Tales From The Commonwealth [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
20071012

1/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071012

1/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071013

1/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071013

1/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071019

2/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071019

2/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071020

2/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071020

2/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071027

3/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071102

4/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

3/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071103

4/4. Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20071103

4/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

20080912

1/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080912

1/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080913

1/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080913

1/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080914

1/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080919

2/4.

The stories behind tourist destinations.

The war has resumed in Sri Lanka between government forces and Tamil Tiger rebels.

20080920

2/4. The stories behind tourist destinations. The war has resumed in Sri Lanka between government forces and Tamil Tiger rebels.

20080920

2/4.

The stories behind tourist destinations.

The war has resumed in Sri Lanka between government forces and Tamil Tiger rebels.

20080921

2/4. The stories behind tourist destinations. The war has resumed in Sri Lanka between government forces and Tamil Tiger rebels.

20080921

2/4.

The stories behind tourist destinations.

The war has resumed in Sri Lanka between government forces and Tamil Tiger rebels.

20080926

3/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080926

3/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

The Maldives are introducing their first free democratic elections.

20080927

3/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. Seychelles is heavily in debt and may have to cut back on its generous social services.

20080927

3/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

Seychelles is heavily in debt and may have to cut back on its generous social services.

20080928

3/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. Seychelles is heavily in debt and may have to cut back on its generous social services.

20080928

3/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

Seychelles is heavily in debt and may have to cut back on its generous social services.

20081003

4/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.

20081004

4/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.

20081004

4/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.

20081005

4/4. We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations. Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.

20081005

4/4.

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.

01Tales from the Commonwealth - The Documentary20080912

Robin White delves into the Indian Ocean to find out what life is like for Maldivians.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Maldives is made up of 1,200 idyllic islands, most of them uninhabited, which lie off the coast of the Indian sub-continent.

The island nation is run, somewhat dictatorially, by one man, President Maumoom Gayoom.

He is Asia's longest-serving leader having been in office for 30 years.

However, under a new constitution, ratified by President Gayoom last month, the country's first multi-party presidential elections will be held by the tenth of October.

Robin speaks to President Gayoom and asks why he has changed his mind and assesses his chances of winning the presidential elections scheduled for next month.

He also speaks to the opposition who think he may have some cunning tricks up his sleeves.

Robin visits the capital city Male, one of the most congested in the world.

Around a third of all Maldivians live in Male, therefore the shortage of housing and road congestion are huge problem.

He finds out what influence, the major religion Islam has on the island nation.

Nudity in films is banned and it's illegal for Maldivians to drink alcohol - if caught you are banished to a remote island.

In contrast tourists are only allowed to drink alcohol in resorts.

Heroin addiction is also a growing problem among young people of the island.

The most serious threat to the stability of the Maldives is not alcohol, drugs or even politics, it's global warming.

The seas are rising and none of the Maldivian islands are more than six feet above sea level.

Six thousand people have been moved from their homes due to rising seas already.

It's estimated that around 50-80% of the Maldives is likely to be lost within the next 50 years if nothing is done to curb the rising tide.

To add to that threat people on inhabited islands are sand mining on a commercial scale, literally digging their own graves.

In the meantime, Maldivians are watching and waiting to see if democracy will come to their island next month.

However, whoever wins will have few islands than now to run.

01Tales from the Commonwealth - The Documentary20080913

Robin White delves into the Indian Ocean to find out what life is like for Maldivians.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Maldives is made up of 1,200 idyllic islands, most of them uninhabited, which lie off the coast of the Indian sub-continent.

The island nation is run, somewhat dictatorially, by one man, President Maumoom Gayoom.

He is Asia's longest-serving leader having been in office for 30 years.

However, under a new constitution, ratified by President Gayoom last month, the country's first multi-party presidential elections will be held by the tenth of October.

Robin speaks to President Gayoom and asks why he has changed his mind and assesses his chances of winning the presidential elections scheduled for next month.

He also speaks to the opposition who think he may have some cunning tricks up his sleeves.

Robin visits the capital city Male, one of the most congested in the world.

Around a third of all Maldivians live in Male, therefore the shortage of housing and road congestion are huge problem.

He finds out what influence, the major religion Islam has on the island nation.

Nudity in films is banned and it's illegal for Maldivians to drink alcohol - if caught you are banished to a remote island.

In contrast tourists are only allowed to drink alcohol in resorts.

Heroin addiction is also a growing problem among young people of the island.

The most serious threat to the stability of the Maldives is not alcohol, drugs or even politics, it's global warming.

The seas are rising and none of the Maldivian islands are more than six feet above sea level.

Six thousand people have been moved from their homes due to rising seas already.

It's estimated that around 50-80% of the Maldives is likely to be lost within the next 50 years if nothing is done to curb the rising tide.

To add to that threat people on inhabited islands are sand mining on a commercial scale, literally digging their own graves.

In the meantime, Maldivians are watching and waiting to see if democracy will come to their island next month.

However, whoever wins will have few islands than now to run.

01Tales from the Commonwealth - The Documentary20080914

Robin White delves into the Indian Ocean to find out what life is like for Maldivians.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Maldives is made up of 1,200 idyllic islands, most of them uninhabited, which lie off the coast of the Indian sub-continent.

The island nation is run, somewhat dictatorially, by one man, President Maumoom Gayoom.

He is Asia's longest-serving leader having been in office for 30 years.

However, under a new constitution, ratified by President Gayoom last month, the country's first multi-party presidential elections will be held by the tenth of October.

Robin speaks to President Gayoom and asks why he has changed his mind and assesses his chances of winning the presidential elections scheduled for next month.

He also speaks to the opposition who think he may have some cunning tricks up his sleeves.

Robin visits the capital city Male, one of the most congested in the world.

Around a third of all Maldivians live in Male, therefore the shortage of housing and road congestion are huge problem.

He finds out what influence, the major religion Islam has on the island nation.

Nudity in films is banned and it's illegal for Maldivians to drink alcohol - if caught you are banished to a remote island.

In contrast tourists are only allowed to drink alcohol in resorts.

Heroin addiction is also a growing problem among young people of the island.

The most serious threat to the stability of the Maldives is not alcohol, drugs or even politics, it's global warming.

The seas are rising and none of the Maldivian islands are more than six feet above sea level.

Six thousand people have been moved from their homes due to rising seas already.

It's estimated that around 50-80% of the Maldives is likely to be lost within the next 50 years if nothing is done to curb the rising tide.

To add to that threat people on inhabited islands are sand mining on a commercial scale, literally digging their own graves.

In the meantime, Maldivians are watching and waiting to see if democracy will come to their island next month.

However, whoever wins will have few islands than now to run.

02Part Two - Sri Lanka, The Endless Civil War - The Documentary20080919

Robin White finds out how Sri Lankans are coping with the racism that divides them.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Nestling off the southern tip of India, the tropical island of Sri Lanka has beguiled travellers for centuries with its palm-fringed beaches, diverse landscapes and historical monuments.

But for the last 20 years, the country has been torn apart by civil war.

It is a conflict that has pitted the majority Buddhist Sinhalese against Tamils who are largely Hindu.

In the second part of this series, Robin White travels to the country's capital Colombo, to see how people are coping with the violence.

A ceasefire was signed in 2002, but it was undermined by regular clashes between government troops and Tamil rebels, and in January 2008 it expired.

The government claims that a military victory is in sight but suicide bombers regularly strike civilian targets in the capital, Colombo, which is now ringed by thousands of security checkpoints.

Everyone is stopped and searched many times everyday.

Many hotels were refurbished during the ceasefire but the only tourists who dare to come now, are local.

Although violence and uncertainty is part of everyday life, cricket, literature and travel are just some of the things that ordinary Sri Lankans enjoy.

Robin travels through the country meeting the various political factions to find out what they think about the current climate.

He visits the government department that has been specifically set up to deal with the peace process.

Would a federal system work or should Tamil Tigers be given their own state?

Or, are the Tigers simply a terrorist organisation that can only be defeated through military action.

Join Robin on his journey as he investigates the underlying issues behind Sri Lanka's racial tensions.

02Part Two - Sri Lanka, The Endless Civil War - The Documentary20080920

Robin White finds out how Sri Lankans are coping with the racism that divides them.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Nestling off the southern tip of India, the tropical island of Sri Lanka has beguiled travellers for centuries with its palm-fringed beaches, diverse landscapes and historical monuments.

But for the last 20 years, the country has been torn apart by civil war.

It is a conflict that has pitted the majority Buddhist Sinhalese against Tamils who are largely Hindu.

In the second part of this series, Robin White travels to the country's capital Colombo, to see how people are coping with the violence.

A ceasefire was signed in 2002, but it was undermined by regular clashes between government troops and Tamil rebels, and in January 2008 it expired.

The government claims that a military victory is in sight but suicide bombers regularly strike civilian targets in the capital, Colombo, which is now ringed by thousands of security checkpoints.

Everyone is stopped and searched many times everyday.

Many hotels were refurbished during the ceasefire but the only tourists who dare to come now, are local.

Although violence and uncertainty is part of everyday life, cricket, literature and travel are just some of the things that ordinary Sri Lankans enjoy.

Robin travels through the country meeting the various political factions to find out what they think about the current climate.

He visits the government department that has been specifically set up to deal with the peace process.

Would a federal system work or should Tamil Tigers be given their own state?

Or, are the Tigers simply a terrorist organisation that can only be defeated through military action.

Join Robin on his journey as he investigates the underlying issues behind Sri Lanka's racial tensions.

02Part Two - Sri Lanka, The Endless Civil War - The Documentary20080921

Robin White finds out how Sri Lankans are coping with the racism that divides them.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Nestling off the southern tip of India, the tropical island of Sri Lanka has beguiled travellers for centuries with its palm-fringed beaches, diverse landscapes and historical monuments.

But for the last 20 years, the country has been torn apart by civil war.

It is a conflict that has pitted the majority Buddhist Sinhalese against Tamils who are largely Hindu.

In the second part of this series, Robin White travels to the country's capital Colombo, to see how people are coping with the violence.

A ceasefire was signed in 2002, but it was undermined by regular clashes between government troops and Tamil rebels, and in January 2008 it expired.

The government claims that a military victory is in sight but suicide bombers regularly strike civilian targets in the capital, Colombo, which is now ringed by thousands of security checkpoints.

Everyone is stopped and searched many times everyday.

Many hotels were refurbished during the ceasefire but the only tourists who dare to come now, are local.

Although violence and uncertainty is part of everyday life, cricket, literature and travel are just some of the things that ordinary Sri Lankans enjoy.

Robin travels through the country meeting the various political factions to find out what they think about the current climate.

He visits the government department that has been specifically set up to deal with the peace process.

Would a federal system work or should Tamil Tigers be given their own state?

Or, are the Tigers simply a terrorist organisation that can only be defeated through military action.

Join Robin on his journey as he investigates the underlying issues behind Sri Lanka's racial tensions.

0320071026

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

0320071027

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

0320071102
03Episode 3 - Seychelles, Bankrolling Paradise - The Documentary20080926

Why is the paradise nation of the Seychelles is struggling economically?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Seychelles is as close to paradise as you can get but there are dark clouds appearing on the horizon.

It is one of the most debt ridden countries in the world, where people have been enjoying amazingly generous social service benefits, from free education, health care and subsidised housing.

However, with sudden increases in fuel and food prices, the socialist policies of this nation may have to be rethought.

A year after independence in 1976, the Seychelles appeared to be heading down the path of instability which has plagued many African states.

The prime minister, France Albert Rene, overthrew the president, James Mancham, and embarked on a programme aimed at giving poorer people a greater share of the country's wealth.

Mr Rene restored multi-party democracy in 1991, after pressure from foreign creditors and aid donors.

James Michel succeeded France Albert Rene, who led the country for almost three decades before stepping down in April 2004

In July 2006 Mr Michel won a five-year term in presidential elections.

There are on 87,000 Seychellewa living in the country, the majority of whom are descendents of slaves, sea-farers and colonialists.

They economy of the Seychelles is simple, they export Tuna and import tourists.

However in the current economic climate, tourism is being hit hard with Air Seychelles facing hard times as the cost of fuel increases.

It is a matriarchal society where marriage and commitment is very rare.

The huge number of unmarried mothers is causing a burden on the state as they have to financially support these children.

Heroin is also a growing problem and on a social level, theft is increasing as people struggle to fund their drug habit.

Join Robin on his journey as he travels around this paradise nation looking at the politics, the struggling economy and the boom in unmarried mothers.

03Episode 3 - Seychelles, Bankrolling Paradise - The Documentary20080927

Why is the paradise nation of the Seychelles is struggling economically?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Seychelles is as close to paradise as you can get but there are dark clouds appearing on the horizon.

It is one of the most debt ridden countries in the world, where people have been enjoying amazingly generous social service benefits, from free education, health care and subsidised housing.

However, with sudden increases in fuel and food prices, the socialist policies of this nation may have to be rethought.

A year after independence in 1976, the Seychelles appeared to be heading down the path of instability which has plagued many African states.

The prime minister, France Albert Rene, overthrew the president, James Mancham, and embarked on a programme aimed at giving poorer people a greater share of the country's wealth.

Mr Rene restored multi-party democracy in 1991, after pressure from foreign creditors and aid donors.

James Michel succeeded France Albert Rene, who led the country for almost three decades before stepping down in April 2004

In July 2006 Mr Michel won a five-year term in presidential elections.

There are on 87,000 Seychellewa living in the country, the majority of whom are descendents of slaves, sea-farers and colonialists.

They economy of the Seychelles is simple, they export Tuna and import tourists.

However in the current economic climate, tourism is being hit hard with Air Seychelles facing hard times as the cost of fuel increases.

It is a matriarchal society where marriage and commitment is very rare.

The huge number of unmarried mothers is causing a burden on the state as they have to financially support these children.

Heroin is also a growing problem and on a social level, theft is increasing as people struggle to fund their drug habit.

Join Robin on his journey as he travels around this paradise nation looking at the politics, the struggling economy and the boom in unmarried mothers.

03Episode 3 - Seychelles, Bankrolling Paradise - The Documentary20080928

Why is the paradise nation of the Seychelles is struggling economically?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The Seychelles is as close to paradise as you can get but there are dark clouds appearing on the horizon.

It is one of the most debt ridden countries in the world, where people have been enjoying amazingly generous social service benefits, from free education, health care and subsidised housing.

However, with sudden increases in fuel and food prices, the socialist policies of this nation may have to be rethought.

A year after independence in 1976, the Seychelles appeared to be heading down the path of instability which has plagued many African states.

The prime minister, France Albert Rene, overthrew the president, James Mancham, and embarked on a programme aimed at giving poorer people a greater share of the country's wealth.

Mr Rene restored multi-party democracy in 1991, after pressure from foreign creditors and aid donors.

James Michel succeeded France Albert Rene, who led the country for almost three decades before stepping down in April 2004

In July 2006 Mr Michel won a five-year term in presidential elections.

There are on 87,000 Seychellewa living in the country, the majority of whom are descendents of slaves, sea-farers and colonialists.

They economy of the Seychelles is simple, they export Tuna and import tourists.

However in the current economic climate, tourism is being hit hard with Air Seychelles facing hard times as the cost of fuel increases.

It is a matriarchal society where marriage and commitment is very rare.

The huge number of unmarried mothers is causing a burden on the state as they have to financially support these children.

Heroin is also a growing problem and on a social level, theft is increasing as people struggle to fund their drug habit.

Join Robin on his journey as he travels around this paradise nation looking at the politics, the struggling economy and the boom in unmarried mothers.

04 LAST20071102

4/4.

Broadcasters from Guyana, Mozambique, St Lucia and Papua New Guinea show us round their capitals and talk about the issues they feel most strongly about.

04 LAST20081003

We tell the stories behind popular tourist destinations.

Mauritius, with no natural resources, seems to be doing very well.