Robert Aickman Stories [Short Works]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Le Miroir20190819

Celia, an aristocratic young Englishwoman, moves to Paris to embark on a career as an artist. But time shifts in the looking glass and entraps her.

Born in 1914, Robert Aickman was the son of architect William Arthur Aickman and worked briefly with his father, a notable eccentric. The younger Aickman was a man of diverse interests (co-founder of the Inland Waterways Association and chair of the London Opera Society included) and did not publish his first stories until 1951, in the collection We Are For The Dark. Half the stories in that collection were written by Aickman and half of them by Elizabeth Jane Howard, his lover at the time.

Aickman would go on to publish 48 “strange stories”, the term he would use for his own works.

Although the grandson of horror writer Richard Marsh, best known for his occult thriller, The Beetle (1897), Aickman never became a full-time writer, but his long-standing membership of the Society for Psychical Research and The Ghost Club is testament to his fascination with the occult, and his mystery stories constantly reshape time in unorthodox ways. Since his death in 1981, his reputation as a writer has grown.

Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra.

Celia, a young Englishwoman, moves to Paris to embark on a career as an artist.

Compelling readings especially adapted for BBC Radio 4 Extra.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra

02Raising The Wind20190820

So often, the boat is never where the owner wants it. It’s Fillbrick’s job to make sure it is. So often, the wind is never where you want it, unless you meet a sorceress.

Born in 1914, Robert Aickman was the son of architect William Arthur Aickman and worked briefly with his father, a notable eccentric. The younger Aickman was a man of diverse interests (co-founder of the Inland Waterways Association and chair of the London Opera Society included) and did not publish his first stories until 1951, in the collection We Are For The Dark. Half the stories in that collection were written by Aickman and half of them by Elizabeth Jane Howard, his lover at the time.

Aickman would go on to publish 48 “strange stories”, the term he would use for his own works.

Although the grandson of horror writer Richard Marsh, best known for his occult thriller, The Beetle (1897), Aickman never became a full-time writer, but his long-standing membership of the Society for Psychical Research and The Ghost Club is testament to his fascination with the occult, and his mystery stories constantly reshape time in unorthodox ways. Since his death in 1981, his reputation as a writer has grown.

Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra

Often, the boat is never where the owner wants it. Fillbrick's job is to make sure it is.

Compelling readings especially adapted for BBC Radio 4 Extra.

03The Fully Conducted Tour20190821

Take off your boots and shoes, and come this way.

Born in 1914, Robert Aickman was the son of architect William Arthur Aickman and worked briefly with his father, a notable eccentric. The younger Aickman was a man of diverse interests (co-founder of the Inland Waterways Association and chair of the London Opera Society included) and did not publish his first stories until 1951, in the collection We Are For The Dark. Half the stories in that collection were written by Aickman and half of them by Elizabeth Jane Howard, his lover at the time.

Aickman would go on to publish 48 “strange stories”, the term he would use for his own works.

Although the grandson of horror writer Richard Marsh, best known for his occult thriller, The Beetle (1897), Aickman never became a full-time writer, but his long-standing membership of the Society for Psychical Research and The Ghost Club is testament to his fascination with the occult, and his mystery stories constantly reshape time in unorthodox ways. Since his death in 1981, his reputation as a writer has grown.

Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra

Compelling readings especially adapted for BBC Radio 4 Extra.

04The Coffin House20190822

Jessica and Bunty, land army women, take refuge in a small wooden cabin. Or so they think.

Born in 1914, Robert Aickman was the son of architect William Arthur Aickman and worked briefly with his father, a notable eccentric. The younger Aickman was a man of diverse interests (co-founder of the Inland Waterways Association and chair of the London Opera Society included) and did not publish his first stories until 1951, in the collection We Are For The Dark. Half the stories in that collection were written by Aickman and half of them by Elizabeth Jane Howard, his lover at the time.

Aickman would go on to publish 48 “strange stories”, the term he would use for his own works.

Although the grandson of horror writer Richard Marsh, best known for his occult thriller, The Beetle (1897), Aickman never became a full-time writer, but his long-standing membership of the Society for Psychical Research and The Ghost Club is testament to his fascination with the occult, and his mystery stories constantly reshape time in unorthodox ways. Since his death in 1981, his reputation as a writer has grown.

Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra

Compelling readings especially adapted for BBC Radio 4 Extra.

05Just A Song At Twilight20190823

All their London friends said Lydia and Timo were mad. But when the dream takes hold...

Born in 1914, Robert Aickman was the son of architect William Arthur Aickman and worked briefly with his father, a notable eccentric. The younger Aickman was a man of diverse interests (co-founder of the Inland Waterways Association and chair of the London Opera Society included) and did not publish his first stories until 1951, in the collection We Are For The Dark. Half the stories in that collection were written by Aickman and half of them by Elizabeth Jane Howard, his lover at the time.

Aickman would go on to publish 48 “strange stories”, the term he would use for his own works.

Although the grandson of horror writer Richard Marsh, best known for his occult thriller, The Beetle (1897), Aickman never became a full-time writer, but his long-standing membership of the Society for Psychical Research and The Ghost Club is testament to his fascination with the occult, and his mystery stories constantly reshape time in unorthodox ways. Since his death in 1981, his reputation as a writer has grown.

Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 Extra

Compelling readings especially adapted for BBC Radio 4 Extra.