Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01The Sushruta2009090720190415 (BBC7)
20190416 (BBC7)

Five scientists look back to their ancient forebears and examine how much of that early knowledge still stands the test of time.

Iain Hutchison, Consultant Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon, discovers that the nasal reconstructive techniques he uses today date back to third century BC in South Asia.

A school of surgery - The Sushruta - grew up on the banks of the river Ganges to help victims of punishment who'd had their noses sliced off.

Producer: Erika Wright

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009

Surgeon Iain Hutchison looks back to the third century BC in South Asia.

Five scientists look back to the knowledge of their ancient forebears.

022009090820190416 (BBC7)
20190417 (BBC7)

As you check the time rushing to work or boiling an egg, you are making a Babylonian calculation.

Dr Anne Curtis of the National Physical Laboratory discovers the origins of 'base 60'.

Five scientists look back to their ancient forebears and examine how much of that early knowledge still stands the test of time.

Producer: Erika Wright

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009

Dr Anne Curtis discovers the origins of 'base 60'.

Five scientists look back to the knowledge of their ancient forebears.

03Egyptian Cooling Methods2009090920190417 (BBC7)
20190418 (BBC7)

Professor Graeme Maidment explores the earliest methods of surviving a hot climate. Does ancient Egypt hold the key to an urgent modern need for sustainable cooling?

He goes to an unlikely place to find out - the Bluewater shopping centre just off the M25 in Kent.

Five scientists look back to their ancient forebears and examine how much of that early knowledge still stands the test of time.
Producer: Erika Wright

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009

Professor Graeme Maidment asks if ancient Egypt answers today's need for sustainable cool.

Five scientists look back to the knowledge of their ancient forebears.

04Aristotle's Meteorology2009091020190418 (BBC7)
20190419 (BBC7)

Science writer Gabrielle Walker goes punting on the River Cam to discover whether Aristotle's treatise on meteorology stands up to modern scrutiny.

He likens earthquakes to bodily ructions but remarkably knew that "where there is dry land there comes to be sea, and where there is now sea, there one day comes to be dry land".

Five scientists look back to their ancient forebears and examine how much of that early knowledge still stands the test of time.
Producer: Erika Wright

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009

Gabrielle Walker finds if Aristotle's treatise on meteorology stands the test of time.

Five scientists look back to the knowledge of their ancient forebears.

05Mesopotamian Wound Healing2009091120190419 (BBC7)
20190420 (BBC7)

Professor Gus McGrouther finds striking parallels between his wound healing research in Manchester and the earliest methods recorded on Mesopotamian clay tablets.

Five scientists look back to their ancient forebears and examine how much of that early knowledge still stands the test of time.

Producer: Erika Wright

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009

Prof Gus McGrouther finds links between his wound healing research and early Mesopotamia.

Five scientists look back to the knowledge of their ancient forebears.