Talk To Me [Drama]

Episodes

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H P Lovecraft20181106By Sara Davies and Abigail Youngman.

The strangest story of all HP Lovecraft's 'weird tales' isn't fiction at all: it's true. It concerns his marriage to Sonia Greene, a successful businesswoman whose family had fled Ukraine to make a life in the United States.

The story is revealed through interviews with Lovecraft and his friends and family by producer Mary Ward-Lowery.

Howard Phillips Lovecraft's horror fiction has achieved cult status in recent decades, but was admired only by a small circle of friends in his lifetime. Lovecraft's eminent New England family indulged his genius, his eccentricities and his prejudices. He favoured human contact by letter, rarely left his home, and even then, only at night, delighting to walk streets empty of people. He preferred the company of men and hated foreigners and Jews: the ‘mongrel hordes’ of New York were anathema to him.

But his relationship with Sonia Greene transcended these prejudices, for a while at least. She swept Lovecraft up in her enthusiasm for his work and her romantic ideas about the man himself, rationalising his beliefs in pursuit of her own beautiful, idealised creation, a fiction of a husband. To the shock and dismay of his family, they married and moved into Sonia’s New York apartment, where she planned to create him anew, as a glittering literary success. But it seems the horrors that make Lovecraft’s fiction so skin-crawlingly effective were not simply a product of his imagination: they have their origins in a terrible family secret.

Bad blood will out.

HP Lovecraft...John MacKay
Sonia Greene...Tracy Wiles
Samuel Loveman...Carl Prekopp
Lilian Clarke...Sarah Parks
Florence Greene...Martha Godber

Music by Tom Constantine
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery

The weirdest of HP Lovecraft's stories is true. By Sara Davies and Abigail Youngman.

Radio 4 drama

Karl Marx2017012320181105 (R4)By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine

Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine

Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine

Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine

Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the centuryThere Is Business Like Show Business

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine

Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine
Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies. Witness a day in Karl Marx's household. With Matt Berry and Pippa Haywood.

Radio 4 drama

By Sara Davies. Witness a day in Karl Marx's household. With Matt Berry and Pippa Haywood.

Drama from BBC Radio 4

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine
Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

By Sara Davies. Witness a day in Karl Marx's household. With Matt Berry and Pippa Haywood.

Drama from BBC Radio 4