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Genome: [r4 Bd=19910411]A three-part NEW series assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved.

1: The Victims

A specially commissioned survey reveals startlingly high levels of anger among disaster victims. Those caught up in the Summerland amusement park fire of 1973, the capsize of the Herald of Free Enterprise in 1987 and the Hillsborough

Stadium crush in 1989 speak freely to

Jenny Cuffe about their feelings in the aftermath of these tragedies. Producer Sue Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Sue Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910411] Unknown: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Sue Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414]A three-part

NEW series assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved. 1:The Victims

With Jenny Cuffe.

Contributors

Unknown: Jenny Cuffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414] Unknown: Jenny Cuffe.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910418]A three-part series assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved. 2: The Accused

Those named in official inquiries as partly responsible for two tragedies, the Summerland fire of 1973 and the Herald of Free Enterprise capsize in 1987, tell their own stories. They feel they were blamed unfairly and unsupported by their companies. Jenny Cuffe looks at how companies can be made to take more corporate responsibility for safety failures. Producer Sue Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Sue Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910418]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]Three programmes assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved. 2: The Accused

Those named in official enquiries as partly responsible for two tragedies, the Summerland fire of 1973 and the Herald of Free Enterprise capsize in 1987, tell their own stories to Jenny Cuffe.

Contributors

Unknown: Jenny Cuffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910425]The last programme of a three-part series assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved. The Officials

Often the aftermath of a disaster is almost as tragic as the disaster itself. Should the bereaved see the body of the person they loved? How, if at all, can coroners, police and other officials ease the pain of all of those tragically caught up in a disaster? Producer Sue Davies

Contributors

Producer: Sue Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910425] Producer: Sue Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910428]The last of a three-part series assessing the effects of recent major disasters on the people involved. The Officials
01Naomi Alderman On Writing20210301When a shock wave hits the world, how do artists respond? In a new five-part series, artists chronicle how they have responded to the crisis. Dare they dream and imagine what work might emerge out of the pandemic?

In January 2020, author Naomi Alderman was four years into writing her next book, the fictional story of a flu-like virus spreading across the globe, carried by pigeons. One month later, with 180,000 words under her belt, she decided she had to stop. The story seemed too close to reality. In this programme, Naomi traces the pandemic year through her writing and speaks to fellow novelists, literary historians and to her editor about how the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted on the world of literature and how big shocks have affected literature in the past.

Producer: Sarah Shebbeare

Five artists chronicle how they have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic.

In January 2020, author Naomi Alderman was two years into writing her next book, the fictional story of a flu-like virus spreading across the globe, carried by pigeons. One month later, with 40,000 words under her belt, she decided she had to stop. The story seemed too close to reality. In this programme, Naomi traces the pandemic year through her writing and speaks to fellow novelists, literary historians and to her editor about how the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted on the world of literature and how big shocks have affected literature in the past.

02Poet And Musician Cornelius Eady20210308When a shock wave hits the world, how do artists respond? Public performance has all but halted, silence and solitude reigns in our performance spaces and places. But the virus cannot kill creativity. In a new five-part series, artists chronicle how they have responded to the crisis and the challenge of performance. Dare they dream and imagine what work might emerge out of the pandemic?

For Cornelius Eady, a leading Black American poet, playwright and musician, the virus struck just as he was about to go into a studio at Nashville to record with his regular music collaborators Lisa Liu and Charlie Rauh. By mid March the three were separated by the gulf of Covid 19, all gigs cancelled, a fearful city surging with infections. Eady had survived prostate cancer, had clapped and watched as the first-responders made their way to Ground Zero on 9/11, but now life was atomised, the enemy was unseen. What began as an attempt just to stave off the panic and worry gradually coalesced over the weeks and months into a pandemic folk song project, 'Don't Get Dead'. The three had to learn to collaborate remotely whilst Eady's work has had to encompass not just a pandemic but the impact of Trump's policies and upheaval of Black Lives Matter. Looking back now on his earliest songs in the spring of the pandemic feels almost like a different age for Cornelius as his project expanded to embrace the spiralling chaos and disaster. His latest song celebrates the actions of Officer Eugene Goodman during the mob insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. As he anxiously awaits the vaccine, he and his collaborators hone their latest song whilst reflecting on a terrible year and the possibilities ahead.

Producer: Mark Burman

Five artists chronicle how they have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic.

03Artist Katie Paterson20210315Katie Paterson is one of the leading artists of her generation. Much of her work explores our place on earth in relation to geological or even cosmic time. As the pandemic brought many aspects of our lives to a halt, and caused various projects and exhibitions to be cancelled or delayed, she’s been exploring how this break in life’s continuum is affecting artistic creativity.

Based outside Edinburgh and with family, staff and studios to support, there was the pragmatic issue of dealing with shrinking finances. But also, with this involuntary pause, a pent-up force of new ideas was released. She’s back in her studio creating an urn made up of collected layers of matter from the dawn of time up until today and is currently deciding which layer should represent the pandemic. And with this hiatus she is learning the Japanese technique of Suminagashi - where ink floats on water - by effectively painting time with 2000-year-old ice cores from the Antarctic.

Comparing notes with other artists - including Edmund de Waal, who's had his most creative year ever, and Peter Liversidge, who saw a gallery that he'd been preparing an exhibition for close - she reflects on the artistic shock waves of the pandemic and its unexpected consequences.

Producer Neil McCarthy

Artist Katie Paterson explores how the pandemic and lockdown have affected her creativity.

Five artists chronicle how they have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic.