Tech Tent [world Service]

Rory Cellan-jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

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20180406

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

20180629
20180706

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

20180713

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

\u2018spear Phishing\u2019 Scammer Demanded Sex Show20170324

We hear about a devastatingly personal 'spear phishing' attack

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We hear about a devastatingly personal 'spear phishing' attack, where the victim was asked to perform a sex show in order to regain control of her online accounts. Professor Alan Woodward, a cyber security expert at Surrey University, tells us whether attacks like this are becoming more common.

BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Edinburgh to meet the robots that want to be friends with you - but are we ready to let them into every area of our lives?

And we find out about a new video game aimed at helping stroke patients regain the use of their hands. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman is joined throughout the programme by Dan Simmons, tech reporter from BBC Click and special guest, James Vincent, reporter for tech website The Verge.

(Photo: Silhouette of a man spear fishing at sea. Credit: Getty Images)

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A Crisis In Moderation?20170526

We look at why social media companies are under scrutiny for the way content is moderated

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Facebook's moderation guidelines on what kind of content should be removed from the site were leaked into the public domain this week. For the social media industry as a whole, moderation is a headache that's not going away. We hear from Professor Sarah Roberts of UCLA in California, who has carried out extensive research into this process of moderation.

Plus, you can stop worrying about robots taking your job - imagine a different world of work. Future gazer Reil Miller, head of foresight at UNESCO tells us more.

And do you long for the simple life, when mobile phones were just - phones! Nokia's iconic 3310 model is back. Would it tempt you to give up your smartphone?

The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones is joined for comment throughout by special guest, Clare McDonald of Computer Weekly and BBC tech desk reporter Samantha Smith.

(Picture: Facebook logos. Credit: Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images)

Cheltenham Science Festival 201820180608

What can chess tell us about artificial intelligence?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

What can chess tell us about artificial intelligence? Rory Cellan-Jones presents the show live from the UK's Cheltenham Science Festival, where he speaks to chess masters Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan. Matt Jones, professor of computer science at Swansea University, talks smartphone addiction and theoretical physicist Clifford Johnson explains the science behind Marvel comic book movies. Our special guest is Dr Jessica Barker, guest curator of the festival and cyber security expert.

(Photo: Artificial intelligence playing chess, Credit: Getty Images)

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

Designing The Future20180511
Designing The Future20180511

Live from "The Future Starts Here", the V&A Museum's major new exhibition in London.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google reveals it's working on a convincingly human-sounding assistant that can perform phone tasks for you, for example booking a restaurant table or hair appointment. We broadcast live from London's V&A Museum for the opening of a new exhibition "The Future Starts Here" on how intelligent tech is being designed into the world around us. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx, BBC Online tech reporter, and Rory Hyde, co-curator at the V&A.

(Image: A gallery assistant sits in the VW Sedric driverless concept car on display at the V&A, Credit: Leon Neal/ Getty Images).

Facebook Seeks Lonely Hearts20180504
Facebook Seeks Lonely Hearts20180504

Data scandal-hit social network announces online dating feature.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The social network announces an online dating feature despite being embroiled in a data privacy scandal. Will users trust it with their most personal information? Plus, could the pioneering female code-breakers of World War 2 inspire a new generation of women and girls into cyber-security work? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online technology correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Stephanie Hare, technology researcher and broadcaster.

(Image: Stock photograph of a couple on a holiday or date in Paris, Credit: Getty Images).

Fighting Over Eyeballs20180622

Instagram launches a long video feature and online ads may ask you to opt-in to see them.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A special look at online video as Instagram launches IGTV, a feature encouraging its users to upload and view longer footage from their phones. Plus we talk to Emmett Shear, co-founder of the games streaming site Twitch on its enduring appeal and how it can broaden its appeal to non-gamers. And, James Milne from advertising platform Outbrain tells us why he thinks video ads that you opt-in to see are more likely to be effective for brands. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Rachael Krishna from Buzzfeed News, and BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield.

(Image: Stock photo of friends looking amazed at a smartphone, Credit: Getty Images).

Fortnite Takes Over E320180615

The headlines from the major games event in Los Angeles.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Dave Lee reports from the E3 games conference in Los Angeles, where Fortnite made the biggest splash. Rory Cellan-Jones watches a Tesla crash on purpose to test its autonomous features, and talks to Frank Chen, partner at Andreessen Horowitz, a Silicon valley venture capital firm, about the future for driverless cars. Rory also hears from the woman hoping to start an African version of Amazon, and one of the founders of OnePlus, the Chinese smartphone firm. He is joined in the studio by Ingrid Lunden, news editor and writer at Techcrunch.com.

(Photo: The Nintendo stand at the E3 event in Los Angeles, Credit: Getty Images)

Is Fortnite Here To Stay?20180601

What the multiplayer hit game Fortnite tells us about trends in gaming.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The multiplayer shooting and building video game Fortnite has become the latest worldwide gaming sensation. What is its appeal and what does it reveal about trends in gaming? Plus, we've seen augmented reality video, now we find out about technologies to augment what you hear. And, are we ready to accept music made by artificial intelligence? We chat to musician Taryn Southern who uses AI in her compositions. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and Keza MacDonald, games editor at The Guardian.

(Image: Videogame Fortnite being played on a large screen, Credit: Chris Foxx/ BBC).

Microsoft's Mobile Meltdown20150710

Microsoft cuts smartphone jobs; the future of Bitcoin; bringing back the barter economy.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones asks whether Microsoft's efforts to gain a foothold in the mobile market are finally over after it announced big cuts to its handsets business. He also visits a digital currency conference in London to find out where the future of Bitcoin lies, and special guest David Birch, digital currency expert, give his views. Plus we hear from Brazil on how technology could boost the barter economy, and children in the UK learning to code.

(Picture: This week's Tech Tent; Credit: Rory Cellan-Jones, BBC)

Nowhere To Hide20180525

Police around the world are starting to use facial recognition tech to hunt suspects.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Amazon has defended working with US police forces to provide facial recognition technology, amid concern from civil rights groups. Matt Cagle from the American Civil Liberties Union tells us why he's worried. Plus, are Europe's new data privacy rules, known as GDPR, a first step in regulating the tech sector for the benefit of its users, or will their complexity and ambiguity amount to a missed opportunity? And, why the French president thinks his country can lead the world in artificial intelligence. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Kate Bevan, editor of Which? Computing.

(Image: Concept image for facial recognition using a smartphone, Credit: Getty Images).

Retro Computers20150327

Broadcasting from the Centre for Computing History in Cambridge, with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Broadcast from the UK's Centre for Computing History museum in the university city of Cambridge. We look at the past, and consider the future, of computing. Dave Lee reports on whether games publishers are missing out on a massive opportunity to bring back, and profit from, their old titles. And researchers from Imperial College London show us medical technology that might allow us to upgrade our bodies. Phil Cox of Silicon Valley Bank gives his view on whether such medical technology is ripe for Silicon Valley investment. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

're-usable Rocket' Success For Spacex20170331

Elon Musk's SpaceX redeploys a rocket for the first time.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Elon Musk's SpaceX venture has just made history by re-launching part of a rocket - but that's not all. This week he's also launched a mission to integrate computers directly with the human brain and his car company Tesla attracted significant Chinese investment. It's stock market value is edging up to around that of Ford. To find out why, we ask electric car analyst and Elon Musk watcher, Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield.

After a spate of exploding phones and in the midst of a high level corruption scandal, Samsung brings it's newest smartphone to the market. Is the Galaxy S8 the most important product launch ever for South Korea's tech giant?

And at the London Games Festival, we meet Ken Levine, creator of BioShock and a titan of the videogames world.

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined throughout the programme by BBC tech reporter, Jane Wakefield and special guest, Jonathan Margolis, technology journalist and gadget guru.

(Photo: SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket lifts off at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images)

Social Media's Growing Pains20141031

More adverts coming on Twitter, the tech sector in North Korea, and hacker culture.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Twitter plans to carry more advertising, but will users put up with it? We ask Adam Bain, the company's Global VP of Revenue. What kind of tech industry is there in North Korea, a nation in which internet access is blocked for ordinary citizens? The BBC's Steve Evans finds out. And we discuss hacker culture and the Anonymous collective with anthropologist Gabriella Coleman who has written a book about the movement.

Our special guest is Victoria Richardson, worldwide mobile payments expert from the company Consult Hyperion. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

Spinning The Tech Globe20150320

Tech stories from Canada, Cuba, Switzerland and China, presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We take a truly global look at the world of technology this week, with reports from Leo Kelion from Switzerland on how traditional watchmakers are responding to the rise of smart watches, and Jane Wakefield at the TED conference in Vancouver on the next generation of 3D printers. We also hear from Japan's biggest messaging app about censorship in China, and hear about Cuba's first free wifi hotspot from Will Grant in Havana. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones

Tech Giants' Earnings Rise20180427

Facebook's quarterly sales rose by $3.9bn in its first results since its privacy scandal.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Facebook's quarterly sales rose by nearly 50% in the social media giant's first results since a privacy scandal over users' data emerged.
The company said that revenues rose to $11.9bn in the first three months of the year, compared to $8bn previously. AJ Bell's Russ Mould talks us through the numbers. Ben Wood from CCS Insight tells us about moves from tech firms to offer song choices free from bad language. But why has it taken them so long? And we get to grips with the future of sex toys with Mystery Vibe founder Stephanie Alys, who tells us what our bedrooms of tomorrow could be like. Presenter Zoe Kleinman is joined by BBC Technology reporter Jane Wakefield and special guest Kasmir Hill of Gizmodo joins the programme from San Francisco.

(Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg returns from a break in a hearing of the House Energy and Commerce Committee on April 11 in Washington, DC. Credit: Getty Images)

The Apple Watch Is Coming20150313

Will the Apple Watch kick-start the wearable tech market? Rory Cellan-Jones presents.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Apple's smart watch goes on sale next month. Olivia Solon, technology editor of the Daily Mirror, tells us what she thinks, and whether it will revolutionise the wearables market. Dr Max Little from Aston University tells us how smartphones are helping medical research, and Craig Wilson, boss of Williams Advanced Engineering, talks about putting Formula 1 technology into buses and trams. Jane Wakefield and Matt Wall also have the latest news from the online tech desk. Rory Cellan-Jones presents.

The Race To Driverless Cars20180518

Europe takes the fight to the US and China to lead the world in autonomous driving.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We visit the London Motor Show where we talk to Andreas Herrmann, co-author of a new book "Autonomous Driving - How the driverless revolution will change the world". Plus, tech giants such as Facebook and Google don't charge for their services up-front, so how should their economic contribution be measured? Renowned economist Erik Brynjolfsson has some suggestions. And, we learn about the challenges of the startup scene in Libya from Benghazi-based entrepreneur Khaled Elmufti.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Shona Ghosh, senior tech reporter at Business Insider. (Image: Passengers getting on a self-driving minibus at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in Shanghai, Credit: AFP/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

Who's Watching You Online?20180413

Facebook's boss Mark Zuckerberg tells Congress users control their data - but do they?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Facebook's boss Mark Zuckerberg tells the US Congress that users control their data - but do they really? We examine how more information is gathered about you than you might think. And we ask how deeply the University of Cambridge is involved in the Facebook data scandal. Vesselin Popov from the Psychometrics Centre at the university responds. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Frederike Kaltheuner from Privacy International.

(Image: Woman looking at data on a computer screen as if seen from behind the glass, Credit: Getty Images).

0120140117

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

02Tech Tent20140124

A new music streaming service arrives, but will people be willing to pay to listen to songs without actually owning their own copies? There's been a slew of financial results from technology companies this week, is the global tech sector in a boom, or a bubble? And as play and learning around the world become more electronic, we find out what that means for schools in Kenya. Eben Upton, the creator of the cheap educational computer, Raspberry Pi, joins Rory Cellan-Jones and members of the BBC Technology desk in the tent.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Rory Cellan-Jones presents this new weekly look at technology trends and businesses

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A new music streaming service arrives, but will people be willing to pay to listen to songs without actually owning their own copies? There's been a slew of financial results from technology companies this week, is the global tech sector in a boom, or a bubble? And as play and learning around the world become more electronic, we find out what that means for schools in Kenya. Eben Upton, the creator of the cheap educational computer, Raspberry Pi, joins Rory Cellan-Jones and members of the BBC Technology desk in the tent.

03Tech Tent20140131

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Why "Deep Learning" will shape our future. Plus the cybersecurity industry in Israel.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why "Deep Learning" will shape our future. Plus one of Israel's leading investors on how the tech industry there is vying to lead the world in cybersecurity. And why there's a backlash in California against the companies and workers that have brought such prosperity to Silicon Valley. Rory Cellan-Jones welcomes Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Officer for Microsoft UK, into the tent and he's joined, as ever, by reporters from the BBC's Technology desk.

04Tech Tent20140207

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

How social media is changing and has money taken the fun out of mobile games?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined by Ellie Gibson from Eurogamer and members of the the BBC's Technology team to discuss how social media is changing; and whether money has taken the fun out of mobile games? And Rory reports on the veterans of the Second World War who used the world's first programmable electronic computer to crack Nazi codes.

05Is Bitcoin In Trouble?20140214

And is it worth paying to promote your FaceBook page?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A big Bitcoin exchange blocks withdrawals after a security scare. Is it worth paying to promote your FaceBook page? And the difficulties in setting up an online supermarket in Nigeria. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with guest Marieme Jamme and the BBC Technology Desk reporters Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

06What's Inside Whatsapp?20140221

The inside track on WhatsApp, the startup bought by FaceBook for $19bn.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The inside track on WhatsApp, the startup bought by FaceBook for $19bn. How phone maker Xiaomi has big plans beyond China. And is it time for business to challenge bogus reviews? Rory Cellan-Jones was joined in the Tech Tent by the editor of Wired UK David Rowan, and BBC Technology Desk members Carolyn Rice and Mark Ward.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

07Where Next For The Mobile Phone?20140228

How the mobile industry hopes to grab its next billion customers

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How the mobile industry hopes to grab its next billion customers. Is the closure for now of the Bitcoin exchange MTGox the beginning of the end for the digital currency? And, how Berlin startups are tapping into Germany's demand for strong online privacy. Rory Cellan-Jones is joined by Dominic Sunnebo from technology reserarch firm Kantar Worldpanel ComTech, and by members of the BBC Online Technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

08Kickstarter Raises $1bn In Pledged Money.20140307

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Kickstarter crowdfunding raises $1bn in pledged money. Will it hurt venture capital?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Kickstarter crowdfunding raises $1bn in pledged cash. Will it hurt venture capital? Also, a long-running Indian call centre scam just got nastier. And is there a merging of robotics and wearable tech? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones. With special guest Avid Larizadeh, co-founder of online boutique Boticca, and members of the BBC Online Tech Desk team Neil Bowdler, Dave Lee, and Mark Ward.

09Techy Teens20140314

Is to cool to be a techy teen? And how the private sector wants to cash in on Space

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Is to cool to be a techy kid? And how the private sector wants to cash in on Space.

Also, how a wave of new Chinese talent could change Silicon Valley startup culture. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, live from the UK's Big Bang Fair in Birmingham, with special guests former Shuttle astronaut Jon McBride and astronomer Maggie Lieu, and Carolyn Rice and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

10Wearable Devices And Sexism In Tech20140321

Is there money in wearable devices? And the reality for women engineers in Silicon Valley

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why the satellite technology used in the hunt for the missing Malaysian airliner isn't quite as sophisticated as we might think. Also, is there really big money to be made in wearable devices? And the experiences of women engineers in Silicon Valley on how they're treated by their male colleagues.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Belinda Parmar, CEO of the creative agency Lady Geek, and Dave Lee and Carolyn Rice from the BBC Online technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

11Crackdown On Piracy20140404

The music industry's efforts to tackle piracy and how some claim they're wrongly targeted

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How the music industry is redoubling efforts to tackle piracy - but some people claim they're being wrongly targeted.

Amazon unveils its TV streaming player - will it make a big splash or be a damp squib? And - the tech of high frequency trading on the stock market.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Jo Twist of The Association for UK Interactive Entertainment, and Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online technology desk.

11The Future Of Gaming And Television20140328

FaceBook swallows up virtual reality firm Oculus VR and tech giants piling into TV

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

FaceBook swallows up virtual reality firm Oculus VR - creator of a virtual reality headset which, until now, has been mainly of interest to gamers - will it gain broader appeal? The CEO of King Digital, maker of the blockbusting app Candy Crush Saga, who has just floated the company for seven billion dollars. Also, the tech giants who want to grab your tv remote control - how will the existing broadcasters and studios fight back? And how in Russia, one major company thinks online retailing should be a very local affair.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest games journalist Keza MacDonald, and Leo Kelion, Zoe Kleinman, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC online tech desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

1220140404

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

13Internet Hit By 'catastrophic' Security Bug20140411

What's the right way to protect yourself from so-called Heartbleed?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

There have been dire warnings over the biggest security flaw to hit the internet in years - what's the right way to protect yourself from so-called Heartbleed?

Tech stocks lose all of their gains of the year so far - is the party over? And, the role of tech startups in Rwanda's transformation.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Sue Black from the Department of Computer Science, University College London, and featuring members of the BBC Online Technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

14Weibo And Wifi20140418

Chinese social media and social wifi

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The Chinese micro-blogging site Sina Weibo floats on the US Nasdaq stock exchange. What does the way social media is used in China mean for its financial prospects? Martin Varsavsky created a global system for WiFi sharing called Fon - he's now crowdsourcing funds to launch Gramofon, a combined wifi-sharing and music streaming device. And how BitTorrent is teaming up with content creators to try to lose its association with digital piracy.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Charlotte Connelly, curator working on the Information Age at London's Science Museum. The programme also features BBC technology journalists Carolyn Rice and LJ Rich.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

15Are Phones And Phablets Killing The Tablet?20140425

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Apple, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon released results this week, what do the numbers mean for the market?

Ed Catmull, president of animation studio Pixar, talks creativity and business and gives an insight on what it was like to work with Apple's Steve Jobs.

Could bubbles - on to which images are projected - be the future of display screens? Scientists at Bristol University are attempting to find out and are even imagining a time where bubbles could burst and leave behind a scent.

What more can be done to encourage girls to enter the world of technology? Are there enough role models to convince young women that it's a profession worth following? Rory Cellan-Jones and Carolyn Rice attended an event encouraging school pupils to try out tech.

BBC technology journalists Mark Ward and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest Ben Wood from analysts CCS Insight.

Apple, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon released results this week, what do the numbers mean for the market?

Ed Catmull, president of animation studio Pixar, talks creativity and business and gives an insight on what it was like to work with Apple's Steve Jobs.

Could bubbles - on to which images are projected - be the future of display screens? Scientists at Bristol University are attempting to find out and are even imagining a time where bubbles could burst and leave behind a scent.

What more can be done to encourage girls to enter the world of technology? Are there enough role models to convince young women that it's a profession worth following? Rory Cellan-Jones and Carolyn Rice attended an event encouraging school pupils to try out tech.

BBC technology journalists Mark Ward and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest Ben Wood from analysts CCS Insight.

16Russian Internet Laws And A Baffling Youtube Mystery20140502

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

What do the new rules on internet use in Russia mean for business and bloggers?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As the Russian government tightens rules around the use of the internet we ask what it means for business and bloggers.

The boss of cloud-based notebook service Evernote, Phil Libin, tries to reassure users their private data is safe after recent revelations of US government snooping on internet traffic. He also explains his vision of wearable technology and how it will interact with software in the future.

Technology reporter Dave Lee meets the controversial New-Zealand based businessman Kim Dotcom, who is wanted by American authorities for allegedly masterminding mass-piracy of digital content through his Megaupload website.

And can a YouTube mystery be solved? Nearly 80,000 video clips featuring red and blue rectangles with a sound effect have been posted on the site but why, and do they contain a hidden message? BBC Click's Stephen Beckett tries to find out.

BBC technology journalists Richard Taylor and Leo Kelion will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest technology entrepreneur Kathryn Parsons from Decoded.

17Alibaba Expansion20140509

Alibaba is China's largest online retailer and has taken a step closer to listing on the US stock market in what will be one of the largest share sales in history. What will this mean for its competitors?

Taxi drivers in cities around the world have been protesting about new apps that allow customers to book a driver and a car using a map on their smartphone. How is this technology disrupting the market and what will be the outcome?

Author and computer programmer Vikram Chandra gives his views on the "macho" nature of the tech world and describes the differences in culture that exist in tech communities around the world.

BBC technology journalists Dougal Shaw and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest Stuart Miles from Pocket Lint.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

China's largest online retailer has taken a step closer to listing on the US stock market

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Alibaba is China's largest online retailer and has taken a step closer to listing on the US stock market in what will be one of the largest share sales in history. What will this mean for its competitors?

Taxi drivers in cities around the world have been protesting about new apps that allow customers to book a driver and a car using a map on their smartphone. How is this technology disrupting the market and what will be the outcome?

Author and computer programmer Vikram Chandra gives his views on the "macho" nature of the tech world and describes the differences in culture that exist in tech communities around the world.

BBC technology journalists Dougal Shaw and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest Stuart Miles from Pocket Lint.

18The Right To Be Forgotten20140516

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

What does an EU court ruling mean for your online reputation?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

An EU court has ruled that Google must amend some of its search results if individuals request it in a test of the so called "right to be forgotten". We ask how it will work and what the impact will be for both individuals and businesses.

Motorola Mobility is set to become part of Chinese computer firm Lenovo. We find out what it means for the company to change ownership and what the future holds for it.

It was a battle between a small hedgehog and a plumber with a moustache. Leo Kelion has met the author of a new book who tells him what really went on in the console wars between Sega and Nintendo.

BBC technology journalists Dougal Shaw and Leo Kelion will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest entrepreneur Elizabeth Varley from Tech Hub.

19Hacking Attacks20140523

The US has charged five Chinese army officilals with cyber espionage after attacks on businesses in the country. Ebay also revealed it had been hacked, leading to millions of users' account details being compromised so can data stored online ever be safe from hackers? Can data security be improved?

The big chiefs of the tech world have been gathering in California to discuss the "Future in Review". What have they been talking about and where do they stand on the balance between freedom of speech and privacy on the internet? Internet pioneer Vint Cerf tells us his views.

How can software modelling help doctors prescribe treatment to patients? Researchers in the UK are using the technique to recreate parts of the human body and test out the effect of different treatments.

BBC technology journalists Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest cyber crime expert Peter Sommer.

How safe is online data? Is it ever safe from hackers?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The US has charged five Chinese army officials with cyber espionage after attacks on businesses in the country. Ebay also revealed it had been hacked, leading to millions of users' account details being compromised so can data stored online ever be safe from hackers? Can data security be improved?

The big chiefs of the tech world have been gathering in California to discuss the "Future in Review". What have they been talking about and where do they stand on the balance between freedom of speech and privacy on the internet? Internet pioneer Vint Cerf tells us his views.

How can software modelling help doctors prescribe treatment to patients? Researchers in the UK are using the technique to recreate parts of the human body and test out the effect of different treatments.

BBC technology journalists Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield will be talking about the tech stories that have led the agenda this week.

Rory Cellan-Jones presents with studio guest cyber crime expert Peter Sommer.

20Making Technology Ethically20140530

Making gadgets without minerals whose sale could fund violence in developing nations

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Tech firms are being asked to declare that their gadgets are made without the use of minerals whose sale could fund violence in developing nations. Should we believe their assurances? And, after another week of hacking attacks against well-known companies, is the use of passwords fundamentally flawed and is there a better alternative to their use?

Presenter Rory Cellan-Jones is joined by Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC online technology desk, with special guest Ning Li, founder of the furniture e-commerce site Made.com.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

21Connecting Everything20140606

Is the rush to connect everyday objects to the net a cause for concern or to be welcomed?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Technology companies are rushing to connect everyday objects to the net and to each other - is this something to be welcomed, or a cause for concern?

Also how retailers are updating the bricks-and-mortar shopping experience with easier ways to try on clothing and pay for merchandise. And what Chinese authorities have done to try to stifle online discussion of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones live from the UK's Cheltenham Science Festival, with special guests Sophie Wilson, designer of the ARM processor, and IBM Master Inventor Andy Stanford-Clark.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

22The Next Big Thing20140613

What next for the gaming industry giants?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

What will the gaming industry giants be trying to sell us in the coming months? And, as new technologies create disruptive change to existing industries across the world, what do the people at the very top of the tech business think will be the next big development? We attend an exclusive gathering of tech founders to find out.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Cate Sevilla, Homepage Editor for BuzzFeed UK, and Joe Miller and Mark Ward from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

2320140620

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

24Amazon Becomes A Phone-maker20140620

Amazon launches its Fire smartphone, but what's the real reason behind its release?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Amazon becomes a maker of smartphones, and insists its new offering, the Fire smartphone, is different from the rest in a crowded market. But what's the real reason behind its release? Is it more about shopping than talking and texting? And, can you create a successful tech industry at will? London wants to try - we assess its chances. And, how ISIS militants in Iraq have proven adept at using social media to rally support for their cause.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ben Hammersley,writer and technologist, and Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

24Silicon Valley Disruption20140627

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Google, Twitter and Uber are big players in the tech world. What are their future plans?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

In a special episode from San Francisco, Google's director of engineering Daniel Singleton explains why smartwatches powered by its Android operating system will make a difference.

Uber is the company behind the smartphone app that connects passengers with drivers. It has only been in existence for four years, but has already had a disruptive impact on the taxi market. Head of Global Operations Ryan Graves explains what the company thinks about its growth and what its future plans are.

The World Cup is taking place in Brazil right now and it is proving to be one of the biggest events in Twitter's history. Simon Rogers, Twitter's data editor explains why the company wants to analyse all the tweets that are being sent and what that information means to the company.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones who is joined in studio by influential tech blogger Robert Scoble and Carolina Milanesi, tech analyst from Kantar Worldpanel. Our North America technology correspondent Richard Taylor will also be giving his views on the stories of the week.

25Big Tech Vs The Little Guy20140704

Google begins the "right to be forgotten", are they being over-zealous?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google begins implementing the "right to be forgotten", but we consider whether it is being over-zealous in how it is doing so.

As FaceBook receives criticism over a pyschological experiment it conducted on users without their knowledge, we hear from the company on how it sees itself as a force for good.

And how one San Francisco resident has responded to being priced out of the city by the influx of tech money, by using the technology industry to make a point about itself.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Mike Butcher, Editor of the TechCrunch Europe website, and Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC online technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

26Development Tech20140711

How tablets are giving Nigerian farmers easier access to subsidised fertiliser and seeds

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Electronic devices carried into the US and UK by air passengers will be checked more thoroughly at airports from this week. But what has changed concerning the terrorist threat? We hear about the chilling technological developments the bomb-makers are thought to be trying to use.

Technologies such as contactless card payments, allowing you save a few seconds when you buy a coffee, are sometimes seen as frivolous. But is the real value of these technologies more likely to be in helping developing countries to progress?

We discover how tablet computers are giving Nigerian farmers easier access to subsidised fertiliser and seeds, even in very remote areas. And we learn how smartphones could soon be saving eyesight in Africa and Asia.

Presented by Jane Wakefield, with special guest Ken Banks, the anthropologist and mobile technologist founder of Kiwanja.net, and Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC online technology desk.

Technologies such as contactless card payments, allowing you save a few seconds when you buy a coffee, are sometimes seen as frivolous. But is the real value of these technologies more likely to be in helping developing countries to progress?

We hear how tablet computers are giving Nigerian farmers easier access to subsidised fertiliser and seeds, even in very remote areas. And we learn how smartphones could soon be saving eyesight in Africa and Asia.

Presented by Jane Wakefield, with special guest Ken Banks, the anthropologist and mobile technologist founder of Kiwanja.net, and Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC online technology desk.

27Girl Power And Solar Power20140718

Jane Wakefield on the latest stories in the tech world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As the big tech companies renew their focus on business computing, Microsoft's future becomes clearer - it involves major job cuts.

Also, why do women in the Middle East seem to do better in getting into tech than their Western counterparts? And, we ride in a solar car called STELLA and consider how soon we could be buying fully solar-powered vehicles.

Presented by Jane Wakefield, with special guest Vidhyalakshmi Karthikeyan, senior researcher at BT and the company's most prolific female inventor. Also featuring Dave Lee from the BBC online technology desk and LJ Rich from BBC TV's Click.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

28Getting Schooled In Starting-up20140725

What does it take to start and grow a tech venture?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

What does it take to start and grow a tech venture? We get educated by our special guest Kevin Hale, partner at the seed funding outfit Y-Combinator, who is in London for their event Startup School Europe.

Also, do Facebook's financial results this week tell us that the company has found a profitable way to present advertising without annoying users of its service? We hear from Facebook director of product management Will Cathcart.

Apple this week indicated a surge in the sale of desktop computers, and a slowing in tablet sales. So are predictions of the death of the desktop computer premature? We speak to Simon Segars, chief executive of the leading microprocessor designer ARM Holdings, whose creations power many mobile devices.

Also Adi Tatarko, co-founder of the interior design and architecture portal Houzz, talks about being a female tech entrepreneur and why she thinks juggling a family life with work makes for a better leader. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Kim Gittleson and Leo Kelion from the BBC Online technology desk.

What does it take to start and grow a tech venture? We get educated by our special guest Kevin Hale, partner at the seed funding outfit Y-Combinator, who is in London for their event Startup School Europe.

Also, do Facebook's financial results this week tell us that the company has found a profitable way to present advertising without annoying users of its service? We hear from Facebook director of product management Will Cathcart.

Apple this week indicated a surge in the sale of desktop computers, and a slowing in tablet sales. So are predictions of the death of the desktop computer premature? We speak to Simon Segars, chief executive of the leading microprocessor designer ARM Holdings, whose creations power many mobile devices.

Also Adi Tatarko, co-founder of the interior design and architecture portal Houzz, talks about being a female tech entrepreneur and why she thinks juggling a family life with work makes for a better leader. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Kim Gittleson and Leo Kelion from the BBC Online technology desk.

29Healthy Business20140801

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How the biggest players in tech are getting interested in our health. From gadgets that log our daily activity, and the use of big data analysis in medicine to digitally-assisted meditation, we look at what's becoming very healthy business.

Professor Amy Abernethy of Duke University, North Carolina, tells us about the potential usefulness to doctors and their patients of data logged by fitness bands and other wearable sensors. Nancy McKinstry, CEO of the Dutch medical publisher Wolters Kluwer talks to us about how data will be the driving force behind many new medical discoveries. And Los Angeles based buddhist monk turned startup co-founder Andy Puddicombe of Headspace.com talks about using tech to combat digital overload.

Plus. the week's main tech stories including news from Moscow of a clampdown on popular Russian bloggers, and security worries over the Tor anonymous internet browsing platform. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Hilary Thomas, chief medical adviser to the consultancy firm KPMG. Also featuring Joe Miller and Mark Ward from the BBC Online technology desk.

How the biggest players in tech are getting interested in our health. From gadgets that log our daily activity, and the use of big data analysis in medicine to digitally-assisted meditation, we look at what's becoming very healthy business.

Professor Amy Abernethy of Duke University, North Carolina, tells us about the potential usefulness to doctors and their patients of data logged by fitness bands and other wearable sensors. Nancy McKinstry, CEO of the Dutch medical publisher Wolters Kluwer talks to us about how data will be the driving force behind many new medical discoveries. And Los Angeles based buddhist monk turned startup co-founder Andy Puddicombe of Headspace.com talks about using tech to combat digital overload.

Plus. the week's main tech stories including news from Moscow of a clampdown on popular Russian bloggers, and security worries over the Tor anonymous internet browsing platform. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Hilary Thomas, chief medical adviser to the consultancy firm KPMG. Also featuring Joe Miller and Mark Ward from the BBC Online technology desk.

30The World Of Wiki20140808

Have we seen the world's biggest hack attack? Over one billion usernames and passwords have reportedly been stolen by a Russian gang. But how serious is this attack? Security experts will be discussing the fallout with us.

Wikimania is the largest event of its type for those interested in wikis and open content. What actually goes on and what is being discussed this year? Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of the wiki world's most well known product Wikipedia, will be giving us his views on that and the organisation's new transparency policy. He'll also be telling us how Wikipedia deals with "right to be forgotten requests".

How has one man convinced 25,000 people to join him in a lawsuit against Facebook over privacy? And why does he feel so strongly about it? Max Schrems explains why he's ready for his day in court.

The great and the good of the hacking world have descended on Las Vegas for the biggest underground hacking conference of its kind. Defcon takes place in Las Vegas and BBC tech reporter Dave Lee is there. He tells us what are the big news items in the world of code cracking.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones and featuring Zoe Kleinman and Leo Kelion from the BBC's online technology desk.

Rory Cellan-Jones live at the Wikimania conference discussing this week's tech news

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Have we seen the world's biggest hack attack? Over one billion usernames and passwords have reportedly been stolen by a Russian gang. But how serious is this attack? Security experts will be discussing the fallout with us.

Wikimania is the largest event of its type for those interested in wikis and open content. What actually goes on and what is being discussed this year? Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of the wiki world's most well known product Wikipedia, will be giving us his views on that and the organisation's new transparency policy. He'll also be telling us how Wikipedia deals with "right to be forgotten requests".

How has one man convinced 25,000 people to join him in a lawsuit against Facebook over privacy? And why does he feel so strongly about it? Max Schrems explains why he's ready for his day in court.

The great and the good of the hacking world have descended on Las Vegas for the biggest underground hacking conference of its kind. Defcon takes place in Las Vegas and BBC tech reporter Dave Lee is there. He tells us what are the big news items in the world of code cracking.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones and featuring Zoe Kleinman and Leo Kelion from the BBC's online technology desk.

31New Media Meets The Mainstream20140815

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Making Ask.fm safe for young users and the future of BuzzFeed and its valuation of $850m

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Has the disruptive new media gone mainstream? CEO of Ask.com, Doug Leeds, talks to Rory about his company's recent purchase of Ask.fm, a social network with a younger demographic and a notorious reputation. Emma Mulqueeny, the founder of the Rewired State Group, joins us to discuss how Ask.fm's new owner can make the site safer for young users.

Also, as BuzzFeed is valued at $850m - more than the Washington Post - has new media gone mainstream? BuzzFeed's Vice President of Europe Will Hayward talks about why the company's use of 'native advertising' is so attractive to readers.

Mobile phone maker Samsung is facing competition abroad from in-country competitors like Xiaomi in China and Micromax in India. What's the secret of the home-grown phone? The BBC's Shanghai Correspondent John Sudworth and BBC India Business Reporter Shilpa Kannan join in to discuss,

There's big business in taking pictures of the earth. BBC ccience correspondent Jonathan Amos makes a visit to the tent to tell us about the most powerful commercial satellite ever - one that can see a resolution of up to 31cm from space.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones and featuring Carolyn Rice and Mark Ward from the BBC's online technology desk.

32Cat And Mouse Games On The Dark Net20140822

Is the Dark Net as anonymous as people say?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

In recent weeks it has emerged that the so-called 'Dark Net' might not be as anonymous as many people had assumed. We speak to the creator of the anonymous Tor browser, about claims that spies and hackers have laid bare the secrets the Dark Net supposedly protects.

In any business, successfully predicting the future is a lucrative skill to have. And they say that history repeats, so is it possible to crunch data about past news events to guess accurately how current situations will play out? We speak to one researcher who's trying to do just that.

And Nigeria's domestic film industry - dubbed "Nollywood" is estimated to be worth $5 billion and turns out up to 50 titles a week, most of which are released on DVD. But we find out how the film-makers are now turning to online platforms to show their creations, despite a persistent lack of internet bandwidth.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden from the TechCrunch website, and Leo Kelion and Joe Miller from the BBC Online technology desk.

In recent weeks it has emerged that the so-called 'Dark Net' might not be as anonymous as many people had assumed. We speak to the creator of the anonymous Tor browser, about claims that spies and hackers have laid bare the secrets the Dark Net supposedly protects.

In any business, successfully predicting the future is a lucrative skill to have. And they say that history repeats, so is it possible to crunch data about past news events to guess accurately how current situations will play out? We speak to one researcher who's trying to do just that.

And Nigeria's domestic film industry - dubbed "Nollywood" is estimated to be worth $5 billion and turns out up to 50 titles a week, most of which are released on DVD. But we find out how the film-makers are now turning to online platforms to show their creations, despite a persistent lack of internet bandwidth.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden from the TechCrunch website, and Leo Kelion and Joe Miller from the BBC Online technology desk.

33High-flying Tech20140829

Google reveals it is working on pilot-less planes.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

First came driver-less cars. Now Google reveals it is working on planes without pilots. A key adviser to Facebook is urging the company to protect users from stumbling across gruesome videos by making them click their consent before they can view them. We speak to him and ask whether access to such content is justified in the public interest to reflect the state of the world around us. Why has retail giant Amazon stumped up nearly $1billion to buy a niche video-streaming service popular with gamers? We'll ask one of the stars of the site whether he's worried it will lose its character under Amazon's ownership. And as a video blogger who posted a film complaining about the misogynistic portayal of women in computer games herself becomes the target of hate messages and threats, we discuss whether her concerns are justified, and how to address them if they are.

Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online Tech Desk and special guest Eileen Burbidge, venture capitalist from Passion Capital.

First came driver-less cars. Now Google reveals it is working on planes without pilots. A key adviser to Facebook is urging the company to protect users from stumbling across gruesome videos by making them click their consent before they can view them. We speak to him and ask whether access to such content is justified in the public interest to reflect the state of the world around us. Why has retail giant Amazon stumped up nearly $1billion to buy a niche video-streaming service popular with gamers? We'll ask one of the stars of the site whether he's worried it will lose its character under Amazon's ownership. And as a video blogger who posted a film complaining about the misogynistic portayal of women in computer games herself becomes the target of hate messages and threats, we discuss whether her concerns are justified, and how to address them if they are.

Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online Tech Desk and special guest Eileen Burbidge, venture capitalist from Passion Capital.

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

34Cracking The Cloud?20140905

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Is the cloud safe and are password hackers becoming more sophisticated?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

This week sees a scandal straight out of a Hollywood drama. Celebrity photos leaked, passwords lifted and privacy compromised. Apple - the tech giant at the alleged centre of it all - maintains its system is airtight. So do we trust the integrity of the cloud? Is user error once again to blame? We hear from a security expert who discusses how password cracking is getting more and more sophisticated, and how the responsibility lies within corporations to ensure their customers are protected.

Also, the latest in wearable tech from the IFA tech conference. We discuss whether it’s time for fashion and technology to fully embrace. We also look at how the arrival of 3G in Iran has led to President Rouhani to instruct clerics to embrace the internet.

Plus, what a server crash and a lopsided cow share in common when it comes to translating the Mozilla web browser in Mali. And technology start-ups with the need for speed. We hear from entrepreneurs trying to woo venture capitalists in the business of motor-sport.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with BBC Tech reporters Dave Lee and Jen Copestake and special guest Alex Wood, editor-in-chief of Tech City News.

35Watch And Learn20140912

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

What impact will Apple's new smartwatch have on the wearable technology market?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The rumours have been swirling for a while, but finally tech giant Apple unveiled a smartwatch. What impact will this have on the already bustling wearable technology market? Will it be a game changer and can Apple repeat the success of previous devices - or is this one piece of technology that consumers might feel they don't really need? Rory Cellan-Jones has the views of tech watchers who were at the launch event.

Can you sleep be improved by a sensor? Entrepreneur James Proud certainly thinks so. He persuaded members of the public to pledge over $2 million to fund his product. He tells us how it all started and what his plans for the future are.

It's the most expensive video game ever made with a budget of $500m. Destiny launched this week and we'll be finding out whether all the investment was worth it and whether video games really are the new blockbusters.

Joining Rory Cellan-Jones in the tent will be Jane Wakefield and Dave Lee from the BBC's online technology desk with special guest Jemima Kiss, head of technology at The Guardian.

36Open Sesame20140919

The largest US share flotation ever - of the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As shares in the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba begin trading in New York, the largest US share flotation ever, how did the man who built the company do it?

Also, Microsoft buys up the Swedish independent games company Mojang, the creator of the hugely successful Minecraft franchise, for $2.5billion. So what's Microsoft playing at? And, AndroidOne – Google's low-cost smartphone platform, launches in India. Will it bring about a revolution in the way Indians use the net?

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion and Joe Miller from the BBC online technology desk, and special guest Sherry Coutu, tech entrepreneur and investor.

37Shellshock And Flaws20140926

How the tech world is 'Shellshock'-ed by a security flaw potentially affecting millions

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A new security flaw called 'Shellshock' emerges, potentially leaving tens of millions of computers around the globe open to hackers. Apple faces a tide of complaints over the ease with which its new and much-hyped iPhone 6 can be bent while being carried in a pocket. That's in addition to a bungled software update to the device which the company was forced to withdraw after some users were no longer able to make phone calls.

FIFA15, the latest giant games franchise launches, but is the games industry failing many players by being slow to respond to changes in its customer base?

Peter Thiel is co-founder of PayPal and an early investor in Facebook and accommodation-sharing website Airbnb. What is the secret to successful startups, and what kinds of ventures does he think are worth backing now?

And apps and devices to track physical activity have been around for a while, but are your emotions about to become the next parameter to be logged as part of the 'quantified self'?

Also, we're at the UK's largest videogames show EGX London. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest David Braben, creator of the influential '80s 3D game Elite, and Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

A new security flaw called 'Shellshock' emerges, potentially leaving tens of millions of computers around the globe open to hackers. Apple faces a tide of complaints over the ease with which its new and much-hyped iPhone 6 can be bent while being carried in a pocket. That's in addition to a bungled software update to the device which the company was forced to withdraw after some users were no longer able to make phone calls.

FIFA15, the latest giant games franchise launches, but is the games industry failing many players by being slow to respond to changes in its customer base?

Peter Thiel is co-founder of PayPal and an early investor in Facebook and accommodation-sharing website Airbnb. What is the secret to successful startups, and what kinds of ventures does he think are worth backing now?

And apps and devices to track physical activity have been around for a while, but are your emotions about to become the next parameter to be logged as part of the 'quantified self'?

Also, we're at the UK's largest videogames show EGX London. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest David Braben, creator of the influential '80s 3D game Elite, and Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

38Ello World!20141003

Ello, a social network creating a buzz, and Travis Kalanick on why Uber is misunderstood

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Uber: The US startup that taxi companies around the world love to hate. Co-founder Travis Kalanick talks to us on why he thinks his ride-sharing company is misunderstood, and how he will continue the firm's aggressive expansion into new countries and areas of business.

Also, why has Microsoft chosen such a low-key unveiling for its new version of Windows?

And we speak to Todd Berger, one of the creators of the new social network Ello which has created a buzz this week. Plus, Star Trek's Captain Kirk, aka William Shatner, tells us which technologies from the show he'd like to see coming our way soon.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC online technology desk, and special guest, the technology journalist Kate Bevan.

39Squeeze On Samsung20141010

Samsung's shocking profit warning and its low-cost Chinese competitors

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Can Samsung bounce back from its shocking profit warning this week? We hear what an institution the company is in its home country, and why its electronics division is facing problems.

The US military has been recruiting gamers to become combat drone pilots. We speak to the Oslo-based documentary film-maker Tonje Hessen Schei who interviewed some of those recruits for her new film "Drone".

The head of Europol's Cyber Crime Centre Troels Oerting tells us how only a handful of rogue programmers are behind most of the world's cyberattacks.

And is the importance of sound effects in videogames overlooked?

Broadcast live from the UK's Technopop science and technology festival in East London. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC online technology desk, and special guest Paul McKnight from Vex Robotics.

40Web Of Hate?20141017

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

"Gamergate" is a Twitter hashtag making the news this week, but what exactly is the affair about and what does it mean for women users of social media? We'll give you a full explanation of it, and hear from Brianna Wu, a female programmer who received death threats after expressing a view on it. And we also talk to two young women engineers who strike a more positive note on women's ability to voice their opinions online. Also, how could SMS messages help to control the outbreak of Ebola in Western Africa? We speak to Robin Burton, who is working with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent societies on extending the Tera system installed in Sierra Leone to neighbouring countries.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

41Money And Diamonds20141024

Do shoppers need, or want to pay for goods with their mobile phones?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Apple, Google, and other companies want us to use our phones to pay for goods. But do shoppers actually need, or want, the technology? In the week that Apple launched its Apple Pay service in the US, we speak to leading venture capitalist Saul Klein, who is backing several crypto-currency and digital wallet startups.

You might be forgiven for thinking that diamonds are for fine jewellery or cutting tools, but we hear from Ambika Bumb, founder of Bikanta Corporation how they could soon be used to help spot cancer earlier, and how she thinks recent investment in her firm by the incubator Y-Combinator signals growing interest in biotech in Silicon Valley.

And, we hear from the creator of a robot whose aim is to let you look out over the surface of the moon.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC online technology desk.

43Ireland - The Technology Island20141107

Rory Cellan-Jones visits two tech events in Ireland and meets the people making the news.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The Dublin Web Summit confirms Ireland's tech cluster status. But how much of that is down to favourable tax arrangements for technology companies?

Also, we take you inside the exclusive F.ounders conference at the Old Midleton Distillery, County Cork, where we talk about the latest tech with John Sculley, former CEO of Apple and business author, Ankur Jain, creator of contact management app Humin, Jess Lee of Polyvore.com, and Yoni Assia of financial tech company eToro.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

The Dublin Web Summit confirms Ireland's tech cluster status. But how much of that is down to favourable tax arrangements for technology companies?

Also, we take you inside the exclusive F.ounders conference in Midleton, County Cork, where we talk about the latest tech with John Sculley, former CEO of Apple and business author, Ankur Jain, creator of contact management app Humin, Jess Lee of Polyvore.com, and Yoni Assia of financial tech company eToro.

44Breakup Songs20141114

Mark Williamson of Spotify on losing singer Taylor Swift from the service

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Mark Williamson of Spotify talks to us about losing Taylor Swift from the service. How the mobile internet is having a profound effect on doing business in Africa. Celia Hatton reports from Beijing on China's 'Singles' Day' online shopping extravaganza. And Mike McCue,the founder of Flipboard on the future for the publishing and newspaper businesses.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ismail Ahmed of WorldRemit, and Zoe Kleinman and Joe Miller from the BBC Online technology desk.

45Nokia Calls Back20141121

Months after Microsoft bought Nokia's phone brand, Nokia has unveiled a tablet computer

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Jack Dorsey co-founded Twitter, can he repeat his success with his current venture, the payments company Square? What's going on at Nokia? Just months after Microsoft bought their phone brand, the Finnish giant has unveiled a tablet computer under the Nokia name. So what did Microsoft get for its money? We ask Sebastian Nystrom, Head of Products at Nokia Technologies.

Plus, Vinod Kumar, the CEO of India’s Tata Communications discusses the challenge of bringing the next billion people online. And, the boys and girls of Silicon Valley can build multi-billion dollar tech empires, but many of them still can’t get a date, it seems. We meet the Silicon Valley matchmaker who’s helping them out with that. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online technology desk.

46Transatlantic Tiff20141128

Google and Facebook come under attack from European politicians.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google and Facebook come under attack from European politicians. Is Europe's love affair with US tech over? Not everyone who starts a tech firm makes millions and changes the world. We attend a funeral for startups. And how do you gather medical data from an Ebola treatment room? Plus, the Indian smartphone app for calling an auto-rickshaw that promises faster and cheaper rides.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Professor Ian Brown of the Oxford Internet Institute, and Zoe Kleinman and Dave Lee from the BBC Online technology desk.

47Artificial Intelligence Special20141205

Professor Stephen Hawking warns of the threat to mankind from artificial intelligence

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Professor Stephen Hawking warns of the threat to mankind from artificial intelligence. Neil Jacobstein of California's Singularity University, AI expert Ben Medlock of SwiftKey, and the music producer and tech investor Will.i.am give us their take.

23andMe wants to make genome sequencing cheap enough for individuals to discover their likelihood to develop diseases. We ask its CEO Anne Wojcicki why private companies should be trusted with this most intimate of personal data?

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Kate Bevan, and Leo Kelion and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

48Lessons In Tech20141212

Google pulls its news service from Spain. And Sir Tim Berners-Lee on "net neutrality".

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google pulls its news service from Spain. We learn the basics of programming for the global Hour of Code with help from British schoolchildren. The Nobel Prize for physics was collected this week by scientists who invented blue Light-Emitting Diodes. We speak to Dr Stephen DenBaars from the University of California Santa Barbara research team that did the work, about the future for LED technology.

The Web's creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee tells us that telecoms operators who insist they must charge customers to prioritise data transmission over the net in order to be able to afford neccessary investment, are talking "nonsense". And Steve Jobs' biographer Walter Isaacson speaks to us about the essential ingredients of innovative companies.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Alex Asseily, the co-founder of wearables company Jawbone and Hour of Code ambassador, and Zoe Kleinman and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

50Stranger Than Fiction20141219

Sony Pictures pulls the film The Inteview because of a cyberattack and online threats

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Sony Pictures pulls a major new movie because of a cyberattack and online threats, but who carried out the hacking that led them to cancel it?

Microsoft reveals a real-time voice translation tool for Skype users, and we give it a try. Gavin Andresen from the Bitcoin Foundation tells us the real potential for the technology in the coming year. And researcher Antonio Espingardeiro on how toys are bringing robotics into the home.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

50Tech Tent Quiz Of The Year20141226

Rory Cellan-Jones hosts the BBC Online Tech desk and BBC TV's Click in a quiz of the year

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

51Tech Trends For 201520150102

Big thinkers from the world of tech tell us what will be big in 2015

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

52What Happens In Vegas?20150109

Automated cars, drones, wearable health devices and other gadegets at the annual CES

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas is where the tech companies present the gadgets and gizmos on which they'll be pinning their hopes during the year. Rory Cellan-Jones and guests assess whether and why anyone needs the automated cars, drones, wearable health devices, and internet-connected home appliances that the tech companies are trying to sell. With technology analyst Carolina Milanesi from Kantar WordPanel, and Zoe Kleinman and Leo Kelion from the BBC Online tech desk.

53China Comes Calling20150116

Xiaomi launches new mobile devices

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Xiaomi - dubbed “China’s answer to Apple” - launches new mobile devices including a flagship model seen as critical to the company’s ability to tackle the US market. We hear from the company's Vice President of International, Hugo Barra.

In the wake of the terrorist shootings in Paris last week, attention has again fallen on the ability of violent jihadists to communicate and coordinate attacks online. We quiz Doug Leeds, the CEO of Ask.com, which owns the Q&A social network Ask.fm, on how he is trying to address this challenge.

And Melanie Sevcenko reports from the US state of Oregon on a new mobile app allowing the public to video-record how the police deal with them or their fellow citizens.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guests the Silicon Valley watcher, evangelist, and author Guy Kawasaki who gives us tips on getting the best from social media, and the international venture capitalist Eileen Burbidge.

54Hacking And Cybersecurity Special20150123

Rory Cellan-Jones and special guests analyse the threat from hacking

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Hacking is making headlines like never before - whether it's done by activists pushing a cause, criminals stealing money, or governments covertly waging electronic war - the threat is centre-stage. We speak to Dr Gabriella Coleman of McGill University, Montreal, Canada on who the hackers are and how their profile is changing.

Cybersecurity expert Professor Alan Woodward of the UK's Surrey University helps us analyse the threat from criminal and state-sponsored hackers.

Also, does this week's unveiling of Windows 10 and a host of whizzy associated technologies suggest a new, more daring Microsoft than we've seen in recent years?

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk.

55Chip And Skin20150130

Rory Cellan-Jones with your weekly status update on the technology business

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Presenter Rory Cellan-Jones visits a new high-tech building in Stockholm, Sweden, where he has a microchip implanted in his hand that functions as security pass, gives you access to your computer and printer, and lets you pay for things in the work café.

What do Apple and Facebook's blazing financial results tell us about the companies and the balance of the World economy?

Amid worries about whether we can trust companies with increased gathering of our health data, we hear one view on how we fail to make best use of the data we already have, from our special guest Karalee Close from Boston Consulting Group.

We learn how children's toys could be an easy target for hackers to make mischief. And, what do you do if your chosen restaurant doesn’t deliver, but you can’t be bothered to go out for food? Reporter Dave Lee finds out.

With Jane Wakefield and Leo Kelion from the BBC Online technology desk.

(Photo: The BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones has a microchip implanted into his hand.)

56A "golden Age For Surveillance"20150206

The creator of PGP email encryption says we're in a golden age of surveillance for spies

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Phil Zimmermann, the creator of PGP email encryption software tells us we live in a golden age of surveillance for police and spies. Justin Parfitt of HeyLetsApp says online reviews would be much more useful if negative comments were banned. Advocates of "Net Neutrality" score a victory. And Melanie Sevcenko reports on a voice-controlled format for electronic books.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ian Maude from Enders Analysis, and Fiona Graham and Dave Lee from the BBC Online technology team.

57Don't Talk In Front Of The Tv20150213

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Samsung's voice-controlled TVs raise worries over privacy as the company warns owners against holding "sensitive" conversations in front of the sets. BBC reporter Kevin Rawlinson visits the Basque Country to try out a handful of language translation apps, and we speak to Luis Von Ahn, the creator of the language-teaching service Duolingo. The UK takes a big step towards trialling automated driverless cars as part of public transport systems in two cities, and announces proposals for the future regulation of autonomous vehicles. Reporter Jane Wakefield takes a ride. And the BBC's Dave Lee considers the question of how random is randomness on the internet? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Steven Murdoch, Security Researcher at University College, London.

58An Unwelcome Addition To Your Pc20150220

How Lenovo stands accused of jeopardising its PC users' online security

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Security researcher Marc Rogers outlines how Lenovo stands accused of jeopardising its PC users' online security. Tech founder and British government adviser Martha Lane-Fox hits back at President Obama's claim that America created and perfected the internet. Plus should you photograph all your food?

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest Judith Clegg, founder of the tech consultancy Takeout, who was recently named among Europe's 50 most inspirational women in the tech business. Also featuring Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

59Financial Tech20150227

How tech firms are set to change banking. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Claire Cockerton of Innovate Finance tells us how tech firms are set to change banking. And reporter Michael Koloki goes spending mobile money in Kenya. Evan Sharp, founder of Pinterest tells us why he finds the aggression of Silicon Valley a distraction. And we meet a robotic contract lawyer. Also, the week's landmark ruling by US regulators on "net neutrality". Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

60Mobile World Congress 201520150306

Rory Cellan-Jones with the big stories from Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Samsung and Huawei launch a new flagship phone and a smart watch. Sony CEO Kazuo Hirai on why his company is making little impact in phones and wearables. John Chen of Blackberry insists he can turn around the company but admits "nothing is sacred" in deciding whether to continue making handsets. Plus the impact of mobile tech in Africa with our special guest Dr Precious Lunga from the telecoms provider Econet Wireless.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

64Sound And Vision20150403

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Jay-Z, Alicia Keys, Madonna, Kanye West, and Rihanna are among the co-owners of Tidal, a new music streaming service launched this week. Can it go toe-to-toe with established players such as Spotify and Pandora? The major mobile technology companies are pinning their hopes on virtual reality – Louis Jebb, CEO of Immersiv.ly talks to us about the technology's potential for the news and media business. We attend a tribute to Alan Dower Blumlein, who first developed the process for sound recording in Stereo, along with other pioneering work in telecommunications, television, and radar. And, we ask, would you have a surveillance camera in your home to watch your family remotely? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Kayleigh Bateman, Special Projects Editor at the magazine Computer Weekly.

65Power To The People20150410

Prof Saiful Islam on the latest in battery technology, and the drones aimed at consumers

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Prof Saiful Islam of Bath University updates us on the latest developments in battery technology. We attend the unveiling of a new generation of drones aimed at consumers, but what about the safety and privacy implications? And is it a good idea to allow legal papers to be served via social media? Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with special guest John McCann of TechRadar. Also featuring LJ Rich from BBC TV's Click, and Dan Simmons from the BBC Online tech desk. Image: DJI Phantom 3 quadcopter in flight.

66Money And Power20150417

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The European Union accuses Google of abusing its dominant market position in search to promote its own shopping service. We hear from a complainant and get a counterview from James Waterworth from the industry body CCIA. As "Moore's Law" on the pace of development in computer chips turns 50 years old this weekend, we speak to co-authors of the book "The Second Machine Age" Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee from MIT on whether future progress will depend more on software than silicon. Plus, a new cash machine that's claimed to be more secure, and more cost-effective for developing countries. And Zoe Kleinman tries to use Bitcoin in the Isle of Man.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Leo Mirani of Quartz. Image: Rory Cellan-Jones photographed by a new type of ATM.

67Avoiding 'mobilegeddon'20150424

Search engine expert Ben Norman on avoiding the pitfalls of changes to Google's search

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Ben Norman, search engine specialist, tells us how to avoid the pitfalls of Google's change to its search recipe. We speak to Emma Kaye, CEO of the Africa-based platform Bozza, which is showcasing emerging artistic talent across the African continent. And, can passenger planes really be hacked?

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Izabella Kaminska, financial technology specialist from the Financial Times.

(Image: Rory Cellan-Jones)

68Energising Tech20150501

Will Tesla CEO Elon Musk's new idea for home batteries to store solar power catch on?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Will Tesla CEO Elon Musk's new idea for home batteries to store solar power catch on? Do the week's torrid financial figures suggest the party's over for Twitter and most other social media platforms? Justin Waller of Vodafone on helping to restore communications in earthquake-hit Nepal. And, the BBC's health editor Hugh Pym reports on the latest ideas for merging technology with medicine.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Shivvy Jervis, creator and host of the online innovation series Digital Futures. (Image: Rory Cellan-Jones and Shivvy Jervis)

69Going Live20150509

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Do streaming apps like Periscope and Meerkat present a copyright threat to traditional broadcasters and their exclusive shows? Also, Herman Narula of London-based startup Improbable on how he wants to make it easier to create virtual models of everything. We hear from Craig Shelburne of audio company Sonos on how his firm decided to take on a "patent troll" and won. And Melanie Sevcenko reports on the popularity of online schooling in the US.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Blathnaid Healy, UK Editor of Mashable. (Image: Rory Cellan-Jones and Blathnaid Healy)

70Spy-wear?20150515

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Dr Chris Brauer from Goldsmiths, University of London, on how big brands want to sell us things via wearable devices. Bruce Schneier, security and privacy expert and author of the book "Data and Goliath", warns of the threat of companies and governments misusing data about us. Emily Bell, from the Tow Centre for Digital Journalism, on Verizon's buyout of AOL, and Facebook's instant articles. And Zoe Kleinman spends a night alone in a house full of robots. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Fiona Graham and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

Image: Rory Cellan-Jones and Dr Chris Brauer.

71Everybody's Internet20150522

Mark Surman from the Mozilla Foundation defends the principle of an open internet.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Mark Surman from the Mozilla Foundation defends the principle of an open internet at the Quartz Next Billion event in London. And, Joyce Kim of Stellar.org describes how the principles underlying the workings of the net could be applied to the world's financial industry. Also, is Spotify's revamp a brave leap or a defence against Apple's forthcoming entry into their market? Plus, the technology that lets you share files using sounds.Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Cate Sevilla, Managing Editor of BuzzFeed UK.

Image: Cate Sevilla and Rory Cellan-Jones.

72Google's Big Jump20150529

Google leaps into virtual reality with a technology called Jump

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google leaps into virtual reality with a technology called Jump, and unveils its plans to fight Apple on mobile payments, smartphones, and more. Cat Jones of Unruly tells us what makes a video go viral on social media. And the BBC's Dave Lee meets the North Korean professor who schooled the nation's elite hackers blamed for cyberattacks abroad. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Niklas Zennstrom, CEO of Atomico Ventures and co-founder of Skype.

(Photo: Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome, and Apps at Google. Credit: Google)

73Online Gossip20150605

Evolutionary Psychologist Robin Dunbar chats about social media and online gossip.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Evolutionary Psychologist Robin Dunbar chats about social media and online gossip. Space scientist Monica Grady weighs up the cost of space exploration. And maverick software entrepreneur John McAfee warns about smartphone security and government surveillance. Live from the UK's Cheltenham Science Festival.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones).

74Twitter Turmoil20150612

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo is stepping down. Anthony Bay of Rdio and Mike McCue of Flipboard respond to Apple's entry into music streaming and news curation. Stephen Evans reports on why South Korea is forcing teenagers to use spyware on their phones. And the project to get schoolchildren to devise a digital Magna Carta. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Blathnaid Healy of Mashable UK.

(Picture: Jane Wakefield, Rory Cellan-Jones, and Blathnaid Healy).

75Games People Play20150619

Virtual Reality and the latest gaming titles from E3

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Virtual Reality and gaming from the gigantic Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles. Google chairman Eric Schmidt tells us the company knows less about you than you might think. And MIT physicist Cesar Hidalgo on why economies are like computers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Keza MacDonald from the games blog Kotaku.

(Picture: Keza MacDonald and Rory Cellan-Jones).

76Streams And Satellites20150626

Taylor Swift forces Apple's hand while Google launches a free music streaming service.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Taylor Swift forces a backdown over royalties from Apple - Chris Cooke of CMU on who's winning the music streaming battle. Sir Richard Branson on using a constellation of 600 communications satellites to connnect remote parts of the world to the Net. And Dave Lee sits in on the recording of match commentary for the next FIFA videogame. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Sydney Padua, author of the graphic novel "The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage".

(Picture: Taylor Swift, Credit: AP).

77Parade Of Robots20150703

Rory Cellan-Jones reports from the Innorobo robotics fair in Lyon, Southern France.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones visits the Innorobo robotics fair in Lyon, Southern France, to meet Pepper, a robot that could be your companion, plus one that could take your job, and another that might help you find things in a shop. Broadcast live from Imperial College London's Aerial Robotics Lab with special guest Dr Mirko Kovac. (Picture: Anastasia Emmanuel of Indiegogo, Rory Cellan-Jones, and Catherine Simon of Innorobo).

79Reboot For Reddit?20150717

Online community Reddit hides "abhorrent" content on its site. With Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Online community Reddit hides "abhorrent" content on its site, and the robots that might one day play World Cup football. Plus using videogames tech in scientific research. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Katherine Yip, investor and Asia expert.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones wearing a virtual reality headset).

80Security In The Spotlight20150724

Claims that dating site Ashley Madison was hacked. And iPod father Tony Fadell on privacy

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Claims that Ashley Madison, the dating site for people seeking affairs, was hacked. And, the iPod's father Tony Fadell on Google Glass, and the privacy of wearable tech. Plus, is the increasing popularity of drones putting lives in danger? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Eileen Burbidge, technology investor from Passion Capital.

(Picture: Tony Fadell of Nest Labs. Credit: AFP)

81Microsoft Cleans Its Windows20150731

Does Microsoft's Windows 10 really herald a 'new era' in computing?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

82Black Hat And Def Con20150807

The world's hackers descend on Las Vegas for their main annual gatherings

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Security researchers at the Def Con hackers' gathering in Las Vegas tell us how they took over a Tesla car. Plus, a look at the software used by some governments to monitor people. And, what might the destruction of HitchBOT, a hitch-hiking robot, say about our willingness to accept mechanised companions at home and work? Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with special guest security expert Graham Cluley.

(Photo: Tesla dashboard. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

83Playtime In Dundee20150814

Broadcast from the Dare ProtoPlay 2015 games festival in the Scottish city of Dundee.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Broadcast from the Dare ProtoPlay 2015 videogames festival in the Scottish city of Dundee. Plus, Rory Cellan-Jones assesses whether Europe can still compete with the United States and China in building world-beating technology companies. Presented by Zoe Kleinman.
(Photo: Videogame characters. Credit: Thinkstock)

Broadcast from the Dare ProtoPlay 2015 videogames festival in the Scottish city of Dundee. Plus, Rory Cellan-Jones assesses whether Europe can still compete with the United States and China in building world-beating technology companies. Presented by Zoe Kleinman.

(Photo: Videogame characters. Credit: Thinkstock)

84Work To Live Or Live To Work?20150821

Does the tech industry expect too much of its workers? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Newspaper claims of a brutal working culture at Amazon have prompted wider debate about what's reasonably expected of staff by the tech industry's elite firms. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Lucy Marcus, business consultant and CEO. (Photo: Man working late from home. Credit: Thinkstock)

Newspaper claims of a brutal working culture at Amazon have prompted wider debate about what's reasonably expected of staff by the tech industry's elite firms. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Lucy Marcus, business consultant and CEO. (Photo: Man working late from home. Credit: Thinkstock)

85Broken China20150828

How will China's economic worries affect its tech giants? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As the boss of the hacked Ashley Madison dating site quits, we speak to one woman who says her fiance cheated on her using its service. How will China's economic worries affect its tech giants, and how concerned should technology companies elsewhere be about falling Chinese demand? "Let's play” videos made by gamers can make or break a title, and until now, Amazon-owned Twitch has been the go-to platform for the genre. But will Google's new dedicated YouTube gaming platform lure Twitch broadcasters away? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest Dr Linda Yueh from London Business School. (Photo: Businesswoman in Beijing's financial district. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

As the boss of the hacked Ashley Madison dating site quits, we speak to one woman who says her fiance cheated on her using its service. How will China's economic worries affect its tech giants, and how concerned should technology companies elsewhere be about falling Chinese demand? "Let's play? videos made by gamers can make or break a title, and until now, Amazon-owned Twitch has been the go-to platform for the genre. But will Google's new dedicated YouTube gaming platform lure Twitch broadcasters away? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest Dr Linda Yueh from London Business School. (Photo: Businesswoman in Beijing's financial district. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

86Berlin Unboxed20150904

As the latest gadgets are unveiled at the IFA technology show in Berlin, we find out just how smart the newest phones and watches really are.

We hear from San Francisco on the latest controversy about the way the taxi app Uber treats its drivers.

Plus - are people getting paid to write promotional articles on Wikipedia? The co-founder, Jimmy Wales, tells us how the site's volunteers are cracking down on so-called sockpuppet accounts.

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined in the Tech Tent by Will Dunn, editor of Stuff magazine, and BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield in London and Dave Lee in San Francisco.

(Photo: Visitors walk past a display at IFA. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Rory and guests chat about the IFA gadget fair in Berlin and the phenomemon of unboxing.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As the latest gadgets are unveiled at the IFA technology show in Berlin, we find out just how smart the newest phones and watches really are.

We hear from San Francisco on the latest controversy about the way the taxi app Uber treats its drivers.

Plus - are people getting paid to write promotional articles on Wikipedia? The co-founder, Jimmy Wales, tells us how the site's volunteers are cracking down on so-called sockpuppet accounts.

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined in the Tech Tent by Will Dunn, editor of Stuff magazine, and BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield in London and Dave Lee in San Francisco.

(Photo: Visitors walk past a display at IFA. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

87Apple, Apps And Ads20150911

As Apple unveils its latest shiny offerings - we ask if the famously consumer-focused company can appeal to serious business users. And is the company's boss, Tim Cook, right to predict that the "future of TV is apps"?

Plus - are we becoming increasingly intolerant of advertising on mobile? We examine what the rise of ad-blocking means for the future of the web, and who pays for it.

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined by Mel Exon, managing director of advertising agency BBH, and Chris Foxx from the BBC's tech desk.

(Picture: A reporter walks by an Apple logo during a media event in San Francisco on September 9, 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

As Apple unveils its latest offerings - we ask if the firm can appeal to business users.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As Apple unveils its latest shiny offerings - we ask if the famously consumer-focused company can appeal to serious business users. And is the company's boss, Tim Cook, right to predict that the "future of TV is apps"?

Plus - are we becoming increasingly intolerant of advertising on mobile? We examine what the rise of ad-blocking means for the future of the web, and who pays for it.

Rory Cellan-Jones is joined by Mel Exon, managing director of advertising agency BBH, and Chris Foxx from the BBC's tech desk.

(Picture: A reporter walks by an Apple logo during a media event in San Francisco on September 9, 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

88#intelligent Machines20150918

Rory Cellan-Jones and team on the rise of artificial intelligence and learning robots.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A special show from Bletchley Park, Britain's wartime code-breaking centre where some of the earliest work on artificial intelligence was done. We hear what the “godfather of deep learning” - Google’s Geoff Hinton, and Facebook’s director of AI research Yann LeCun think about the threats and opportunities of learning machines, as well as the view of Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak. And, machine learning and robotics experts Professors Murray Shanahan of Imperial College, London and Kerstin Dautenhahn of the University of Hertfordshire, share their expertise. Plus, a preview of this year’s Loebner Prize for artificial intelligence with its chair Ed Keedwell.

A special show from Bletchley Park, Britain's wartime code-breaking centre where some of the earliest work on artificial intelligence was done. We hear what the “godfather of deep learning? - Google’s Geoff Hinton, and Facebook’s director of AI research Yann LeCun think about the threats and opportunities of learning machines, as well as the view of Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak. And, machine learning and robotics experts Professors Murray Shanahan of Imperial College, London and Kerstin Dautenhahn of the University of Hertfordshire, share their expertise. Plus, a preview of this year’s Loebner Prize for artificial intelligence with its chair Ed Keedwell.

89Silicon Valley Special20150925

Is California's Silicon Valley still the draw for would-be tech entrepreneurs that it was, and what does the future hold? Broadcast from the landmark Computer History Museum in Mountain View, with special guests John Hollar, president of the museum, and tech journalist Kristen Brown. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones in Palo Alto, California)

Is California's Silicon Valley still the draw for tech entrepreneurs that it was?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Is California's Silicon Valley still the draw for would-be tech entrepreneurs that it was, and what does the future hold? Broadcast from the landmark Computer History Museum in Mountain View, with special guests John Hollar, president of the museum, and tech journalist Kristen Brown. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones in Palo Alto, California)

90Driving Into The Future20151002

Are electric cars ready for the mass-market? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The diesel emissions scandal at Volkswagen has thrown electric cars into the spotlight. But is electric technology ready to replace fuel-burning vehicles? Dave Lee reports from California where Tesla launched a new electric car this week. Google's head of search Amit Singhal tells us why the company has not released a Siri or Cortana-style chatbot. And, we discover Freevolt, a technology that claims to harvest energy from the radio waves around us. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Sahar Danesh, transport adviser at the UK's Institution of Engineering and Technology. (Picture: Elon Musk of Tesla Motors unveils the new Model X, Credit: Getty Images).

The diesel emissions scandal at Volkswagen has thrown electric cars into the spotlight. But is electric technology ready to replace fuel-burning vehicles? Dave Lee reports from California where Tesla launched a new electric car this week. Google's head of search Amit Singhal tells us why the company has not released a Siri or Cortana-style chatbot. And, we discover Freevolt, a technology that claims to harvest energy from the radio waves around us. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Sahar Danesh, transport adviser at the UK's Institution of Engineering and Technology. (Picture: Elon Musk of Tesla Motors unveils the new Model X, Credit: Getty Images).

91Microsoft Wows With Windows20151009

Microsoft wows its critics with new Windows 10 devices. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Microsoft wows its critics with new Windows 10 devices - is it now the cool kid on the block? Facebook details plans to give 14 African countries satellite internet. We ask Michel de Rosen of Eutelsat, Facebook's partner, whether the tech is up to the job. Europe's highest court says a transatlantic agreement on transferring European internet users' data to America is invalid. Plus, Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan, authors of a new book "The Red Web" tell us how the Russian state sees the Net as both threat and opportunity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Orla Lynskey, from the London School of Economics.

(Picture: Microsoft demo of Hololens glasses, Credit: Getty Images).

Microsoft wows its critics with new Windows 10 devices - is it now the cool kid on the block? Facebook details plans to give 14 African countries satellite internet. We ask Michel de Rosen of Eutelsat, Facebook's partner, whether the tech is up to the job. Europe's highest court says a transatlantic agreement on transferring European internet users' data to America is invalid. Plus, Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan, authors of a new book "The Red Web" tell us how the Russian state sees the Net as both threat and opportunity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Orla Lynskey, from the London School of Economics.

(Picture: Microsoft demo of Hololens glasses, Credit: Getty Images).

92Game On!20151016

Join Rory Cellan-Jones and the team at the League of Legends World Championship.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Brandon Beck, CEO of Riot Games, the company behind the massive title League of Legends talks to us about the growth of e-sports. Plus, League of Legends team manager Mike O'Dell, and top player xPeke, give their take on the business and career possibilities in gaming tournaments. In celebration of computing pioneer Ada Lovelace, we hear from scientists and engineers Dr Suze Kundu, Abbie Hutty, and Dr Jen Gupta, how they would close the gender gap in technology. And, we catch up with indie games developer Arran Langmead, who is creating a video game from home.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of the event Ada Lovelace Day.

(Photo: A Boy and a girl playing a video game. Credit: Purestock).

Brandon Beck, CEO of Riot Games, the company behind the massive title League of Legends talks to us about the growth of e-sports. Plus, League of Legends team manager Mike O'Dell, and top player xPeke, give their take on the business and career possibilities in gaming tournaments. In celebration of computing pioneer Ada Lovelace, we hear from scientists and engineers Dr Suze Kundu, Abbie Hutty, and Dr Jen Gupta, how they would close the gender gap in technology. And, we catch up with indie games developer Arran Langmead, who is creating a video game from home.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of the event Ada Lovelace Day.

(Photo: A Boy and a girl playing a video game. Credit: Purestock).

93Your Money Or Your Data20151023

The UK's phone and broadband giant TalkTalk is hacked. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Hackers breach the systems of one of the UK's biggest broadband and mobile phone providers TalkTalk. The company says it has received a demand for money from the purported hacker. Is this a worrying new turn in how hackers target companies? YouTube launches an ad-free subscription service, but other tech giants are also circling around digital video. The internet goes crazy with "Back to the Future Day" - but how true to the film trilogy was October 21st 2015? And how an Israel-based DIY website company wants to offer musicians a way to control their entire artistic output.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion, Dave Lee, and Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest BT futurologist Dr Nicola Millard. (Picture: Security keypad, Credit: Thinkstock).

Hackers breach the systems of one of the UK's biggest broadband and mobile phone providers TalkTalk. The company says it has received a demand for money from the purported hacker. Is this a worrying new turn in how hackers target companies? YouTube launches an ad-free subscription service, but other tech giants are also circling around digital video. The internet goes crazy with "Back to the Future Day" - but how true to the film trilogy was October 21st 2015? And how an Israel-based DIY website company wants to offer musicians a way to control their entire artistic output.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion, Dave Lee, and Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest BT futurologist Dr Nicola Millard. (Picture: Security keypad, Credit: Thinkstock).

94Deleting Email20151030

Is social media about to replace email at work? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Stewart Butterfield of Slack tells us why he thinks email at work is on the way out. Eben Upton, creator of the Raspberry Pi educational computer reveals a new direction for the project into industry. And Mike Cassidy, Vice President of Google's Project Loon, a plan to provide the internet to remote places using balloons in the stratosphere, tells us how the company is edging towards creating a ring of such balloons around the world.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Blathnaid Healy, UK Editor of Mashable, and Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk. (Picture: Young office workers using social media, Credit: Thinkstock).

Stewart Butterfield of Slack tells us why he thinks email at work is on the way out. Eben Upton, creator of the Raspberry Pi educational computer reveals a new direction for the project into industry. And Mike Cassidy, Vice President of Google's Project Loon, a plan to provide the internet to remote places using balloons in the stratosphere, tells us how the company is edging towards creating a ring of such balloons around the world.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Blathnaid Healy, UK Editor of Mashable, and Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk. (Picture: Young office workers using social media, Credit: Thinkstock).

95Spotting Unicorns In Dublin20151106

Rory Cellan-Jones reports from the annual Web Summit in Ireland's capital, Dublin.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Nicolas Brusson of BlaBlaCar, and Ambarish Mitra of Blippar, founders of two European "Unicorns" - companies valued at over a billion dollars. Plus Kickstarter's CEO Yancey Strickler tells why he thinks crowdfunding is only just getting going, and Nell Watson, Futurist at California's Singularity University predicts the power of Augmented Reality. Recorded at the Web Summit in Ireland's capital, Dublin.

(Photo: Yancey Strickler of Kickstarter being photographed by Rory Cellan-Jones).

Rory Cellan-Jones talks to Nicolas Brusson of BlaBlaCar, and Ambarish Mitra of Blippar, founders of two European "Unicorns" - companies valued at over a billion dollars. Plus Kickstarter's CEO Yancey Strickler tells why he thinks crowdfunding is only just getting going, and Nell Watson, Futurist at California's Singularity University predicts the power of Augmented Reality. Recorded at the Web Summit in Ireland's capital, Dublin.

(Photo: Yancey Strickler of Kickstarter being photographed by Rory Cellan-Jones).

96Data And Drones20151113

Microsoft's new European data centres and Facebook's plan for connectivity drones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella seeks to reassure European customers over security and privacy with local data centres. Facebook's top engineer Jay Parikh on why he thinks laser-equipped drones are the way to bring the Net to remote places. Influential analyst Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz on who's winning in smartphones. And physicist Professor Brian Cox on the tantalising promise of quantum computers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest tech writer Kate Bevan. (Picture: Facebook's Jay Parikh),

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella seeks to reassure European customers over security and privacy with local data centres. Facebook's top engineer Jay Parikh on why he thinks laser-equipped drones are the way to bring the Net to remote places. Influential analyst Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz on who's winning in smartphones. And physicist Professor Brian Cox on the tantalising promise of quantum computers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest tech writer Kate Bevan. (Picture: Facebook's Jay Parikh),

97Tech For Health And Wealth20151120

A new app claiming to boost your wealth as well as your health, using fitness data.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

A new app called Bitwalking aims to generate a virtual currency by tracking how far you walk. We speak to the company's co-founder, Nissan Bahar. Plus, why should we trust our data to the "Cloud"? We ask the head of Amazon's Web Services business Andy Jassy. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest tech broadcaster Georgie Barrat. (Picture: Three people fitness training. Credit: Thinkstock)

A new app called Bitwalking aims to generate a virtual currency by tracking how far you walk. We speak to the company's co-founder, Nissan Bahar. Plus, why should we trust our data to the "Cloud"? We ask the head of Amazon's Web Services business Andy Jassy. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with special guest tech broadcaster Georgie Barrat. (Picture: Three people fitness training. Credit: Thinkstock)

98Media Storm20151127

How publishers are fighting back against ad-blocking and less online advertising money.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How media companies are fighting back against online ad-blocking by making "brand content" for advertisers. Alexander Klöpping of the Dutch startup Blendle is convinced that charging readers just a few cents for each article they see is the answer to the publishing industry's funding worries. Herman Narula of the British company Improbable reveals a means to simulate an entire city in software. And Erica Young of Hong-Kong based firm Insight Robotics gives her take on the debate about robots potentially destroying jobs. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Technology Desk and special guest Ian Maude, digital advertising specialist at Enders Analysis. (Picture: Film crew on a shoot, Credit: Thinkstock).

How media companies are fighting back against online ad-blocking by making "brand content" for advertisers. Alexander Klöpping of the Dutch startup Blendle is convinced that charging readers just a few cents for each article they see is the answer to the publishing industry's funding worries. Herman Narula of the British company Improbable reveals a means to simulate an entire city in software. And Erica Young of Hong-Kong based firm Insight Robotics gives her take on the debate about robots potentially destroying jobs. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Technology Desk and special guest Ian Maude, digital advertising specialist at Enders Analysis. (Picture: Film crew on a shoot, Credit: Thinkstock).

99High Noon For Smartwatches?20151204

The latest on the VTech hack, and is the fad for smartwatches already over?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The latest on the VTech toy company hack with Ken Munro of Pentest Partners. Is the fad for smartwatches already over? We ask Eric Migicovsky, founder of Pebble, one of the earliest devices of this kind. Paul Cameron talks to us about Booktrack, his idea to give e-books a soundtrack. And Mark Lawson-Statham of Intelligent Energy tells us about plans for a hydrogen fuel-cell phone battery. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Holly Brockwell of Gadgette.com, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Man studying rack of smartwatches, Credit: Getty Images).

The latest on the VTech toy company hack with Ken Munro of Pentest Partners. Is the fad for smartwatches already over? We ask Eric Migicovsky, founder of Pebble, one of the earliest devices of this kind. Paul Cameron talks to us about Booktrack, his idea to give e-books a soundtrack. And Mark Lawson-Statham of Intelligent Energy tells us about plans for a hydrogen fuel-cell phone battery. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Holly Brockwell of Gadgette.com, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Man studying rack of smartwatches, Credit: Getty Images).

100Live From London's Science Museum20151211

Rory Cellan-Jones presents the 100th edition of Tech Tent, live from London's Science Museum, where he takes in the history of communications technology with curator John Liffen. We also discuss terrorism with our man in Silicon Valley Dave Lee, how tech is being used for good in developing countries, and how taking a selfie could replace passwords. With the BBC's Jane Wakefield and special guest Eileen Burbidge from Passion Capital.

(Photo: Eileen Burbidge and John Liffen with Rory Cellan-Jones at the Science Museum, Credit: BBC)

Silicon Valley versus terrorism; tech for good; selfie security

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones presents the 100th edition of Tech Tent, live from London's Science Museum, where he takes in the history of communications technology with curator John Liffen. We also discuss terrorism with our man in Silicon Valley Dave Lee, how tech is being used for good in developing countries, and how taking a selfie could replace passwords. With the BBC's Jane Wakefield and special guest Eileen Burbidge from Passion Capital.

(Photo: Eileen Burbidge and John Liffen with Rory Cellan-Jones at the Science Museum, Credit: BBC)

101Who Controls The Internet?20151218

WhatsApp gets blocked in Brazil, and China's leaders push for Internet sovereignty. We hear from ZDNet's Angelica Mari in Sao Paolo, and get the views of special guest Vicki Nash, deputy director of the Oxford Internet Institute. The BBC's Chris Vallance reports on using face recognition to catch criminals in the UK, and we talk cinema tech with Barco "cinemavangelist" Ted Shilowitz. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: WhatsApp logo displayed on a Brazilian phone, Credit: AFP)

WhatsApp in Brazil; Internet sovereignty in China; face recognition in the UK

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

WhatsApp gets blocked in Brazil, and China's leaders push for Internet sovereignty. We hear from ZDNet's Angelica Mari in Sao Paolo, and get the views of special guest Vicki Nash, deputy director of the Oxford Internet Institute. The BBC's Chris Vallance reports on using face recognition to catch criminals in the UK, and we talk cinema tech with Barco "cinemavangelist" Ted Shilowitz. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: WhatsApp logo displayed on a Brazilian phone, Credit: AFP)

102News Quiz Of The Year 201520151225

BBC World TV Click take on BBC Online Tech Desk. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How good is your knowledge of the technology news? Play along with us as Talia Franco and LJ Rich from BBC World TV's Click take on Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Tech Desk. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with scoring by Zoe Kleinman. (Picture: Back Row - LJ Rich and Zoe Kleinman. Front Row - Talia Franco, Jane Wakefield, Rory Cellan-Jones, Tech Tent producer Jat Gill, Dave Lee).

How good is your knowledge of the technology news? Play along with us as Talia Franco and LJ Rich from BBC World TV's Click take on Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online Tech Desk. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with scoring by Zoe Kleinman. (Picture: Back Row - LJ Rich and Zoe Kleinman. Front Row - Talia Franco, Jane Wakefield, Rory Cellan-Jones, Tech Tent producer Jat Gill, Dave Lee).

103New Year Tech 201620160101

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests on the tech to watch out for in 2016.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests look at the key developments in gadgets, advertising, and robotics in the year just gone, and highlight the tech to watch out for in 2016. With Stuart Miles from Pocket-lint, Sarah Wood from Unruly, and Erica Young of Insight Robotics. Also featuring BBC Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Laptop with mobile devices, Credit: Thinkstock).

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests look at the key developments in gadgets, advertising, and robotics in the year just gone, and highlight the tech to watch out for in 2016. With Stuart Miles from Pocket-lint, Sarah Wood from Unruly, and Erica Young of Insight Robotics. Also featuring BBC Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Laptop with mobile devices, Credit: Thinkstock).

104From Ces In Las Vegas20160108

Rory Cellan-Jones presents a special programme from the CES technology trade show in Las Vegas. He speaks to the company behind an alarm clock that wakes you up with pleasant smells, and another showcasing the latest drone technology. We also hear from Faraday Future, a company that wants to revolutionise the car industry, and BMW on how traditional car makers are responding. And Rory also looks at how Las Vegas hopes to be a pioneer of solar energy technology.

(Photo: VR headsets being tested at CES, Credit: Getty Images)

Smelling alarm clocks; high-tech cars; solar-powered Vegas

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones presents a special programme from the CES technology trade show in Las Vegas. He speaks to the company behind an alarm clock that wakes you up with pleasant smells, and another showcasing the latest drone technology. We also hear from Faraday Future, a company that wants to revolutionise the car industry, and BMW on how traditional car makers are responding. And Rory also looks at how Las Vegas hopes to be a pioneer of solar energy technology.

(Photo: VR headsets being tested at CES, Credit: Getty Images)

105Driving Technology20160115

Rory Cellan-Jones meets Elon Musk, the man behind Tesla electric cars.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Elon Musk, the visionary tech entrepreneur behind the Space X rocket company and Tesla electric cars, talks to us about a coming transport revolution. Tim Kelly from the World Bank tells us how he thinks the economic benefits of the tech industry are going disproportionately to the world’s rich. Plus, could a robotic cat replace an actual pet for some people? Our Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee gives it a try. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden from TechCrunch Europe.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones with Tesla car)

Elon Musk, the visionary tech entrepreneur behind the Space X rocket company and Tesla electric cars, talks to us about a coming transport revolution. Tim Kelly from the World Bank tells us how he thinks the economic benefits of the tech industry are going disproportionately to the world’s rich. Plus, could a robotic cat replace an actual pet for some people? Our Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee gives it a try. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden from TechCrunch Europe.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones with Tesla car)

106Crowdfunding, Farming Tech, And Doom20160122

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Mark Harris, who investigated what went wrong with the failed Kickstarter drone project Zano, gives us his conclusion. We hear Microsoft's plans for the 3D virtual world Minecraft. We find out how farmers are using autonomous vehicles and big data to get the most from their land. And we talk to John Romero, the creator of the seminal videogame Doom, on why he's released a new final level, 23 years after the game first came out.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Rob Carter of Fieldmargin, and BBC Online reporters Chris Baraniuk, Zoe Kleinman, and Jane Wakefield. (Picture: Farmer in field using smartphone, Credit: iStock).

Mark Harris, who investigated what went wrong with the failed Kickstarter drone project Zano, gives us his conclusion. We hear Microsoft's plans for the 3D virtual world Minecraft. We find out how farmers are using autonomous vehicles and big data to get the most from their land. And we talk to John Romero, the creator of the seminal videogame Doom, on why he's released a new final level, 23 years after the game first came out.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Rob Carter of Fieldmargin, and BBC Online reporters Chris Baraniuk, Zoe Kleinman, and Jane Wakefield. (Picture: Farmer in field using smartphone, Credit: iStock).

107All Systems Go!20160129

A landmark moment in Artificial Intelligence as a computer beats a champion Go player

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind on using Artificial Intelligence to beat a champion player of the ancient board game Go. Jason Njoku of iROKOtv on investing in making Nigerian 'Nollywood' films and TV. And, how traditional games are getting a tech update at the London Toy Fair. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ellie Gibson, video games journalist and co-presenter of the Scummy Mummies podcast.

(Photo: Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind)

Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind on using Artificial Intelligence to beat a champion player of the ancient board game Go. Jason Njoku of iROKOtv on investing in making Nigerian 'Nollywood' films and TV. And, how traditional games are getting a tech update at the London Toy Fair. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ellie Gibson, video games journalist and co-presenter of the Scummy Mummies podcast.

(Photo: Demis Hassabis of Google DeepMind)

108Tech Desires20160205

What makes a tech company attractive? And lessons from the UK's 80s home computer scene.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

As Microsoft buys UK Artificial Intelligence firm SwiftKey, we ask leading venture capitalist Saul Klein what investors are looking for in a tech company. Plus we speak to Joyce Kim of Stellar on trying to slash the cost of money transfers in Nigeria. And Tom Lean, author of the new book "Electronic Dreams" tells us what today's startups can learn from the 1980s home computer revolution in the UK.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with guest Marieme Jamme, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk. (Picture: NASDAQ Stock Exchange in New York, Credit: Getty Images).

As Microsoft buys UK Artificial Intelligence firm SwiftKey, we ask leading venture capitalist Saul Klein what investors are looking for in a tech company. Plus we speak to Joyce Kim of Stellar on trying to slash the cost of money transfers in Nigeria. And Tom Lean, author of the new book "Electronic Dreams" tells us what today's startups can learn from the 1980s home computer revolution in the UK.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with guest Marieme Jamme, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk. (Picture: NASDAQ Stock Exchange in New York, Credit: Getty Images).

109India Halts Free Facebook Plan20160212

The row over US firms' attitude to India after Facebook's free net access is blocked.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The row over US firms' attitude to India after Facebook's free net access plan is blocked. Plus how toy giant VTech wants parents to accept their kids' data could be hacked. And Diffbot, the company trying to teach robots to read the Web. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Professor Angela Sasse.

(Image: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visiting Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, Credit: Getty Images).

The row over US firms' attitude to India after Facebook's free net access plan is blocked. Plus how toy giant VTech wants parents to accept their kids' data could be hacked. And Diffbot, the company trying to teach robots to read the Web. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Professor Angela Sasse.

(Image: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visiting Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, Credit: Getty Images).

110Apple Fights Order To Unlock The Iphone20160219

Apple resists an order to unlock an iPhone that belonged to a dead terrorist

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Apple resists an order to unlock an iPhone that belonged to a dead terrorist. Plus, how you might soon be visiting a Virtual Reality theme park. And, Prof Hiroshi Ishiguro, of the University of Osaka in Japan, tells us why he thinks people should learn to love robots. With special guest, the technology journalist Kayleigh Bateman from WeAreTheCity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: Apple chief executive Tim Cook. Credit: Getty Images)

Apple resists an order to unlock an iPhone that belonged to a dead terrorist. Plus, how you might soon be visiting a Virtual Reality theme park. And, Prof Hiroshi Ishiguro, of the University of Osaka in Japan, tells us why he thinks people should learn to love robots. With special guest, the technology journalist Kayleigh Bateman from WeAreTheCity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: Apple chief executive Tim Cook. Credit: Getty Images)

111Mobile World Congress 201620160226

How phone-makers are looking to VR to boost their profits. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The big news from Samsung, Huawei, and other tech giants at the annual Mobile World Congress event in Barcelona, Spain. We find out why handset makers think Virtual Reality is the next "killer app" for smartphones. And we drop in on Social Media Week in Lagos to talk to Nigerian bloggers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden of TechCrunch Europe, and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones and animatronic dog with internet-connected dog-collar at Mobile World Congress).

The big news from Samsung, Huawei, and other tech giants at the annual Mobile World Congress event in Barcelona, Spain. We find out why handset makers think Virtual Reality is the next "killer app" for smartphones. And we drop in on Social Media Week in Lagos to talk to Nigerian bloggers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ingrid Lunden of TechCrunch Europe, and Dave Lee from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Rory Cellan-Jones and animatronic dog with internet-connected dog-collar at Mobile World Congress).

112Driverless Cars On Collision Course?20160304

Will a collision between an autonomous car and a bus dent enthusiasm for driverless tech?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

After a Google autonomous car collides with a bus, should driverless tech be trusted? Evan Williams, CEO of Medium (and co-founder of Twitter) on why long-form online publishing has a place in the social-media age. Plus, Nikhil Pahwa, the campaigner who took on Facebook in India over free internet access.Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest, tech journalist Kate Bevan.

(Picture: Interior of Nissan autonomous concept car at Geneva Motor Show 2016, Credit: Getty Images).

After a Google autonomous car collides with a bus, should driverless tech be trusted? Evan Williams, CEO of Medium (and co-founder of Twitter) on why long-form online publishing has a place in the social-media age. Plus, Nikhil Pahwa, the campaigner who took on Facebook in India over free internet access.Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest, tech journalist Kate Bevan.

(Picture: Interior of Nissan autonomous concept car at Geneva Motor Show 2016, Credit: Getty Images).

113Beyond The Connected Kettle20160311

Will the Internet Of Things (IOT) make its biggest mark in industry ahead of the home?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Will the Internet Of Things (IOT) make its biggest mark in industry ahead of the home? We talk to Ron Zink of John Deere about self-driving tractors, and Nigel Hill of Umbra Shading about connected window blinds. Plus Irene Ng of the HATDeX project tells us about the possibility of using our personal data to get discounts in stores. With special guests professor Andy Stanford-Clark, IOT expert and Master Inventor at IBM, and Jeni Tennison, technical director of the Open Data Institute. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: Automated tractor cab, Credit: John Deere).

Will the Internet Of Things (IOT) make its biggest mark in industry ahead of the home? We talk to Ron Zink of John Deere about self-driving tractors, and Nigel Hill of Umbra Shading about connected window blinds. Plus Irene Ng of the HATDeX project tells us about the possibility of using our personal data to get discounts in stores. With special guests professor Andy Stanford-Clark, IOT expert and Master Inventor at IBM, and Jeni Tennison, technical director of the Open Data Institute. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Photo: Automated tractor cab, Credit: John Deere).

114Sony Throws Down Vr Gauntlet20160318

Sony reveals its Virtual Reality headset. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Sony reveals its Virtual Reality headset. Will its massive base of existing PlayStation users help it leapfrog its rivals? Microsoft's UK research chief Chris Bishop tells us why he thinks artificial intelligence is about the rise of humans rather than the "rise of robots". Plus independent games developer Arran Langmead, whose fortunes we have been following, is invited to showcase his title "Bears Can't Drift?" at the Games Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk and special guest Thomas Tamblyn, Tech Editor at Huffington Post UK. (Picture: Young people on sofa using Sony VR headset, Credit: Sony Computer Entertainment Inc).

Sony reveals its Virtual Reality headset. Will its massive base of existing PlayStation users help it leapfrog its rivals? Microsoft's UK research chief Chris Bishop tells us why he thinks artificial intelligence is about the rise of humans rather than the "rise of robots". Plus independent games developer Arran Langmead, whose fortunes we have been following, is invited to showcase his title "Bears Can't Drift?" at the Games Developers Conference in San Francisco.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk and special guest Thomas Tamblyn, Tech Editor at Huffington Post UK. (Picture: Young people on sofa using Sony VR headset, Credit: Sony Computer Entertainment Inc).

115When Ai Goes Rogue20160325

Microsoft pulls its chat bot from the internet after people teach it to be offensive.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Microsoft pulls the @TayandYou chat bot from the internet after people teach it to be offensive. AI expert Prof Noel Sharkey tells us what went wrong. We ask renowned phone analyst Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz why Apple introduced the iPhone SE. Plus we examine how doctors are turning to digital medicine. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Shivvy Jervis, creator of the YouTube technology series "Trailblazers".

(Picture: @TayandYou logo, Credit: Microsoft).

Microsoft pulls the @TayandYou chat bot from the internet after people teach it to be offensive. AI expert Prof Noel Sharkey tells us what went wrong. We ask renowned phone analyst Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz why Apple introduced the iPhone SE. Plus we examine how doctors are turning to digital medicine. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Shivvy Jervis, creator of the YouTube technology series "Trailblazers".

(Picture: @TayandYou logo, Credit: Microsoft).

116Tesla's Model For The Masses20160401

Tesla unveils a smaller electric car for the mass market. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Tesla takes on its biggest challenge so far by unveiling a smaller and cheaper electric car pitched at the mass market. Plus, on Apple's 40th anniversary we hear from one of the company's founders. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Holly Brockwell from the Gadgette.com website.

(Photo: Tesla Model 3 car, Credit: Tesla Motors).

Tesla takes on its biggest challenge so far by unveiling a smaller and cheaper electric car pitched at the mass market. Plus, on Apple's 40th anniversary we hear from one of the company's founders. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Holly Brockwell from the Gadgette.com website.

(Photo: Tesla Model 3 car, Credit: Tesla Motors).

117Whatsapp Boosts Message Privacy20160408

Will WhatsApp's boost to privacy create headaches with government for its owner Facebook?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Will WhatsApp's boost to privacy create headaches with governments in key markets for its owner Facebook? Huawei launches its flagship P9 smartphone featuring a Leica-branded dual-lens camera. What does the tie-up with a luxury camera brand mean for rival Samsung? Plus, the French company whose technology helped journalists analyse millions of documents and find stories in the leaked "Panama Papers". Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ben Wood, Chief of Research at CCS Insight, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

(Picture: WhatsApp and Facebook icons on smartphone, Credit AFP/ Getty Images).

Will WhatsApp's boost to privacy create headaches with governments in key markets for its owner Facebook? Huawei launches its flagship P9 smartphone featuring a Leica-branded dual-lens camera. What does the tie-up with a luxury camera brand mean for rival Samsung? Plus, the French company whose technology helped journalists analyse millions of documents and find stories in the leaked "Panama Papers". Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Ben Wood, Chief of Research at CCS Insight, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online Technology Desk.

(Picture: WhatsApp and Facebook icons on smartphone, Credit AFP/ Getty Images).

118Bye Bye App - Hello Bot20160415

Why Facebook thinks "bots" are the hot new way for companies to talk to their customers.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why Facebook thinks "bots" are the essential new way for companies to reach their customers. We talk to Dennis Mortensen, whose company x.ai is behind the meeting-scheduling bot Amy. And we find out how Californian startup Zipline plans to use autonomous aircraft to deliver medical supplies in Rwanda. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Blathnaid Healy, UK Editor of Mashable, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Humanoid robot wearing headset, Credit: Thinkstock).

Why Facebook thinks "bots" are the essential new way for companies to reach their customers. We talk to Dennis Mortensen, whose company x.ai is behind the meeting-scheduling bot Amy. And we find out how Californian startup Zipline plans to use autonomous aircraft to deliver medical supplies in Rwanda. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Blathnaid Healy, UK Editor of Mashable, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Picture: Humanoid robot wearing headset, Credit: Thinkstock).

119Eu Accuses Google Of Android "abuse"20160422

Why European antitrust regulators say Google is abusing its dominance of Android.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why European antitrust regulators say Google is abusing its dominance of the Android mobile platform. And Martin Ford, author of "Rise of the Robots" tells us why he believes automated systems are already destroying jobs as he feared they would. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest technology writer Kate Bevan.

(Picture: EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, Credit: Getty Images).

Why European antitrust regulators say Google is abusing its dominance of the Android mobile platform. And Martin Ford, author of "Rise of the Robots" tells us why he believes automated systems are already destroying jobs as he feared they would. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest technology writer Kate Bevan.

(Picture: EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, Credit: Getty Images).

120Exporting Silicon Valley20160429

The BBC's Dave Lee in California assesses the changing fortunes of Silicon Valley's tech giants and Nolan Bushnell, the legendary founder of Atari, explains why he's getting back into computer games. Ed Butler reports on Ghana's tech start-up scene and Leah Busque from TaskRabbit explains why the struggles of some gig economy companies might turn out to be a good thing. Special guest Gerard Grech from Tech City UK joins Rory Cellan-Jones in the studio to give his views on what makes a successful tech start-up hub.

(Photo: A Facebook 'like' symbol on an Apple laptop, Credit: Getty Images)

Silicon Valley's tech giants; start-ups in Ghana; the gig economy.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The BBC's Dave Lee in California assesses the changing fortunes of Silicon Valley's tech giants and Nolan Bushnell, the legendary founder of Atari, explains why he's getting back into computer games. Ed Butler reports on Ghana's tech start-up scene and Leah Busque from TaskRabbit explains why the struggles of some gig economy companies might turn out to be a good thing. Special guest Gerard Grech from Tech City UK joins Rory Cellan-Jones in the studio to give his views on what makes a successful tech start-up hub.

(Photo: A Facebook 'like' symbol on an Apple laptop, Credit: Getty Images)

121Seeking Satoshi20160506

The businessman who claims to have created Bitcoin fails to make his case stick.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The Australian businessman Craig Wright, who claims to have created the virtual currency Bitcoin, fails to make his case stick. Plus we go behind the assembly lines at Tesla to ask how the electric car-maker can hope to meet the 400,000 pre-orders it says it has for its new Model 3 vehicle. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Garrick Hileman, economic historian at the University of Cambridge and London School of Economics, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Bitcoin logo on digital abstract background, Credit: Thinkstock).

The Australian businessman Craig Wright, who claims to have created the virtual currency Bitcoin, fails to make his case stick. Plus we go behind the assembly lines at Tesla to ask how the electric car-maker can hope to meet the 400,000 pre-orders it says it has for its new Model 3 vehicle. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Garrick Hileman, economic historian at the University of Cambridge and London School of Economics, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Bitcoin logo on digital abstract background, Credit: Thinkstock).

122Estonia Tech Special20160513

How Estonia wants to attract 'e-Residents' from the rest of the world.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones visits Estonia to discover how the Baltic nation of just 1.3 million people is a powerhouse of digital innovation, and how it wants to offer 'e-Residency' to citizens from around the world. Plus Rory talks to some of the grandees of Estonian tech about how Skype - Estonia's biggest tech success - trained a generation of engineers and entrepreneurs to drive their country's extraordinary progress. With special guest Eileen Burbidge, partner at Passion Capital and former head of product at Skype.

(Image: The e-Estonia Showroom where foreign delegations are shown how Estonia's digital services platform works).

Rory Cellan-Jones visits Estonia to discover how the Baltic nation of just 1.3 million people is a powerhouse of digital innovation, and how it wants to offer 'e-Residency' to citizens from around the world. Plus Rory talks to some of the grandees of Estonian tech about how Skype - Estonia's biggest tech success - trained a generation of engineers and entrepreneurs to drive their country's extraordinary progress. With special guest Eileen Burbidge, partner at Passion Capital and former head of product at Skype.

(Image: The e-Estonia Showroom where foreign delegations are shown how Estonia's digital services platform works).

123Google Plans Ai For Your Home20160520

How Google wants to put an artificially intelligent assistant in your home.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google takes on Amazon by unveiling an intelligent assistant loudspeaker for your home. What would a world in which human brains can be replicated in software look like? And we learn about the state of technology in secretive North Korea. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Nick Summers from Engadget UK.

(Image: Woman poses for photo by Android characters at Google I/O 2016, Credit: Getty Images).

Google takes on Amazon by unveiling an intelligent assistant loudspeaker for your home. What would a world in which human brains can be replicated in software look like? And we learn about the state of technology in secretive North Korea. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Nick Summers from Engadget UK.

(Image: Woman poses for photo by Android characters at Google I/O 2016, Credit: Getty Images).

124The Cobots Are Coming20160527

How collaborative robots (or "Cobots") might soon be your workmates.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How collaborative robots (or "Cobots") might soon be your workmates. We visit the Innorobo exhibition in Paris to see the latest models. And Tom Davenport, co-author of new book "Only Humans Need Apply" on how jobs will change in a robotic future. Plus, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on how he plans to make his company regain its popularity.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Sabine Hauert, lecturer in robotics at Bristol University and President of Robohub. (Image: humanoid robots at Innorobo, Credit: Peter Page).

How collaborative robots (or "Cobots") might soon be your workmates. We visit the Innorobo exhibition in Paris to see the latest models. And Tom Davenport, co-author of new book "Only Humans Need Apply" on how jobs will change in a robotic future. Plus, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on how he plans to make his company regain its popularity.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Sabine Hauert, lecturer in robotics at Bristol University and President of Robohub. (Image: humanoid robots at Innorobo, Credit: Peter Page).

125Dark Side Of The Net20160603

Are the internet's trolls beyond taming? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Are the internet's trolls beyond taming? Twitter, Facebook, and Google sign a European agreement to curb online hate speech. Plus why are huge caches of passwords hacked and stolen many years ago now turning up for sale on the "Dark Web"? And the Brazilian startup using sounds to send data between phones and objects.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk and Joseph Evans, social media specialist at Enders Analysis. (Image: Pointing finger emerging from computer screen, Credit: Thinkstock).

Are the internet's trolls beyond taming? Twitter, Facebook, and Google sign a European agreement to curb online hate speech. Plus why are huge caches of passwords hacked and stolen many years ago now turning up for sale on the "Dark Web"? And the Brazilian startup using sounds to send data between phones and objects.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk and Joseph Evans, social media specialist at Enders Analysis. (Image: Pointing finger emerging from computer screen, Credit: Thinkstock).

126Cheltenham Science Festival Special20160610

Why virtual reality is coming of age and whether it’s a good idea to treat robots like humans are among the topics we talk about in a special show from Europe’s biggest science festival. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guests Professor Jim Al-Khalili, British theoretical physicist, author and broadcaster, and Louise Emerson, CEO of Cheltenham Festivals.

(Photo: Pepper the robot, Credit: Getty Images)

Robots; virtual reality; info security

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why virtual reality is coming of age and whether it’s a good idea to treat robots like humans are among the topics we talk about in a special show from Europe’s biggest science festival. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guests Professor Jim Al-Khalili, British theoretical physicist, author and broadcaster, and Louise Emerson, CEO of Cheltenham Festivals.

(Photo: Pepper the robot, Credit: Getty Images)

127Gaming Goes Virtual At E320160617

Your weekly status update on the technology business with Rory Cellan-Jones

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The first virtual reality games go on show at E3 in Los Angeles. Plus, we meet Amelia, a software agent whose makers claim it can perform the role of a human customer adviser. And we ask Carl Pei of crowd-designed phone maker OnePlus whether their new handset can compete in a crowded Android market.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Keza MacDonald, UK editor of gaming site Kotaku, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online Tech Desk. (Image: Man tries VR game at E3, Credit: Getty Images).

The first virtual reality games go on show at E3 in Los Angeles. Plus, we meet Amelia, a software agent whose makers claim it can perform the role of a human customer adviser. And we ask Carl Pei of crowd-designed phone maker OnePlus whether their new handset can compete in a crowded Android market.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Keza MacDonald, UK editor of gaming site Kotaku, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online Tech Desk. (Image: Man tries VR game at E3, Credit: Getty Images).

129Self-driving Cars Under Scrutiny20160701

Will a fatal accident involving a Tesla semi-autonomous car raise safety concerns?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Will a fatal accident involving a Tesla semi-autonomous car raise safety concerns over the technology? Plus, we hear how London-based startups are responding to the UK's referendum vote to leave the European Union. We visit the 5GWorld show to discover the coming innovation in wireless networks. And we ask whether India is really about to get a $4 smartphone.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Gary Stewart from the accelerator Wayra UK, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk. (Image: Line of Tesla cars, Credit: Getty Images).

Will a fatal accident involving a Tesla semi-autonomous car raise safety concerns over the technology? Plus, we hear how London-based startups are responding to the UK's referendum vote to leave the European Union. We visit the 5GWorld show to discover the coming innovation in wireless networks. And we ask whether India is really about to get a $4 smartphone.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Gary Stewart from the accelerator Wayra UK, and Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk. (Image: Line of Tesla cars, Credit: Getty Images).

130Your Ai Will See You Now20160708

How artificial intelligence is helping doctors diagnose eye diseases.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How artificial intelligence is being used in everything from helping doctors diagnose eye diseases, to Amazon's ability to spot fraudulent orders and fake reviews. Plus, Ken Segall, the man who gave the iMac its name, talks to us about Apple's future.

Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Stephanie Hare, technology strategist at the data science firm Palantir. (Image: Close-up of woman's eye with tech overlay, Credit: Thinkstock).

How artificial intelligence is being used in everything from helping doctors diagnose eye diseases, to Amazon's ability to spot fraudulent orders and fake reviews. Plus, Ken Segall, the man who gave the iMac its name, talks to us about Apple's future.

Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Stephanie Hare, technology strategist at the data science firm Palantir. (Image: Close-up of woman's eye with tech overlay, Credit: Thinkstock).

131Pok\u00e9mon Go Takes Over Tech20160715

How an updated version of a 90s game made augmented reality mainstream.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How an updated version of the 90s game Pokémon has made augmented reality mainstream. Plus, ways in which crooks are using ever more sophisticated email attacks to steal money and data from companies. And the energy-generating paving tiles that are helping light a Favela in Brazil. Presented by BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Keza MacDonald, editor of games site Kotaku UK.

(Image: Three young women in Los Angeles playing Pokémon Go, Credit: Getty Images).

131Pokmon Go Takes Over Tech20160715

How an updated version of the 90s game Pokémon has made augmented reality mainstream. Plus, ways in which crooks are using ever more sophisticated email attacks to steal money and data from companies. And the energy-generating paving tiles that are helping light a Favela in Brazil. Presented by BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Keza MacDonald, editor of games site Kotaku UK.

(Image: Three young women in Los Angeles playing Pokémon Go, Credit: Getty Images).

132Facebook Drone Takes Flight20160722

Inside the plant where Facebook's internet drone is being built. With Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We go inside the plant where Facebook's internet drone is being built. Plus, why Japanese company Softbank wants to buy ARM Holdings, the “jewel in the crown” of the UK’s tech industry. And a scheme set up to teach girls in Africa to code that is now helping young women in a prosperous English county to learn to program. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Mariéme Jamme, social entrepreneur.

(Image: Wing of Facebook's Project Aquila aircraft in flight, Credit: Facebook).

We go inside the plant where Facebook's internet drone is being built. Plus, why Japanese company Softbank wants to buy ARM Holdings, the “jewel in the crown? of the UK’s tech industry. And a scheme set up to teach girls in Africa to code that is now helping young women in a prosperous English county to learn to program. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Mariéme Jamme, social entrepreneur.

(Image: Wing of Facebook's Project Aquila aircraft in flight, Credit: Facebook).

133Tesla's 'gigafactory'20160729

Zoe Kleinman presents this week's programme. North America tech reporter Dave Lee tells us about his visit to Tesla's new battery factory in the desert and Israeli tech firm Aquarius Engines pitches one of the alternatives to battery power. Zoe takes a trip on a high-tech search and rescue boat, and Edwin Lane finds out why old formats like VHS are still so popular. Tech journalist Kate Bevan is our special guest and the BBC's Chris Foxx rounds up the news.

(Photo: Tesla cars, Credit: Getty Images)

Reports from California, a high-tech boat and the world of VHS.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Zoe Kleinman presents this week's programme. North America tech reporter Dave Lee tells us about his visit to Tesla's new battery factory in the desert and Israeli tech firm Aquarius Engines pitches one of the alternatives to battery power. Zoe takes a trip on a high-tech search and rescue boat, and Edwin Lane finds out why old formats like VHS are still so popular. Tech journalist Kate Bevan is our special guest and the BBC's Chris Foxx rounds up the news.

(Photo: Tesla cars, Credit: Getty Images)

134Silicon Beach?20160805

Can startups flourish outside major cities? We visit a tech hub in the UK with a seaside location, and hear from 'Silicon Beach' founder Matt Desmier and app developer Ted Nash, while Robert Gaal from the TQ hub in Amsterdam, argues the case for cities. Plus we hear from the BBC's Dave Lee, in Las Vegas for not one but two major hackers' conferences, and artist and inventor Bart Jansen, the man famous for turning his pet cat into a drone. Zoe Kleinman presents, and our special guest in the studio is chief envisioning officer for Microsoft, Dave Coplin.

(Photo: A beach in Bournemouth, UK, Credit: Getty Images)

Can startups flourish outside the tech hubs of major cities? Zoe Kleinman presents.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Can startups flourish outside major cities? We visit a tech hub in the UK with a seaside location, and hear from 'Silicon Beach' founder Matt Desmier and app developer Ted Nash, while Robert Gaal from the TQ hub in Amsterdam, argues the case for cities. Plus we hear from the BBC's Dave Lee, in Las Vegas for not one but two major hackers' conferences, and artist and inventor Bart Jansen, the man famous for turning his pet cat into a drone. Zoe Kleinman presents, and our special guest in the studio is chief envisioning officer for Microsoft, Dave Coplin.

(Photo: A beach in Bournemouth, UK, Credit: Getty Images)

135Computer Meltdown Hits Delta Flights20160812

How Delta Airlines flyers were stranded this week by a power cut.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How Delta Airlines flyers were stranded this week by a power cut. And why China's Alibaba plans to help foreign firms enter its own market. Plus, US comedian Ari Shaffir tells us why he is not missing his smartphone since swapping it for a simpler handset 18 months ago. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Georgie Barrat, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online technology desk.

(Image: Travellers queuing at Delta Airlines' check-in desk at New York's LaGuardia Airport this week. Credit: Getty Images).

How Delta Airlines flyers were stranded this week by a power cut. And why China's Alibaba plans to help foreign firms enter its own market. Plus, US comedian Ari Shaffir tells us why he is not missing his smartphone since swapping it for a simpler handset 18 months ago. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Georgie Barrat, and Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online technology desk.

(Image: Travellers queuing at Delta Airlines' check-in desk at New York's LaGuardia Airport this week. Credit: Getty Images).

136The Race For Driverless Rides20160819

How Ford, Volvo, and Uber are racing to make driverless taxis a reality.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How Ford, Volvo, and Uber are racing to make driverless taxis a reality. Plus, how changing views of the role of women in South Korea are spilling into online abuse. And the tech that aims to tailor podcast adverts to the listener.

Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest the software developer Meri Williams, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk. (Image: Uber driverless car in Pittsburgh, Credit: Uber).

How Ford, Volvo, and Uber are racing to make driverless taxis a reality. Plus, how changing views of the role of women in South Korea are spilling into online abuse. And the tech that aims to tailor podcast adverts to the listener.

Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest the software developer Meri Williams, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk. (Image: Uber driverless car in Pittsburgh, Credit: Uber).

137Has Open Computing Won?20160826

The "free" operating system Linux is 25 years old. Will open software dominate computing?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

It's 25 years since a young programmer from Finland called Linus Torvalds proposed a "free" operating system for desktop computers. Linux, as it became known, would go on to power lots of devices we now use, wear, and carry. We look at its legacy and ask Martin Percival of Red Hat whether it will still dominate computing in the future.

Plus, the messaging platform WhatsApp says it will begin showing its users adverts. Is WhatsApp going back on its original ethos, or is it a fair way for its owner Facebook to recoup some of the billions it spent to buy the company?

And we talk to the creators of a phone-based system that traders in Kenya can use to combat corruption when they import goods from neighbouring countries. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Kate Bevan, and Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Linux mascot "Tux" penguin in front of a laptop, Credit: Thinkstock).

It's 25 years since a young programmer from Finland called Linus Torvalds proposed a "free" operating system for desktop computers. Linux, as it became known, would go on to power lots of devices we now use, wear, and carry. We look at its legacy and ask Martin Percival of Red Hat whether it will still dominate computing in the future.

Plus, the messaging platform WhatsApp says it will begin showing its users adverts. Is WhatsApp going back on its original ethos, or is it a fair way for its owner Facebook to recoup some of the billions it spent to buy the company?

And we talk to the creators of a phone-based system that traders in Kenya can use to combat corruption when they import goods from neighbouring countries. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Kate Bevan, and Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Linux mascot "Tux" penguin in front of a laptop, Credit: Thinkstock).

138Samsung's Big Recall20160902

Samsung recalls Note 7 phones and Rory Cellan-Jones reports from IFA in Berlin.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones visits IFA - Europe's biggest consumer technology show - in Berlin. He finds out how the much-vaunted 'Internet of Things' is progressing with the latest smart fridge and hears from special guests Lukas Kampfmann from the Factory - a trendy space for startups in Berlin's heart - and Anna Bojic, founder of Merisier - a startup based there. Plus, Berlin State Senator for Technology Cornelia Yzer tells Rory why she believes she can lure startups from London to her city. Meanwhile Samsung has recalled its new Galaxy Note 7 phones amid concerns that some of them are bursting into flames. With Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Photo: Samsung stand in Seoul, South Korea, Credit: Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones visits IFA - Europe's biggest consumer technology show - in Berlin. He finds out how the much-vaunted 'Internet of Things' is progressing with the latest smart fridge and hears from special guests Lukas Kampfmann from the Factory - a trendy space for startups in Berlin's heart - and Anna Bojic, founder of Merisier - a startup based there. Plus, Berlin State Senator for Technology Cornelia Yzer tells Rory why she believes she can lure startups from London to her city. Meanwhile Samsung has recalled its new Galaxy Note 7 phones amid concerns that some of them are bursting into flames. With Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Photo: Samsung stand in Seoul, South Korea, Credit: Getty Images).

139Apple's Give And Take20160909

Apple gambles on its new iPhone 7 with no traditional headphone socket.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Apple pulls the traditional headphone socket from its new iPhone 7. Will Apple fans remain loyal? We ask Adam Christianson, creator of the Maccast show. Plus Japan's gaming giants Sony and Nintendo compete for attention with new consoles and an iPhone version of Mario. And has private money boosted the space sector? Alison Van Diggelen speaks to Peter Diamandis, founder of the X-Prize. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion from the BBC online tech desk, and special guest gaming journalist Ellie Gibson.

(Image: Apple's Tim Cook reveals new Mario game for iPhone, Credit: Stephen Lam/ Getty Images).

Apple pulls the traditional headphone socket from its new iPhone 7. Will Apple fans remain loyal? We ask Adam Christianson, creator of the Maccast show. Plus Japan's gaming giants Sony and Nintendo compete for attention with new consoles and an iPhone version of Mario. And has private money boosted the space sector? Alison Van Diggelen speaks to Peter Diamandis, founder of the X-Prize. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion from the BBC online tech desk, and special guest gaming journalist Ellie Gibson.

(Image: Apple's Tim Cook reveals new Mario game for iPhone, Credit: Stephen Lam/ Getty Images).

140Transatlantic Tech Tussle20160916

The European Commission’s plans to change copyright laws could mean bigger bills for websites that allow users to stream music. Add to this Apple’s tax issues in Ireland and there’s anger in America, where companies feel they are being unfairly targeted. Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, tells us why. Amazon brings its voice-controlled speaker to the UK and Germany – one of its creators, William Tunstall-Pedoe, explains the huge technological challenge behind understanding, then acting on the human voice. And could mobile technology help lift people out of poverty in Africa? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with Chris Foxx from the BBC online tech desk and special guest Madhumita Murgia, European technology correspondent for the Financial Times.

(Photo credit: Thinkstock)

Europe takes action on copyright and tax laws - US tech companies feel unfairly targeted.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The European Commission’s plans to change copyright laws could mean bigger bills for websites that allow users to stream music. Add to this Apple’s tax issues in Ireland and there’s anger in America, where companies feel they are being unfairly targeted. Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, tells us why. Amazon brings its voice-controlled speaker to the UK and Germany – one of its creators, William Tunstall-Pedoe, explains the huge technological challenge behind understanding, then acting on the human voice. And could mobile technology help lift people out of poverty in Africa? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones with Chris Foxx from the BBC online tech desk and special guest Madhumita Murgia, European technology correspondent for the Financial Times.

(Photo credit: Thinkstock)

141Yahoo! Suffers 'biggest' Hack20160923

Yahoo! admits up to half a billion users may have had their details stolen by hackers.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Yahoo! has admitted that up to half a billion of its users may have had their details stolen by hackers. We hear from renowned security consultant Troy Hunt. Plus, Paul Lee of Deloitte tells us whether phone giants are failing to keep customers' attention with new models. And our special guest Adriana Hamacher talks about what humans want from robots. Presented by BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, Credit: Getty Images).

Yahoo! has admitted that up to half a billion of its users may have had their details stolen by hackers. We hear from renowned security consultant Troy Hunt. Plus, Paul Lee of Deloitte tells us whether phone giants are failing to keep customers' attention with new models. And our special guest Adriana Hamacher talks about what humans want from robots. Presented by BBC Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, Credit: Getty Images).

14230/09/2016 Gmt20160930
142Dinky Drones To Take Everywhere20160930

Two new compact drones aim to expand the gadgets' appeal. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Two new compact drones from GoPro and DJI aim to expand the gadgets' appeal. We ask film-maker Philip Bloom whether they will. And will Google's plan to put more Indians online be better received than that of Facebook? Plus Adrian Lacey reports on how researchers are shaping the future of audio broadcasting. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Samira Sohail, creator of the Samira Stalks podcast.

(Image: Closeup of GoPro Karma drone in flight, Credit: Josh Edelson/ AFP/ Getty Images).

14307/10/2016 Gmt20161007

143An Ai-first World Is Coming20161007

Why Google thinks AI assistants are as important a development as the birth of the web.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why Google thinks AI assistants are as important a development as the birth of the web. Plus the scramble by Oculus, Sony, and HTC to bring virtual reality to the mass-market. And we talk to engineering giant ABB on the role that robots might play in India's future prosperity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Jessica Ekholm, research director at Gartner.

(Image: Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg demonstrates the latest Oculus virtual reality devices at the Connect 3 event in California, Credit: Glenn Chapman /AFP/Getty Images).

144Samsung Ditches New Smartphone20161014

Korean giant Samsung kills off its latest smartphone after a series of battery fires.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Korean giant Samsung kills off its new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after a series of battery fires. Plus, as Microsoft expands the availability of its Hololens headset, we ask whether mixed and augmented reality is more useful than virtual reality. And we hear from Nadav Zafrir, the former commander of an Israeli army intelligence unit that's also a startup hub. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of the annual Ada Lovelace Day event.

(Image: Safety warning over Samsung Galaxy Note 7 to air travellers, Credit:Greg Baker/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Korean giant Samsung kills off its new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after a series of battery fires. Plus, as Microsoft expands the availability of its Hololens headset, we ask whether mixed and augmented reality is more useful than virtual reality. And we hear from Nadav Zafrir, the former commander of an Israeli army intelligence unit that's also a startup hub. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of the annual Ada Lovelace Day event.

(Image: Safety warning over Samsung Galaxy Note 7 to air travellers, Credit:Greg Baker/ AFP/ Getty Images).

14521/10/2016 Gmt20161021
145Is Ai Cause For Fear Or Hope?20161021

Are researchers now taking the ethics of artificial intelligence seriously?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Are researchers now taking the ethics of artificial intelligence seriously, following a series of rapid recent advances? Plus how "computational propaganda" is at play in the US election. And, the claim that "ransomware" is now the cybercrime of choice against businesses. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Thomas Tamblyn, technology editor of the Huffington Post UK.

(Image: Human and robot hands about to touch, Credit: Thinkstock).

146Is The Desktop Pc Back?20161028

How Microsoft is squaring up to Apple for a fight over desktop computers

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How Microsoft is squaring up to Apple for a fight over desktop computers. Plus, why the courts in Sweden have effectively banned drone flights. And, why despite the popularity of mobile phones in India, enthusiasm for mobile payments is lagging behind. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Victoria Woollaston, digital editor of Wired UK.

(Photo: Woman using Microsoft's new desktop computer launched this week. Credit: Microsoft)

How Microsoft is squaring up to Apple for a fight over desktop computers. Plus, why the courts in Sweden have effectively banned drone flights. And, why despite the popularity of mobile phones in India, enthusiasm for mobile payments is lagging behind. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Victoria Woollaston, digital editor of Wired UK.

(Photo: Woman using Microsoft's new desktop computer launched this week. Credit: Microsoft)

147Keeping Up With Innovation20161104

Are ideas like Amazon delivery drones and Hyperloop's transport pods too wild?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Are ideas like parcel delivery drones and transport pods that move people and freight through tubes at the speed of sound too outlandish to be accepted by public, politicians, and regulators? We ask Paul Misener from Amazon, and Alan James of Hyperloop One. Plus we get the view of President Obama's technology adviser Megan Smith. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Dr Ruth McKernan from Innovate UK.

(Image: Hyperloop One test site in Nevada, Credit: David Becker/ Getty Images).

Are ideas like parcel delivery drones and transport pods that move people and freight through tubes at the speed of sound too outlandish to be accepted by public, politicians, and regulators? We ask Paul Misener from Amazon, and Alan James of Hyperloop One. Plus we get the view of President Obama's technology adviser Megan Smith. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Dr Ruth McKernan from Innovate UK.

(Image: Hyperloop One test site in Nevada, Credit: David Becker/ Getty Images).

14811/11/2016 Gmt20161111
148Did Donald's Data Trump Hillary?20161111

How data science helped Donald Trump's campaign target voters who mattered the most.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How data science helped Donald Trump's campaign to zero in on those voters who mattered the most. Plus, is social media to blame for so-called "post-truth" politics? And how Tanzania is using mobile phones to register newborn babies. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Alison Van Diggelen, journalist specialising in green technology, and Chris Foxx from the BBC online tech desk.

(Image: US President-elect Donald Trump on election night, Credit: AFP).

How data science helped Donald Trump's campaign to zero in on those voters who mattered the most. Plus, is social media to blame for so-called "post-truth" politics? And how Tanzania is using mobile phones to register newborn babies. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Alison Van Diggelen, journalist specialising in green technology, and Chris Foxx from the BBC online tech desk.

(Image: US President-elect Donald Trump on election night, Credit: AFP).

14918/11/2016 Gmt20161118
149Fake News And Online Hate20161118

Fake news and hate speech cause soul-searching for Facebook, Google, and Twitter.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Is the internet still a force for good as fake news and hate speech cause soul-searching for the likes of Facebook, Google, and Twitter? Plus, as Africa nears one billion mobile phone subscriptions, will connectivity continue to drive the continent's economies? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from BBC Online, and special guest Professor Philip Howard from the Oxford Internet Institute.

(Image: Tablet computer with fake news related word-cloud, Credit: Thinkstock).

150The Promise And Perils Of Data20161125

How data will shape the future of everything from health to driving

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How data will shape everything from health to driving. We talk to Dr Julia Powles from the Faculty of Law and Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, and to Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder of Google's DeepMind AI company, about using data in healthcare. Plus we hear why insurers want data from the driverless cars of the future. And Dave Lee reports from a town in the United States where using WiFi and even cellphones is forbidden. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Stephanie Hare, tech strategist at the data science firm Palantir.

(Photo: Concept driverless car interior. Credit: Thinkstock)

How data will shape everything from health to driving. We talk to Dr Julia Powles from the Faculty of Law and Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, and to Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder of Google's DeepMind AI company, about using data in healthcare. Plus we hear why insurers want data from the driverless cars of the future. And Dave Lee reports from a town in the United States where using WiFi and even cellphones is forbidden. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Stephanie Hare, tech strategist at the data science firm Palantir.

(Image: Concept driverless car interior, Credit: Thinkstock).

15102/12/2016 Gmt20161202

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

151Slush 2016: Hot Tech In Icy Finland20161202

Rory Cellan-Jones finds out why Finland is a tech powerhouse at Slush 2016.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones visits Finland’s capital Helsinki for the Slush 2016 tech gathering. He chats to Niklas Zennstrom, co-founder of Skype and now venture capitalist, on whether European entrepreneurs have reason for optimism. Plus he asks Chris Sacca, the Silicon Valley investor who spotted the early potential of Twitter and Uber among others, for a transatlantic view. And Rory finds out from educational games company Lightneer why Helsinki is a hub for mobile games developers. And he talks to the company relaunching the Nokia mobile phone brand. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Ingrid Lunden from TechCrunch.

(Image: Niklas Zennstrom on stage at Slush 2016).

15209/12/2016 Gmt20161209
152Progress Before People?20161209

Does Amazon's shop without cashiers say the tech business puts progress before people?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We ask Silicon Valley investor and thinker Om Malik what Amazon's concept shop without cashiers says about the tech industry's attitude towards society. Plus we try the latest app from Blippar, which recognises faces in the street - will it be good for jogging your memory or just creepy? And Jane Wakefield reports on attempts by traditional media to combat online lies masquerading as news. With Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Rebecca Sentance, digital marketing blogger.

(Image: Amazon Go concept storefront, Credit: Reuters).

We ask Silicon Valley investor and thinker Om Malik what Amazon's concept shop without cashiers says about the tech industry's attitude towards society. Plus we try the latest app from Blippar, which recognises faces in the street - will it be good for jogging your memory or just creepy? And Jane Wakefield reports on attempts by traditional media to combat online lies masquerading as news. With Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Rebecca Sentance, digital marketing blogger.

(Image: Amazon Go concept storefront, Credit: Reuters).

15316/12/2016 Gmt20161216
153Facebook's Plan To Foil Fake News20161216

Will the social network's plan to tackle the spread of online lies work?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones hears what Facebook is doing to tackle the spread of false news on its network. Plus is 5G phone technology overhyped and not needed? We ask industry expert Prof William Webb, and Prof Rahim Tafazolli of the University of Surrey 5G Innovation Centre. And Justin Westbrook of the car site Jalopnik gives his view on our readiness for autonomous vehicles. With special guest Madhumita Murgia from the Financial Times, and Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk.

(Image: Facebook "Like" sign outside company HQ, Credit: AFP/ Getty Images).

15423/12/2016 Gmt20161223
154Tech News Quiz Of The Year 201620161223

Play along with us in our quiz of the past year's big technology stories

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How good is your knowledge of the technology news? Play along with us as team captains Zoe Kleinman and Dave Lee are joined by Samira Sohail of the Samira Stalks podcast and Victoria Woollaston from Wired UK.

Presented by quiz-master Rory Cellan-Jones, with scoring by Mark Ward. (Image: Zoe Kleinman, Vicky Woollaston, Mark Ward, Samira Sohail, Rory Cellan-Jones, Tech Tent producer Jat Gill, and Dave Lee).

155New Year Tech 201720161230

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests discuss which technologies will make the headlines in 2017.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests examine how artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and "ransomware" made the news in the past year, and discuss the technologies to watch in 2017. Featuring Mike Fey of Symantec, Danae Ringelmann of Indiegogo, and Chris Sacca from Lowercase Capital. With special guests the tech writer and broadcaster Kate Bevan, and Stuart Miles from the gadget website Pocket-lint.

(Image: Young girl in Santa hat using tablet computer, Credit: Thinkstock).

Rory Cellan-Jones and guests examine how artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and "ransomware" made the news in the past year, and discuss the technologies to watch in 2017. Featuring Mike Fey of Symantec, Danae Ringelmann of Indiegogo, and Chris Sacca from Lowercase Capital. With special guests the tech writer and broadcaster Kate Bevan, and Stuart Miles from the gadget website Pocket-lint.

(Image: Young girl in Santa hat using tablet computer, Credit: Thinkstock).

15606/01/2017 Gmt20170106

Rory Cellan-jones on the latest stories in the tech world

156Ces 2017: Las Vegas Special20170106

Rory Cellan-Jones and the team visit the gigantic CES technology fair in Las Vegas.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones and the team visit the gigantic CES technology fair in Las Vegas where they try out the appliances and gadgets that could be in your home very soon. Dave Lee takes a ride in a prototype autonomous vehicle from Korean car giant Hyundai, while Rory finds out how BMW wants to entertain us when the car is doing the driving. Plus, we hear from the tech giant Sony on its plans to use artificial intelligence in its products, and we meet Danny Manu, a British inventor chasing his dream in Las Vegas to find someone who will manufacture his real-time language-translating earpods.

(Image: Prototype Kikoo autonomous robot for children made by Hanwuji Intelligence at CES 2017, Credit: Ethan Miller/ Getty Images).

157Tech Prepares For Trump20170113

Rory Cellan-Jones finds out how Silicon Valley is preparing for the new US President.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones visits San Francisco to find out how Silicon Valley is preparing for the new US President. He speaks to renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher from Recode, serial entrepreneur Michael Birch, and Parmy Olson from Forbes magazine. Plus, 10 years after Apple introduced the iPhone we assess how smartphones have changed business and ask whether the devices will remain central to how we access the net. And, our reporter Chris Foxx tries out the new Nintendo Switch console. With Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Paul Lee,Technology, Media, and Telecoms Head of Research at Deloitte.

(Image: San Francisco cable car, Credit: Justin Sullivan/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones visits San Francisco to find out how Silicon Valley is preparing for the new US President. He speaks to renowned tech journalist Kara Swisher from Recode, serial entrepreneur Michael Birch, and Parmy Olson from Forbes magazine. Plus, 10 years after Apple introduced the iPhone we assess how smartphones have changed business and ask whether the devices will remain central to how we access the net. And, our reporter Chris Foxx tries out the new Nintendo Switch console. With Chris Baraniuk from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Paul Lee,Technology, Media, and Telecoms Head of Research at Deloitte.

(Image: San Francisco cable car, Credit: Justin Sullivan/ Getty Images).

15820/01/2017 Gmt20170120
158Minecraft Link Claimed To Biggest Cyberattack20170120

Researcher alleges cybersecurity firm in Minecraft community created the Mirai botnet.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Researcher Brian Krebs alleges a cybersecurity firm set up to protect Minecraft players from denial of service attacks created the Mirai botnet that knocked Twitter, Spotify and Reddit offline. Plus, ahead of major elections in France and Germany this year, we ask the European Commission Vice President Andrus Ansip whether Europe can fight lies and fake news on social media. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Elizabeth Varley, CEO of TechHub.

(Image: Minecraft presentation at Microsoft's E3 2016 Xbox press conference, Credit: Frederic J. Brown/ AFP/ Getty Images).

15927/01/2017 Gmt20170127
159Winners And Losers In The 'gig Economy'20170127

New research on the effect that companies such as Uber have on jobs and wages.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How do companies such as Uber affect jobs and wages in the taxi industry? Dr Carl Benedikt Frey of the Oxford Martin School tells us what his new research indicates. Plus, we ask leading chemist Prof Clare Grey from Cambridge University whether Samsung's battery problems in its Galaxy Note 7 device suggest Lithium-Ion technology has reached its limits. And Zoe Kleinman visits London's Toy Fair to discover how tech is making its way into the latest games. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Tom Wiggins, deputy editor of Stuff magazine.

(Image: Taxi drivers demonstrate against Uber, in Cali, Colombia, June 2016, Credit: Luis Robayo/ AFP/ Getty Images).

16003/02/2017 Gmt20170203
160Snap Lifts Silicon Valley's Mood20170203

The company behind Snapchat is valued at $25bn.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The company behind Snapchat gets ready to hit the New York Stock Exchange with a mammoth $25bn valuation. Plus tech founder Ismail Ahmed of WorldRemit on why he's worried for himself and his customers about Donald Trump's US travel ban against people from seven predominantly-Muslim countries. And how the Basque province of Biscay wants to encourage ordinary savers to invest in startups. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Lucy Marcus, tech investment consultant and columnist.

(Image: Snapchat sign hanging on the New York Stock Exchange, Credit: Reuters/ Brendan McDermid).

16110/02/2017 Gmt20170210
161Reprise Of The Robots20170210

What can tomorrow's workers learn from past mechanisation? Rory Cellan-Jones finds out.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We visit London's Science Museum to see a new exhibition on robotics and discover what past mechanisation might teach tomorrow's workers about adapting to automation at work. Plus we try out a radio that claims to know your mood and play you music to suit how you're feeling, And we find out how a free data plan is shaking up India's mobile phone market and causing controversy for its rivals. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Chris Foxx from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Valerie Mocker, an expert in the "digital economy" at the UK innovation charity NESTA.

(Image: Toy robots on display at the Science Museum, London, Credit: BBC/ Jat Gill).

162India's Rocketing Space Ambition20170217

India launches a record-breaking 104 satellites in a single mission.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How India's record-breaking launch of 104 satellites in a single mission shows its ambition to be a world power in the space business. Plus, we keep being told to change our passwords regularly and choose ever more complex ones. But could there be a better way to stay safe online? Dr Shujun Li from the University of Surrey thinks he has an answer. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Michelle Kennedy, co-founder of the Peanut social app for new parents.

(Image: The PSLV-C37 rocket lifting off at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, this week. Credit: EPA/ ISRO).

How India's record-breaking launch of 104 satellites in a single mission shows its ambition to be a world power in the space business. Plus, we keep being told to change our passwords regularly and choose ever more complex ones. But could there be a better way to stay safe online? Dr Shujun Li from the University of Surrey thinks he has an answer. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Michelle Kennedy, co-founder of the Peanut social app for new parents.

(Image: The PSLV-C37 rocket lifting off at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, this week. Credit: EPA/ ISRO).

16324/02/2017 Gmt20170224
163Disability Works Special20170224

How technology is helping people with disabilities. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

We find out how technology is helping people with disabilities, and how the same tech can be useful to everyone. BBC producer Johny Cassidy tries Orcam, a wearable camera that reads out text to its user and recognises faces. We ask Microsoft's Chief Accessibility Officer Jenny Lay-Flurrie what the company is doing to increase accessibility to key workplace software. And IBM's chief science officer for cognitive computing Dr Guru Banavar tells us how advances in artificial intelligence will soon boost the accessibility of technology to everyone. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Dr Jo-Anne Bichard from the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the Royal College of Art.

(Image: Johny Cassidy and Jo-Anne Bichard, Credit: BBC/ Rory Cellan-Jones).

16403/03/2017 Gmt20170303
164Mobile World Congress 201720170303

Rory Cellan-Jones visits the phone industry's main annual gathering in Barcelona

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones sees the latest smartphones from Nokia and the return of the iconic 3310 featurephone. We ask the man behind Pokemon Go whether augmented reality will have more mass appeal than virtual reality. And we ask Intel whether 5G technology is overhyped. With independent analysis from Ben Wood of CCS Insight and Carolina Milanesi of Creative Strategies. Plus Jane Wakefield from the BBC Online tech desk rounds up the week's other tech news.

(Image: Arto Nummela of HMD Global, owner of the Nokia phone brand, reveals the relaunched 3310 at a press conference in Barcelona, Credit: JOSEP LAGO/ AFP/ Getty Images).

165The Spy In Your Tv20170310

How US spy agencies might be able to listen in on you via your television

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Leaked documents reveal US spy agencies might be able to listen in on you via your television. We ask Dave Palmer of Darktrace whether everyone's internet security is compromised. Plus, Danny Sullivan of the Search Engine Land website talks to us about whether Google Search has a "fake news" problem. And will autonomous machines be able to get along with each other? Dr Taha Yasseri from the Oxford Internet Institute tells us. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Kate Bevan, tech journalist and security blogger.

(Image: Man and woman on sofa watching TV from behind a blanket, Credit: Getty Images).

Leaked documents reveal US spy agencies might be able to listen in on you via your television. We ask Dave Palmer of Darktrace whether everyone's internet security is compromised. Plus, Danny Sullivan of the Search Engine Land website talks to us about whether Google Search has a "fake news" problem. And will autonomous machines be able to get along with each other? Dr Taha Yasseri from the Oxford Internet Institute tells us. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Mark Ward from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Kate Bevan, tech journalist and security blogger.

(Image: Man and woman on sofa watching TV from behind a blanket, Credit: Getty Images).

16617/03/2017 Gmt20170317

Rory Cellan-jones on the latest stories in the tech world

166Advertisers Fear Rising Fraud20170317

Rory Cellan-Jones hears how online advertisers want Google and Facebook to tackle fraud.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Rory Cellan-Jones hears a call from leading ad industry executive Johnny Hornby, founder of The&Partnership, for Facebook and Google to help tackle fraud or risk facing a spending boycott. Plus he talks to Jeff Jarvis, journalism professor at the City University of New York about how advertising fuels fake news and how the media business needs to change to thrive alongside the big platforms. And Dan Faulkner, from voice recognition firm Nuance, chats about the day when your phone will not only answer your queries, but ask you questions back. With Zoe Kleinman from the BBC Online tech desk, and special guest Lara O'Reilly, senior editor at Business Insider who writes about advertising and media.

(Image: Woman on sofa looking at an online advert, Credit: Getty Images).

16724/03/2017 Gmt20170324
167€spear Phishing’ Scammer Demanded Sex Show20170324

We hear about a devastatingly personal 'spear phishing' attack, where the victim was asked to perform a sex show in order to regain control of her online accounts. Professor Alan Woodward, a cyber security expert at Surrey University, tells us whether attacks like this are becoming more common.

BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Edinburgh to meet the robots that want to be friends with you - but are we ready to let them into every area of our lives?

And we find out about a new video game aimed at helping stroke patients regain the use of their hands. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman is joined throughout the programme by Dan Simmons, tech reporter from BBC Click and special guest, James Vincent, reporter for tech website The Verge.

(Photo: Silhouette of a man spear fishing at sea. Credit: Getty Images)

16831/03/2017 Gmt20170331
170Focus On Fintech20170414

Can London maintain a leading position in the buzzing financial tech sector?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Can London maintain a leading position in the buzzing financial tech sector after Britain leaves the European Union? We get the view of Taavet Hinrikus, founder of TransferWise, and Eileen Burbidge, the UK government special envoy to the fintech industry. Plus we find out why free public WiFi is still quite hard to find in Germany, and we meet the first graduates of the Code Your Future programming course for refugees. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with Leo Kelion from BBC Online, and special guest Mary-Ann Russon from International Business Times UK.

(Image: Man using credit card with mobile phone, Credit: Getty Images).

171Automation Rapidly Changing Work20170421

How artificial intelligence is changing jobs even faster than experts predicted.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Erik Brynjolfsson, MIT professor and best-selling author who heralded the 'Second Machine Age', says automation is changing work faster than even he thought it would. Plus, why China's tech giant Baidu is opening its driverless car platform to outside developers. And how Facebook is placing messaging and virtual reality centre-stage at its annual F8 gathering. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Tom Standage, deputy editor of The Economist.

(Image: Robot sitting behind a desk in a meeting room, Credit: Getty Images).

172Fake News And Flying Cars20170428

How Wikipedia's creator thinks he can tackle fake news online.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Jimmy Wales, the creator of Wikipedia tells us how he thinks he can combat fake news online. Plus, Joshua Benton from the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard University gives his take on Google's attempt to present more truthful answers to search queries. As the concept of flying cars seems to be all the rage, we talk to Doug MacAndrew of Aeromobil, the creators of one such vehicle. And Jane Wakefield visits the TED conference in Vancouver, Canada, where she meets Richard Browning, the inventor of a jet-powered flying suit. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Ingrid Lunden from TechCrunch UK.

(Image: The Aeromobil flying supercar, on display at the 'Top Marques' show in Monaco, Credit: VALERY HACHE/ AFP/ Getty Images).

173Can Machines Beat The Pollsters?20170505

How companies are using machine learning to gauge public opinion

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Can learning machines that gauge public opinion using Tweets or smartphone adverts perform better than traditional polling? We talk to Rob Lancashire of Essencient, and Chris Kahler of Qriously, who believe they can. And we meet the latest robot from Japan's Hitachi that might soon be greeting you in shops. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Baraniuk, and special guest Sarah Golding, chief executive of advertising agency CHI and Partners and incoming president of the ad industry body the IPA.

(Photo: Close-up of the Hitachi EMIEW3 robot, Credit: Toshifumi Kitamura/ AFP/Getty Images).

174The Net Effect20170512

Are the damaging effects of the internet catching up with the benefits?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Picture messaging firm Snap once snubbed a buyout offer from Facebook. Is it now losing to its Facebook-owned rival Instagram? Plus, we chat to Kathryn Brown, CEO of the Internet Society, and Professor Philip Howard from the Oxford Internet Institute, about how the Net is changing societies around the world. And 20 years ago, chess world champion Garry Kasparov was beaten by IBM's Deep Blue computer. We hear what he makes of artificial intelligence today. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Cassie Werber from the Quartz news website.

(Image: Four young people in a line taking selfies with their faces hidden behind their phones, Credit: Getty Images).

17519/05/2017 Gmt20170519
175French Tech Looks To Robots20170519

France's aim to lead in robotics and high-tech industry.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

France is aiming to be a leader in robotics and other high-tech businesses. We visit the Innorobo expo in Paris to see the latest robots and talk to the show's director Catherine Simon. Startup founder Pierre Lebeau of Keecker shows us his home entertainment robot due out later this year. And venture capitalist Marie-Hortense Varin of Partech Ventures tells us why French tech companies are worth investing in. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online technology correspondent Mark Ward.

(Image: Pierre Lebeau of Keecker and his home entertainment robot, with Rory Cellan-Jones. Credit: BBC/ Peter Page).

17626/05/2017 Gmt20170526
17702/06/2017 Gmt20170602

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Why did British Airways passengers suffer cancelled flights and days of travel disruption because of a fault at a data centre? We ask airline IT expert Bert Craven of consultants T2RL why large companies are still vulnerable to computing failures. Plus, everyone knows about harassment and abuse on social media. But is the problem even worse in online games? We hear the experience of one young gamer and the view of Jo Twist from Ukie, which represents the UK games industry. And why is the hacking world unhappy with the chaos brought about by the WannaCry ransomware attack? We’ll find out from cybersecurity researcher Andrei Barysevich of the firm Recorded Future. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Mariéme Jamme, entrepreneur and new board member of the World Wide Web Foundation.

(Image: BA aircraft on the tarmac at London Heathrow airport following the weekend's IT problems, Credit: Jack Taylor/ Getty Images).

177Flyers Grounded By Tech Glitch20170602

Why did British Airways passengers suffer days of disruption over a computer fault?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Why did British Airways passengers suffer cancelled flights and days of travel disruption because of a fault at a data centre? We ask airline IT expert Bert Craven of consultants T2RL why large companies are still vulnerable to computing failures. Plus, everyone knows about harassment and abuse on social media. But is the problem even worse in online games? We hear the experience of one young gamer and the view of Jo Twist from Ukie, which represents the UK games industry. And why is the hacking world unhappy with the chaos brought about by the WannaCry ransomware attack? We’ll find out from cybersecurity researcher Andrei Barysevich of the firm Recorded Future. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Mariéme Jamme, entrepreneur and new board member of the World Wide Web Foundation.

(Image: BA aircraft on the tarmac at London Heathrow airport following the weekend's IT problems, Credit: Jack Taylor/ Getty Images).

17820170609

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Ellen Stofan, former chief scientist at NASA, talks about whether opinion has overtaken established scientific facts. Plus, Jeni Tennison from the Open Data Institute and Hetan Shah from the Royal Statistical Society discuss whether algorithms know best. And signal processing expert Mark Plumbley and cyber-security specialist Jason Nurse assess to what extent our mobile devices are listening in on us, and whether we should worry about it. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones.

(Image: Maker tent at the Cheltenham Science Festival 2017, Credit: BBC/ Jat Gill).

179The Future For Games Consoles20170616

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Xbox launches the most powerful games console ever at the E3 expo in Los Angeles, but where's the VR? We ask Keza MacDonald, editor at Kotaku UK, why games consoles still pull in the punters. Plus we hear from the voice of Mario - Nintendo's famous plumber. Also on the programme, after another bad week for Uber and its founder Travis Kalanick, what does the future hold for one of silicon valley's biggest names? Author and journalist Adam Lashinsky discusses. Rory Cellan Jones meets a real-life rocket man who has invented his own jet pack, and Jane Wakefield gets a cup of coffee from a robot in California.

(Photo: Xbox launch at E3 in Los Angeles, Credit: Getty Images)

Xbox launches the most powerful games console ever, but where's the VR?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

180Tech Tent20170623

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Does the resignation of Uber's boss signal a radical change in the company's culture? We ask US journalist Sarah Lacy who was among the first to report on Uber's attitudes to women. Plus the BBC's Sameer Hashmi travels to Bangalore to discover how India's IT sector is shedding tens of thousands of jobs. And presenter Zoe Kleinman visits the International Space Station from the comfort of an English country house. With BBC technology reporter Chris Foxx and special guest Lucy Marcus, business and management expert.

(Image: Uber founder Travis Kalanick speaking at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai, January 2016, Credit: REUTERS/ Danish Siddiqui).

180Uber At A Crossroads20170623

Does the resignation of Uber's boss signal a radical change in the company's culture?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Does the resignation of Uber's boss signal a radical change in the company's culture? We ask US journalist Sarah Lacy who was among the first to report on Uber's attitudes to women. Plus the BBC's Sameer Hashmi travels to Bangalore to discover how India's IT sector is shedding tens of thousands of jobs. And presenter Zoe Kleinman visits the International Space Station from the comfort of an English country house. With BBC technology reporter Chris Foxx and special guest Lucy Marcus, business and management expert.

(Image: Uber founder Travis Kalanick speaking at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai, January 2016, Credit: REUTERS/ Danish Siddiqui).

181Net Firms Face Fines20170630

Have regulators found their teeth against the internet giants?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Google faces a fine of $2.7bn by the European Commission over a competition ruling on its shopping service, and Germany passes a law that requires internet firms to take down illegal content within 24 hours of being reported or face big penalties. Have regulators found their teeth against the internet giants? We ask Jeff Jarvis, author of the book "What would Google do?". Plus, will artificial intelligence be a useful tool in computer security? Emily Orton of security firm Darktrace tells why she thinks so. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Kate Bevan, journalist and computer security specialist.

(Image: Google Shopping demo on smartphone, Credit: Google).

181Tech Tent20170630

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Google faces a fine of $2.7bn by the European Commission over a competition ruling on its shopping service, and Germany passes a law that requires internet firms to take down illegal content within 24 hours of being reported or face big penalties. Have regulators found their teeth against the internet giants? We ask Jeff Jarvis, author of the book "What would Google do?". Plus, will artificial intelligence be a useful tool in computer security? Emily Orton of security firm Darktrace tells why she thinks so. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Kate Bevan, journalist and computer security specialist.

(Image: Google Shopping demo on smartphone, Credit: Google).

182Silicon Valley's Sexism Problem20170707

Entrepreneur Cheryl Yeoh on how she was harassed by a prominent Silicon Valley investor.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Entrepreneur Cheryl Yeoh tells how she was sexually harassed by a prominent Silicon Valley investor. Plus Danae Ringelmann, the co-founder of crowdfunding site Indiegogo, shares her own experience of being assaulted by a fellow entrepreneur at an industry gathering. Do a string of revelations by women in the tech industry mark a watershed moment for change?

We discuss whether the electric car's time has come after Volvo says all its new vehicles from 2019 will be fully or hybrid-electric. And we talk to Helen Dixon, Data Protection Commissioner for Ireland, on whether people are still willing to let companies do whatever they want with their data in return for free services. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Rachel Burgess, News Editor of Autocar and What Car? magazines.

(Image: Businesswoman pushing away a male colleague who is leaning in to her, Credit: Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

183Overwatch League Boosts E-sports20170714

Could professional online gaming one day rival the earnings of sports such as the NFL?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Bobby Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard tells us why a new league for professional players of Overwatch could take e-sports into the mainstream, and rival the earnings of sports such as the NFL and the Premier League. Plus, we hear why Microsoft thinks artificial intelligence will help, rather than replace, workers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and Ben Skipper, video game reporter for IBTimes UK.

(Image: Screenshot from Overwatch showing female character Tracer firing pulse pistols, Credit: Activision Blizzard).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

184The New Gold Rush20170721

How firms are raising cash by issuing new cryptocurrencies in "Initial Coin Offerings".

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Start-up firms are raising cash by issuing new cryptocurrencies in "Initial Coin Offerings". But are these ICOs an emerging investment bubble? Economics blogger Frances Coppola and Pavlo Tanasyuk, founder of Spacebit, a "cryptocurrency for space exploration", discuss. Plus we find out what’s happening to the market for freelance online task-based work from Vili Lehdonvirta from the Oxford Internet Institute. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Alison Van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues podcast.

(Image: 3D rendering of Ethereum cryptocurrency, Credit: Lightboxx/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

185Summer Camp For Hackers20170728

What the world's hackers have been up to at their annual meetings Black Hat and Def Con.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

What the world's hackers have been up to at their big annual meetings Black Hat and Def Con in Las Vegas. Plus the man behind Amazon's Alexa business Dave Limp talks to us about how the service might develop. And we witness a - thankfully fictional - hacking challenge that involves preventing a rogue state from firing nuclear missiles. Presented by Jane Wakefield, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion, and special guest William Goodwin, Commissioning Editor at Computer Weekly.

(Image: Man with computer code reflected in dark glasses, Credit: Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

186Governments Vs Silicon Valley20170804

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Should tech companies share more data with governments? British minister Amber Rudd thinks so. The BBC's man in California Dave Lee reports on her tour of Silicon Valley, where she called on companies like Facebook to do more to help fight terrorism. Also on the programme: The man credited with halting the WannaCry cyber attack is arrested in the US, we get the latest. Plus, is the concept of the 'digital native' a myth? One researcher thinks so. And ahead of a major tournament this weekend, presenter Kathleen Hawkins plays FIFA against a professional e-gamer to find out what it takes to play online football for a living. This week's special guest is technology journalist Charles Arthur.

(Photo: Computer security, illustrated. Credit: Getty Images)

Should tech companies share more data with governments?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

187Diversity Row Hits Google20170811

Google fires author of memo suggesting women are biologically less-suited to some jobs.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Dame Stephanie Shirley, a pioneer of Britain's computing industry, gives her take on a memo by a Google programmer suggesting women are biologically less-suited to some jobs in tech. Professor Paul Fletcher from the University of Cambridge and Tameem Antoniades of games developer Ninja Theory tell us about Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, a game aiming to give players an experience of psychosis. And James Chappell from security firm Digital Shadows reveals disturbing information about people available on the open internet and the "Dark Web". Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Stephanie Hare, from technology consultants Accenture Research.

(Image: Participants hold up a Google banner during Berlin's annual Christopher Street Day (CSD) gay pride parade, Credit: JOHN MACDOUGALL/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

188Tech Firms Drop Neo-nazi Site20170818

GoDaddy, Google and Cloudflare stop providing services to the Daily Stormer.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

GoDaddy, Google and Cloudflare stop providing internet services to the Daily Stormer after it disparaged a woman killed during protests in Charlottesville. Plus, Mark Robinson of Kolos tells us why he thinks Norway might be the perfect place to build the "world's largest" data centre. And we visit Manchester in North-West England to find out how the city plans to use data to make its public transport more responsive to passenger demand. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Baraniuk, and special guest Jeni Tennison, chief executive of the Open Data Institute.

(Image: A man holds up a sign reading "Stop Fascism" during a protest against racism in front of the White House earlier this week. Credit: Mark Wilson/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

189Dramatic Week For Samsung20170825

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

South Korean tech giant Samsung launches its flagship Galaxy Note 8 phone and sees its vice-chairman Jay Y. Lee jailed for corruption. Carolina Milanesi of Creative Strategies weighs up Samsung's fortunes. Plus, we speak to Kaspar Korjus, the man behind a plan in Estonia to launch an official crypto-currency. And we drop in on the Arcola Energy Hydrogen Hack to meet young people making use of fuel cells in electronics projects. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Izabella Kaminska from the Financial Times.

(Image: A woman tries the new Samsung Galaxy Note 8 smartphone during the launch event in New York City this week. Credit: Drew Angerer/ Getty Images).

Samsung launches a flagship phone and sees its vice chairman Jay Y. Lee jailed.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

190Africa's Drone Delivery Rush20170901

How drones are helping African citizens access healthcare. Presented by Zoe Kleinman.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Keller Rinaudo of Zipline tells us how drones are helping African citizens to access healthcare and reveals plans to expand his drone delivery service to Tanzania. Plus, we speak to David Paja of automotive technology giant Delphi about why your car could soon be another way for companies to gather and trade data about you. And we get the latest on the gadgets on show at the IFA tech fair in Berlin in time for the holiday shopping season. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC technology reporter Mary-Ann Russon, and special guest Thomas Tamblyn, tech editor of HuffPost UK.

(Image: A Zipline technician prepares a delivery drone for launch near Kigali, Rwanda. Credit: STEPHANIE AGLIETTI/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

191Nissan Unveils New Leaf20170908

Is Nissan's new Leaf the car that will make electric vehicles commonplace?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Is Nissan's new Leaf the car that will make electric vehicles commonplace? We ask Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield from the YouTube channel Transport Evolved, who attended the launch in Tokyo. Plus, what facial recognition tech can tell about you. And, we chat to neuroscientist Tali Sharot, author of the new book "The Influential Mind", about why she thinks it's futile to try to change people's minds online with facts. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online technology correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Tom Standage, deputy editor of The Economist.

(Image: New Nissan Leaf at its launch in Tokyo, Credit:EPA/ KIMIMASA MAYAMA).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

192Kaspersky Defends Antivirus Firm20170915

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

The Russian antivirus provider Kaspersky sells its products worldwide - but now the Trump administration has ordered US government agencies to stop using the company's products. The BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to Eugene Kaspersky.

Later in the programme, Brian Merchant, the author of the One Device, an account of the birth of the iPhone and its impact on the world, says he doesn't think that another revolution had been unleashed by Apple.

During the recent hurricane and flooding in Texas, an app called Zello which turns a phone into a sort of walkie-talkie was widely used by people trying to get help. We speak to Holly Hartman, a teacher at Memorial High School in Houston, who used the Zello app to help co-ordinate rescue efforts.

And following the Equifax hack, British entrepreneur Nick Halstead says we need to decentralise data.

Rory is joined by BBC Technology reporter Zoe Kleinman.

(Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and CEO of Kaspersky Lab, in New York. Photo credit: Reuters.)

"All this bad news about us - it's not true," Eugene Kaspersky tells the BBC.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

193Facebook Tightens Political Ads20170922

Facebook says it'll give the US Congress details of political ads placed by Russians during the presidential election - does the move mark a shift in its attitude to how its platform is used? Plus, how Alphabet's Google is paying $1.1bn to Taiwan's HTC to strengthen its Pixel smartphone business. And, we speak to Sayyeda Salam from the charity Save the Children about its new app designed to help Syrian refugee children in Jordan keep up with their school lessons. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Ian Fogg,Senior Director, Mobile and Telecoms at IHS Markit.

(Image: Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Credit: David Ramos/ Getty Images).

Facebook to give the US Congress details of political ads placed by Russians.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

194Amazon's Bid For Ai Lead20170929

Amazon unveils a new range of home devices using its Alexa AI assistant. But will customers be baffled by too many devices to choose from? Plus, we talk to Steven Wilson, the head of Europol's European Cybercrime Centre, on the biggest cyber-threats to watch out for. And, Gwen Lighter from the startup GoFly tells us why she's running a competition asking people to design a personal flying machine. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Kate Bevan, technology writer and broadcaster.

(Image: Group of people in a living room using Amazon Echo Buttons accessory, Credit: Amazon).

Amazon unveils more home devices using its Alexa AI assistant. But are they overkill?

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

195Google Home Goes Mini20171006

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Google reveals new Pixel 2 phones and a bigger range of intelligent Home speakers, but the focus is on its AI Assistant software. Plus, is your computer or smartphone secretly making money for someone else? We hear how websites can use your machine to mine cryptocurrency, without telling you. And we chat to a man who spends his time baiting online scammers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Emily Orton from the computer security firm Darktrace.

(Image: Google Home Mini devices, Credit: Google).

Google reveals new Pixel 2 phones and Home speakers, but the focus is on its software.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

196Rivals Split On Virtual Reality20171013

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg says virtual reality is the future, but Apple's boss Tim Cook dismisses it as niche tech. Who is right? Plus, not so long ago, Silicon Valley could seemingly do little wrong. But is the political and cultural tide turning against the US tech industry's "disruptive" behaviour? We ask Phil Libin, founder of the AI startup studio All Turtles and the man behind the Evernote app. And, in the week that Ada Lovelace Day celebrates women's contribution to science and technology, we chat to female winners of the TeenTech awards about their ambitions. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Madhumita Murgia, European technology correspondent for the Financial Times.

(Image: Woman trying out Oculus Go VR headset, Credit: Facebook).

Facebook says virtual reality is the future but Apple's boss dismisses it as niche tech.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

197Deepmind's Alphago Learns Without Humans20171020

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

The software that beat the world champion at the ancient game of Go can now teach itself to play, and outperform its previous version. Is this a big step towards general artificial intelligence? Plus, we visit a conference for Initial Coin Offerings or ICOs, the investment craze that's sweeping the cryptocurrency world. And, we chat to Professor William Webb, telecoms expert and author of the forthcoming book Our Digital Future, on why he thinks tech such as fully autonomous cars and 5G data networks are much further away than many companies claim. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Ingrid Lunden, writer and editor at TechCrunch.

(Image: Computer-generated human head representing artificial intelligence, Credit: Getty Images).

Software that beat the human Go world champion can now teach itself to play.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

198Facebook Scares Publishers20171027

An experiment making it harder for people to see news alarms smaller media companies.

An experiment removing unpaid news posts from Facebook users' main feeds alarms media firms relying on the social giant for viewers. We ask Joshua Benton from the Nieman Journalism Lab whether publishers are right to be worried. Plus, Twitter bans ads from some Russian sources and pledges to reveal the origin and funding of political advertising. Are Facebook and Twitter feeling the heat over accusations they help foreign powers to influence elections? Roland Lamb, the creator of the ROLI Seaboard musical instrument chats to us about star endorsements in tech as he brings Pharrell Williams on board his venture. And, we visit The Glass Room, an exhibit that looks like a technology store but aims to show people how much private data they give away online. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Keith Collins from the Quartz news site.

(Image: People browsing Facebook on smartphones, Credit:ISSOUF SANOGO/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

199Senators Grill Social Giants20171103

Facebook, Google, and Twitter face questions over alleged Russian election influence.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Internet firms Facebook, Google, and Twitter face questions from Senators over alleged Russian influence on the 2016 US Presidential election. Plus, does blockchain technology offer a way to fix the "fake news" problem? We speak to the startup Publiq which thinks it does. And, we hear how you set up an ecommerce business in Somalia. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee, and tech journalist Kate Bevan.

(Image: (L-R) Colin Stretch, general counsel for Facebook, Sean Edgett, acting general counsel for Twitter, and Richard Salgado, director of law enforcement and information security at Google, testify to the Senate Intelligence Committee. Credit: REUTERS/Joshua Roberts).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world

200Waymo Hails Driverless Taxi20171110

Waymo autonomous cars will soon offer the public rides with nobody at the wheel.

Waymo, formerly Google's autonomous car project, will soon offer the public rides with nobody at the wheel. Is the era of driverless taxis here? We ask the transport journalist Christian Wolmar, and our special guest Professor Paul Newman who leads the Oxford Mobile Robotics Group and its spin-out company Oxbotica. Plus, a wave of money is being invested in artificial intelligence and health. What's it being used for? We chat to physicist and startup founder Dr Elina Berglund, one of the team who identified the Higgs-Boson particle, who's now using AI to help couples with family planning. And we discover the ways in which Britain's National Health Service wants to benefit from AI.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Silicon Valley reporter Dave Lee in San Francisco. (Image: Waymo self-driving minivan on public roads, Credit: Waymo).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

201Tesla Keeps On Trucking20171117

The US electric car maker reveals a battery-powered freight truck, and a sports car.

US electric car maker Tesla doubles down on its ambitions by unveiling a battery-powered Semi-truck and a new Roadster 2 sports car. Plus, James Chappell of security firm Digital Shadows shows us evidence of a dark web industry dedicated to creating and spreading "fake news". And should users of Apple's new iPhone X be concerned about claims that its facial recognition system can be fooled by a mask? We ask James Lyne, global head of research and development at SANS Institute. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Rhiannon Williams, technology correspondent at the i newspaper.

(Photo: Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveils the Roadster 2 in California. Credit: Reuters)

US electric car maker Tesla doubles down on its ambitions by unveiling a battery-powered Semi-truck and a new Roadster 2 sports car. Plus, James Chappell of security firm Digital Shadows shows us evidence of a dark web industry dedicated to creating and spreading "fake news". And should users of Apple's new iPhone X be concerned about claims that its facial recognition system can be fooled by a mask? We ask James Lyne, Global Head of Security Research at Sophos. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Rhiannon Williams, technology correspondent at the i newspaper.

(Photo: Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveils the Roadster 2 in California. Credit: Reuters)

US electric car maker Tesla doubles down on its ambitions by unveiling a battery-powered Semi-truck and a new Roadster 2 sports car. Plus, James Chappell of security firm Digital Shadows shows us evidence of a dark web industry dedicated to creating and spreading "fake news". And should users of Apple's new iPhone X be concerned about claims that its facial recognition system can be fooled by a mask? We ask James Lyne, Global Head of Security Research at Sophos. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Rhiannon Williams, technology correspondent at the i newspaper.

(Image: Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveils the Roadster 2 in California, Credit: Reuters).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

202China's Tencent Overtakes Facebook20171124

The owner of the WeChat social network has global reach with stakes in Lyft and Tesla.

The owner of the WeChat social network also has stakes in Lyft and Tesla and is a leader in gaming. Should its Western rivals be worried about its ambitions? We hear from Kitty Fok, Managing Director of IDC China, and we visit London's V&A museum to see a digital exhibit of the WeChat platform. Plus, we meet Oliver Montague, an inventor who believes the future of mass electric transport lies not in high-end cars, but in bicycles. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Joon Ian Wong from the Quartz website.

(Image: The logo of Chinese instant messaging platform WeChat on a mobile device, Credit: PETER PARKS/ AFP/ Getty Images).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

203Apple's Root Problem20171201

How a security bug let anyone take control of Mac computers without entering a password.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

How a security bug let anyone take full control of Mac computers without entering a password. Professor Angela Sasse from the department of computer science at University College London tells us how Apple made an "elementary" mistake. Plus, are the energy costs of mining the cryptocurrency Bitcoin becoming excessive when everyone is supposed to be reducing their carbon footprint? And, as e-sports continue to grow, we chat to games caster The Rum Ham and professional player ElecTr1fy ahead of the Clash Royale Crown World Championship final in London. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech correspondent Mark Ward, and special guest Hilary Lamb, news reporter at the Institution of Engineering and Technology magazine E&T.

(Image:An Apple employee points to the Touch Bar on a new Apple MacBook Pro, Credit: Stephen Lam/ Getty Images)

204Cryptokitties Slow Down Blockchain20171208

Digital kittens bring a friendly face to blockchain technology but reveal problems.

A game involving buying and breeding digital kittens gives blockchain technology a friendly face, but exposes weaknesses with the Ethereum cryptocurrency in meeting demand. We talk to Elsa Wilk from Axiom Zen, the company behind the game. Plus, we hear how the city of Moscow is applying blockchain tech to a citizen voting system. Andrey Belozerov, Moscow's strategy and innovations adviser, tells us more. And, Cindy Sui reports on how Taiwan plans to grow a software startup scene. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Kate Bevan, tech journalist and information security specialist.

(Image: Kitten character from CryptoKitties game, Credit: Axiom Zen).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

205Us Axes Net Neutrality20171215

Communications regulator relaxes rules on internet providers governing treatment of data.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

American internet providers will no longer have to treat all data equally after the communications regulator the FCC relaxed the rules. Is it a blow for consumers and a win for telecoms companies or just a return to a previously successful system? Plus, Slava Rubin, co-founder of crowdfunding platform Indiegogo, tell us why it will give a home to Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), part of the investment craze around crypto-currencies. And could vast indoor farms help solve the world's food problems? We chat to Matt Barnard of Plenty, a US startup that thinks they could. Presented by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones, with tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Vicki Turk, senior editor at Wired UK.

(Image: Abstract picture of woman against a cityscape accessing different types of data, Credit: Getty Images).

206Tech Quiz Of The Year 201720171222

Test yourself against the BBC tech team in our annual end of year quiz.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

207What Next For Artificial Intelligence?20171229

Rory Cellan-Jones looks at key developments in AI during 2017 and what's coming in 2018.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Creating new medicines and teaching autonomous cars to drive are just two of the jobs that AI is already working on. Rory Cellan-Jones looks at what’s happening with AI in healthcare, transport, and considers the ethical issues involved in developing this technology further in 2018. With contributions from Jerome Pesenti, CEO of BenevolentAI and former Vice-President of IBM’s Watson Platform, Martha Lane Fox, dotcom pioneer and director of Twitter, Luciano Floridi from the Digital Ethics Lab at Oxford University, and Chris Hoyle from British simulation company rFpro. With special guests Tabitha Goldstaub of CognitionX and Azeem Azhar, author of The Exponential View newsletter.

(Image: Mock-up of a driver behind the wheel of an autonomous car, and how the vehicle might see its surroundings, Credit: iStock/ Getty Images).

208The Big Tech Backlash20180105

The reputations of Silicon Valley tech firms took a hit in 2017. Will 2018 be any better?

The reputations of Silicon Valley tech firms took a hit in 2017. Will 2018 be any better? Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to Frank Foer, author of World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech. And will 2018 be another bumper year for cryptocurrencies? We hear from Brad Garlinghouse, chief executive of Ripple - the company behind one surging Bitcoin rival - and David Gerard, a blockchain sceptic. The BBC's Leo Kelion looks ahead to CES - the world's biggest tech conference taking place in Las Vegas next week. And Jane Wakefield is also in the studio to talk about the computer bug affecting almost the entire computer market.

(Photo: An employee's laptop at Facebook's new headquarters in London, Credit: Getty Images)

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

209Ces 201820180112

Rory Cellan-Jones visits CES, the electronics industry's giant annual event in Las Vegas.

Rory Cellan-Jones and the Tech Tent team visit CES, the electronics industry's giant annual event in Las Vegas where manufacturers unveil the gadgets that will soon be in the shops. We meet a scarily realistic humanoid robot and check out a new Chinese-backed electric car. Plus we chat to China's search giant Baidu about facial recognition. With BBC tech reporters Chris Foxx, Zoe Kleinman, and Dave Lee, and special guest Ben Wood from CCS Insight.

(Image: A concept autonomous vehicle cabin is displayed at the Panasonic booth during CES 2018, Credit: David Becker/ Getty Images).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

210'revenge Porn' Victory For Youtube Star20180119

Chrissy Chambers wins case against ex-boyfriend who posted explicit videos of her online.

Singer Chrissy Chambers, who won damages from an ex-boyfriend for posting explicit videos of her online, tells us how she wanted to set an example to others. Plus, Kai-Fu Lee, former President of Google China talks to us about China's ambitions to lead in artificial intelligence. And Rahul Tandon reports from India on why the massive "Adhaar" biometric ID card scheme is proving controversial for many. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Shona Ghosh, senior tech reporter at the Business Insider website.

(Image: Musician and YouTube personality Chrissy Chambers, Credit: Chris Foxx/ BBC).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

211Hyperloop: Hype Or Not?20180126

Is Hyperloop closer to being a viable means of future transport?

We visit Virgin Hyperloop One in Nevada, and speak to Anita Sengupta, head of systems engineering on the project, to find out whether the futuristic idea proposed by Elon Musk is closer to being a viable means of transport. Plus, renowned security researcher and Pluralsight author Troy Hunt talks to us about Meltdown and Spectre, the serious security flaws revealed in many of the chips running our computers and mobile devices. And our reporter Jane Wakefield tries out Lenovo and Google's latest attempt to bring virtual reality into the classroom.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Dr Colin Brown, Director at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

(Image: People photographing the inside of a Hyperloop One tube following a first test of a propulsion system. Credit: David Becker/ Getty Images).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

212Crypto-currencies Facing Clampdown20180202

Facebook blocks crypto-currency adverts and US regulator halts an Initial Coin Offering.

As the US financial regulator the SEC blocks an Initial Coin Offering over alleged fraudulent activity, and Facebook says it will stop adverts for crypto-currencies, does this week mark a reality check for Bitcoin and other alternative currencies? Becky Pinkard from security firm Digital Shadows tells us how cybercrooks are jumping on the crypto-currency bandwagon. Plus, Matthew Prince, the boss of internet hosting platform Cloudflare, tells us why he thinks governments have a right to control what internet users see in their own countries. And our special guest Rosie Spinks from Quartz talks to us about revelations that the fitness app Strava can reveal information about the location of sensitive military sites and their occupants.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech correspondent Mark Ward. (Image: A woman uses an ATM for Bitcoin in Hong Kong, Credit: ANTHONY WALLACE/ AFP/ Getty Images).

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

213Driverless Cars In Court20180209

Are driverless cars the next battleground for tech giants?

Are driverless cars the next battleground for tech giants? Jane Wakefield gets the latest on a court case involving Uber from the BBC's Dave Lee in San Francisco. Also on the show, we hear from Dr Rangan Chatterjee, a general practitioner who's concerned that too much social media is harming the mental health of teenagers, and from Priya Lakhani, founder of a tech firm bringing artificial intelligence into the classroom. Plus a biohacker with microchips and magnets under her skin. Our special guest this week is Thomas Tamblyn, technology editor at the Huffington Post UK.

(Photo: Uber testing driverless cars, Credit: Getty Images)

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

214Two Sides Of The Crypto-coin20180216

Hackers hijacked 4,000 websites, including government ones, to mine crypto-currencies without visitors knowing. Scott Helme, the security researcher who found the flaw, tells us what happened. Plus, how online publisher Salon.com plans to use digital currencies to offset revenue lost to ad-blocking software. Salon chief executive Jordan Hoffner talks to us. And why Estonian startup WePower thinks Initial Coin Offerings are the best way to fund cleaner energy. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Perveen Akhtar, and special guest Adriana Hamacher, managing editor of Blockchain News.

(Image: Coins stacked against an abstract circuit board background, Credit: Getty Images).

How hackers and entrepreneurs are focusing their attention on crypto-currencies.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

215Worries Over Ai Misuse20180223

Researchers say the misuse of artificial intelligence is already happening. Haydn Belfield from Cambridge University's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk tells us how. AirBnB reveals plans to introduce a tier of more professional, upmarket properties, so is it now firmly part of the hospitality industry? And "cyber-spy hunter" Dmitri Alperovich, who revealed Russian hacking of the US Democratic Party, says his main worry right now is North Korea's cyber activity. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield and Rowland Manthorpe from Wired UK.

(Image: Drawing of lines of scary robots using computers, Credit: Getty Images).

Researchers say the misuse of artificial intelligence is already happening.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

216Mobile World Congress 201820180302

Nokia reissues the 90s classic 8110 "banana phone" - Florian Seiche, the chief executive of HMD Global, the company behind the brand, tells us why he hopes the device will encourage some people to use phone apps for the first time. We also speak to the designer of the original 8110, Andrea Finke-Anlauff, about mobile phone design today. Plus, the boss of Huawei's consumer business Richard Yu declares the Chinese company's ambitions to become the world's leading handset maker, ahead of Samsung and Apple. And tech analysts Ben Wood from CCS Insight and Carolina Milanesi from Creative Strategies give their take on the state of the mobile phone industry. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Chris Foxx.

(Image: People arriving at the Fira Gran Via in Barcelona for Mobile World Congress 2018, Credit: PAU BARRENA/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Nokia reissues another retro phone and Huawei declares it will be biggest handset maker.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

217Equal Net Fight Continues20180309

The "father of the Web" Sir Tim Berners-Lee says the fight for net neutrality isn't over.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The "father of the Web" Sir Tim Berners-Lee says people should protest on the streets for the principle of net neutrality, in which all internet traffic is treated equally. Plus, after another embarrassing incident in which YouTube placed adverts next to controversial videos, are advertisers closer to losing patience with Google? We ask Johnny Hornby, founding partner of The&Partnership agency. And, we ask the businessman and investor Sunil Wadhwani why he wants to use artificial intelligence to tackle India's social problems. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and special guest Kayleigh Bateman, head of digital content at the WeAreTheCity website.

(Image: Protesters at a net neutrality rally in Boston, Massachusetts, in December 2017, Credit: RYAN MCBRIDE/ AFP/ Getty Images).

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

218Facebook Removes Far-right Group20180316

Their videos were shared by Donald Trump, but now Facebook bans the group Britain First.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Their videos were shared by Donald Trump, but now Facebook bans the group Britain First. Plus, Google says it will no longer carry ads promoting cryptocurrencies. How much of a blow is it to a buzzing sector? We ask Zeeshan Feroz, UK chief executive of the Coinbase exchange. And our special guest Tugce Bulut, founder of Streetbees, tells us why her company pays people in developing countries to show it how they go about their daily lives.

(Photo: Britain First deputy leader Jayda Fransen (L) and leader Paul Golding (R) pictured in January 2018, Credit: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images)

Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.

219Privacy Crisis Engulfs Facebook20180323

Data on Facebook members was passed to political consultants without the users knowing.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Facebook wants to rebuild trust after data on millions of its members was passed to a political consultancy - Cambridge Analytica - that worked for Donald Trump's campaign, without the users knowing. But is it a turning point for the way in which Facebook and the other tech giants do business? Plus are autonomous flying taxis a serious prospect for easing urban congestion? And are African governments too close to Facebook when it comes to safeguarding their citizens' privacy? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Dave Lee and Jane Wakefield, and special guest Emma Mulqueeny, expert on digital transformation and digital democracy.

(Image: On-screen Facebook logo reflected in a woman's eye, Credit: CHRISTOPHE SIMON/ AFP/ Getty Images).

220Facebook Revamps Privacy Settings20180330

The social media giant continues to face pressure over data gathering and sharing.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

The social media giant continues to face pressure over data gathering and sharing. We take you behind the scenes with a marketer to show you how advertisers learn about and target you on Facebook. Plus, autonomous driving moves forward as Waymo ties-up with car-maker Jaguar. But will on-demand cars help or worsen urban congestion? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech desk editor Leo Kelion, and special guests Kate Bevan, editor of Which? Computing, and Jeni Tennison from the Open Data Institute.

(Image: The Facebook app uninstall / open page on a smartphone, Credit: ARUN SANKAR/ AFP/ Getty Images).

221Facebook's Data Scandal Deepens20180406

Mark Zuckerberg reveals almost all users could have had details "scraped" by others.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg tells reporters even more people had their data passed to political consultancy Cambridge Analytica than previously thought, and almost all Facebook users could have had data from their public profile "scraped" by "malicious actors". Plus, Microsoft claims a breakthrough on the road to quantum computing. And a new OECD report forecasts that fewer people's jobs are likely to be destroyed by artificial intelligence and robots than was suggested by a much-cited 2013 Oxford University study. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Chris Foxx, and special guest Rowland Manthorpe, senior editor at Wired UK.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg giving the keynote speech at Facebook's F8 developer conference in 2017, Credit: Justin Sullivan/ Getty Images).

222Who's Watching You Online?20180413
223Fake Videos Threaten Trust20180420

New AI tools let you put words into the mouths of public figures.

How the technology business is transforming the way we live and work

New AI tools let you make public figures appear to say things they've never said. Will remaining trust in online content disappear? Plus, is there a case for sharing more data about ourselves with smart devices? We hear from Poppy Crum, chief scientist at Dolby Labs. And, Karishma Vaswani reports on how India's clampdown on large banknotes has helped digital payments. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman, and Akshat Rathi, from the Quartz website.

(Image: Abstract representation of a video streaming site with pictures emerging from a laptop screen, Credit: Getty Images).