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01Stella Rimington2011021420120521Most people, at some point in their life, will have been a willing or reluctant member of a team. Whether it was a college year, an army regiment, a business team, a cricket match, am dram theatricals, the pub quiz or the Girl Guides, group photos are our souvenirs - fond or grim reminders of a previous way of life and the people who shared it. In this series, five writers take out a team photograph from their past and take a forensic and philosophical look at the shared strangeness of a moment preserved.
Stella Rimington considers a photograph commemorating a cricket match between the Ladies team from the British High Commission and the Ladies of the Roshanara Club in Delhi, 1966.
Stella Rimington lived in India between 1965 and 1969, having travelled out there with her husband John Rimington, when he was appointed First Secretary (Economic) for the British High Commission in Delhi. She joined the Security Service (MI5) in 1965 and was appointed Director-General in 1992. She was the first woman to hold the post and the first Director-General whose name was publicly announced on appointment. Following her retirement from MI5 in 1996, she became a non-executive director of Marks and Spencer and published her autobiography, Open Secret (Arrow 2002). Her first novel, At Risk, was published in 2004.
Produced by Emma Harding.

Five writers take out a team photo from their past and consider the moment when one is captured not as an individual, but as part of a group.
Most people, at some point in their life, will have been a willing or reluctant member of a team.
Whether it was a college year, an army regiment, a business team, a cricket match, am dram theatricals, the pub quiz or the Girl Guides, group photos are our souvenirs - fond or grim reminders of a previous way of life and the people who shared it.
In this series, five writers take out a team photograph from their past and take a forensic and philosophical look at the shared strangeness of a moment preserved.
This evening, Stella Rimington, former Director-General of MI5, considers a photograph commemorating a cricket match between the Ladies team from the British High Commission and the Ladies of the Roshanara Club in Delhi, 1966.
Stella Rimington lived in India between 1965 and 1969, having travelled out there with her husband John Rimington, when he was appointed First Secretary (Economic) for the British High Commission in Delhi.
She joined the Security Service (MI5) in 1965 and was appointed Director-General in 1992.
She was the first woman to hold the post and the first Director-General whose name was publicly announced on appointment.
Following her retirement from MI5 in 1996, she became a non-executive director of Marks and Spencer and published her autobiography, Open Secret (Arrow 2002).
Her first novel, At Risk, was published in 2004.
She is to chair the Man Booker prize in 2011.
Stella Rimington, former director-general of MI5, considers a team photo from her past.
02Hisham Matar2011021520120522reflects on a photograph of himself as a young boy with the other members of the 'rabbit club', an exclusive group that prided itself on being the best rabbit catchers in his grandfather's small Libyan town.
Hisham Matar was born in New York in 1970 and spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo. He has lived in London since 1986. His novel, In the Country of Men, was shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize 2006.
Produced by Emma Harding.

Five writers take out a team photograph from their past and consider the moment when one is captured not as an individual, but as part of a group.
Hisham Matar reflects on a photograph of himself as a young boy with the other members of 'the rabbit club' in his grandfather's small Libyan town.
Hisham Matar was born in New York in 1970 and spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo.
He has lived in London since 1986.
His novel, In the Country of Men, was shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize 2006.
His latest novel, Anatomy of a Disappearance, is published by Viking in March 2011.
Novelist Hisham Matar considers a team photo from his childhood in Libya.
03Eva Salzman2011021620120523reflects on the photograph of herself in a dance piece called Life of the Bee, created by Doris Humphrey, a pioneer of modern dance and based on a book by Maeterlinck.
Eva Salzman was born in 1960 in New York City, and grew up in Brooklyn where - from the age of 10 until 22 - she was a dancer and later a choreographer. She was educated at Bennington College and Columbia University, moving to Britain in 1985. Her books of poetry include Double Crossing: New and Selected Poems (Bloodaxe 2004), The English Earthquake (Bloodaxe 1992) and Bargain With The Watchman (Oxford University Press 1997).
Produced by Emma Harding.

Five writers take out a team photograph from their past and consider the moment when one is captured not as an individual, but as part of a group.
Poet Eva Salzman reflects on the photograph of herself in a publicity shot for a dance piece called Life of the Bee, created by Doris Humphrey, a pioneer of modern dance.
Eva Salzman was born in 1960 in New York City, and grew up in Brooklyn where - from the age of 10 until 22 - she was a dancer and later a choreographer.
She was educated at Bennington College and Columbia University, moving to Britain in 1985.
Her books of poetry include Double Crossing: New and Selected Poems (Bloodaxe 2004), The English Earthquake (Bloodaxe 1992) and Bargain With The Watchman (Oxford University Press 1997).
Her most recent book is the acclaimed Women's Work: Modern Women Poets Writing in English (Seren 2008), co-edited with Amy Wack.
Poet and former dancer Eva Salzman considers a team photo from her past.
04Farahad Zama2011021720120524reflects on a photograph of himself as a member of a bank's IT team, engaged on a project that was to have far-reaching consequences for his own career.
Farahad Zama moved to London in 1990 from Vizag in India. He is a father of two, and he works as an IT director in the City. He is the author of two novels, The Marriage Bureau for Rich People (Abacus 2008) and The Many Conditions of Love (2009).
Produced by Emma Harding.

Five writers take out a team photograph from their past and consider the moment when one is captured not as an individual, but as part of a group.
Writer and City-based IT director, Farahad Zama, reflects on a photograph of himself as a member of a bank's IT team, engaged on a project that was to have far-reaching consequences for his own career.
Farahad Zama moved to London in 1990 from Vizag in India.
He is a father of two, and he works as an IT director in the City.
He is the author of two novels, The Marriage Bureau for Rich People (Abacus 2008) and The Many Conditions of Love (2009).
His latest novel, The Wedding Wallah, is published on April 28th 2011 (Abacus).
Writer and City-based IT director Farahad Zama considers a team photo from his past.
05 LASTHoratio Clare2011021820120525considers his teenage self in the context of a youthful, multi-national lifeboat crew.
Horatio Clare was born in London in 1973, but grew up on a hill farm in the Black Mountains of south Wales. His books include the memoirs Running for the Hills (2006), Truant: Notes from the Slippery Slope (2007) and A Single Swallow (2009). Running for the Hills won a Somerset Maugham Award in 2007, was longlisted for The Guardian First Book Award 2006 and Clare was shortlisted for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, 2007.
Produced by Emma Harding.

Five writers take out a team photo from their past and consider the moment when one is captured not as an individual, but as part of a group.
Writer Horatio Clare considers a photograph of his teenage self in the context of a youthful, multi-national lifeboat crew.
Horatio Clare was born in London in 1973, but grew up on a hill farm in the Black Mountains of south Wales.
His books include the memoirs Running for the Hills (2006), Truant: Notes from the Slippery Slope (2007) and A Single Swallow (2009).
Running for the Hills won a Somerset Maugham Award in 2007, was longlisted for The Guardian First Book Award 2006 and Clare was shortlisted for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, 2007.
Writer Horatio Clare considers a team photo from his time as a member of a lifeboat crew.

Duration

  • 15 Minutes

Genre

  • Documentaries
  • Arts
  • Culture & the Media
  • Factual
  • Life Stories

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