070428

3/5. Bursting at the Seams: The Dethronement of the North Atlantic by Jeffrey Sachs. Power in the 21st century is shifting to the East, to India and China.

20070428

3/5. Bursting at the Seams: The Dethronement of the North Atlantic by Jeffrey Sachs. Power in the 21st century is shifting to the East, to India and China.

20070429

3/5. Bursting at the Seams: The Dethronement of the North Atlantic by Jeffrey Sachs. Power in the 21st century is shifting to the East, to India and China.

20070429

3/5. Bursting at the Seams: The Dethronement of the North Atlantic by Jeffrey Sachs. Power in the 21st century is shifting to the East, to India and China.

20070505

4/5. Can the United Nations Unite? by Jeffrey Sachs. The UN has succeeded and failed in recent years, particularly in the Iraq War.

20070505

4/5. Can the United Nations Unite? by Jeffrey Sachs. The UN has succeeded and failed in recent years, particularly in the Iraq War.

20070506

4/5. Can the United Nations Unite? by Jeffrey Sachs. The UN has succeeded and failed in recent years, particularly in the Iraq War.

20070506

4/5. Can the United Nations Unite? by Jeffrey Sachs. The UN has succeeded and failed in recent years, particularly in the Iraq War.

20080607

1/4. Chinese Vistas: Confucian Ways with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the British Library in London.

20080607

1/4. Chinese Vistas: Confucian Ways with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the British Library in London.

20080608

1/4. Chinese Vistas: Confucian Ways with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the British Library in London.

20080608

1/4. Chinese Vistas: Confucian Ways with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the British Library in London.

20080614

2/4. Chinese Vistas: English Lessons with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From St George's Hall, Liverpool.

20080614

2/4. Chinese Vistas: English Lessons with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From St George's Hall, Liverpool.

20080615

2/4. Chinese Vistas: English Lessons with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From St George's Hall, Liverpool.

20080615

2/4. Chinese Vistas: English Lessons with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From St George's Hall, Liverpool.

20080621

3/4. Chinese Vistas: American Dreams with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the Asia Society, New York.

20080621

3/4. Chinese Vistas: American Dreams with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the Asia Society, New York.

20080622

3/4. Chinese Vistas: American Dreams with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the Asia Society, New York.

20080622

3/4. Chinese Vistas: American Dreams with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From the Asia Society, New York.

20080628

4/4. Chinese Vistas: The Body Beautiful with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From Lord's Cricket Ground, London.

20080628

4/4. Chinese Vistas: The Body Beautiful with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From Lord's Cricket Ground, London.

20080629

4/4. Chinese Vistas: The Body Beautiful with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From Lord's Cricket Ground, London.

20080629

4/4. Chinese Vistas: The Body Beautiful with Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. From Lord's Cricket Ground, London.

20090613
20090620
20090627
20090627

In his third lecture, Professor Michael Sandel explores genetics and morals. How should we use our ever increasing scientific knowledge? New genetic technologies hold great promise for treating and curing disease, but how far we should go in using them to manipulate muscles, moods and gender? This lecture was recorded at the Centre for Life in Newcastle.

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

20090627

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In his third lecture, Professor Michael Sandel explores genetics and morals. How should we use our ever increasing scientific knowledge? New genetic technologies hold great promise for treating and curing disease, but how far we should go in using them to manipulate muscles, moods and gender? This lecture was recorded at the Centre for Life in Newcastle.

20090704
20090704

Barack Obama won the US presidency after campaigning for moral and civic renewal. But what should that look like?

In his final Reith Lecture, Professor Michael Sandel calls for a new politics of the common good and says that we need to think of ourselves as citizens, not just consumers.

This lecture was recorded in front of a live audience at George Washington University in Washington DC.

Professor Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics.

Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency after campaigning for moral and civic renewal. But.

20090704

Professor Sandel makes the case for a moral and civic renewal in democratic politics.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Barack Obama won the US presidency after campaigning for moral and civic renewal. But what should that look like?

In his final Reith Lecture, Professor Michael Sandel calls for a new politics of the common good and says that we need to think of ourselves as citizens, not just consumers.

This lecture was recorded in front of a live audience at George Washington University in Washington DC.

08/11/2016 GMT20161108

08/11/2016 GMT20161108

Mistaken Identities: Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah gives this year's BBC Reith Lectures, on Creed, Country, Colour & Culture.

08/11/2016 GMT2016110820161112 (WS)

Mistaken Identities: Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah gives this year's BBC Reith Lectures, on Creed, Country, Colour & Culture.

13/06/200920090614

In his first lecture, in the wake of the financial crisis Professor Sandel asks: what a...

13/06/200920090614

In his first lecture, in the wake of the financial crisis Professor Sandel asks: what a.

20/06/200920090621

Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics? Is it t...

20/06/200920090621

Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics? Is it t.

27/06/200920090628

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

27/06/200920090628

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

27/06/200920090628

Professor Sandel considers how we should use our ever-increasing scientific knowledge.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In his third lecture, Professor Michael Sandel explores genetics and morals. How should we use our ever increasing scientific knowledge? New genetic technologies hold great promise for treating and curing disease, but how far we should go in using them to manipulate muscles, moods and gender? This lecture was recorded at the Centre for Life in Newcastle.

Adaptation20170711

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen. Each medium, she says, draws a different potential from the original. She argues that fiction, if written well, doesn't betray history, but enhances it. When fiction is turned into theatre, or into a film or TV, the same applies - as long as we understand that adaptation is not a secondary process or a set of grudging compromises, but an act of creation in itself. And this matters. "Without art, what have you to inform you about the past?" she asks. "What lies beyond is the unedited flicker of closed-circuit TV." The programme is recorded in Stratford-Upon-Avon in front of an audience, with a question and answer session, chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

Adaptation20170711

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen. Each medium, she says, draws a different potential from the original. She argues that fiction, if written well, doesn't betray history, but enhances it. When fiction is turned into theatre, or into a film or TV, the same applies - as long as we understand that adaptation is not a secondary process or a set of grudging compromises, but an act of creation in itself. And this matters. "Without art, what have you to inform you about the past?" she asks. "What lies beyond is the unedited flicker of closed-circuit TV." The programme is recorded in Stratford-Upon-Avon in front of an audience, with a question and answer session, chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

Adaptation2017071120170715 (WS)

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen. Each medium, she says, draws a different potential from the original. She argues that fiction, if written well, doesn't betray history, but enhances it. When fiction is turned into theatre, or into a film or TV, the same applies - as long as we understand that adaptation is not a secondary process or a set of grudging compromises, but an act of creation in itself. And this matters. "Without art, what have you to inform you about the past?" she asks. "What lies beyond is the unedited flicker of closed-circuit TV." The programme is recorded in Stratford-Upon-Avon in front of an audience, with a question and answer session, chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

Adaptation20170711

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Hilary Mantel on how fiction changes when adapted for stage or screen. Each medium, she says, draws a different potential from the original. She argues that fiction, if written well, doesn't betray history, but enhances it. When fiction is turned into theatre, or into a film or TV, the same applies - as long as we understand that adaptation is not a secondary process or a set of grudging compromises, but an act of creation in itself. And this matters. "Without art, what have you to inform you about the past?" she asks. "What lies beyond is the unedited flicker of closed-circuit TV." The programme is recorded in Stratford-Upon-Avon in front of an audience, with a question and answer session, chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110628

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110628

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110629

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110629

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110702

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 1: Liberty20110702

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110705

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series. 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110705

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series.

'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110706

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110706

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110709

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110709

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110710

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2: Dissent20110710

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

Black Holes: Not as Black as They Are Painted20160202

Black Holes: Not as Black as They Are Painted20160202

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the second of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor Stephen Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses about the search for mini black holes, noting that so far "no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize." And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.

The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of BBC Radio listeners and some of the country's leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a Q&A session with professor Hawking. BBC Radio listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to professor Hawking.

(Photo: Scientist Stephen Hawking of 'Into The Universe With Stephen Hawking' speaks via satellite during the 2010 Television Critics Association Press Tour 2010, in Pasadena, California. Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Black Holes: Not As Black As They Are Painted20160202

Professor Stephen Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses about the search for mini black holes, noting that so far "no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize." And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.

The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of BBC Radio listeners and some of the country's leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a Q&A session with professor Hawking. BBC Radio listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to professor Hawking.

(Photo: Scientist Stephen Hawking of 'Into The Universe With Stephen Hawking' speaks via satellite during the 2010 Television Critics Association Press Tour 2010, in Pasadena, California. Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Black Holes: Not as Black as They Are Painted20160202

Professor Stephen Hawking examines scientific thinking about black holes and challenges the idea that all matter and information is destroyed irretrievably within them. He explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses about the search for mini black holes, noting that so far no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize. And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.

The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of BBC Radio listeners and some of the country's leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a Q&A session with professor Hawking. BBC Radio listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to professor Hawking.

(Photo: Scientist Stephen Hawking of 'Into The Universe With Stephen Hawking' speaks via satellite during the 2010 Television Critics Association Press Tour 2010, in Pasadena, California. Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Can These Bones Live?20170704

Hilary Mantel on how historical fiction can make the past come to life

Hilary Mantel analyses how historical fiction can make the past come to life. She says her task is to take history out of the archive and relocate it in a body. "It's the novelist's job: to put the reader in the moment, even if the moment is 500 years ago." She takes apart the practical job of "resurrection", and the process that gets historical fiction on to the page. "The historian will always wonder why you left certain things out, while the literary critic will wonder why you left them in," she says. How then does she try and get the balance right? The lecture is recorded in front of an audience in Exeter, near Mantel's adopted home in East Devon, followed by a question and answer session. The Reith Lectures are chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.

Can These Bones Live?20170704

Hilary Mantel on how historical fiction can make the past come to life

Hilary Mantel analyses how historical fiction can make the past come to life. She says her task is to take history out of the archive and relocate it in a body. "It's the novelist's job: to put the reader in the moment, even if the moment is 500 years ago." She takes apart the practical job of "resurrection", and the process that gets historical fiction on to the page. "The historian will always wonder why you left certain things out, while the literary critic will wonder why you left them in," she says. How then does she try and get the balance right? The lecture is recorded in front of an audience in Exeter, near Mantel's adopted home in East Devon, followed by a question and answer session. The Reith Lectures are chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.

Can These Bones Live?2017070420170708 (WS)

Hilary Mantel on how historical fiction can make the past come to life

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Hilary Mantel analyses how historical fiction can make the past come to life. She says her task is to take history out of the archive and relocate it in a body. "It's the novelist's job: to put the reader in the moment, even if the moment is 500 years ago." She takes apart the practical job of "resurrection", and the process that gets historical fiction on to the page. "The historian will always wonder why you left certain things out, while the literary critic will wonder why you left them in," she says. How then does she try and get the balance right? The lecture is recorded in front of an audience in Exeter, near Mantel's adopted home in East Devon, followed by a question and answer session. The Reith Lectures are chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.

Can These Bones Live?20170704

Hilary Mantel on how historical fiction can make the past come to life

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Hilary Mantel analyses how historical fiction can make the past come to life. She says her task is to take history out of the archive and relocate it in a body. "It's the novelist's job: to put the reader in the moment, even if the moment is 500 years ago." She takes apart the practical job of "resurrection", and the process that gets historical fiction on to the page. "The historian will always wonder why you left certain things out, while the literary critic will wonder why you left them in," she says. How then does she try and get the balance right? The lecture is recorded in front of an audience in Exeter, near Mantel's adopted home in East Devon, followed by a question and answer session. The Reith Lectures are chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.

Civilians and War2018071020180714 (WS)

How civilians have been deliberately targeted and why women are singled out in mass rapes

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Margaret MacMillan dissects the relationship between war and the civilian. Recorded in Beirut, she looks back at the city’s violent past and discusses the impact of war on civilians. She explores how civilians have been deliberately targeted, used as slaves and why women are still often singled out in mass rapes. And she addresses the proposition that human beings are becoming less, not more violent.

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

(Illustration: Civilians in a city with war planes flying overhead. Credit: Greg Smith)

Civilians and War20180710

How civilians have been deliberately targeted and why women are singled out in mass rapes

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Margaret MacMillan dissects the relationship between war and the civilian. Recorded in Beirut, she looks back at the city’s violent past and discusses the impact of war on civilians. She explores how civilians have been deliberately targeted, used as slaves and why women are still often singled out in mass rapes. And she addresses the proposition that human beings are becoming less, not more violent.

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

(Illustration: Civilians in a city with war planes flying overhead. Credit: Greg Smith)

Civilians And War2018071020180714 (WS)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

Eliza Manningham-Buller Lecture 2: Security20110913

The former director-general of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the second of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011.

In this lecture called " Security" she argues that the security and intelligence services in a democracy have a good record of protecting and preserving freedom.

Assessing the role of security and intelligence services in a democracy.

Eliza Manningham-buller Lecture 2: Security20110913

The former director-general of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the second of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011.

In this lecture called " Security" she argues that the security and intelligence services in a democracy have a good record of protecting and preserving freedom.

Assessing the role of security and intelligence services in a democracy.

Eliza Manningham-Buller Lecture 3: Freedom20110920

In this third and final Reith lecture the former director-general of the British Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9/11.

She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of al-Qaeda. The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".

Former M15 director-general Eliza Manningham-Buller discusses foreign policy since 9/11.

Eliza Manningham-buller Lecture 3: Freedom20110920

In this third and final Reith lecture the former director-general of the British Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9/11.

She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of al-Qaeda.

The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".

Former M15 director-general Eliza Manningham-Buller discusses foreign policy since 9/11.

Fearing and Loving: Making Sense of the Warrior2018070320180707 (WS)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor MacMillan asks why both men and women go to war. “We are both fascinated and repulsed by war and those who fight,” she says. She looks at the role of the warrior in history and culture and analyses how warriors are produced. And she interrogates the differences that gender plays in war.

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

(Illustration: A warrior with bow and arrow, a soldier and a Roman centurion)

Fearing And Loving: Making Sense Of The Warrior20180703

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

Fearing and Loving: Making Sense of the Warrior20180703

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor MacMillan asks why both men and women go to war. “We are both fascinated and repulsed by war and those who fight,” she says. She looks at the role of the warrior in history and culture and analyses how warriors are produced. And she interrogates the differences that gender plays in war.

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

(Illustration: A warrior with bow and arrow, a soldier and a Roman centurion)

Lecture 1: Aung San Suu Kyi on Liberty20110628

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The Burmese pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lecture series, 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on her own experience under house arrest in Burma, she explores the universal human aspiration to be free and the spirit which drives people to dissent.

She also comments on the Arab Spring, comparing the event that triggered last December's revolution in Tunisia with the death of a student during a protest in Burma in 1988.

Lecture 1: Aung San Suu Kyi on Liberty20110629

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The Burmese pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lecture series, 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on her own experience under house arrest in Burma, she explores the universal human aspiration to be free and the spirit which drives people to dissent.

She also comments on the Arab Spring, comparing the event that triggered last December's revolution in Tunisia with the death of a student during a protest in Burma in 1988.

Lecture 1: Aung San Suu Kyi on Liberty20110702

Aung San Suu Kyi explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lectures

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The Burmese pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, explores what freedom means in the first of the 2011 Reith Lecture series, 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on her own experience under house arrest in Burma, she explores the universal human aspiration to be free and the spirit which drives people to dissent.

She also comments on the Arab Spring, comparing the event that triggered last December's revolution in Tunisia with the death of a student during a protest in Burma in 1988.

Lecture 1: Eliza Manningham-Buller on Terror20110906

Eliza Manningham-Buller reflects on 9/11 in the first of her Reith Lectures 2011.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The former director-general of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the first of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011 called Terror.

On the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the United States on September 11, she reflects on the lasting significance of that day.

Was it a "terrorist" crime, an act of war or something different?

Lecture 2: Aung San Suu Kyi on Dissent20110705

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series. 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Lecture 2: Aung San Suu Kyi on Dissent20110706

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series. 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Lecture 2: Aung San Suu Kyi on Dissent20110709

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series. 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Lecture 2: Aung San Suu Kyi on Dissent20110710

Aung San Suu Kyi examines what drives people to dissent in the second Reith Lecture 2011

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines what drives people to dissent in the second of the 2011 Reith Lecture series. 'Securing Freedom'.

Reflecting on the history of her own party, the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi, examines the meaning of opposition and dissident.

She also explains her reasons for following the path of non-violence.

Lecture 2: Eliza Manningham-Buller on Security20110913

Assessing the role of security and intelligence services in a democracy.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Lecture 3: Eliza Manningham-Buller on Freedom20110920

Former M15 director-general Eliza Manningham-Buller discusses foreign policy since 9/11.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In this third and final Reith lecture the former director-general of the British Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9/11.

She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of al-Qaeda.

The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".

Managing The Unmanageable2018071720180721 (WS)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

Mistaken Identities: Colour2016110120161105 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah discusses skin colour and its role in ideas of identity

We live in a world where the language of identity pervades both our public and our private lives. We have religious identities, national identities, gender identities and racial identities. There is much contention about the boundaries of all of these. And you can claim to be of no religion or gender or race or nation.

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah looks at the story of Anton Wilhelm Amo Afer, who was brought from the Gold Coast to Germany in 1707 at the age of five and was educated at a royal court, becoming an eminent philosopher. Kwame argues against racial essentialism and says there is far more variation among people of the same skin colour than between the races.

(Photo: The Cape Coast in Ghana)

Mistaken Identities: Colour2016110120161105 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah discusses skin colour and its role in ideas of identity

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

We live in a world where the language of identity pervades both our public and our private lives. We have religious identities, national identities, gender identities and racial identities. There is much contention about the boundaries of all of these. And you can claim to be of no religion or gender or race or nation.

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah looks at the story of Anton Wilhelm Amo Afer, who was brought from the Gold Coast to Germany in 1707 at the age of five and was educated at a royal court, becoming an eminent philosopher. Kwame argues against racial essentialism and says there is far more variation among people of the same skin colour than between the races.

(Photo: The Cape Coast in Ghana)

Mistaken Identities: Country2016102520161029 (WS)

In these lectures British-born, Ghanaian-American philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah, explores confusions of identity through an examination of four central kinds of identity - creed, country, colour and culture.

In the second lecture Appiah explores the idea of Country, that was born in the 19th Century, that suggests that there are peoples (eg the Austrians) who are entitled to their own state. He uses the life story of Italo Svevo to illustrate this. He argues that nations exist as a shared process rather than some sort of mythical and ancient group.

(Photo: Prof Kwame Anthony Appiah)

Mistaken Identities: Country2016102520161029 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah gives lectures on Creed, Country, Colour and Culture

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In these lectures British-born, Ghanaian-American philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah, explores confusions of identity through an examination of four central kinds of identity - creed, country, colour and culture.

In the second lecture Appiah explores the idea of Country, that was born in the 19th Century, that suggests that there are peoples (eg the Austrians) who are entitled to their own state. He uses the life story of Italo Svevo to illustrate this. He argues that nations exist as a shared process rather than some sort of mythical and ancient group.

(Photo: Prof Kwame Anthony Appiah)

Mistaken Identities: Creed2016101820161022 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah says we overestimate scripture in our view of faith

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah argues that when considering religion we overestimate the importance of scripture and underestimate the importance of practice.

He begins with the complexities of his own background, as the son of an English Anglican mother and a Ghanaian Methodist father. He turns to the idea that religious faith is based around unchanging and unchangeable holy scriptures. He argues that over the millennia religious practice has been quite as important as religious writings. He provides examples from Jewish, Christian, Islamic and Buddhist texts to show that they are often contradictory and have been interpreted in different ways at different times, for example on the position of women and men in Islam. He argues that fundamentalists are a particularly extreme example of this mistaken scriptural determinism.

The lecture is recorded in front of audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley. Future lectures will examine identity in the contexts of country, colour and culture.

Philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah argues that when considering religion we overestimate the importance of scripture and underestimate the importance of practice.

He begins with the complexities of his own background, as the son of an English Anglican mother and a Ghanaian Methodist father. He turns to the idea that religious faith is based around unchanging and unchangeable holy scriptures. He argues that over the millennia religious practice has been quite as important as religious writings. He provides examples from Jewish, Christian, Islamic and Buddhist texts to show that they are often contradictory and have been interpreted in different ways at different times, for example on the position of women and men in Islam. He argues that fundamentalists are a particularly extreme example of this mistaken scriptural determinism.

The lecture is recorded in front of audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley. Future lectures will examine identity in the contexts of country, colour and culture.

Mistaken Identities: Culture2016110820161112 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the idea of culture and 'western civilisation'

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the confusions of identity through an examination of four central kinds - creed, country, color and culture. Through the lives of particular people in particular places and times, we see how the confusions play out, but also how they can be cleared up.

Based around the story of Sir Edward Burnett Tylor, the father of modern social anthropology, Appiah argues that the idea of “Western civilization? or “Western culture? is a mistaken one and that we should abandon it.

(Photo: European Union and UK flags spraypainted on a tunnel wall next to a Brexit slogan)

Mistaken Identities: Culture2016110820161112 (WS)

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the idea of culture and 'western civilisation'

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the confusions of identity through an examination of four central kinds - creed, country, color and culture. Through the lives of particular people in particular places and times, we see how the confusions play out, but also how they can be cleared up.

Based around the story of Sir Edward Burnett Tylor, the father of modern social anthropology, Appiah argues that the idea of “Western civilization” or “Western culture” is a mistaken one and that we should abandon it.

(Photo: European Union and UK flags spraypainted on a tunnel wall next to a Brexit slogan)

Securing Freedom20110906

Former head of the British Security Service Eliza Manningham-Buller offers a perspective on 9/11, its impact and repercussions.

Former head of the British Security Service Eliza Manningham-Buller offers a perspectiv...

Securing Freedom20110906

Former head of the British Security Service Eliza Manningham-Buller offers a perspective on 9/11, its impact and repercussions.

Former head of the British Security Service Eliza Manningham-Buller offers a perspectiv.

Silence Grips the Town20170627

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

Silence Grips the Town20170627

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

The story of a how an obsessive relationship with history killed the young Polish writer Stanislawa Przybyszewska, told by best-selling author, Hilary Mantel. The brilliant Przybyszewska wrote gargantuan plays and novels about the French Revolution, in particular about the revolutionary leader Robespierre. She lived in self-willed poverty and isolation and died unknown in 1934. But her work, so painfully achieved, did survive her. Was her sacrifice worthwhile? "She embodied the past until her body ceased to be," Dame Hilary says. "Multiple causes of death were recorded, but actually she died of Robespierre."

Over the course of these five lectures, she discusses the role that history plays in our lives. How do we view the past, she asks, and what is our relationship with the dead? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the ancient Vleehuis in Antwerp, a city which features in Mantel's novels about Thomas Cromwell and the cosmopolitan world of the early Tudors. The lecture is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.

The producer is Jim Frank.

Silence Grips The Town20170627

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

The story of a how an obsessive relationship with history killed the young Polish writer Stanislawa Przybyszewska, told by best-selling author, Hilary Mantel. The brilliant Przybyszewska wrote gargantuan plays and novels about the French Revolution, in particular about the revolutionary leader Robespierre. She lived in self-willed poverty and isolation and died unknown in 1934. But her work, so painfully achieved, did survive her. Was her sacrifice worthwhile? "She embodied the past until her body ceased to be," Dame Hilary says. "Multiple causes of death were recorded, but actually she died of Robespierre."

Over the course of these five lectures, she discusses the role that history plays in our lives. How do we view the past, she asks, and what is our relationship with the dead? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the ancient Vleehuis in Antwerp, a city which features in Mantel's novels about Thomas Cromwell and the cosmopolitan world of the early Tudors. The lecture is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.

The producer is Jim Frank.

Silence Grips the Town2017062720170701 (WS)

The story of a how historical obsession killed a Polish writer, told by Hilary Mantel

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The story of a how an obsessive relationship with history killed the young Polish writer Stanislawa Przybyszewska, told by best-selling author, Hilary Mantel. The brilliant Przybyszewska wrote gargantuan plays and novels about the French Revolution, in particular about the revolutionary leader Robespierre. She lived in self-willed poverty and isolation and died unknown in 1934. But her work, so painfully achieved, did survive her. Was her sacrifice worthwhile? "She embodied the past until her body ceased to be," Dame Hilary says. "Multiple causes of death were recorded, but actually she died of Robespierre."

Over the course of these five lectures, she discusses the role that history plays in our lives. How do we view the past, she asks, and what is our relationship with the dead? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the ancient Vleehuis in Antwerp, a city which features in Mantel's novels about Thomas Cromwell and the cosmopolitan world of the early Tudors. The lecture is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.

The producer is Jim Frank.

Silence Grips the Town20170627

The story of a how historical obsession killed a Polish writer, told by Hilary Mantel

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

The story of a how an obsessive relationship with history killed the young Polish writer Stanislawa Przybyszewska, told by best-selling author, Hilary Mantel. The brilliant Przybyszewska wrote gargantuan plays and novels about the French Revolution, in particular about the revolutionary leader Robespierre. She lived in self-willed poverty and isolation and died unknown in 1934. But her work, so painfully achieved, did survive her. Was her sacrifice worthwhile? "She embodied the past until her body ceased to be," Dame Hilary says. "Multiple causes of death were recorded, but actually she died of Robespierre."

Over the course of these five lectures, she discusses the role that history plays in our lives. How do we view the past, she asks, and what is our relationship with the dead? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the ancient Vleehuis in Antwerp, a city which features in Mantel's novels about Thomas Cromwell and the cosmopolitan world of the early Tudors. The lecture is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.

The producer is Jim Frank.

Stephen Hawking: Do Black Holes Have No Hair?20160126

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his two BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity - a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life.

Rather than see them as a scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of BBC Radio 4 listeners and some of the country's leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London.

Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with professor Hawking. BBC Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to professor Hawking.

Stephen Hawking: Do Black Holes Have No Hair?20160126

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers the first of his two BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity - a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life.

Rather than see them as a scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe. The programmes are recorded in front of an audience of BBC Radio 4 listeners and some of the country's leading scientists at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London.

Sue Lawley introduces the evening and chairs a question-and-answer session with professor Hawking. BBC Radio 4 listeners submitted questions in their hundreds, of which a selection were invited to attend the event to put their questions in person to professor Hawking.

Stephen Hawking: on Black Holes2016020620160207 (WS)

These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers his BBC Reith Lecture on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity - a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life.

Rather than see them as scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe.

Professor Hawking then explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses about the search for mini black holes, noting that so far "no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize." And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.

Stephen Hawking: on Black Holes20160206

These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers his BBC Reith Lecture on black holes. These collapsed stars challenge the very nature of space and time, as they contain a singularity - a phenomenon where the normal rules of the universe break down. They have held an enduring fascination for Professor Hawking throughout his life.

Rather than see them as scary, destructive and dark he says if properly understood, they could unlock the deepest secrets of the cosmos. Professor Hawking describes the history of scientific thinking about black holes, and explains how they have posed tough challenges to conventional understanding of the laws which govern the universe.

Professor Hawking then explains his own hypothesis that black holes may emit a form of radiation, now known as Hawking Radiation. He discusses about the search for mini black holes, noting that so far "no-one has found any, which is a pity because if they had, I would have got a Nobel Prize." And he advances a theory that information may remain stored within black holes in a scrambled form.

The Century of the System2014120220141206 (WS)

The impact of systems - from simple checklists to complex mechanisms - on medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In this second lecture, Atul Gawande will focus on the impact that the development of systems has had – and should have in the future - on medicine and overcoming failures of ineptitude. He will dissect systems of all kinds, from simple checklists to complex mechanisms of many parts. And he will argue for how they can be better designed to transform care from the richest parts of the world to the poorest.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He is well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Among his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The Century of the System2014120220141230 (WS)

The impact of systems - from simple checklists to complex mechanisms - on medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In this second lecture, Atul Gawande will focus on the impact that the development of systems has had – and should have in the future - on medicine and overcoming failures of ineptitude. He will dissect systems of all kinds, from simple checklists to complex mechanisms of many parts. And he will argue for how they can be better designed to transform care from the richest parts of the world to the poorest.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He is well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Among his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The Century of the System20141202

The impact of systems - from simple checklists to complex mechanisms - on medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In this second lecture, Atul Gawande will focus on the impact that the development of systems has had – and should have in the future - on medicine and overcoming failures of ineptitude. He will dissect systems of all kinds, from simple checklists to complex mechanisms of many parts. And he will argue for how they can be better designed to transform care from the richest parts of the world to the poorest.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He is well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Among his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The Day Is for the Living20170613

Art can bring the dead back to life argues novelist Hilary Mantel

The Day Is for the Living20170613

Art can bring the dead back to life argues novelist Hilary Mantel

Art can bring the dead back to life, argues the best-selling novelist Hilary Mantel, starting with the story of her own great-grandmother. "We sense the dead have a vital force still," she says. "They have something to tell us, something we need to understand. Using fiction and drama, we try to gain that understanding." She describes how and why she began to write fiction about the past, and how her view of her trade has evolved. We cannot hear or see the past, she says, but "we can listen and look".

Over this series of five lectures, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. How can we understand the past, she asks, and how can we convey its nature today? Above all, she believes, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at Halle St Peter's in Manchester, and is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

The Day Is For The Living20170613

Art can bring the dead back to life argues novelist Hilary Mantel

Art can bring the dead back to life, argues the best-selling novelist Hilary Mantel, starting with the story of her own great-grandmother. "We sense the dead have a vital force still," she says. "They have something to tell us, something we need to understand. Using fiction and drama, we try to gain that understanding." She describes how and why she began to write fiction about the past, and how her view of her trade has evolved. We cannot hear or see the past, she says, but "we can listen and look".

Over this series of five lectures, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. How can we understand the past, she asks, and how can we convey its nature today? Above all, she believes, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at Halle St Peter's in Manchester, and is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

The Day Is for the Living2017061320170617 (WS)

Art can bring the dead back to life argues novelist Hilary Mantel

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Art can bring the dead back to life, argues the best-selling novelist Hilary Mantel, starting with the story of her own great-grandmother. "We sense the dead have a vital force still," she says. "They have something to tell us, something we need to understand. Using fiction and drama, we try to gain that understanding." She describes how and why she began to write fiction about the past, and how her view of her trade has evolved. We cannot hear or see the past, she says, but "we can listen and look".

Over this series of five lectures, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. How can we understand the past, she asks, and how can we convey its nature today? Above all, she believes, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at Halle St Peter's in Manchester, and is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

The Day Is for the Living20170613

Art can bring the dead back to life argues novelist Hilary Mantel

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Art can bring the dead back to life, argues the best-selling novelist Hilary Mantel, starting with the story of her own great-grandmother. "We sense the dead have a vital force still," she says. "They have something to tell us, something we need to understand. Using fiction and drama, we try to gain that understanding." She describes how and why she began to write fiction about the past, and how her view of her trade has evolved. We cannot hear or see the past, she says, but "we can listen and look".

Over this series of five lectures, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. How can we understand the past, she asks, and how can we convey its nature today? Above all, she believes, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at Halle St Peter's in Manchester, and is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley. The producer is Jim Frank.

The Idea of Wellbeing2014121620141220 (WS)

Medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The fourth and final lecture, The Idea of Wellbeing, will argue that medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing - on protecting, insofar as possible, people’s abilities to pursue their highest priorities in life. And, as he will suggest from the story of his father’s life and death from cancer, those priorities are nearly always more complex than simply to live longer.

Photo: Dr Atul Gawande

The Idea of Wellbeing2014121620150101 (WS)

Medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The fourth and final lecture, The Idea of Wellbeing, will argue that medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing - on protecting, insofar as possible, people’s abilities to pursue their highest priorities in life. And, as he will suggest from the story of his father’s life and death from cancer, those priorities are nearly always more complex than simply to live longer.

Photo: Dr Atul Gawande

The Idea of Wellbeing20141216

Medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

The fourth and final lecture, The Idea of Wellbeing, will argue that medicine must shift from a focus on health and survival to a focus on wellbeing - on protecting, insofar as possible, people’s abilities to pursue their highest priorities in life. And, as he will suggest from the story of his father’s life and death from cancer, those priorities are nearly always more complex than simply to live longer.

Photo: Dr Atul Gawande

The Iron Maiden20170620

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

The Iron Maiden20170620

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

How do we construct our pictures of the past, including both truth and myth, asks best-selling author Hilary Mantel. Where do we get our evidence? She warns of two familiar errors: either romanticising the past, or seeing it as a gory horror-show. It is tempting, but often condescending, to seek modern parallels for historical events. "Are we looking into the past, or looking into a mirror?" she asks. "Dead strangers...did not live and die so we could draw lessons from them." Above all, she says, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

Over the course of the lecture series, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. She asks how we view the past and what our relationship is with the dead.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Middle Temple in London, followed by a question and answer session.

The Iron Maiden20170620

Author Hilary Mantel gives this years Reith Lectures, on how art brings the dead to life.

How do we construct our pictures of the past, including both truth and myth, asks best-selling author Hilary Mantel. Where do we get our evidence? She warns of two familiar errors: either romanticising the past, or seeing it as a gory horror-show. It is tempting, but often condescending, to seek modern parallels for historical events. "Are we looking into the past, or looking into a mirror?" she asks. "Dead strangers...did not live and die so we could draw lessons from them." Above all, she says, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

Over the course of the lecture series, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. She asks how we view the past and what our relationship is with the dead.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Middle Temple in London, followed by a question and answer session.

The Iron Maiden2017062020170624 (WS)

Best-selling Author Hilary Mantel asks: How do we construct our pictures of the past?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

How do we construct our pictures of the past, including both truth and myth, asks best-selling author Hilary Mantel. Where do we get our evidence? She warns of two familiar errors: either romanticising the past, or seeing it as a gory horror-show. It is tempting, but often condescending, to seek modern parallels for historical events. "Are we looking into the past, or looking into a mirror?" she asks. "Dead strangers...did not live and die so we could draw lessons from them." Above all, she says, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

Over the course of the lecture series, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. She asks how we view the past and what our relationship is with the dead.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Middle Temple in London, followed by a question and answer session.

The Iron Maiden20170620

Best-selling Author Hilary Mantel asks: How do we construct our pictures of the past?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

How do we construct our pictures of the past, including both truth and myth, asks best-selling author Hilary Mantel. Where do we get our evidence? She warns of two familiar errors: either romanticising the past, or seeing it as a gory horror-show. It is tempting, but often condescending, to seek modern parallels for historical events. "Are we looking into the past, or looking into a mirror?" she asks. "Dead strangers...did not live and die so we could draw lessons from them." Above all, she says, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

Over the course of the lecture series, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. She asks how we view the past and what our relationship is with the dead.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Middle Temple in London, followed by a question and answer session.

The Problem of Hubris2014120920141213 (WS)

Dr Atul Gawande examines the problems in ageing and death and the limits of healthcare

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Dr Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

This third lecture, The Problem of Hubris, he examines the great unfixable problems in life and healthcare - ageing and death. Gawande will argue that the reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do is producing widespread suffering. But research is revealing how this can change.

(Photo: Dr Atul Gawande)

The Problem of Hubris2014120920141231 (WS)

Dr Atul Gawande examines the problems in ageing and death and the limits of healthcare

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Dr Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

This third lecture, The Problem of Hubris, he examines the great unfixable problems in life and healthcare - ageing and death. Gawande will argue that the reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do is producing widespread suffering. But research is revealing how this can change.

(Photo: Dr Atul Gawande)

The Problem of Hubris20141209

Dr Atul Gawande examines the problems in ageing and death and the limits of healthcare

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Dr Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance. Amongst his other roles, he is Director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and Chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally.

This third lecture, The Problem of Hubris, he examines the great unfixable problems in life and healthcare - ageing and death. Gawande will argue that the reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do is producing widespread suffering. But research is revealing how this can change.

(Photo: Dr Atul Gawande)

The Reith Lectures20160206

The Reith Lectures20160206

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes.

The Reith Lectures2016020620160207 (WS)

Professor Stephen Hawking delivers his BBC Reith Lectures on black holes.

War and Humanity2018062620180630 (WS)

Is war an essential part of being human? Margaret MacMillan explores the history of war

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

(Photo: Professor Margaret Macmillan with kind permission)

War And Humanity2018062620180630 (WS)

Is war an essential part of being human? Margaret MacMillan explores the history of war

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

(Photo: Professor Margaret Macmillan with kind permission)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

War's Fatal Attraction2018072420180728 (WS)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

(Illustration: Hands holding war medals, a wreath and a white dove)

War's Fatal Attraction2018072420180728 (WS)

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

(Illustration: Hands holding war medals, a wreath and a white dove)

War's Fatal Attraction20180724

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: Is war an essential part of being human?

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that this year’s BBC Reith Lecturer, Professor Margaret Macmillan, addresses in five lectures, recorded in the UK, Lebanon and Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight, as well as answering questions from the audience.

Why do Doctors Fail?2014112520141129 (WS)

Atul Gawande explores the nature of imperfection in medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance.

Among his other roles, he is director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally. The first lecture, Why do Doctors Fail? will explore the nature of imperfection in medicine. In particular, Gawande will examine how much of failure in medicine remains due to ignorance, and how much is due to ineptitude - and what that means for where medical progress will come from in the future.

Why do Doctors Fail?2014112520141229 (WS)

Atul Gawande explores the nature of imperfection in medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance.

Among his other roles, he is director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally. The first lecture, Why do Doctors Fail? will explore the nature of imperfection in medicine. In particular, Gawande will examine how much of failure in medicine remains due to ignorance, and how much is due to ineptitude - and what that means for where medical progress will come from in the future.

Why do Doctors Fail?20141125

Atul Gawande explores the nature of imperfection in medicine

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

Atul Gawande is a practising surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor at both the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. He’s well known for his writing on medicine, and his research on medical error and performance.

Among his other roles, he is director of Ariadne Labs, a joint centre for health systems innovation, and chairman of Lifebox, a global charity reducing unsafe surgery globally. The first lecture, Why do Doctors Fail? will explore the nature of imperfection in medicine. In particular, Gawande will examine how much of failure in medicine remains due to ignorance, and how much is due to ineptitude - and what that means for where medical progress will come from in the future.

01Episode 1 - The Reith Lectures20090613

A New Citizenship, with Harvard philosopher Professor Michael Sandel.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

A New Citizenship, with Harvard philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect for a new politics of the common good.

In the first lecture, Professor Sandel considers the expansion of markets and how we determine their moral limits. Should immigrants, for example, pay for citizenship? Should we pay schoolchildren for good test results, or even to read a book? Should people be paid for blood donation?

01Episode 1 - The Reith Lectures20090614

A New Citizenship, with Harvard philosopher Professor Michael Sandel.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

A New Citizenship, with Harvard philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect for a new politics of the common good.

In the first lecture, Professor Sandel considers the expansion of markets and how we determine their moral limits. Should immigrants, for example, pay for citizenship? Should we pay schoolchildren for good test results, or even to read a book? Should people be paid for blood donation?

1Scientific Horizons, : The Scientific Citizen20100605
01Scientific Horizons, : The Scientific Citizen20100605

In the first of this year’s Reith Lectures, Professor Martin Rees - President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal - explores the challenges facing science in the 21st Century.

We are increasingly turning to our governments and national media to explain the risks we face.

But in the wake of public confusion over global pandemics like swine flu and more recently Iceland’s volcanic ash cloud that spread across Europe, Professor Rees calls on scientists to come forward and play a greater role in helping us understand the science that affects us all.

Producer Kirsten Lass

Editor Sue Ellis

Contact the programme: thereithlectures@bbc.co.uk

Martin Rees explores the challenges facing science in the 21st Century.

1Scientific Horizons, : The Scientific Citizen20100606

. Martin Rees explores the challenges facing science in the 21st Century.

01Scientific Horizons, : The Scientific Citizen20100606

Martin Rees explores the challenges facing science in the 21st Century.

1The Reith Lectures20090613
01The Reith Lectures20090613

A New Citizenship, with philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect for a new politics of the common good.

A New Citizenship, with philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect.

In his first lecture, in the wake of the financial crisis Professor Sandel asks: what are the moral limits of markets?

In his first lecture, in the wake of the financial crisis Professor Sandel asks: what a.

1The Reith Lectures20090614

. A New Citizenship, with philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect...

01The Reith Lectures20090614

A New Citizenship, with philosopher Professor Michael Sandel, who looks at the prospect.

02Episode 2 - The Reith Lectures20090620

Professor Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In the second of his Reith lectures, Professor Michael Sandel considers the role of moral argument in politics.

He argues that it is not possible (or desirable) for government to be neutral on moral questions and calls for a more engaged civic debate about issues such as commercial surrogacy and same-sex marriage.

02Episode 2 - The Reith Lectures20090621

Professor Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

The BBC's annual series of lectures from a major academic figure.

In the second of his Reith lectures, Professor Michael Sandel considers the role of moral argument in politics.

He argues that it is not possible (or desirable) for government to be neutral on moral questions and calls for a more engaged civic debate about issues such as commercial surrogacy and same-sex marriage.

02Scientific Horizons, : Surviving The Century20100612

In the second of this year’s Reith Lectures, recorded for the first time in Wales in its capital city Cardiff, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st century.

Our planet is coming under increasing strain from climate change, population explosion and food shortages.

As we use up our natural resources ever more quickly, how can we use science to help us solve the crisis that we are moving rapidly towards?

We need international consensus, and global funding for clean and green technologies.

The challenge, for scientists, governments and people everywhere, is to confront the threats to our planet and find the solutions in science.

Producer: Kirsten Lass

Editor: Sue Ellis

Contact the programme: thereithlectures@bbc.co.uk

Martin Rees explores whether science can save our planet.

02Scientific Horizons, : Surviving The Century20100613

Martin Rees explores whether science can save our planet.

02The Reith Lectures20090620

In the second of his Reith lectures, Professor Michael Sandel considers the role of moral argument in politics.

He argues that it is not possible (or desirable) for government to be neutral on moral questions and calls for a more engaged civic debate about issues such as commercial surrogacy and same-sex marriage.

Professor Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics? Is it time for a more morally engaged debate?

Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics? Is it t.

02The Reith Lectures20090621

Professor Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

03Scientific Horizons, : What We’ll Never Know20100619

In the third of this year's Reith Lectures, recorded at the Royal Society during its 350th anniversary year, its President Martin Rees continues to explore the challenges facing science in the 21st Century.

He stresses there are things that will always lie beyond our sphere of comprehension and we should accept these limits to our knowledge.

On the other hand, there are things we've never even dreamt of that will one day be ours to explore and understand.

The outcome of the quest for alien life will revolutionise our sense of self in the next two decades.

But some things - like travelling back in time - will never happen.

Producer: Kirsten Lass

Editor: Sue Ellis

Contact the programme: thereithlectures@bbc.co.uk

Astronomer Royal Martin Rees looks into the future and explores what we’ll never know.

03Scientific Horizons, : What We’ll Never Know20100620

Astronomer Royal Martin Rees looks into the future and explores what we’ll never know.

04 LASTScientific Horizons, : The Runaway World20100626

In the fourth and final Reith Lecture of 2010, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society and Astronomer Royal, explores how fast our world is moving in the 21st Century.

Speaking at the Open University in Milton Keynes, the home of online learning, he acknowledges how the internet and other technologies have transformed our lives.

Now he calls on politicians and other powers that be to provide the funding that will keep the UK among the world’s front runners in scientific research and discovery.

Without money and without education to attract young people into science, the UK is in danger of falling behind China and India - countries that are investing heavily in their science and technology sectors.

Professor Rees ends his series of lectures evoking memories of the ‘glorious’ Ely Cathedral, near Cambridge in England, a monument built to last a thousand years.

If we, like the cathedral builders, redirect our energies and focus on the long-term, he believes together we can solve the problems that face our planet, and secure its future for billions of people worldwide and for generations to come.

Producer: Kirsten Lass

Editor: Sue Ellis

Contact the programme: thereithlectures@bbc.co.uk

In his final Reith lecture, Martin Rees urges the UK to stay at the forefront of science.

04 LASTScientific Horizons, : The Runaway World20100627

In his final Reith lecture, Martin Rees urges the UK to stay at the forefront of science.

2Scientific Horizons, : Surviving the Century20100612
2Scientific Horizons, : Surviving the Century20100613

. Martin Rees explores whether science can save our planet.

2The Reith Lectures20090620
2The Reith Lectures20090621

. Professor Michael Sandel asks what role, if any, there is for moral argument in politics.

3Scientific Horizons, : What We’ll Never Know20100619
3Scientific Horizons, : What We’ll Never Know20100620

. Astronomer Royal Martin Rees looks into the future and explores what we’ll never know.

200720070414

1/5.

Bursting at the Seams: Hanging Together or Hanging Separately by Jeffrey Sachs.

This century will be marked by severely limited resources, and the threat of failed states.

200701Bursting At The Seams20070415

Hanging Together or Hanging Separately by Jeffrey Sachs.

This century will be marked by severely limited resources, and the threat of failed states.