Resolves [Resolves] [World Service]

Episodes

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012020061320200614 (WS)Gayathri Vaidyanathan remains with her family, in her own, self-imposed lockdown in Chennai, India. Her resolve is to be a "non-consumer for as long as possible". She continues, "I’ve been trying to cut down my consumption for a while, but my execution was imperfect. I tried to grow some vegetables in a raised garden bed back at my house in Bangalore, but white flies decimated them. I continued to buy things I didn’t need. I ordered lots of takeout. I bought a bamboo salad bowl last year when I don’t even enjoy salads. Why did I buy it?"

She recorded her resolve ahead of the broadcast, and was fearful of what would happen in the next few days. Each day she learns of more cases nearby, just two lanes away or one street down. "Workers in India don’t get paid to stay at home, there is little choice but to work," she reflects. "The daring, the desperation is all set to burst".

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

01Environment journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan20200613Gayathri Vaidyanathan remains with her family, in her own, self-imposed lockdown in Chennai, India. Her resolve is to be a "non-consumer for as long as possible". She continues, "I’ve been trying to cut down my consumption for a while, but my execution was imperfect. I tried to grow some vegetables in a raised garden bed back at my house in Bangalore, but white flies decimated them. I continued to buy things I didn’t need. I ordered lots of takeout. I bought a bamboo salad bowl last year when I don’t even enjoy salads. Why did I buy it?"

She recorded her resolve ahead of the broadcast, and was fearful of what would happen in the next few days. Each day she learns of more cases nearby, just two lanes away or one street down. "Workers in India don’t get paid to stay at home, there is little choice but to work," she reflects. "The daring, the desperation is all set to burst".

The Indian journalist on why she wants to be a "non-consumer

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

01Environment journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan2020061320200614 (WS)Gayathri Vaidyanathan remains with her family, in her own, self-imposed lockdown in Chennai, India. Her resolve is to be a "non-consumer for as long as possible". She continues, "I’ve been trying to cut down my consumption for a while, but my execution was imperfect. I tried to grow some vegetables in a raised garden bed back at my house in Bangalore, but white flies decimated them. I continued to buy things I didn’t need. I ordered lots of takeout. I bought a bamboo salad bowl last year when I don’t even enjoy salads. Why did I buy it?"

She recorded her resolve ahead of the broadcast, and was fearful of what would happen in the next few days. Each day she learns of more cases nearby, just two lanes away or one street down. "Workers in India don’t get paid to stay at home, there is little choice but to work," she reflects. "The daring, the desperation is all set to burst".

The Indian journalist on why she wants to be a "non-consumer

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

01Environment journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan20200613The Indian journalist on why she wants to be a "non-consumer

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

01Environment Journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan2020061320200614 (WS)The Indian journalist on why she wants to be a "non-consumer

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

0220200620Frans de Waal, a professor of psychology at Emory University in the USA, who is renowned for his work with non-human primates, resolves to find ways in which humans can learn to live alongside animals.

“The problems we have with the diseases that are coming up are all problems of us setting ourselves apart and thinking we can do anything we like with animals, with nature - because we think we are far superior.”

During lockdown, he’s imagined a new system for supermarkets to adopt which will let customers know where the meat they are buying has come from, and make clear what is meant by, for example, ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’. He proposes a scan code on the packaging that customers can read with their smart phones, which gives images and information about the farm and the ethos of the farmer.

A Cast Iron Production for the BBC World Service.
Part of Rethink - a series of programmes on BBC Radio looking at how the world should change post-coronavirus.

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

022020062020200621 (WS)Frans de Waal, a professor of psychology at Emory University in the USA, who is renowned for his work with non-human primates, resolves to find ways in which humans can learn to live alongside animals.

“The problems we have with the diseases that are coming up are all problems of us setting ourselves apart and thinking we can do anything we like with animals, with nature - because we think we are far superior.”

During lockdown, he’s imagined a new system for supermarkets to adopt which will let customers know where the meat they are buying has come from, and make clear what is meant by, for example, ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’. He proposes a scan code on the packaging that customers can read with their smart phones, which gives images and information about the farm and the ethos of the farmer.

A Cast Iron Production for the BBC World Service.
Part of Rethink - a series of programmes on BBC Radio looking at how the world should change post-coronavirus.

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

022020062020200621 (WS)People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.
02Frans de Waal20200620Frans de Waal, a professor of psychology at Emory University in the USA, who is renowned for his work with non-human primates, resolves to find ways in which humans can learn to live alongside animals.

“The problems we have with the diseases that are coming up are all problems of us setting ourselves apart and thinking we can do anything we like with animals, with nature - because we think we are far superior.”

During lockdown, he’s imagined a new system for supermarkets to adopt which will let customers know where the meat they are buying has come from, and make clear what is meant by, for example, ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’. He proposes a scan code on the packaging that customers can read with their smart phones, which gives images and information about the farm and the ethos of the farmer.

A Cast Iron Production for the BBC World Service.
Part of Rethink - a series of programmes on BBC Radio looking at how the world should change post-coronavirus.

How a psychologist is trying to find ways for humans to live alongside animals

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

02Frans de Waal2020062020200621 (WS)Frans de Waal, a professor of psychology at Emory University in the USA, who is renowned for his work with non-human primates, resolves to find ways in which humans can learn to live alongside animals.

“The problems we have with the diseases that are coming up are all problems of us setting ourselves apart and thinking we can do anything we like with animals, with nature - because we think we are far superior.”

During lockdown, he’s imagined a new system for supermarkets to adopt which will let customers know where the meat they are buying has come from, and make clear what is meant by, for example, ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’. He proposes a scan code on the packaging that customers can read with their smart phones, which gives images and information about the farm and the ethos of the farmer.

A Cast Iron Production for the BBC World Service.
Part of Rethink - a series of programmes on BBC Radio looking at how the world should change post-coronavirus.

How a psychologist is trying to find ways for humans to live alongside animals

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

02Frans de Waal20200620How a psychologist is trying to find ways for humans to live alongside animals

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

02Frans de Waal2020062020200621 (WS)How a psychologist is trying to find ways for humans to live alongside animals

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

03Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell20200627Olympic Gold medallist Sally Gunnell, renowned for her 400 metre win in Barcelona, resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others.
“I’ve had to move from being quite a selfish person as an athlete where everyone around me was thinking about what I’d had to eat, what massage I needed; everyone was running around me…and in the last few months of lockdown, I’ve been thinking about the adjustments that I needed to make to move from that and to reflect on what being kind really means”.

Gunnell shares some of her insider experience of how to make real change; the importance of a few minutes of concentration each day to allow the imagination to create the scenarios that will come about.

(Photo: Sally Gunnell of Great Britain celebrates after winning the Womens 400m Olympic Hurdles Final, 1992 . Credit: John Stillwell/ Press Association)

Why Sally Gunnell resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

03Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell2020062720200628 (WS)Olympic Gold medallist Sally Gunnell, renowned for her 400 metre win in Barcelona, resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others.
“I’ve had to move from being quite a selfish person as an athlete where everyone around me was thinking about what I’d had to eat, what massage I needed; everyone was running around me…and in the last few months of lockdown, I’ve been thinking about the adjustments that I needed to make to move from that and to reflect on what being kind really means”.

Gunnell shares some of her insider experience of how to make real change; the importance of a few minutes of concentration each day to allow the imagination to create the scenarios that will come about.

(Photo: Sally Gunnell of Great Britain celebrates after winning the Womens 400m Olympic Hurdles Final, 1992 . Credit: John Stillwell/ Press Association)

Why Sally Gunnell resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

03Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell20200627Why Sally Gunnell resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

03Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell2020062720200628 (WS)Why Sally Gunnell resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

042020070420200705 (WS)People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

In a series of special programmes recorded as the world gradually ‘unlocks’ during the Covid 19 crisis, we hear from people of all kinds, experiencing life on different continents, in different countries, in rural and urban societies, reflect on aspects of their lives and determine ways in which they want to do something differently. They offer up small and large initiatives; acts that give expression and focus to the change they are undertaking. These echo the Resolves that each of us will also make in recognition of our own preoccupations given the charge of life and the proximity to death, seemingly closer, in the presence of the disease.

We hear Resolves that will bring about a greater awareness of the natural world or the decision to provide mobile healthcare to giving school pupils new educational structures. We also hear the frustration of young Zimbabwean Anele Matshiselaa who sees the terrible deterioration of health and the natural environment but it has nothing to do with Covid 19 – this is the long term drought that has bought the country to its knees and is the cause of people crying that they would rather die of the virus rather than desperate days of contamination and dehydration without water. He determines an important change in his work in wildlife research and management.

Resolvers include Primatologist Frans de Waal (US), Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell in the UK, Head Teacher Caroline Hodges (UK), International curator Juliana Engberg (NZ) and Environmental Journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan (India).

04Anele Matshiselaa20200704Anele Matshiselaa, a 27-year-old wildlife resources manager coming out of lockdown in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, resolves to convince more local people to visit the wildlife parks across the country.

“Without tourists from Europe, America and Asia, we won’t be able to maintain animal safety and security” he says. “It’s time for indigenous Zimbabweans to see the zebras, lions, rhinos and elephants for themselves.” He is spurred on by seeing his friends penniless, made worse by the Covid-19 crisis, though it’s the longer term consequences of a two-year drought, which has devastated crops and livelihoods, bringing the country to its knees. “We haven’t had water to wash our hands… there are people who say they would rather die of Covid than endure this impossible life.”

His efforts to encourage locals to the wildlife parks begin at home with his family, and his method of enticement includes the possibility of seeing their ancestral totem, the elephant.

A 27-year-old wants more Zimbabweans to discover their native wildlife

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

04Anele Matshiselaa2020070420200705 (WS)Anele Matshiselaa, a 27-year-old wildlife resources manager coming out of lockdown in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, resolves to convince more local people to visit the wildlife parks across the country.

“Without tourists from Europe, America and Asia, we won’t be able to maintain animal safety and security” he says. “It’s time for indigenous Zimbabweans to see the zebras, lions, rhinos and elephants for themselves.” He is spurred on by seeing his friends penniless, made worse by the Covid-19 crisis, though it’s the longer term consequences of a two-year drought, which has devastated crops and livelihoods, bringing the country to its knees. “We haven’t had water to wash our hands… there are people who say they would rather die of Covid than endure this impossible life.”

His efforts to encourage locals to the wildlife parks begin at home with his family, and his method of enticement includes the possibility of seeing their ancestral totem, the elephant.

A 27-year-old wants more Zimbabweans to discover their native wildlife

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

05Juliana Engberg20200711International curator and festival director Juliana Engberg resolves to “continue to enable, craft, produce and exhibit work by artists so that we can all go on discovering who we are and what we care about”.

From her partial lockdown in Auckland, away from home in Australia, she is shocked and challenged by the predicament of festivals, museums and theatres, but determined to find ways for these places to continue, to operate and thrive.

“I realise why I continue to work with art, in all its forms - musical, movement, literary, visual - because it’s a means by which we step out of the commonplace into a suspended moment of encounter, so we can contemplate and release our emotions and curiosity. Art might be surprising, confusing, strange, delightful, inspire love or disgust; it helps us move through our lives in all their dark, light and unstable passages. During these dark lockdown times, it’s art that makes me completely forget I am just a lump of chemical and biological processes that could catch or infect another with Covid-19.”

Image: Juliana Engberg (Credit: Kay Campbell)

A curator and festival director resolves to help artists thrive

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

05Juliana Engberg2020071120200712 (WS)International curator and festival director Juliana Engberg resolves to “continue to enable, craft, produce and exhibit work by artists so that we can all go on discovering who we are and what we care about”.

From her partial lockdown in Auckland, away from home in Australia, she is shocked and challenged by the predicament of festivals, museums and theatres, but determined to find ways for these places to continue, to operate and thrive.

“I realise why I continue to work with art, in all its forms - musical, movement, literary, visual - because it’s a means by which we step out of the commonplace into a suspended moment of encounter, so we can contemplate and release our emotions and curiosity. Art might be surprising, confusing, strange, delightful, inspire love or disgust; it helps us move through our lives in all their dark, light and unstable passages. During these dark lockdown times, it’s art that makes me completely forget I am just a lump of chemical and biological processes that could catch or infect another with Covid-19.”

Image: Juliana Engberg (Credit: Kay Campbell)

A curator and festival director resolves to help artists thrive

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

In a series of special programmes recorded as the world gradually ‘unlocks’ during the Covid 19 crisis, we hear from people of all kinds, experiencing life on different continents, in different countries, in rural and urban societies, reflect on aspects of their lives and determine ways in which they want to do something differently. They offer up small and large initiatives; acts that give expression and focus to the change they are undertaking. These echo the Resolves that each of us will also make in recognition of our own preoccupations given the charge of life and the proximity to death, seemingly closer, in the presence of the disease.

We hear Resolves that will bring about a greater awareness of the natural world or the decision to provide mobile healthcare to giving school pupils new educational structures. We also hear the frustration of young Zimbabwean Anele Matshiselaa who sees the terrible deterioration of health and the natural environment but it has nothing to do with Covid 19 – this is the long term drought that has bought the country to its knees and is the cause of people crying that they would rather die of the virus rather than desperate days of contamination and dehydration without water. He determines an important change in his work in wildlife research and management.

Resolvers include Primatologist Frans de Waal (US), Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell in the UK, Head Teacher Caroline Hodges (UK), International curator Juliana Engberg (NZ) and Environmental Journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan (India).

06Professor Malik Peiris2020071820200719 (WS)Professor Malik Peiris, a clinical and public health virologist based at the School of Public Health at the University of Hong Kong, is best known for his work to identify the SARS virus in 2003. He resolves to learn the language of politics and economics, as well as science.

“I personally, in the small way that I can, have resolved to move beyond the laboratory, even beyond the health paradigm I’ve been in, and ask questions about the year-on-year economic growth that we have all taken for granted - in nature, nothing grows forever - and I’ve cut my working hours by fifty percent to study sustainable economics”.

A leading virologist resolves to learn the language of politics and economics

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

In a series of special programmes recorded as the world gradually ‘unlocks’ during the Covid 19 crisis, we hear from people of all kinds, experiencing life on different continents, in different countries, in rural and urban societies, reflect on aspects of their lives and determine ways in which they want to do something differently. They offer up small and large initiatives; acts that give expression and focus to the change they are undertaking. These echo the Resolves that each of us will also make in recognition of our own preoccupations given the charge of life and the proximity to death, seemingly closer, in the presence of the disease.

We hear Resolves that will bring about a greater awareness of the natural world or the decision to provide mobile healthcare to giving school pupils new educational structures. We also hear the frustration of young Zimbabwean Anele Matshiselaa who sees the terrible deterioration of health and the natural environment but it has nothing to do with Covid 19 – this is the long term drought that has bought the country to its knees and is the cause of people crying that they would rather die of the virus rather than desperate days of contamination and dehydration without water. He determines an important change in his work in wildlife research and management.

Resolvers include Primatologist Frans de Waal (US), Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell in the UK, Head Teacher Caroline Hodges (UK), International curator Juliana Engberg (NZ) and Environmental Journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan (India).

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

07Caroline Hodges20200725Caroline Hodges, headteacher of Little Ealing Primary School in London, resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support for their children through the summer holidays, since Covid-19 has revealed the difficulties they’ve faced year on year in the past.

The school has remained open to frontline worker families, and here she observes how the older and younger children adapt and play together, but the wealth divide at this large primary school is not so easily accommodated. Caroline is determined to set up a fund to support the families in need.

Caroline recalls her own tight knit community in Northern England, where she grew up in an atmosphere of certainty about the shared care and help that existed between families.

A headteacher resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

07Caroline Hodges2020072520200726 (WS)Caroline Hodges, headteacher of Little Ealing Primary School in London, resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support for their children through the summer holidays, since Covid-19 has revealed the difficulties they’ve faced year on year in the past.

The school has remained open to frontline worker families, and here she observes how the older and younger children adapt and play together, but the wealth divide at this large primary school is not so easily accommodated. Caroline is determined to set up a fund to support the families in need.

Caroline recalls her own tight knit community in Northern England, where she grew up in an atmosphere of certainty about the shared care and help that existed between families.

A headteacher resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

Caroline Hodges, headteacher of Little Ealing Primary School in London, resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support for their children through the summer holidays, since Covid-19 has revealed the difficulties they’ve faced year on year in the past.

The school has remained open to frontline worker families, and here she observes how the older and younger children adapt and play together, but the wealth divide at this large primary school is not so easily accommodated. Caroline is determined to set up a fund to support the families in need.

Caroline recalls her own tight knit community in Northern England, where she grew up in an atmosphere of certainty about the shared care and help that existed between families.

A headteacher resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

08Nino Redruello20200801Nino Redruello, a young chef in Madrid, resolves to support the city's recovery by cooking simple, local dishes and making them affordable and/or free to poorer communities, among which are the staff and farm workers who have supported his family restaurant business, La Ancha, for decades. His wealthier customers are all paying for the initiative.

“Madrid is on its knees; we all need to start again. Our food can at least give people nourishment and hope. Our local dishes are for the people and their families who have helped to make our restaurants successful for 100 years, and who need help now. We’re thinking about everything again, and this is how we start. We’re making healthy, affordable food, and we won’t stop.”

How a chef in Madrid plans to use cooking to support his city's recovery

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.

08Nino Redruello2020080120200802 (WS)Nino Redruello, a young chef in Madrid, resolves to support the city's recovery by cooking simple, local dishes and making them affordable and/or free to poorer communities, among which are the staff and farm workers who have supported his family restaurant business, La Ancha, for decades. His wealthier customers are all paying for the initiative.

“Madrid is on its knees; we all need to start again. Our food can at least give people nourishment and hope. Our local dishes are for the people and their families who have helped to make our restaurants successful for 100 years, and who need help now. We’re thinking about everything again, and this is how we start. We’re making healthy, affordable food, and we won’t stop.”

How a chef in Madrid plans to use cooking to support his city's recovery

People reflect on how they will do things differently after living with a deadly virus.