Talking Books [world Service]

Episodes

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2012100820121009 (WS)

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentrating on their literary life story.

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentr...

20121015

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentr.

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentrating on their literary life story.

2012101520121016 (WS)

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentrating on their literary life story.

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentr...

2012102920121030 (WS)

In London, Razia Iqbal talks to American author Paul Auster about his work, and his new...

In London, Razia Iqbal talks to American author Paul Auster about his work, and his new book Winter Journal.

2012102920121030 (WS)

In London, Razia Iqbal talks to American author Paul Auster about his work, and his new...

In London, Razia Iqbal talks to American author Paul Auster about his work, and his new...

In London, Razia Iqbal talks to American author Paul Auster about his work, and his new book Winter Journal.

20130513
20130513

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentrating on their literary life story.

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentr.

20130520

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentr...

Razia Iqbal talks to well-known authors, looking at what drives their work and concentrating on their literary life story.

Adhaf Soueif20170707

Renowned authors from around the world on what drives their work and their literary life

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

George Alagiah meets renowned writer and political commentator Adhaf Soueif at the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts. Her latest book, This is Not a Border: Reportage and Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature, is an anthology celebrating the 10th anniversary of her own extraordinary literary festival. Her non-fiction also includes Cairo: A City Transformed, a passionate and gripping account of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, which she experienced first-hand. In 1999 Adhaf Soueif became the first Muslim woman to be nominated for the Booker Prize for her novel The Map of Love.

Adhaf Soueif20170707

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

George Alagiah meets renowned writer and political commentator Adhaf Soueif at the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts. Her latest book, This is Not a Border: Reportage and Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature, is an anthology celebrating the 10th anniversary of her own extraordinary literary festival. Her non-fiction also includes Cairo: A City Transformed, a passionate and gripping account of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, which she experienced first-hand. In 1999 Adhaf Soueif became the first Muslim woman to be nominated for the Booker Prize for her novel The Map of Love.

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

George Alagiah meets renowned writer and political commentator Adhaf Soueif at the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts. Her latest book, This is Not a Border: Reportage and Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature, is an anthology celebrating the 10th anniversary of her own extraordinary literary festival. Her non-fiction also includes Cairo: A City Transformed, a passionate and gripping account of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, which she experienced first-hand. In 1999 Adhaf Soueif became the first Muslim woman to be nominated for the Booker Prize for her novel The Map of Love.

Alaa Al Aswany20111121

Razia Iqbal talks to the Egyptian author of the bestselling Yacoubian Building.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week is the first of two Talking Books specials from Egypt.

As the country moves towards Parliamentary elections following the momentous events of the Arab Uprising, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Alaa Al Aswany, author of the best-selling The Yacoubian Building and one of Egypt's most prominent writers.

Al Aswany was a vocal critique of the former Mubarak regime but post revolution, can Egyptian writers expect more freedoms or more constraints?

Alaa Al Aswany20111122

Razia Iqbal talks to the Egyptian author of the bestselling Yacoubian Building.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week is the first of two Talking Books specials from Egypt.

As the country moves towards Parliamentary elections following the momentous events of the Arab Uprising, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Alaa Al Aswany, author of the best-selling The Yacoubian Building and one of Egypt's most prominent writers.

Al Aswany was a vocal critique of the former Mubarak regime but post revolution, can Egyptian writers expect more freedoms or more constraints?

Alexander Mccall Smith20180727

Internationally acclaimed writer Alexander McCall Smith speaks to Gavin Esler at the Hay Festival about what motivates his work.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Alexander McCall Smith20180727

Writer Alexander McCall Smith on creating The Number 1. Ladies\u2019 Detective Agency

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Internationally acclaimed writer Alexander McCall Smith speaks to Gavin Esler at Hay Festival. The author of more than 80 books including the 44 Scotland Street series, has been described as a writer of “gentle wisdom and good cheer”. His books have been translated into more than 46 languages. He discusses what motivates his work and his huge range including his heart-warming series of books about The Number 1. Ladies’ Detective Agency, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

(Photo: Alexander McCall Smith attends a photocall during the Edinburgh International Book Festival on August 15, 2017. Credit: Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images)

Alexander McCall Smith20180727

Writer Alexander McCall Smith on creating The Number 1. Ladies\u2019 Detective Agency

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Internationally acclaimed writer Alexander McCall Smith speaks to Gavin Esler at Hay Festival. The author of more than 80 books including the 44 Scotland Street series, has been described as a writer of “gentle wisdom and good cheer”. His books have been translated into more than 46 languages. He discusses what motivates his work and his huge range including his heart-warming series of books about The Number 1. Ladies’ Detective Agency, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

(Photo: Alexander McCall Smith attends a photocall during the Edinburgh International Book Festival on August 15, 2017. Credit: Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images)

Aminatta Forna20130513

Why author Aminatta Forna is drawn to the topics of betrayal, love and loss

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Talking Books meets Aminatta Forna who was born in Scotland and raised in Sierra Leone. Her father, a former finance minister in the country, was hanged in Sierra Leone in 1975 after being falsely accused of treason. Her first book investigated the events surrounding her father’s death and is an exploration of how, 25 years later, Sierra Leone imploded into civil war.

Through her work she wants to reverse the gaze used by much of Western fiction, especially in regards to Africa. She talks to Razia Iqbal about her focus on countries that have experienced conflict and why she believes fiction can break the silence of trauma. Why does she feel drawn to the topics of betrayal, love and loss?

Anuradha Roy20180803

Indian writer and publisher Anuradha Roy on her novel An Atlas of Impossible Longing

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Anuradha Roy20180803

Indian writer and publisher Anuradha Roy on her novel An Atlas of Impossible Longing

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Indian writer and publisher Anuradha Roy talks about her novel \u2018An Atlas of Impossible Longing\u2019.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Anuradha Roy20180803

Indian writer and publisher Anuradha Roy talks about her novel \u2018An Atlas of Impossible Longing\u2019.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Asne Seierstad20180810

Norwegian author \u00c5sne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of daily life in war zones

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Norwegian journalist and author Åsne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of day-to-day life from war zones and has written six non-fiction books. The Bookseller of Kabul (2002), based on her time living with an Afghan family following the fall of the Taliban, was an instant best-seller and has since been translated into 29 languages. Her new book Two Sisters: Into the Syrian Jihad follows two teenage girls as they travel from their home in Oslo to Syria, and the shocking consequences of their decision.

Presenter: Gavin Esler

(Photo: Åsne Seierstad at the Hay Festival. Credit: Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

Norwegian journalist and author \u00c5sne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of day-to-day life from war zones.

Asne Seierstad20180810

Norwegian author \u00c5sne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of daily life in war zones

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Norwegian journalist and author Ã…sne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of day-to-day life from war zones and has written six non-fiction books. The Bookseller of Kabul (2002), based on her time living with an Afghan family following the fall of the Taliban, was an instant best-seller and has since been translated into 29 languages. Her new book Two Sisters: Into the Syrian Jihad follows two teenage girls as they travel from their home in Oslo to Syria, and the shocking consequences of their decision.

Presenter: Gavin Esler

(Photo: Ã…sne Seierstad at the Hay Festival. Credit: Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

Asne Seierstad20180810

Norwegian journalist and author \u00c5sne Seierstad is renowned for her accounts of day-to-day life from war zones.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Author Marlon James - Talking Books2016072220160723 (WS)

Jamaican-born author Marlon James on his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Martha Kearney talks to Jamaican-born author Marlon James. James has written three novels to date, John Crew’s Devil, The Book of Night Women and his latest book A Brief History of Seven Killings, which won the Man Booker prize in 2015. He discusses his work and how in his third he starts with an account of an attempted assassination of Bob Marley intertwining fact and fiction, documenting a violent era of political instability in Jamaican history.

(Photo: Author Marlon James poses with his award at the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2015 ceremony in London. Credit: Neil Hall/Getty Images)

Author Marlon James - Talking Books20160722

Jamaican-born author Marlon James on his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Martha Kearney talks to Jamaican-born author Marlon James. James has written three novels to date, John Crew’s Devil, The Book of Night Women and his latest book A Brief History of Seven Killings, which won the Man Booker prize in 2015. He discusses his work and how in his third he starts with an account of an attempted assassination of Bob Marley intertwining fact and fiction, documenting a violent era of political instability in Jamaican history.

(Photo: Author Marlon James poses with his award at the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2015 ceremony in London. Credit: Neil Hall/Getty Images)

Author Peter Carey - Talking Books20160805

Author Peter Carey on his novels and issues with privacy

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Martha Kearney interviews author Peter Carey, best known for being one of only three authors to win the Man Booker Prize twice. Born in Australia, Carey‘s first novel Bliss was published in 1981. His first Booker Prize winning novel was Oscar and Lucinda bringing him international recognition, along with his second True History of The Kelly Gang. His latest book Amnesia, tells the story of a young, female, Australian computer hacker, and follows a journalist recreating her personality for the media. With echoes of Wikileaks and Julian Assange, the book explores Carey’s issues with privacy and the historical and political relationship between America and Australia.

(Photo: Australian writer Peter Carey, shortlisted for the Man Booker literary prize, poses with his book, Parrot and Olivier in America, 2010. Credit: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

Author Tahmima Anam - Talking Books20160729

Author Tahmima Anam on her first novel , A Golden Age, about Bangladesh's Liberation war

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

George Alagiah speaks to author Tahmima Anam. Born in Bangladesh, and growing up in Paris, New York City and Bangkok, Anam’s first novel , A Golden Age, centred around the Bangladesh Liberation War and was inspired by her parents who were freedom fighters during the conflict. It went on to win the Best First Book award at the 2008 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize.

Her sequel The Good Muslim, was nominated for the 2011 Man Asian Literary Prize. This book explores the after-effects of war and examines the conflicts within modern-day religion and family. Her latest book the Bones of Grace, is the story of searching - or love, parentage and self.

(Photo: Bangladeshi author Tahmim)a Anam talks at the Liberation War Museum, Dhaka, 2007. Credit: Farjana K Godhuly/AFP/Getty Images

Caryl Phillips20111107

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

This week on Talking Books Razia Iqbal's guest is the playwright, essayist and novelist Caryl Phillips.

Born in the Caribbean, he grew up as an immigrant in the UK.

After university he left the UK and has spent many years in the United States.

Distance and isolation form the themes of many of his non-fiction and novels, which often feature outsiders.

Caryl Phillips20111107

Caryl Phillips on how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week on Talking Books Razia Iqbal's guest is the playwright, essayist and novelist Caryl Phillips.

Born in the Caribbean, he grew up as an immigrant in the UK.

After university he left the UK and has spent many years in the United States.

Distance and isolation form the themes of many of his non-fiction and novels, which often feature outsiders.

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Caryl Phillips20111107

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

This week on Talking Books Razia Iqbal's guest is the playwright, essayist and novelist Caryl Phillips.

Born in the Caribbean, he grew up as an immigrant in the UK.

After university he left the UK and has spent many years in the United States.

Distance and isolation form the themes of many of his non-fiction and novels, which often feature outsiders.

Caryl Phillips20111108

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Caryl Phillips20111108

Caryl Phillips on how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week on Talking Books Razia Iqbal's guest is the playwright, essayist and novelist Caryl Phillips.

Born in the Caribbean, he grew up as an immigrant in the UK.

After university he left the UK and has spent many years in the United States.

Distance and isolation form the themes of many of his non-fiction and novels, which often feature outsiders.

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Caryl Phillips20111108

Razia Iqbal asks him how travel and life as an immigrant has shaped his writing.

Elizabeth Strout20170728

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

The Pulitzer prize-winning author of Olive Kitteridge, Elizabeth Strout, is in conversation with George Alagiah at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts.

Her new title Anything is Possible takes the form of linked short stories which tell the story of the inhabitants of rural, dusty Amgash, Illinois, the hometown of Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer who finally returns, after 17 years of absence, to visit the siblings she left behind.

Elizabeth Strout is noted for the profound wisdom she brings to her nuanced depictions of human relationships.

(Photo: Author Elizabeth Strout attends the Olive Kitteridge New York Premiere, 2014. Credit: Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

The Pulitzer prize-winning author of Olive Kitteridge, Elizabeth Strout, is in conversation with George Alagiah at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts.

Her new title Anything is Possible takes the form of linked short stories which tell the story of the inhabitants of rural, dusty Amgash, Illinois, the hometown of Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer who finally returns, after 17 years of absence, to visit the siblings she left behind.

Elizabeth Strout is noted for the profound wisdom she brings to her nuanced depictions of human relationships.

(Photo: Author Elizabeth Strout attends the Olive Kitteridge New York Premiere, 2014. Credit: Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

Elizabeth Strout - Author20170728

Pulitzer prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout on what drives her and her literary career

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

The Pulitzer prize-winning author of Olive Kitteridge, Elizabeth Strout, is in conversation with George Alagiah at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts.

Her new title Anything is Possible takes the form of linked short stories which tell the story of the inhabitants of rural, dusty Amgash, Illinois, the hometown of Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer who finally returns, after 17 years of absence, to visit the siblings she left behind.

Elizabeth Strout is noted for the profound wisdom she brings to her nuanced depictions of human relationships.

(Photo: Author Elizabeth Strout attends the Olive Kitteridge New York Premiere, 2014. Credit: Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

Jeffrey Eugenides20111114

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

Jeffrey Eugenides is best known for his ethereal first novel, the cult bestseller, Virgin Suicides, which was made into a film by Sophia Coppola.

In 2007 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his second novel, Middlesex.

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States, the decline and fall of his hometown of Detroit, Michigan and whether creative writing can be taught.

Jeffrey Eugenides20111114

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

is best known for his ethereal first novel, the cult bestseller, Virgin Suicides, which was made into a film by Sophia Coppola.

In 2007 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his second novel, Middlesex.

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States, the decline and fall of his hometown of Detroit, Michigan and whether creative writing can be taught.

Jeffrey Eugenides20111114

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Jeffrey Eugenides is best known for his ethereal first novel, the cult bestseller, Virgin Suicides, which was made into a film by Sophia Coppola.

In 2007 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his second novel, Middlesex.

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States, the decline and fall of his hometown of Detroit, Michigan and whether creative writing can be taught.

Jeffrey Eugenides20111115

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

Jeffrey Eugenides20111115

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

Jeffrey Eugenides20111115

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Jeffrey Eugenides is best known for his ethereal first novel, the cult bestseller, Virgin Suicides, which was made into a film by Sophia Coppola.

In 2007 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his second novel, Middlesex.

Razia Iqbal talks to him about being an immigrant in the melting pot of the United States, the decline and fall of his hometown of Detroit, Michigan and whether creative writing can be taught.

Joyce Carol Oates20121022

The prolific writer and academic Joyce Carol Oates on how she finds work rewarding

In New York, Razia Iqbal talks to the prolific writer and academic Joyce Carol Oates, about how she finds so much work rewarding.

Oates attributes her enormous output to a love of writing and a Protestant work ethic. She has turned her pen to numerous subjects including professional boxing, Marilyn Monroe, Detroit and a memoir of life after the death of her first husband. All while still working as a full time academic.

Razia Iqbal asks after so much work is it still as rewarding as it has always been?

(Image: Joyce Carol Oates, Credit: Getty Images)

Joyce Carol Oates20121022

The prolific writer and academic Joyce Carol Oates on how she finds work rewarding

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In New York, Razia Iqbal talks to the prolific writer and academic Joyce Carol Oates, about how she finds so much work rewarding.

Oates attributes her enormous output to a love of writing and a Protestant work ethic. She has turned her pen to numerous subjects including professional boxing, Marilyn Monroe, Detroit and a memoir of life after the death of her first husband. All while still working as a full time academic.

Razia Iqbal asks after so much work is it still as rewarding as it has always been?

(Image: Joyce Carol Oates, Credit: Getty Images)

Jung Chang20140627

Razia Iqbal talks to Jung Chang who, she says, went from concubine to laying the foundations of modern China

Razia Iqbal talks to Jung Chang who, she says, went from concubine to laying the founda...

Razia Iqbal talks to Jung Chang who, she says, went from concubine to laying the founda...

Razia Iqbal talks to Jung Chang who, she says, went from concubine to laying the foundations of modern China

Jung Chang20140627

The author on the imperial concubine, Cixi, who ruled China for half a century

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Jung Chang's book Wild Swans catapulted her onto the international stage, a harrowing story of her own family focusing on three generations of women.

The Chinese author then tackled a mammoth task of rethinking what we should think about Chairman Mao in her book Mao: The Unknown Story and has now written a biography of the Empress Dowager Cixi, who ruled China from 1860 to her death in 1908.

In front of an audience on the main stage at Hay Festival she talks to Razia Iqbal about this woman who, she says, went from concubine to laying the foundations of modern China.

Justin Cartwright20111205

Razia Iqbal's guest is the novelist Justin Cartwright

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Justin Cartwright is not a name that many recognise, but for those who read his novels he has a loyal following and his books have won a number of awards.

His characters are often successful professionals whose lives have started to unravel in ways that force them to change.

Razia Iqbal talks to Justin Cartwright about success as a writer and the possibilities of spiritual change in a material world.

Justin Cartwright2011120520111206

Razia Iqbal talks to author Justin Cartwright.

Razia Iqbal talks to author Justin Cartwright.

Justin Cartwright20111206

Razia Iqbal talks to author Justin Cartwright.

Justin Cartwright20111206

Razia Iqbal's guest is the novelist Justin Cartwright

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Justin Cartwright is not a name that many recognise, but for those who read his novels he has a loyal following and his books have won a number of awards.

His characters are often successful professionals whose lives have started to unravel in ways that force them to change.

Razia Iqbal talks to Justin Cartwright about success as a writer and the possibilities of spiritual change in a material world.

Kamila Shamsie20140404

The novelist talks about the themes of loyalty and belonging

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

For this edition of ‘Talking Books: On the Road’ Razia Iqbal is in Pakistan for the Lahore Literary Festival. Her guest is the Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie. Kamila Shamsie has written a lot about her home city of Karachi but her last two novels have spanned several continents and decades in history from Nagasaki to 9/11, from the excavation of India’s ancient history to its nascent independence movement. She talks to Razia Iqbal about why she is drawn to the themes of loyalty and belonging.

Karl Ove Knausgaard20140620

Karl Ove Knausgaard and what motivated him to expose intimate details of his life

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

The Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard is among the surprise literary successes in recent years. Aged only 45 he has been compared to March Proust having written 3,600 pages, six volumes, on his life. He contends this work isn’t a memoir but fiction. It’s called My Struggle, Min Kamp in Norwegian, and Mein Kampf in German. It’s full of the everyday banalities of life, existential crises, and a serious exposition on Adolf Hitler, the nature of good and evil, and death. Razia Iqbal interviews him in front of an audience at the Hay Festival and asks what motivated him to expose the most intimate details of his life on paper.

(Karl Ove Knausgaard)
(Credit: Thomas Wagstrom)

Lionel Shriver - Talking Books20160812

The author talks about her novels We Need to Talk about Kevin, and The Mandibles

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Lionel Shriver is best known for her hard-hitting 2003 novel We Need To Talk About Kevin, a book that is centered around a fictional school massacre. She will be talking about it with George Alagiah.

Her new book The Mandibles: A Family 2029-2047 focuses in on three generations of a wealthy family, as a fiscal crisis hits a near-future America. Although set in the future, Shriver holds up a mirror to the current state of the world and presents a glimpse into the decline that may await the United States all too soon.

Picture: Lionel Shriver, Credit: Stuart C Wilson/Getty Images

Michael Frayn20130527

Gavin Esler meets playwright and novelist Michael Frayn, one of the few British writers...

Gavin Esler meets playwright and novelist Michael Frayn, one of the few British writers to succeed in drama and prose fiction.

Michael Frayn20130527

Playwright and novelist Michael Frayn on why he wants to make his readers laugh

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In this the last of four interviews with authors from around the globe, Talking Books meets Britain’s Michael Frayn, one of the most prolific living writers in the English language. Best known as the author of the farce Noises Off and the dramas Copenhagen and Democracy, his comic novels have also found ciritical and commercial success. Then there are his translations from Russian and his critically acclaimed novels, his non-fiction, and his screenplays.

He talks to Gavin Esler about a writing career which began with his time as an award-winning journalist, how he feels his success has changed him and why he is drawn to the theme of chaos and human behaviour. Why does he want to make his readers laugh?

(Image: Special award winner Michael Frayn, at the Olivier Awards 2013. Credit: Press Association )

Mohammed Hanif20140328

On writing about minorities, contradictions in society and making his readers laugh

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Mohammed Hanif has been an officer pilot, a journalist and is now a satirical novelist. His work explores the contradictions in Pakistani society and he is one of a generation of new writers in the country who are keen to show it is not mired in conflict. He talks to Razia Iqbal about his novels A Case of Exploding Mangoes and Our Lady of Alice Bhatti and why he likes to make his readers laugh.

Recorded with Razia Iqbal in Pakistan for the Lahore Literary Festival.

Picture: Mohammed Hanif, Credit: Hannes Magerstaedt/Getty Images

Mohsin Hamid20130506

Award-winning Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid on his passion for fiction

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In the first of four interviews with authors from around the globe, Talking Books meets Mohsin Hamid, the award-winning Pakistani author. Mohsin Hamid has written three distinctly different novels, which all offer a vision of Pakistani modernity that challenges the prevailing stereotype of the country since 9/11. A former management consultant and Harvard and Princeton graduate, Mohsin tells Razia Iqbal why he is passionate about the role of fiction in culture. Why does he feel so strongly about the relationship between the author and the reader?

Mohsin Hamid20130506

In the first of four interviews with authors from around the globe, Talking Books meets Mohsin Hamid, the award-winning Pakistani author. Mohsin Hamid has written three distinctly different novels, which all offer a vision of Pakistani modernity that challenges the prevailing stereotype of the country since 9/11. A former management consultant and Harvard and Princeton graduate, Mohsin tells Razia Iqbal why he is passionate about the role of fiction in culture. Why does he feel so strongly about the relationship between the author and the reader?

Award-winning Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid on his passion for fiction

Award-winning Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid on his passion for fiction

In the first of four interviews with authors from around the globe, Talking Books meets Mohsin Hamid, the award-winning Pakistani author. Mohsin Hamid has written three distinctly different novels, which all offer a vision of Pakistani modernity that challenges the prevailing stereotype of the country since 9/11. A former management consultant and Harvard and Princeton graduate, Mohsin tells Razia Iqbal why he is passionate about the role of fiction in culture. Why does he feel so strongly about the relationship between the author and the reader?

Nawal Al Saadawi20111128

Razia Iqbal talks to the feminist campaigner Nawal Al Saadawi.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week in the second of two special programmes recorded in Egypt, Razia Iqbal talks to the feminist campaigner Nawal Al Saadawi.

Al Saadawi was born in a remote village in Egypt in 1931.

In a fiercely conservative country she has spent her life fighting for women's rights, including campaigns against female circumcision, domestic violence and political exclusion.

In a country where just over half the adult female population can read and write, Razia Iqbal asks her how her books have contributed to her campaigns.

Nawal Al Saadawi20111129

Razia Iqbal talks to the feminist campaigner Nawal Al Saadawi.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

This week in the second of two special programmes recorded in Egypt, Razia Iqbal talks to the feminist campaigner Nawal Al Saadawi.

Al Saadawi was born in a remote village in Egypt in 1931.

In a fiercely conservative country she has spent her life fighting for women's rights, including campaigns against female circumcision, domestic violence and political exclusion.

In a country where just over half the adult female population can read and write, Razia Iqbal asks her how her books have contributed to her campaigns.

On The Road20140328

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Mohammed Hanif about why...

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Mohammed Hanif about why he focuses on minorities in Pakistan.

On The Road20140328

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Mohammed Hanif about why...

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal talks to novelist Mohammed Hanif about why he focuses on minorities in Pakistan.

On The Road20140404

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal asks novelist Kamila Shamsie why she likes...

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal asks novelist Kamila Shamsie why she likes themes of loyalty and belonging.

On The Road20140404

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal asks novelist Kamila Shamsie why she likes...

At the Lahore Literary Festival, Razia Iqbal asks novelist Kamila Shamsie why she likes themes of loyalty and belonging.

Paul Auster20121029

Razia Iqbal talks to US author Paul Auster about his work, and his book Winter Journal.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Paul Auster20121030

Razia Iqbal talks to US author Paul Auster about his work, and his book Winter Journal.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Richard Ford20121015

"I'm dyslexic... I see language as objects on a page" author Richard Ford on writing

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Richard Ford20121016

"I'm dyslexic... I see language as objects on a page" author Richard Ford on writing

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Sebastian Barry20170721

Author Sebastian Barry on his writing career and latest novel Days Without End

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Sebastian Barry discusses his distinguished writing career and latest novel, 'Days Without End', winner of the Costa Book of the Year Award in 2016, at Hay Festival of Literature, 2017.

Teenager Tom McNulty has fled brutal poverty in Ireland for America, later enlisting to fight in the Indian Wars and the Civil War. This dramatic and lyrical tale has won rave reviews. Barry's fine body of historical fiction has roots in the stories passed down the generations of families in Ireland.

(Photo: Irish author Sebastian Barry poses with his book Days Without End at the 2016 Costa Book Awards. Credit: Niklas Hallen/Getty Images)

Sebastian Barry20170721

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

Sebastian Barry discusses his distinguished writing career and latest novel, 'Days Without End', winner of the Costa Book of the Year Award in 2016, at Hay Festival of Literature, 2017.

Teenager Tom McNulty has fled brutal poverty in Ireland for America, later enlisting to fight in the Indian Wars and the Civil War. This dramatic and lyrical tale has won rave reviews. Barry's fine body of historical fiction has roots in the stories passed down the generations of families in Ireland.

(Photo: Irish author Sebastian Barry poses with his book Days Without End at the 2016 Costa Book Awards. Credit: Niklas Hallen/Getty Images)

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

Sebastian Barry discusses his distinguished writing career and latest novel, 'Days Without End', winner of the Costa Book of the Year Award in 2016, at Hay Festival of Literature, 2017.

Teenager Tom McNulty has fled brutal poverty in Ireland for America, later enlisting to fight in the Indian Wars and the Civil War. This dramatic and lyrical tale has won rave reviews. Barry's fine body of historical fiction has roots in the stories passed down the generations of families in Ireland.

(Photo: Irish author Sebastian Barry poses with his book Days Without End at the 2016 Costa Book Awards. Credit: Niklas Hallen/Getty Images)

Susan Hill20111031

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

Susan Hill had her first novel published in the UK at the age of 18.

Since then her short stories and novels have won numerous awards, and her ghost story, The Woman in Black is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to her about her writing life and how ghost stories still thrill her readers in the modern age.

Susan Hill20111031

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

had her first novel published in the UK at the age of 18.

Since then her short stories and novels have won numerous awards, and her ghost story, The Woman in Black is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to her about her writing life and how ghost stories still thrill her readers in the modern age.

Susan Hill20111031

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Susan Hill had her first novel published in the UK at the age of 18.

Since then her short stories and novels have won numerous awards, and her ghost story, The Woman in Black is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to her about her writing life and how ghost stories still thrill her readers in the modern age.

Susan Hill20111101

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

Susan Hill20111101

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

Susan Hill20111101

Razia Iqbal talks to her about The Woman in Black which is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Susan Hill had her first novel published in the UK at the age of 18.

Since then her short stories and novels have won numerous awards, and her ghost story, The Woman in Black is about to be released as a film.

Razia Iqbal talks to her about her writing life and how ghost stories still thrill her readers in the modern age.

T. Geronimo Johnson20180926

Kirsty Wark talks to author and academic T. Geronimo Johnson

Interviews with well-known authors from Britain and around the world

Talking Books2016072220160723 (WS)

Martha Kearney talks to Jamaican-born author Marlon James. James has written three novels to date, John Crew’s Devil, The Book of Night Women and his latest book A Brief History of Seven Killings, which won the Man Booker prize in 2015. He discusses his work and how in his third he starts with an account of an attempted assassination of Bob Marley intertwining fact and fiction, documenting a violent era of political instability in Jamaican history.

(Photo: Author Marlon James poses with his award at the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2015 ceremony in London. Credit: Neil Hall/Getty Images)

Jamaican-born author Marlon James on his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

Talking Books20160729

George Alagiah speaks to author Tahmima Anam. Born in Bangladesh, and growing up in Paris, New York City and Bangkok, Anam’s first novel , A Golden Age, centred around the Bangladesh Liberation War and was inspired by her parents who were freedom fighters during the conflict. It went on to win the Best First Book award at the 2008 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize.

Her sequel The Good Muslim, was nominated for the 2011 Man Asian Literary Prize. This book explores the after-effects of war and examines the conflicts within modern-day religion and family. Her latest book the Bones of Grace, is the story of searching - or love, parentage and self.

(Photo: Bangladeshi author Tahmim)a Anam talks at the Liberation War Museum, Dhaka, 2007. Credit: Farjana K Godhuly/AFP/Getty Images

Author Tahmima Anam on her first novel , A Golden Age, about Bangladesh's Liberation war

Talking Books20160805
Talking Books20160805

Martha Kearney interviews author Peter Carey, best known for being one of only three authors to win the Man Booker Prize twice. Born in Australia, Carey‘s first novel Bliss was published in 1981. His first Booker Prize winning novel was Oscar and Lucinda bringing him international recognition, along with his second True History of The Kelly Gang. His latest book Amnesia, tells the story of a young, female, Australian computer hacker, and follows a journalist recreating her personality for the media. With echoes of Wikileaks and Julian Assange, the book explores Carey’s issues with privacy and the historical and political relationship between America and Australia.

(Photo: Australian writer Peter Carey, shortlisted for the Man Booker literary prize, poses with his book, Parrot and Olivier in America, 2010. Credit: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

Author Peter Carey on his novels and issues with privacy

Talking Books20160812
Talking Books20160812

The author talks about her novels We Need to Talk about Kevin, and The Mandibles

Lionel Shriver is best known for her hard-hitting 2003 novel We Need To Talk About Kevin, a book that is centered around a fictional school massacre. She will be talking about it with George Alagiah.

Her new book The Mandibles: A Family 2029-2047 focuses in on three generations of a wealthy family, as a fiscal crisis hits a near-future America. Although set in the future, Shriver holds up a mirror to the current state of the world and presents a glimpse into the decline that may await the United States all too soon.

Picture: Lionel Shriver, Credit: Stuart C Wilson/Getty Images

Talking Books: Alaa Al Aswany20111121

Razia Iqbal talks to author Alaa Al Aswany.

Talking Books: Alaa Al Aswany20111122
Talking Books: Alaa Al Aswany20111122

Razia Iqbal talks to author Alaa Al Aswany.

Talking Books: Nawal Al Saadawi20111128

Razia Iqbal talks to author Nawal Al Saadawi.

Talking Books: Nawal Al Saadawi20111129
Talking Books: Nawal Al Saadawi20111129

Razia Iqbal talks to author Nawal Al Saadawi.

Tim Winton20170714
Tim Winton20170714

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

Tim Winton20170804

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

Rebecca Jones, BBC News arts correspondent, is at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts to meet Tim Winton, the critically-acclaimed author of novels Dirt Music, Riders and Cloudstreet.

Tim Winton, who once likened writing to surfing, is now publishing two non-fiction titles about his native Australia - Island Home: A Landscape Memoir, is a passionate call for the conservation of its wild spaces. The deeply personal The Boy Behind the Curtain: Notes from an Australian Life, shows how moments from Winton's formative years have shaped his views on class, faith, fundamentalism, the environment and literature.

Tim Winton20170804

We talk to authors at the Hay Festival of Literature, looking at what drives their work and at their literary life story.

Rebecca Jones, BBC News arts correspondent, is at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts to meet Tim Winton, the critically-acclaimed author of novels Dirt Music, Riders and Cloudstreet.

Tim Winton, who once likened writing to surfing, is now publishing two non-fiction titles about his native Australia - Island Home: A Landscape Memoir, is a passionate call for the conservation of its wild spaces. The deeply personal The Boy Behind the Curtain: Notes from an Australian Life, shows how moments from Winton's formative years have shaped his views on class, faith, fundamentalism, the environment and literature.

Tim Winton - Author20170804

Australian author Tim Winton on what drives him and his literary career

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Rebecca Jones, BBC News arts correspondent, is at Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts to meet Tim Winton, the critically-acclaimed author of novels Dirt Music, Riders and Cloudstreet.

Tim Winton, who once likened writing to surfing, is now publishing two non-fiction titles about his native Australia - Island Home: A Landscape Memoir, is a passionate call for the conservation of its wild spaces. The deeply personal The Boy Behind the Curtain: Notes from an Australian Life, shows how moments from Winton's formative years have shaped his views on class, faith, fundamentalism, the environment and literature.

Toni Morrison20121008

How much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In a new series of Talking Books, Razia Iqbal talks to four authors from the United States.

In the first programme she is in Rome, at the American Academy, to meet one of America's most-celebrated authors.

Toni Morrison is the only black woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and her books have been described as amongst the most-important in modern America.

Her novels explore the pain and shame of racism in a unique style that mixes speech, magic and poetry, often to tell brutal stories.

For Morrison 'all good art is political.

She backed Obama in the 2008 election and has spoken out against racism and censorship.

Razia Iqbal asks her how much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

(Image: President Barack Obama prsenting the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor to author Toni Morrison. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Toni Morrison2012100820121009 (WS)

In a new series of Talking Books, Razia Iqbal talks to four authors from the United States.

In the first programme she is in Rome, at the American Academy, to meet one of America's most-celebrated authors.

Toni Morrison is the only black woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and her books have been described as amongst the most-important in modern America.

Her novels explore the pain and shame of racism in a unique style that mixes speech, magic and poetry, often to tell brutal stories.

For Morrison 'all good art is political.

She backed Obama in the 2008 election and has spoken out against racism and censorship.

Razia Iqbal asks her how much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

(Image: President Barack Obama prsenting the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor to author Toni Morrison. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

How much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

How much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

How much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

In a new series of Talking Books, Razia Iqbal talks to four authors from the United States.

In the first programme she is in Rome, at the American Academy, to meet one of America's most-celebrated authors.

Toni Morrison is the only black woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and her books have been described as amongst the most-important in modern America.

Her novels explore the pain and shame of racism in a unique style that mixes speech, magic and poetry, often to tell brutal stories.

For Morrison 'all good art is political.

She backed Obama in the 2008 election and has spoken out against racism and censorship.

Razia Iqbal asks her how much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

(Image: President Barack Obama prsenting the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor to author Toni Morrison. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Toni Morrison20121009

How much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In a new series of Talking Books, Razia Iqbal talks to four authors from the United States.

In the first programme she is in Rome, at the American Academy, to meet one of America's most-celebrated authors.

Toni Morrison is the only black woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and her books have been described as amongst the most-important in modern America.

Her novels explore the pain and shame of racism in a unique style that mixes speech, magic and poetry, often to tell brutal stories.

For Morrison 'all good art is political.

She backed Obama in the 2008 election and has spoken out against racism and censorship.

Razia Iqbal asks her how much has changed for black Americans since Obama entered the White House?

(Image: President Barack Obama prsenting the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor to author Toni Morrison. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Toni Morrison20140613

"Our story... That wasn't anywhere" author Toni Morrison on African American literature

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for literature 1993, the last American to do so, and she remains a towering figure in literature today.

Her works range from her first book The Bluest Eye about an African American girl who wants blue eyes, and Beloved about the impact of 200 years of slavery. She has always written from the perspective of being an African American woman yet her writing has become emblematic about an essential aspect of American reality.

In front of an audience of 2,000 at Hay Festival 2014 Razia Iqbal talks to Toni Morrison about how she has challenged the ‘white gaze’ and, with the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War in America next year, how has the US confronted what was at the heart of that war, slavery?

Picture: Toni Morrison, Credit: Francois Durand/Getty Images

Tracy Chevalier20130520

Historical novelist Tracy Chevalier on why she wants to bring the past to life

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

In this third of four interviews with authors from around the globe, Talking Books meets American-born author Tracy Chevalier, whose second novel Girl with a Pearl Earring has sold more than three million copies worldwide and has been made into a film starring Colin Firth and Scarlet Johansson. Her historical novels are highly researched and range in subject matter from the discovery of fossils to Quakers helping slaves escape in pre-civil war Ohio. She talks to Gavin Esler about her love of research, why her latest book was the first to be set in her homeland America, and how she doesn’t write about what she knows. Why does she want to bring the past to life?

(Image: American-born author Tracy Chevalier)

01Germaine Greer - Author - Talking Books20150529

A conversation with Germaine Greer at the Hay Festival in Wales in front of an audience

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

02Kazuo Ishiguro - Talking Books20150605

A conversation with author Kazuo Ishiguro in front of an audience at Hay Festival, Wales

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Martha Kearney speaks to Kazuo Ishiguro in front of a live audience at the Hay Festival in Wales. Kazuo Ishiguro has managed to achieve literary success with immense popularity amongst readers. He has won a Man Booker prize and been shortlisted four times. His novels have sold in their millions around the world and have been made into highly successful films. His latest book The Buried Giant is set in a Anglo-Saxon England beset by ogres and dragons and is his first novel in 10 years. He talks to Martha Kearney about some of the themes in his books as well as his highly individual prose style.

(Photo: Kazuo Ishiguro meets fans and signs copies of his new novel The Buried Giant at Waterstone's, Piccadilly, 2015. Credit: Ian Gavan/Getty Images)

03Yuval Noah Harari - Talking Books20150612

Yuval Noah Harari on his book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Anita Anand speaks to Yuval Noah Harari on his new book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. Sapiens starts big from the very start, asking profound questions. What defines us as a species? How did we come to be like this? And, what truly makes us happy? It has been translated into over 30 languages and is now a bestseller in many countries around the world. Yuval explains why he decided to take on such a mammoth task and questions whether we really are happier now than we were 15,000 years ago.

(Photo: Yuval Noah Harari)

04Anne Enright - Talking Books20150619

Ireland\u2019s first Laureate for Fiction Anne Enright on love, sex, secrets and Irish history

Razia Iqbal talks to a series of well-known authors from Britain and around the world.

Anita Anand speaks to award winning novelist Anne Enright. She was catapulted onto the international stage in 2007 when she was the surprise winner of the Man Booker Prize for her fourth novel The Gathering. Since then she has continued to rise and rise - this year becoming Ireland’s first ever Laureate for Fiction. Witty, warm, yet at the same time ascorbic acerbic (presumably) and brutal in her writing, she rips up the rule book, crocheting with complicated timelines and weaving in and out of the secrets of her protagonists. She speaks to Anita Anand about the themes in her work - love, sex, secrets and Ireland's tumultuous history.