Shakespeare Speaks [world Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
Courage - Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160428

The line "A tower of strength" is from Richard III, but originally featured elsewhere

On the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, what is the writer's global legacy?

The line "A tower of strength" is from Shakespeare's Richard III, but originally featured in the book of common prayer.

Also under discussion are the lines 'once more unto breach' and 'band of brothers' both from Henry V, and 'cowards die many times before their deaths' from Julius Caesar. It was a favourite line of Nelson Mandela's.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.

Grief - Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160426

What does "at one fell swoop" mean now and what did it mean in Shakespeare's time?

On the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, what is the writer's global legacy?

What does "at one fell swoop", a phrase from Macbeth, mean now and what did it mean in Shakespeare's time?

Also under discussion are the lines 'more in sorrow than in anger' from Hamlet and 'what's done, is done' from Macbeth.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Love - Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160425

"The course of true love never did run smooth" is a perfect summary of love

On the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, what is the writer's global legacy?

The line "The course of true love never did run smooth" from Midsummer Night's Dream summarises the experience of love perfectly, and is just one of Shakespeare's phrases we use without knowing it originated with him.

Also under discussion are the phrases 'green-eyed monster' from Othello and 'parting is such sweet sorrow' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.

Madness - Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160427

"That way madness lies" is from King Lear, but how has its meaning changed over time?

On the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, what is the writer's global legacy?

Why do we end up speaking like Shakespeare without realising it?

"That way madness lies" is a phrase from King Lear, but how has its meaning changed over time?

Also under discussion are the phrases 'there is method in my madness' from Hamlet and 'living in a fool's paradise' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160425

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160425

The line "The course of true love never did run smooth" from Midsummer Night's Dream summarises the experience of love perfectly, and is just one of Shakespeare's phrases we use without knowing it originated with him.

Also under discussion are the phrases 'green-eyed monster' from Othello and 'parting is such sweet sorrow' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160425

The line "The course of true love never did run smooth" from Midsummer Night's Dream summarises the experience of love perfectly, and is just one of Shakespeare's phrases we use without knowing it originated with him.

Also under discussion are the phrases 'green-eyed monster' from Othello and 'parting is such sweet sorrow' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160426

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160426

What does "at one fell swoop", a phrase from Macbeth, mean now and what did it mean in Shakespeare's time?

Also under discussion are the lines 'more in sorrow than in anger' from Hamlet and 'what's done, is done' from Macbeth.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160426

What does "at one fell swoop", a phrase from Macbeth, mean now and what did it mean in Shakespeare's time?

Also under discussion are the lines 'more in sorrow than in anger' from Hamlet and 'what's done, is done' from Macbeth.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160427

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160427

Why do we end up speaking like Shakespeare without realising it?

"That way madness lies" is a phrase from King Lear, but how has its meaning changed over time?

Also under discussion are the phrases 'there is method in my madness' from Hamlet and 'living in a fool's paradise' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160427

Why do we end up speaking like Shakespeare without realising it?

"That way madness lies" is a phrase from King Lear, but how has its meaning changed over time?

Also under discussion are the phrases 'there is method in my madness' from Hamlet and 'living in a fool's paradise' from Romeo and Juliet.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with academic Kate Rumbold and actor Ray Fearon.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160428

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160428

The line "A tower of strength" is from Shakespeare's Richard III, but originally featured in the book of common prayer.

Also under discussion are the lines 'once more unto breach' and 'band of brothers' both from Henry V, and 'cowards die many times before their deaths' from Julius Caesar. It was a favourite line of Nelson Mandela's.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.

Shakespeare on BBC World Service20160428

The line "A tower of strength" is from Shakespeare's Richard III, but originally featured in the book of common prayer.

Also under discussion are the lines 'once more unto breach' and 'band of brothers' both from Henry V, and 'cowards die many times before their deaths' from Julius Caesar. It was a favourite line of Nelson Mandela's.

Presented by Robin Lustig, with actor Ray Fearon and academic Kate Rumbold.