Soul Music [The Documentary] [World Service]

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Back to Black by Amy Winehouse2019112720191128 (WS)

British singer Amy Winehouse died in July 2011 aged just 27. Back to Black the title track of her second and final album is a torch song to tragic love, addiction and loss. People who loved her and her music talk about how she helped them cope with their own struggles.

Lesley Jamison is now a successful writer but at 27 she was an alcoholic. She stopped drinking the same year that Amy died. Lesley reflects on how her own life could have followed the same path had she gone further into the darkness or the black of drinking and self destruction.

Daisy Buchanan tells her story of addictive love and how Back to Black helped her break free. Umaru Saidu was a vulnerable teenager with mental health issues who lost a dear childhood friend when he was 17. He later trained at the Amy's Yard programme and is grateful for the inspiration she gave him. As a young teenager Amy Charles too identified with the pain expressed in Back to Black and says it helped her deal with depression brought on by a spinal injury.

Donald Brackett is the author of Back to Black: Amy Winehouse's Only Masterpiece and believes performing the song may have become traumatic for her in the end as it forced her to relive the emotional pain. Elizabeth Kesses was visiting her terminally ill father at the same hospital where Amy Winehouse was being treated. She recalls seeing her there and hoping she would recover. Sadly it was not to be. But these stories reveal a legacy that goes beyond the music.

(Photo: Singer Amy Winehouse performs Back to Black at the 2007 MTV Europe Music Awards in Munich. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty Images)

How Amy Winehouse's song to tragic love, addiction and loss, inspired a generation

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

British singer Amy Winehouse died in July 2011 aged just 27. Back to Black the title track of her second and final album is a torch song to tragic love, addiction and loss. People who loved her and her music talk about how she helped them cope with their own struggles.

Lesley Jamison is now a successful writer but at 27 she was an alcoholic. She stopped drinking the same year that Amy died. Lesley reflects on how her own life could have followed the same path had she gone further into the darkness or the black of drinking and self destruction.

Daisy Buchanan tells her story of addictive love and how Back to Black helped her break free. Umaru Saidu was a vulnerable teenager with mental health issues who lost a dear childhood friend when he was 17. He later trained at the Amy's Yard programme and is grateful for the inspiration she gave him. As a young teenager Amy Charles too identified with the pain expressed in Back to Black and says it helped her deal with depression brought on by a spinal injury.

Donald Brackett is the author of Back to Black: Amy Winehouse's Only Masterpiece and believes performing the song may have become traumatic for her in the end as it forced her to relive the emotional pain. Elizabeth Kesses was visiting her terminally ill father at the same hospital where Amy Winehouse was being treated. She recalls seeing her there and hoping she would recover. Sadly it was not to be. But these stories reveal a legacy that goes beyond the music.

(Photo: Singer Amy Winehouse performs Back to Black at the 2007 MTV Europe Music Awards in Munich. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty Images)

How Amy Winehouse's song to tragic love, addiction and loss, inspired a generation

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Back To Black By Amy Winehouse2019112720191128 (WS)British singer Amy Winehouse died in July 2011 aged just 27. Back to Black the title track of her second and final album is a torch song to tragic love, addiction and loss. People who loved her and her music talk about how she helped them cope with their own struggles.

Lesley Jamison is now a successful writer but at 27 she was an alcoholic. She stopped drinking the same year that Amy died. Lesley reflects on how her own life could have followed the same path had she gone further into the darkness or the black of drinking and self destruction.

Daisy Buchanan tells her story of addictive love and how Back to Black helped her break free. Umaru Saidu was a vulnerable teenager with mental health issues who lost a dear childhood friend when he was 17. He later trained at the Amy's Yard programme and is grateful for the inspiration she gave him. As a young teenager Amy Charles too identified with the pain expressed in Back to Black and says it helped her deal with depression brought on by a spinal injury.

Donald Brackett is the author of Back to Black: Amy Winehouse's Only Masterpiece and believes performing the song may have become traumatic for her in the end as it forced her to relive the emotional pain. Elizabeth Kesses was visiting her terminally ill father at the same hospital where Amy Winehouse was being treated. She recalls seeing her there and hoping she would recover. Sadly it was not to be. But these stories reveal a legacy that goes beyond the music.

(Photo: Singer Amy Winehouse performs Back to Black at the 2007 MTV Europe Music Awards in Munich. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty Images)

How Amy Winehouse's song to tragic love, addiction and loss, inspired a generation

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share.

In Soul Music we take a song and talk to people for whom the song has a special place in their lives.

Back to Black by Amy Winehouse
British singer Amy Winehouse died in July 2011 aged just 27. Back to Black the title track of her second and final album is a torch song to tragic love, addiction and loss. People who loved her and her music talk about how she helped them cope with their own struggles.

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

God Only Knows By The Beach Boys2019112020191121 (WS)For artist Kim Lynch, God Only Knows is a song that she has carried with her from the moment her father played it to her mother back in their 1960s London home and it is the song that resonated throughout her parents 65 years together.

Meanwhile in land locked Burundi, another couple are bought together from two very different cultures. Sharing the same hopes and prayers, they began their married life by blending a traditional wedding ceremony with the Californian song that spans decades - and continents - to touch souls wherever it is played.

And across the ocean, Erin Prewitt tells her love story and describes how tragic and unexpected circumstances meant she has had to learn to live out those iconic lyrics and discover what it means to be without the person you love.

With reflections from musician Al Kooper and author Barry Miles.

(Photo: The Beach Boys at the Finsbury Astoria. (L-R) Bruce Johnston, Al Jardine (front), Carl Wilson (1946-1998), Dennis Wilson (1944-1983), and Mike Love. Credit: Clive Limpkin/Express/Getty Images)

How The Beach Boys iconic song helped people discover what it means to be in love

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

For artist Kim Lynch, God Only Knows is a song that she has carried with her from the moment her father played it to her mother back in their 1960s London home and it is the song that resonated throughout her parents 65 years together.

Meanwhile in land locked Burundi, another couple are bought together from two very different cultures. Sharing the same hopes and prayers, they began their married life by blending a traditional wedding ceremony with the Californian song that spans decades - and continents - to touch souls wherever it is played.

And across the ocean, Erin Prewitt tells her love story and describes how tragic and unexpected circumstances meant she has had to learn to live out those iconic lyrics and discover what it means to be without the person you love.

With reflections from musician Al Kooper and author Barry Miles.

(Photo: The Beach Boys at the Finsbury Astoria. (L-R) Bruce Johnston, Al Jardine (front), Carl Wilson (1946-1998), Dennis Wilson (1944-1983), and Mike Love. Credit: Clive Limpkin/Express/Getty Images)

How The Beach Boys iconic song helped people discover what it means to be in love

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

For artist Kim Lynch, God Only Knows is a song that she has carried with her from the moment her father played it to her mother back in their 1960s London home and it is the song that resonated throughout her parents 65 years together.

Meanwhile in land locked Burundi, another couple are bought together from two very different cultures. Sharing the same hopes and prayers, they began their married life by blending a traditional wedding ceremony with the Californian song that spans decades - and continents - to touch souls wherever it is played.

And across the ocean, Erin Prewitt tells her love story and describes how tragic and unexpected circumstances meant she has had to learn to live out those iconic lyrics and discover what it means to be without the person you love.

With reflections from musician Al Kooper and author Barry Miles.

(Photo: The Beach Boys at the Finsbury Astoria. (L-R) Bruce Johnston, Al Jardine (front), Carl Wilson (1946-1998), Dennis Wilson (1944-1983), and Mike Love. Credit: Clive Limpkin/Express/Getty Images)

How The Beach Boys iconic song helped people discover what it means to be in love

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Ich Habe Genug By J.s. Bach2020021220200213 (WS)J.S Bach wrote his cantata Ich Habe Genug for the Feast of the Purification of Mary to be performed in Leipzig on 2 February 1727. The work is a retelling of the story of the old man Simeon who, waiting in the temple, was presented with the baby Jesus. As he held the baby in his arms, in Bach's version he says:

It is enough.
I have held the Saviour, the hope of all peoples,
In the warm embrace of my arms.
It is enough.

Oboist George Caird recalls playing Ich Habe Genug at his father's funeral. Theologian Paula Gooder recalls the effect of putting her new born baby into the arms of an elderly relative. Danish music therapist Lars Ole Bonde tells how this music provided vital solace for him as a teenager growing up with a father suffering from depression. American Susan Dray remembers how the Cantata helped her when she was grieving for her baby. And tenor Ian Bostridge wonders why we never feel that we have "enough".

(Photo: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750), German musician and composer playing the organ, circa 1725. From a print in the British Museum. Credit: Rischgitz/Getty Images)

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Ich Habe Genug by J.S. Bach2020021220200213 (WS)J.S Bach wrote his cantata Ich Habe Genug for the Feast of the Purification of Mary to be performed in Leipzig on 2 February 1727. The work is a retelling of the story of the old man Simeon who, waiting in the temple, was presented with the baby Jesus. As he held the baby in his arms, in Bach's version he says:

It is enough.
I have held the Saviour, the hope of all peoples,
In the warm embrace of my arms.
It is enough.

Oboist George Caird recalls playing Ich Habe Genug at his father's funeral. Theologian Paula Gooder recalls the effect of putting her new born baby into the arms of an elderly relative. Danish music therapist Lars Ole Bonde tells how this music provided vital solace for him as a teenager growing up with a father suffering from depression. American Susan Dray remembers how the Cantata helped her when she was grieving for her baby. And tenor Ian Bostridge wonders why we never feel that we have "enough".

(Photo: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750), German musician and composer playing the organ, circa 1725. From a print in the British Museum. Credit: Rischgitz/Getty Images)

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Prelude A L'apres Midi D'un Faune - Debussy2020010820200109 (WS)Claude Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun speaks to artists of different kinds.

Jamaican poet Ishion Hutchinson recalls hearing it through an open window in Kingston, Jamaica, and being mesmerised by its beauty. Not knowing what it was, he set off on a quest to find out, and to write a poem that captured his feelings about the piece.

Babak Kazemi was training to be a doctor in his home city of Tehran when he heard it for the first time. The piece changed his life, and led him to abandon his medical studies in Iran to move to the UK to become a professional conductor and composer.

Artist Fiona Robinson specialises in interpreting Debussy's works on paper. She explains how she has been moved to visualise the Prelude, while Debussy's biographer Paul Roberts credits it with having changed classical music forever.

Katya Jezzard-Puyraud recalls how the music lifted her out of a difficult time after the birth of her first son, and how she uses it now to help people with anxiety and stress to relax.

(Photo: Claude Debussy, pictured in 1904 (Credit: adoc-photos/Corbis/Getty Images)

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share.

In Soul Music we take a song and talk to people for whom the song has a special place in their lives.

Prelude a l'Apres Midi d'un Faune by Debussy
Claude Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun speaks to artists of different kinds. Jamaican poet Ishion Hutchinson recalls hearing it through an open window in Kingston Jamaica and being mesmerised by its beauty, but not knowing what it was, setting off on a quest to find out and to write a poem that captured his feelings about the piece.
Babak Kazemi was training to be a doctor in his home city of Tehran when he heard it for the first time. The piece changed his life and led him to abandon his medical studies in Iran to move to the UK to become a professional conductor and composer.
Artist Fiona Robinson specialises in interpreting Debussy's works on paper. She explains how she has been moved to visualise the Prelude, while Debussy's biographer Paul Roberts credits it with having changed classical music forever.
Katya Jezzard-Puyraud recalls how the music lifted her out of a difficult time after the birth of her first son and how she uses it now to help people with anxiety and stress to relax.

Claude Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun speaks to artists of different kinds.

(Photo: Claude Debussy, pictured in 1904 (Credit: adoc-photos/Corbis/Getty Images)

Prelude A L'apres Midi D'un Faune By Debussy2020010820200109 (WS)Claude Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun speaks to artists of different kinds.

Jamaican poet Ishion Hutchinson recalls hearing it through an open window in Kingston, Jamaica, and being mesmerised by its beauty. Not knowing what it was, he set off on a quest to find out, and to write a poem that captured his feelings about the piece.

Babak Kazemi was training to be a doctor in his home city of Tehran when he heard it for the first time. The piece changed his life, and led him to abandon his medical studies in Iran to move to the UK to become a professional conductor and composer.

Artist Fiona Robinson specialises in interpreting Debussy's works on paper. She explains how she has been moved to visualise the Prelude, while Debussy's biographer Paul Roberts credits it with having changed classical music forever.

Katya Jezzard-Puyraud recalls how the music lifted her out of a difficult time after the birth of her first son, and how she uses it now to help people with anxiety and stress to relax.

(Photo: Claude Debussy, pictured in 1904 (Credit: adoc-photos/Corbis/Getty Images)

A classical piece that speaks to artists of different kinds

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Claude Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun speaks to artists of different kinds.

(Photo: Claude Debussy, pictured in 1904 (Credit: adoc-photos/Corbis/Getty Images)

River by Joni Mitchell2019122520191226 (WS)

Stories of Canadian singer Joni Mitchell's River, from her iconic 1971 album Blue. A song about the breakdown of a relationship and of a longing to be elsewhere that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem.

Emotional true stories of what the song means to different people, including comedian Chris Forbes, who lost his father on Christmas Day; Isobel, who fell sick far from home and understands the longing to be elsewhere captured in the song; Laura, who heard the song while pregnant at Christmastime; writer Rob Crossan, who will forever associate the song with his first love; Canadian poet Lorna Crozier who describes the frozen rivers of her and Joni's Saskatchewan childhood; and from Joni Mitchell's biographer David Yaffe.

Image: Joni Mitchell, pictured in 1970 (Credit: Roy Jones/Getty Images)

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Stories of Canadian singer Joni Mitchell's River, from her iconic 1971 album Blue. A song about the breakdown of a relationship and of a longing to be elsewhere that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem.

Emotional true stories of what the song means to different people, including comedian Chris Forbes, who lost his father on Christmas Day; Isobel, who fell sick far from home and understands the longing to be elsewhere captured in the song; Laura, who heard the song while pregnant at Christmastime; writer Rob Crossan, who will forever associate the song with his first love; Canadian poet Lorna Crozier who describes the frozen rivers of her and Joni's Saskatchewan childhood; and from Joni Mitchell's biographer David Yaffe.

Image: Joni Mitchell, pictured in 1970 (Credit: Roy Jones/Getty Images)

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Stories of Canadian singer Joni Mitchell's River, from her iconic 1971 album Blue. A song about the breakdown of a relationship and of a longing to be elsewhere that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem.

Emotional true stories of what the song means to different people, including comedian Chris Forbes, who lost his father on Christmas Day; Isobel, who fell sick far from home and understands the longing to be elsewhere captured in the song; Laura, who heard the song while pregnant at Christmastime; writer Rob Crossan, who will forever associate the song with his first love; Canadian poet Lorna Crozier who describes the frozen rivers of her and Joni's Saskatchewan childhood; and from Joni Mitchell's biographer David Yaffe.

Image: Joni Mitchell, pictured in 1970 (Credit: Roy Jones/Getty Images)

A song about a broken relationship that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Stories of Canadian singer Joni Mitchell's River, from her iconic 1971 album Blue. A song about the breakdown of a relationship and of a longing to be elsewhere that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem.

Emotional true stories of what the song means to different people, including comedian Chris Forbes, who lost his father on Christmas Day; Isobel, who fell sick far from home and understands the longing to be elsewhere captured in the song; Laura, who heard the song while pregnant at Christmastime; writer Rob Crossan, who will forever associate the song with his first love; Canadian poet Lorna Crozier who describes the frozen rivers of her and Joni's Saskatchewan childhood; and from Joni Mitchell's biographer David Yaffe.

Image: Joni Mitchell, pictured in 1970 (Credit: Roy Jones/Getty Images)

A song about a broken relationship that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

River By Joni Mitchell2019122520191226 (WS)Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share.

In Soul Music we take a song and talk to people for whom the song has a special place in their lives.

River by Joni Mitchell
Stories of Canadian singer Joni Mitchell's 'River', from her iconic 1971 album Blue. A song about the breakdown of a relationship and of a longing to be elsewhere that has become a melancholy Christmas anthem.

Emotional true stories of what the song means to different people, including comedian Chris Forbes, who lost his father on Christmas Day; Isobel, who fell sick far from home and understands the longing to be elsewhere captured in the song; Laura, who heard the song while pregnant at Christmastime; writer Rob Crossan, who will forever associate the song with his first love; Canadian poet Lorna Crozier who describes the frozen rivers of her and Joni's Saskatchewan childhood; and from Joni Mitchell's biographer David Yaffe.

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Schubert\u2019s B-Flat Piano Sonata D9602019111320191114 (WS)

The B-Flat Piano Sonata D960, which Schubert completed two months before his death, in 1828, is a vast and complex work. It is the last of a triptych of piano sonatas that Schubert wrote, possibly in response to the death of his hero Beethoven the year before. Schubert had been a pallbearer at Beethoven’s funeral.

In this programme, pianists Imogen Cooper, Steven Osborne and James Lisney consider what it is like to play this work. And Andrea Avery and Pamela Rose describe ways in which this sonata has marked and shaped their lives.

(Photo: Portrait of Franz Peter Schubert (Vienna, 1797-1828), Austrian composer. Credit: DEA/A. Dagli Orti/De Agostini/Getty Images)

How Schubert's B-Flat Piano Sonata D960 has shaped the lives of three remarkable pianists

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The B-Flat Piano Sonata D960, which Schubert completed two months before his death, in 1828, is a vast and complex work. It is the last of a triptych of piano sonatas that Schubert wrote, possibly in response to the death of his hero Beethoven the year before. Schubert had been a pallbearer at Beethoven’s funeral.

In this programme, pianists Imogen Cooper, Steven Osborne and James Lisney consider what it is like to play this work. And Andrea Avery and Pamela Rose describe ways in which this sonata has marked and shaped their lives.

(Photo: Portrait of Franz Peter Schubert (Vienna, 1797-1828), Austrian composer. Credit: DEA/A. Dagli Orti/De Agostini/Getty Images)

How Schubert's B-Flat Piano Sonata D960 has shaped the lives of three remarkable pianists

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Schubert's B-flat Piano Sonata D9602019111320191114 (WS)Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share.

In Soul Music we take a peice of music and talk to people for whom it has a special place in their lives.

Schubert’s B-Flat Piano Sonata D960
The B-Flat Piano Sonata D960, which Schubert completed two months before his death, in 1828, is a vast and complex work. It’s the last of a triptych of piano sonatas that Schubert wrote, possibly in response to the death of his hero Beethoven the year before. Schubert had been a pallbearer at Beethoven’s funeral.

In this programme, pianists Imogen Cooper, Steven Osborne and James Lisney consider what it’s like to play this work. And Andrea Avery and Pamela Rose describe ways in which this sonata has marked and shaped their lives.

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The B-Flat Piano Sonata D960, which Schubert completed two months before his death, in 1828, is a vast and complex work. It is the last of a triptych of piano sonatas that Schubert wrote, possibly in response to the death of his hero Beethoven the year before. Schubert had been a pallbearer at Beethoven’s funeral.

In this programme, pianists Imogen Cooper, Steven Osborne and James Lisney consider what it is like to play this work. And Andrea Avery and Pamela Rose describe ways in which this sonata has marked and shaped their lives.

(Photo: Portrait of Franz Peter Schubert (Vienna, 1797-1828), Austrian composer. Credit: DEA/A. Dagli Orti/De Agostini/Getty Images)

How Schubert's B-Flat Piano Sonata D960 has shaped the lives of three remarkable pianists

Shine On You Crazy Diamond By Pink Floyd2020011520200116 (WS)Shine On You Crazy Diamond by Pink Floyd is said to have been written about Syd Barrett, their former band member. It is both a tribute, and a call for him to ‘shine on’ despite suffering serious mental health issues. David Gilmour, the voice and guitar of Pink Floyd, recalls the day that Syd unexpectedly appeared in the studio where they were recording Wish You Were Here, the album bookended by Shine On. Nobody recognised him at first; once handsome and slender, he had gained weight and shaved his head and eyebrows.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond has a special place in many people's lives. Anna Gascoigne talks about the pain of losing her son, Jay. He was a gentle boy, a talented musician, who eventually succumbed to the multiple mental health problems he had battled for years. For Anna, Shine On You Crazy Diamond speaks directly to her of Jay; he loved Pink Floyd, and Shine On was played at his memorial service. Anna herself was driven to the brink of suicide by her son’s death.

British DJ Ed Steelefox describes a New Year’s Eve house party, where, as the guests gradually fell asleep, he chose to slip out the door leaving a non-stop playlist of different live versions of Shine On You Crazy Diamond to penetrate their dreams.

And professor Allan Moore takes to the grand piano to play and talk about what it is in the track that is so directly reminiscent of Syd Barrett.

(Photo: Pink Floyd, pictured in 1972. Credit: Press Association)

How a song for a former bandmate has resonated with people around the world

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond by Pink Floyd2020011520200116 (WS)Shine On You Crazy Diamond by Pink Floyd is said to have been written about Syd Barrett, their former band member. It is both a tribute, and a call for him to ‘shine on’ despite suffering serious mental health issues. David Gilmour, the voice and guitar of Pink Floyd, recalls the day that Syd unexpectedly appeared in the studio where they were recording Wish You Were Here, the album bookended by Shine On. Nobody recognised him at first; once handsome and slender, he had gained weight and shaved his head and eyebrows.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond has a special place in many people's lives. Anna Gascoigne talks about the pain of losing her son, Jay. He was a gentle boy, a talented musician, who eventually succumbed to the multiple mental health problems he had battled for years. For Anna, Shine On You Crazy Diamond speaks directly to her of Jay; he loved Pink Floyd, and Shine On was played at his memorial service. Anna herself was driven to the brink of suicide by her son’s death.

British DJ Ed Steelefox describes a New Year’s Eve house party, where, as the guests gradually fell asleep, he chose to slip out the door leaving a non-stop playlist of different live versions of Shine On You Crazy Diamond to penetrate their dreams.

And professor Allan Moore takes to the grand piano to play and talk about what it is in the track that is so directly reminiscent of Syd Barrett.

(Photo: Pink Floyd, pictured in 1972. Credit: Press Association)

How a song for a former bandmate has resonated with people around the world

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Soul Music: Crazy2020051620200517 (WS)People reflect on the pop country classic Crazy, made famous by Patsy Cline

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

People of different ages reflect on why the pop country classic Crazy, made famous by Patsy Cline, brings out such strong emotions in them, including a young woman mourning the loss of a father's love after divorce, broadcaster Fiona Phillips on losing her father to Alzheimers and 87-year-old Wayne Rethford who, as a young man in 1961, met Patsy Cline and two years later happened upon the crash site where she died after her plane came down in a heavy storm in Tennessee.

(Photo: Patsy Cline, posed portrait. Credit: GAB Archive/Redferns)

People reflect on the pop country classic Crazy, made famous by Patsy Cline

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

People of different ages reflect on why the pop country classic Crazy, made famous by Patsy Cline, brings out such strong emotions in them, including a young woman mourning the loss of a father's love after divorce, broadcaster Fiona Phillips on losing her father to Alzheimers and 87-year-old Wayne Rethford who, as a young man in 1961, met Patsy Cline and two years later happened upon the crash site where she died after her plane came down in a heavy storm in Tennessee.

(Photo: Patsy Cline, posed portrait. Credit: GAB Archive/Redferns)

People reflect on the pop country classic Crazy, made famous by Patsy Cline

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

True Colors By Cyndi Lauper2020010120200102 (WS)Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share.

In Soul Music we take a song and talk to people for whom the song has a special place in their lives

True Colors
Billy Steinberg's lyrics were originally inspired by his mother but his song writing partner Tom Kelly recognised it's universal appeal and with a slight re-write, it became the song that Cyndi Lauper made famous the world over.

Growing up in a small town in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Ken Kidd could never truly be himself. Watching Cyndi Lauper perform True Colors on MTV showed him that it was OK to be his authentic self. Years later he describes his pride at watching the Rainbow Flag being raised above the Stonewall National Monument as he and other LGBTQ campaigners sang that same song.

Lesley Pyne learnt to sing 'True Colors' with her local choir. It's a song that resonated with her more than she had ever expected. After six attempts at IVF, Lesley had had to come to terms with the knowledge that she wouldn't be able to have children. It wasn't easy. It has taken years of digging deep to work through the grief but now she helps others to find their true colours and firmly believes that they can be beautiful, like a rainbow.

And in 1999, Caroline Paige, a jet and helicopter navigator in the Royal Air Force, became the first ever openly serving transgender officer in the British military. She rose above the extraordinary challenges placed before her to show her 'True Colors' whilst serving her country on the front line in the war on terror.

Featuring songwriter Billy Steinberg and music from The Rock Choir

Soul Music hears people share their stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Billy Steinberg's lyrics were originally inspired by his mother, but his song writing partner Tom Kelly recognised their universal appeal. With a slight re-write, True Colors became the song that Cyndi Lauper made famous the world over.

Growing up in a small town in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Ken Kidd could never truly be himself. Watching Cyndi Lauper perform True Colors on MTV showed him that it was OK to be his authentic self. Years later he describes his pride at watching the rainbow flag being raised above the Stonewall National Monument as he and other LGBTQ campaigners sang that same song.

Lesley Pyne learnt to sing True Colors with her local choir. It's a song that resonated with her more than she had ever expected. After six attempts at IVF, Lesley had had to come to terms with the knowledge that she wouldn't be able to have children. It wasn't easy. It has taken years of digging deep to work through the grief, but now she helps others to find their true colours, and firmly believes that they can be beautiful, like a rainbow.

Featuring songwriter Billy Steinberg and music from The Rock Choir.

Image: Cyndi Lauper, pictured in 1986 (Credit: Michael Putland/Getty Images)

How Cyndi Lauper's 1980s ballad True Colors has inspired people around the world

Wind of Change: Scorpions2020030420200305 (WS)The German rock band Scorpions’ lead singer, Klaus Meine, was inspired to write Wind of Change at a rock festival in Moscow in the summer of 1989. Politics were rapidly shifting in the Soviet Union at the time, as a result of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms. Recalling the peaceful yet revolutionary atmosphere at the concerts, Klaus said, “There was a whole new generation of Russian kids that said the Cold War would be over soon - we could literally feel the world changing in front of our eyes. ?

No one had any idea that the Berlin wall would come down only a few months later. Wind of Change was released in 1990, and has since become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War and the reunification of Germany in 1991. The power ballad is one of the best-selling singles in history, and popular all over the world.

Featuring interviews with Scorpions lead singer Klaus Meine, Russian rock musician Stas Namin, and true stories of what the song means to people who lived in the former USSR.

(Photo: Klaus Meine (L) and Matthias Jabs (R) of Scorpions performs at Palco Mundo at Cidade do Rock, 2019 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Credit: Wagner Meier/Getty Images)

Released in 1990, the song has become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Wind Of Change: Scorpions2020030420200305 (WS)The German rock band Scorpions’ lead singer, Klaus Meine, was inspired to write Wind of Change at a rock festival in Moscow in the summer of 1989. Politics were rapidly shifting in the Soviet Union at the time, as a result of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms. Recalling the peaceful yet revolutionary atmosphere at the concerts, Klaus said, “There was a whole new generation of Russian kids that said the Cold War would be over soon - we could literally feel the world changing in front of our eyes.”

No one had any idea that the Berlin wall would come down only a few months later. Wind of Change was released in 1990, and has since become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War and the reunification of Germany in 1991. The power ballad is one of the best-selling singles in history, and popular all over the world.

Featuring interviews with Scorpions lead singer Klaus Meine, Russian rock musician Stas Namin, and true stories of what the song means to people who lived in the former USSR.

(Photo: Klaus Meine (L) and Matthias Jabs (R) of Scorpions performs at Palco Mundo at Cidade do Rock, 2019 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Credit: Wagner Meier/Getty Images)

Released in 1990, the song has become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Wind Of Change: The Scorpions2020030420200305 (WS)The German rock band Scorpions’ lead singer Klaus Meine was inspired to write Wind of Change at a rock festival in Moscow in the summer of 1989. Politics were rapidly shifting in the Soviet Union at the time as a result of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms. Recalling the peaceful yet revolutionary atmosphere at the concerts, Klaus said “there was a whole new generation of Russian kids that said the Cold War would be over soon - we could literally feel the world changing in front of our eyes”.

No one had any idea that the Berlin wall would come down only a few months later. Wind of Change was released in 1990, and has since become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War and the reunification of Germany in 1991. The power ballad is one the best-selling singles in history, and popular all over the world.

Featuring interviews with lead singer of the Scorpions Klaus Meine, Russian rock musician Stas Namin, and true stories of what the song means to people who lived in the former USSR.

People share stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

01You Are My Sunshine2019071720190718 (WS)You Are My Sunshine - the 1930s country song has morphed from political slogan into a children’s favourite. It has since been recorded by more than 400 artists from Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Bryan Ferry. A mother and daughter explain how the song helped the daughter's recovery after a catastrophic car crash.

Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share. Soul Music takes a piece of music and talk to people for whom it has a special place in their lives.

(Photo: From left: Jimmie Davis, Veda Ann Borg, 1949. Credit: Getty Images)

The 1930s country song You Are My Sunshine and how it became a children's favourite

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

You Are My Sunshine - the 1930s country song has morphed from political slogan into a children’s favourite. It has since been recorded by more than 400 artists from Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Bryan Ferry. A mother and daughter explain how the song helped the daughter's recovery after a catastrophic car crash.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

You Are My Sunshine - the 1930s country song has morphed from political slogan into a children’s favourite. It has since been recorded by more than 400 artists from Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Bryan Ferry. A mother and daughter explain how the song helped the daughter's recovery after a catastrophic car crash.

Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share. Soul Music takes a piece of music and talk to people for whom it has a special place in their lives.

(Photo: From left: Jimmie Davis, Veda Ann Borg, 1949. Credit: Getty Images)

The 1930s country song You Are My Sunshine and how it became a children's favourite

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

You Are My Sunshine - the 1930s country song has morphed from political slogan into a children’s favourite. It has since been recorded by more than 400 artists from Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash to Aretha Franklin and Bryan Ferry. A mother and daughter explain how the song helped the daughter's recovery after a catastrophic car crash.

Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share. Soul Music takes a piece of music and talk to people for whom it has a special place in their lives.

(Photo: From left: Jimmie Davis, Veda Ann Borg, 1949. Credit: Getty Images)

The 1930s country song You Are My Sunshine and how it became a children's favourite

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02My Favourite Things2019072420190725 (WS)Music brings meaning to our lives. From first breath to last rites music is there, helping us to deal with our emotions and reflect on our experiences. Be it solace or celebration, grief, love, lost youth or contented aging, we find ourselves reflected in the music we love and share. In Soul Music we take a piece of music and talk to people for whom it has a special place in their lives.

My Favourite Things: In this week's Soul Music, guests from around the world share their special memories of The Sound of Music classic 'My Favourite Things'. Written by Rodgers and Hammerstein in 1959 this deceptively simple song has travelled the globe to comfort and enthral children the world over.

Iranian Astronaut and philanthropist Anousheh Ansari's first encounter with this musical classic was in her native language of Farsi. It's a melody she held dear to her during years of unrest through the Iranian revolution and the war that was to follow. It's also the song that travelled with her as she realised her childhood dream of exploring outer space.

People share stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

"Raindrops on Roses and Whiskers on Kittens"...this week Soul Music and guests from around the world share their special memories of The Sound of Music classic My Favourite Things. Written by Rodgers and Hammerstein in 1959 this deceptively simple song has travelled the globe to comfort and enthral children the world over.

Iranian astronaut and philanthropist Anousheh Ansari's first encounter with this musical classic was in her native language of Farsi. It is a melody she held dear to her during years of unrest through the Iranian revolution and the war that was to follow. It is also the song that travelled with her as she realised her childhood dream of exploring outer space.

(Photo: American composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein (1895-1960), collaborators on the Broadway musicals Oklahoma!, The Sound of Music and The King and I. Credit: Slim Aarons/Getty Images)

People share stories about music that has changed their lives

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

"Raindrops on Roses and Whiskers on Kittens"...this week Soul Music and guests from around the world share their special memories of The Sound of Music classic My Favourite Things. Written by Rodgers and Hammerstein in 1959 this deceptively simple song has travelled the globe to comfort and enthral children the world over.

Iranian astronaut and philanthropist Anousheh Ansari's first encounter with this musical classic was in her native language of Farsi. It is a melody she held dear to her during years of unrest through the Iranian revolution and the war that was to follow. It is also the song that travelled with her as she realised her childhood dream of exploring outer space.

(Photo: American composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein (1895-1960), collaborators on the Broadway musicals Oklahoma!, The Sound of Music and The King and I. Credit: Slim Aarons/Getty Images)

People share stories about music that has changed their lives

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

"Raindrops on Roses and Whiskers on Kittens"...this week Soul Music and guests from around the world share their special memories of The Sound of Music classic My Favourite Things. Written by Rodgers and Hammerstein in 1959 this deceptively simple song has travelled the globe to comfort and enthral children the world over.

Iranian astronaut and philanthropist Anousheh Ansari's first encounter with this musical classic was in her native language of Farsi. It is a melody she held dear to her during years of unrest through the Iranian revolution and the war that was to follow. It is also the song that travelled with her as she realised her childhood dream of exploring outer space.

(Photo: American composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein (1895-1960), collaborators on the Broadway musicals Oklahoma!, The Sound of Music and The King and I. Credit: Slim Aarons/Getty Images)

People share stories about music that has changed their lives

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

03Kraftwerk: Computer World2019073120190801 (WS)How the German band Kraftwerk's classic album Computer World has changed people's lives.

Ramona Gonzales from the band Nite Jewel recounts how a car crash and a chance encounter with Computer World changed the course of her life. And Andy McCluskey, from British group Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, recalls the Kraftwerk concert that inspired his musical career.

Photo: Kraftwerk in front of world time clock in Keio Plaza Hotel, Tokyo, September 1981 Credit: Koh Hasebe/Shinko Music/Getty Images

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How the German band Kraftwerk's classic album Computer World has changed people's lives.

Ramona Gonzales from the band Nite Jewel recounts how a car crash and a chance encounter with Computer World changed the course of her life. And Andy McCluskey, from British group Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, recalls the Kraftwerk concert that inspired his musical career.

Photo: Kraftwerk in front of world time clock in Keio Plaza Hotel, Tokyo, September 1981 Credit: Koh Hasebe/Shinko Music/Getty Images

How the German band Kraftwerk's classic album Computer World has changed people's lives

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How the German band Kraftwerk's classic album Computer World has changed people's lives.

Ramona Gonzales from the band Nite Jewel recounts how a car crash and a chance encounter with Computer World changed the course of her life. And Andy McCluskey, from British group Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, recalls the Kraftwerk concert that inspired his musical career.

Photo: Kraftwerk in front of world time clock in Keio Plaza Hotel, Tokyo, September 1981 Credit: Koh Hasebe/Shinko Music/Getty Images

How the German band Kraftwerk's classic album Computer World has changed people's lives

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

04Redemption Song2019080720190808 (WS)For Grammy award-winning artist John Legend, Bob Marley’s Redemption Song is an anthem for addressing the criminal justice system of America. 'Musicians without Borders' practitioner Ahmed al 'Azzeh finds the song inspires him to work towards a better life in the Palestinian Territories. And for Bob Scott, it will forever be heard in memory of his nephew Dominick who lost his life during the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004.

People share stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

For Grammy award-winning artist John Legend, Bob Marley’s Redemption Song is an anthem for addressing the criminal justice system of America. 'Musicians without Borders' practitioner Ahmed al 'Azzeh finds the song inspires him to work towards a better life in the Palestinian Territories. And for Bob Scott, it will forever be heard in memory of his nephew Dominick who lost his life during the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004.

People share stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

For Grammy award-winning artist John Legend, Bob Marley’s Redemption Song is an anthem for addressing the criminal justice system of America. 'Musicians without Borders' practitioner Ahmed al 'Azzeh finds the song inspires him to work towards a better life in the Palestinian Territories. And for Bob Scott, it will forever be heard in memory of his nephew Dominick who lost his life during the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004.

People share stories about music that has changed their lives.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.