Science And Society [The Evidence] [World Service]

Episodes

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01Traditional Healers And Hiv20180331

Bound up in a history of mistrust, once outlawed and condemned as witchdoctors, reliant on faith, communications with ancestors and guided by spirits, traditional healers have an uneasy relationship with the conventional medical establishment.

However South Africa’s efforts to control the spread of HIV means traditional healers are being encouraged to collaborate with a biomedical system based on treating patients using scientific evidence.

We look at this unlikely success story – bringing together seemingly incompatible concepts of medicine and health care.

Claudia Hammond speaks to traditional healers and biomedical researchers about the similarities and conflicts in their very different approaches and looks at the practical ways in which healers and medics are coming together to face the challenge of HIV.

Can visits to healers delay patients with diseases such as HIV from getting life-saving medication? Or could they be the key to ensuring every patient can get what they need?

Picture: Baba Ximba, KwaZuluNatal, Credit: Claudia Hammond

Can bringing together faith healers and medics help South Africa's fight against HIV?

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

01Traditional Healers And Hiv2018033120180401 (WS)

Bound up in a history of mistrust, once outlawed and condemned as witchdoctors, reliant on faith, communications with ancestors and guided by spirits, traditional healers have an uneasy relationship with the conventional medical establishment.

However South Africa’s efforts to control the spread of HIV means traditional healers are being encouraged to collaborate with a biomedical system based on treating patients using scientific evidence.

We look at this unlikely success story – bringing together seemingly incompatible concepts of medicine and health care.

Claudia Hammond speaks to traditional healers and biomedical researchers about the similarities and conflicts in their very different approaches and looks at the practical ways in which healers and medics are coming together to face the challenge of HIV.

Can visits to healers delay patients with diseases such as HIV from getting life-saving medication? Or could they be the key to ensuring every patient can get what they need?

Picture: Baba Ximba, KwaZuluNatal, Credit: Claudia Hammond

Can bringing together faith healers and medics help South Africa's fight against HIV?

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

02Transforming Bodies20180505

Claudia Hammond discusses how the body might evolve in the future with the help of technology. Transhumanism pushes the limits of what the human body can do by enhancing the body to give us new senses such as hearing colour. Scientists are looking at whether an extra limb will help us to work harder and be more efficient. The idea that some people could live way forever digitally is becoming possible. But is this all too risky? Could we end up with a super-enhanced elite, leaving the rest of struggling?

Recorded at the Wellcome Collection with a live audience Claudia’s three guests are already pushing towards the limits of what’s currently possible, each in very different ways. Ghislaine Boddington, who’s a Reader in Digital Immersion, Creative Professions and Digital Art at the University of Greenwich, Journalist Frank Swain, who writes for the New Scientist and Tamar Makin who is a neuroscientist at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London.

Picture: Heart shaped by human and robot hands, Credit: Dimdimich/Getty Images

The human body is evolving new senses like hearing colours with the help of technology

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

02Transforming Bodies2018050520180506 (WS)

Claudia Hammond discusses how the body might evolve in the future with the help of technology. Transhumanism pushes the limits of what the human body can do by enhancing the body to give us new senses such as hearing colour. Scientists are looking at whether an extra limb will help us to work harder and be more efficient. The idea that some people could live way forever digitally is becoming possible. But is this all too risky? Could we end up with a super-enhanced elite, leaving the rest of struggling?

Recorded at the Wellcome Collection with a live audience Claudia’s three guests are already pushing towards the limits of what’s currently possible, each in very different ways. Ghislaine Boddington, who’s a Reader in Digital Immersion, Creative Professions and Digital Art at the University of Greenwich, Journalist Frank Swain, who writes for the New Scientist and Tamar Makin who is a neuroscientist at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London.

Picture: Heart shaped by human and robot hands, Credit: Dimdimich/Getty Images

The human body is evolving new senses like hearing colours with the help of technology

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

03Building Better Healthcare2018060220180603 (WS)

Building a healthcare system: who gets treated and who pays? Innovation maybe the key.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

Healthcare is not only a human right but key to sustainable societies. If you could build a healthcare system from scratch, how would you design it? We hear from Dr Bailor Barrie who grew up in poverty in Sierra Leone, survived war and near death to fulfil his dream to become a doctor only to discover if you didn’t have money you couldn’t afford health care. Travelling to one of the areas most devastated by the war he co-founded the Wellbody Alliance and has transformed health care in the Kono district. Claudia asks about his experience of setting up clinics in Sierra Leone in the aftermath of war and natural disasters such as Ebola. Associate Professor Dina Balabanova from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine surveys the countries in the world with surprisingly effective health services, emphasising that it’s not how much money you spend, but how you spend it and innovation is everything. Nayanabhiram Kalnad explains how digital healthcare is making medicine more equitable and from his company’s experience how doctors manage ever increasing demands in India.

Picture: Medical symbol, Credit: Getty Images

Picture: Medical symbol, Credit: Getty Images

03Building Better Healthcare20180602

Healthcare is not only a human right but key to sustainable societies. If you could build a healthcare system from scratch, how would you design it? We hear from Dr Bailor Barrie who grew up in poverty in Sierra Leone, survived war and near death to fulfil his dream to become a doctor only to discover if you didn’t have money you couldn’t afford health care. Travelling to one of the areas most devastated by the war he co-founded the Wellbody Alliance and has transformed health care in the Kono district. Claudia asks about his experience of setting up clinics in Sierra Leone in the aftermath of war and natural disasters such as Ebola. Associate Professor Dina Balabanova from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine surveys the countries in the world with surprisingly effective health services, emphasising that it’s not how much money you spend, but how you spend it and innovation is everything. Nayanabhiram Kalnad explains how digital healthcare is making medicine more equitable and from his company’s experience how doctors manage ever increasing demands in India.

Picture: Medical symbol, Credit: Getty Images

Building a healthcare system: who gets treated and who pays? Innovation maybe the key.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

03Building Better Healthcare2018060220180603 (WS)

Healthcare is not only a human right but key to sustainable societies. If you could build a healthcare system from scratch, how would you design it? We hear from Dr Bailor Barrie who grew up in poverty in Sierra Leone, survived war and near death to fulfil his dream to become a doctor only to discover if you didn’t have money you couldn’t afford health care. Travelling to one of the areas most devastated by the war he co-founded the Wellbody Alliance and has transformed health care in the Kono district. Claudia asks about his experience of setting up clinics in Sierra Leone in the aftermath of war and natural disasters such as Ebola. Associate Professor Dina Balabanova from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine surveys the countries in the world with surprisingly effective health services, emphasising that it’s not how much money you spend, but how you spend it and innovation is everything. Nayanabhiram Kalnad explains how digital healthcare is making medicine more equitable and from his company’s experience how doctors manage ever increasing demands in India.

Picture: Medical symbol, Credit: Getty Images

Building a healthcare system: who gets treated and who pays? Innovation maybe the key.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

04Civilisation On The Move20180714

Over 65 million people worldwide have been forced from their homes and there are many reasons people leave their countries of origin including conflict, famine and drought. The Lancet Commission on migration and health states the climate change is the biggest global threat of the 21st century.
Professor Jennifer Leaning is concerned about the role of climate change in conflicts and mass migration
In this event we investigate the health care needs at different stages of people’s journey, how do you make health care personal and culturally specific in refugee camps and what happens to people when they reach their country of destination. Surgeon Fouad M Fouad was compelled to leave his native Syria because of his work helping the wounded, now living in Beirut he is calling for a new approach to the health care of refugees and Bernadette Kumar is Director of the Norwegian Centre for Migration and Health and thinks there are many myths surrounding migration.

Picture: People Shadows, Credit: Fotojog/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Why do people move, refugee health and how countries can meet migrant needs.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

04Civilisation On The Move2018071420180715 (WS)

Over 65 million people worldwide have been forced from their homes and there are many reasons people leave their countries of origin including conflict, famine and drought. The Lancet Commission on migration and health states the climate change is the biggest global threat of the 21st century.
Professor Jennifer Leaning is concerned about the role of climate change in conflicts and mass migration
In this event we investigate the health care needs at different stages of people’s journey, how do you make health care personal and culturally specific in refugee camps and what happens to people when they reach their country of destination. Surgeon Fouad M Fouad was compelled to leave his native Syria because of his work helping the wounded, now living in Beirut he is calling for a new approach to the health care of refugees and Bernadette Kumar is Director of the Norwegian Centre for Migration and Health and thinks there are many myths surrounding migration.

Picture: People Shadows, Credit: Fotojog/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Why do people move, refugee health and how countries can meet migrant needs.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

04Civilisation On The Move2018071420180715 (WS)

Why do people move, refugee health and how countries can meet migrant needs.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science's effect on our world

Over 65 million people worldwide have been forced from their homes and there are many reasons people leave their countries of origin including conflict, famine and drought. The Lancet Commission on migration and health states the climate change is the biggest global threat of the 21st century.
Professor Jennifer Leaning is concerned about the role of climate change in conflicts and mass migration
In this event we investigate the health care needs at different stages of people’s journey, how do you make health care personal and culturally specific in refugee camps and what happens to people when they reach their country of destination. Surgeon Fouad M Fouad was compelled to leave his native Syria because of his work helping the wounded, now living in Beirut he is calling for a new approach to the health care of refugees and Bernadette Kumar is Director of the Norwegian Centre for Migration and Health and thinks there are many myths surrounding migration.

Picture: People Shadows, Credit: Fotojog/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald