Schubert - Swansong

Episodes

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01The Beginning Of The End20161107

Donald Macleod discusses Schubert's last New Year's Eve party and final song collection.

Donald Macleod explores the remarkable and prolific final year of Schubert's life, during which he battled failing health to compose a succession of masterpieces.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod begins the week with Schubert's last - typically boozy - New Year's Eve party, of 1827/8, before introducing his last collection of songs, cobbled together and titled "Swansong" by his publisher after the composer's death. We'll hear excerpt from the set, sung by some of the greatest contemporary interpreters of Schubert's work, all week.

Die Taubenpost (Schwanengesang)

Matthias Goerne, baritone

Christoph Eschenbach, piano

Piano Trio in E flat, D929 - II. Andante

Trio Wanderer

Fantasy in C major, D934

Vineta Sareika, violin

Amandine Savary, piano

Impromptu in F minor, D935 no.4

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Liebesbotschaft (Schwanengesang)

01The Beginning of the End20161107

Donald Macleod explores the remarkable and prolific final year of Schubert's life, during which he battled failing health to compose a succession of masterpieces.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod begins the week with Schubert's last - typically boozy - New Year's Eve party, of 1827/8, before introducing his last collection of songs, cobbled together and titled "Swansong" by his publisher after the composer's death. We'll hear excerpt from the set, sung by some of the greatest contemporary interpreters of Schubert's work, all week.

Die Taubenpost (Schwanengesang)

Matthias Goerne, baritone

Christoph Eschenbach, piano

Piano Trio in E flat, D929 - II. Andante

Trio Wanderer

Fantasy in C major, D934

Vineta Sareika, violin

Amandine Savary, piano

Impromptu in F minor, D935 no.4

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Liebesbotschaft (Schwanengesang)

Matthias Goerne, baritone

Christoph Eschenbach, piano.

Donald Macleod discusses Schubert's last New Year's Eve party and final song collection.

02Foreboding And Fantasy20161108

Exploring Schubert's brooding personality and the ongoing debate regarding his sexuality.

Donald Macleod continues his exploration of the extraordinary last year of Schubert's life. Featuring excerpts all week from his final song collection Schwanengesang (Swansong).

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E Flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

In early 1828, as Schubert's close friends become variously engaged and married, he sinks deeper into loneliness and depression. Donald Macleod explores Schubert's brooding personality, and the ongoing debate regarding his sexuality.

Kriegers Ahnung (Schwanengesang)

James Rutherford, baritone

Eugene Asti, piano

Die Hochzeitsbraten

Marlis Petersen, soprano, Werner Güra, tenor, Konrad Jarnot, bass, Christoph Berner, fortepiano

Der Kreuzzug, D932

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, baritone

Gerald Moore, piano

Fantasy in F minor for piano duet, D940

Leon Fleisher, Katherine Jacobson, piano four hands

Frühlingssehnsucht; Ständchen; Aufenthalt (Schwanengesang)

02Foreboding and Fantasy20161108

Exploring Schubert's brooding personality and the ongoing debate regarding his sexuality.

Donald Macleod continues his exploration of the extraordinary last year of Schubert's life. Featuring excerpts all week from his final song collection Schwanengesang (Swansong).

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E Flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

In early 1828, as Schubert's close friends become variously engaged and married, he sinks deeper into loneliness and depression. Donald Macleod explores Schubert's brooding personality, and the ongoing debate regarding his sexuality.

Kriegers Ahnung (Schwanengesang)

James Rutherford, baritone

Eugene Asti, piano

Die Hochzeitsbraten

Marlis Petersen, soprano, Werner Güra, tenor, Konrad Jarnot, bass, Christoph Berner, fortepiano

Der Kreuzzug, D932

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, baritone

Gerald Moore, piano

Fantasy in F minor for piano duet, D940

Leon Fleisher, Katherine Jacobson, piano four hands

Frühlingssehnsucht; Ständchen; Aufenthalt (Schwanengesang)

James Rutherford, baritone

Eugene Asti, piano.

03Dona Nobis Pacem20161109

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's final mass setting and his interest in Paganini.

Donald Macleod continues his journey through Franz Schubert's final year of life - and the towering late masterpieces he composed.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

As spring turns to summer in 1828, Schubert's attention is taken first with the touring violin virtuoso Paganini, and then his own deep Christian faith, as he composes the last - and possibly finest - setting of the Mass.

Psalm 92, D953

Elmar Schoter, baritone

Capella Bavariae

Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor

Rondeau in A, D951

Martha Argerich, Nelson Freire, piano duet

Sanctus; Benedictus; Agnus Dei (Mass in E flat, D950)

Susan Gritton, soprano, Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano, Mark Padmore, tenor, James Gilchrist, tenor, Matthew Rose, bass

Collegium Musicum 90

Richard Hickox, conductor

In der ferne; Abschied (Schwanengesang)

Christoph Prégardien, tenor

Andreas Staier, piano.

03Dona Nobis Pacem20161109

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's final mass setting and his interest in Paganini.

Donald Macleod continues his journey through Franz Schubert's final year of life - and the towering late masterpieces he composed.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

As spring turns to summer in 1828, Schubert's attention is taken first with the touring violin virtuoso Paganini, and then his own deep Christian faith, as he composes the last - and possibly finest - setting of the Mass.

Psalm 92, D953

Elmar Schoter, baritone

Capella Bavariae

Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor

Rondeau in A, D951

Martha Argerich, Nelson Freire, piano duet

Sanctus; Benedictus; Agnus Dei (Mass in E flat, D950)

Susan Gritton, soprano, Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano, Mark Padmore, tenor, James Gilchrist, tenor, Matthew Rose, bass

Collegium Musicum 90

Richard Hickox, conductor

In der ferne; Abschied (Schwanengesang)

Christoph Prégardien, tenor

Andreas Staier, piano.

04Franz Is Unwell20161110

Donald Macleod on what killed Schubert. Plus music the composer wrote in his final weeks.

Donald Macleod explores music Schubert wrote in his very final weeks - a period that included some of his greatest works, including three piano sonatas and the String Quintet in C.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod explores the murky question of what actually killed Schubert. He also introduces music composed in the very final weeks of Schubert's short life - including two of his remarkable late trio of piano sonatas played by the acclaimed Schubert interpreter Mitsuko Uchida.

Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe!, D955

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, baritone

Gerald Moore, piano

Piano Sonata in C minor, D958: IV. Allegro

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

String Quintet in C, D956: III. Scherzo and Trio; IV. Allegro

Gautier Capuçon, cello

Quatuor Ebene

Piano Sonata in A, D959: II. Andantino

Der Atlas; Ihr Bild; Das Fischermädchen (Schwanengesang)

Robert Holl, bass-baritone

Roger Vignoles, piano.

04Franz is Unwell20161110

Donald Macleod on what killed Schubert. Plus music the composer wrote in his final weeks.

Donald Macleod explores music Schubert wrote in his very final weeks - a period that included some of his greatest works, including three piano sonatas and the String Quintet in C.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod explores the murky question of what actually killed Schubert. He also introduces music composed in the very final weeks of Schubert's short life - including two of his remarkable late trio of piano sonatas played by the acclaimed Schubert interpreter Mitsuko Uchida.

Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe!, D955

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, baritone

Gerald Moore, piano

Piano Sonata in C minor, D958: IV. Allegro

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

String Quintet in C, D956: III. Scherzo and Trio; IV. Allegro

Gautier Capuçon, cello

Quatuor Ebene

Piano Sonata in A, D959: II. Andantino

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Der Atlas; Ihr Bild; Das Fischermädchen (Schwanengesang)

Robert Holl, bass-baritone

Roger Vignoles, piano.

05Passing Into Legend20161111

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's very last works and his musical legacy.

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's very final works, and the colossal hole he left in music after his premature death.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod ends this week exploring the final year of Schubert's life by exploring the immediate impact of his death upon 19th century musical circles. As well as completing the sequence of songs from Schubert's final collection, Schwanengesang, he presents a unique, remarkable "rendering" of the composer's incomplete Tenth Symphony by the modern Italian master Luciano Berio.

Schubert

Die Stadt (Schwanengesang)

Mark Padmore, tenor

Paul Lewis, piano

Piano Sonata in B flat, D960: II. Andante sostenuto

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D965

Ailish Tynan, soprano

Michael Collins, clarinet

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Berio/Schubert:

Rendering: II. Andante

Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra

Edward Gardner, conductor

Am Meer; Der Doppelgänger (Schwanengesang)

05Passing into Legend20161111

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's very last works and his musical legacy.

Donald Macleod explores Schubert's very final works, and the colossal hole he left in music after his premature death.

There are few composers whose genius is so fertile that you can make a whole week of programmes from a single year of their life. Yet even by Franz Schubert's remarkably prolific standards, his last 12 months were utterly extraordinary. As his body entered terminal decline through a mixture of alcoholism and syphilis, masterpiece upon masterpiece poured from his pen: the String Quintet in C, the delirious last three piano sonatas, his Mass in E flat, the last collection of lieder, posthumously titled "Swansong" - and many more besides. This week Donald Macleod takes us through the last year of Schubert's tragically foreshortened life and death at the age of only 31.

Donald Macleod ends this week exploring the final year of Schubert's life by exploring the immediate impact of his death upon 19th century musical circles. As well as completing the sequence of songs from Schubert's final collection, Schwanengesang, he presents a unique, remarkable "rendering" of the composer's incomplete Tenth Symphony by the modern Italian master Luciano Berio.

Schubert

Die Stadt (Schwanengesang)

Mark Padmore, tenor

Paul Lewis, piano

Piano Sonata in B flat, D960: II. Andante sostenuto

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D965

Ailish Tynan, soprano

Michael Collins, clarinet

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Berio/Schubert:

Rendering: II. Andante

Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra

Edward Gardner, conductor

Schubert

Am Meer; Der Doppelgänger (Schwanengesang)

Mark Padmore, tenor

Paul Lewis, piano.