Somebody I Used To Know

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012018020520180206 (R4)The experience of having Alzheimer's as told by someone living with the condition.

This is the first memoir written by someone living with dementia.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58 . But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

This is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. Every tiny victory was hard won. Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.

Four years on from the diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling throughout the UK to give talks, and continues to do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself - somebody she used to know - might greet her when she wakes each morning.

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58. But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

022018020620180207 (R4)Wendy tries to pinpoint the moment when dementia became part of her life.

Wendy looks back and, in a conversation with her pre-dementia self, wonders when the condition really began to take hold.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58 . But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

This is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. Every tiny victory was hard won. Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.

Four years on from the diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling throughout the UK to give talks, and continues to do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself - somebody she used to know - might greet her when she wakes each morning.

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58. But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

032018020720180208 (R4)Forced into early retirement, Wendy finds a new purpose in raising awareness of dementia.

Despite being forced to leave her job on grounds of ill-health, Wendy is anything but retired, finding fresh purpose in her charity work of raising dementia awareness across the UK.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58 . But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

This is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. Every tiny victory was hard won. Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.

Four years on from the diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling throughout the UK to give talks, and continues to do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself - somebody she used to know - might greet her when she wakes each morning.

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58. But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to just give in.

042018020820180209 (R4)Moving house presents new challenges to overcome.

The noise and unbearable clatter of city life has meant a move to more peaceful surroundings for Wendy, in a new home near her daughter Gemma.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's​ at the age of 58 ​. ​But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to ​just ​give in.

Th​is is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. ​Every tiny victory was hard won.​ Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.​

​F​our years on from th​e​ diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling th​roughout the UK to give talks​, ​​ ​and ​continues to ​do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself ​- somebody she used to know - ​ might greet ​her ​when she wakes ​each​ morning.​ ​

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies

052018020920180210 (R4)Living with dementia, Wendy works hard to stay in touch with the world.

Wendy finds companionship and discussion through online forums, which are a vital lifeline with the outside world as well.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's​ at the age of 58 ​. ​But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to ​just ​give in.

Th​is is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. ​Every tiny victory was hard won.​ Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.​

​F​our years on from th​e​ diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling th​roughout the UK to give talks​, ​​ ​and ​continues to ​do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself ​- somebody she used to know - ​ might greet ​her ​when she wakes ​each​ morning.​ ​

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies

05 LAST20180209Living with dementia, Wendy works hard to stay in touch with the world.

Wendy finds companionship and discussion through online forums, which are a vital lifeline with the outside world as well.

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's​ at the age of 58 ​. ​But after a 20 year career in the NHS, based in York, this single mother of two adult daughters was not going to ​just ​give in.

Th​is is her account, written with Anna Wharton, of how she determined to try and outsmart the challenges served up by the dementia on a daily basis. ​Every tiny victory was hard won.​ Every day is faced with courage and resourcefulness.​

​F​our years on from th​e​ diagnosis, she still lives independently, spends more time than ever travelling th​roughout the UK to give talks​, ​​ ​and ​continues to ​do whatever she can to change a society that views dementia as a death sentence. Her driving force is a compulsion to live in the moment, never knowing which version of herself ​- somebody she used to know - ​ might greet ​her ​when she wakes ​each​ morning.​ ​

Written by Wendy Mitchell and Anna Wharton

Abridged by Amanda Hargreaves

Read by Tessa Gallagher

Produced by Lizzie Davies