Description
Zeinab Badawi reports from Khartoum on the efforts of the artistic community to help bring piece to a country which had suffered violent internal conflict.
Theatre, dance and song all played their part in preparing the country for a future which would be decided by the 2010 referendum, a referendum which would lead to the creation of two separate countries.
She visits the Albuga Festival in Khartoum to find out how writers, actors and directors use their skills to help communities recover from war - people like Ali Mahdi, director of the National Theatre in Khartoum and an active member of the International Theatre Institute, who has established a Centre for Theatre in Conflict Zones.
Much of its work is based on the approach of Augusto Boal, who pioneered theatre within damaged communities.
The actors and the audience join forces to play out their experiences, reaching some kind of resolution from which they can rebuild.
Zeinab Badawi also experiences the passionate singing and ululating of the Hakamas, a group of women from southwest Sudan, who, during the civil war, used to sing their menfolk to war.
Now they have brought their powerful voices to the cause of peace.
Zeinab visits one of the refugee camps to hear them perform.
These and other groups are all committed to reconciliation and community rebuilding, but Sudan is often on a political knife-edge, and Zeinab asks whether theatre and performance can really make a lasting difference.
Zeinab Badawi reports from Khartoum on theatre groups helping those caught up in conflict.
In many places where there has been conflict in the world, such as the destructive violence of civil war, theatre workers - writers, directors, and actors - are using the potential of theatre to help people work through their grief, anger, and suffering.
With the release offered by the theatrical experience, damaged communities are encouraged to regenerate.
By exploring and reviving cultural roots - stories, songs and music - they re-establish connections with a traditional way of life.
The BBC World reporter Zeinab Badawi visits Khartoum for this Sunday Feature to meet some of those dedicated to this task.
People like Ali Mahdi, director of the National Theatre in Khartoum and an active member of the International Theatre Institute, who has established a Centre for Theatre in Conflict Zones.
Each year he runs a festival which brings together some of those groups working in distant parts of Sudan, and Zeinab Badawi meets these groups at the Festival and hears their stories about how they attempt to help those communities in which they work.
Many of the groups have been influenced by the theories of Augusto Boal, who pioneered theatre which works within victimised communities.
The people, or the audience, become a part of the action and play out their experiences, reaching a kind of resolution from which they can rebuild.
Zeinab Badawi talks to Thomas Engel and Alexander Stilmark, who have brought Boal's theories to the people of the Sudan, as well as to other Sudanese and international figures.

Series

Broadcast Details

  • First broadcast 20100502
  • First repeated 20110814

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