SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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0101George Gershwin2011031520111016Barry Manilow looks at the lives and works of ten famous composers of the Great American Songbook.
He explores their genius through rare recordings and de-constructs their songs at his piano.
Recorded at Barry's home in America, the series gives a songwriter's insight into the art and craft of songwriting.
It covers over sixty years of composition examining the work of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen, Frank Loesser, Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Jerry Herman and Kander and Ebb.
Among the rare recordings are songs by Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland, and a never before heard Barry Manilow recording, made when he was three years old.
George Gershwin is the first composer in the spotlight, who left school in 1913 to pursue a career as a song plugger and composer in New York's Tin Pan Alley.
His first hit song was Swanee, which was recorded by Al Jolson in 1920.
He went on to create an impressive body of work, including celebrated musicals like Funny Face; jazz standards and popular songs like They Can't Take That Away from Me [which was posthumously nominated for an Oscar]; and the ambitious opera Porgy and Bess.
Barry Manilow looks at the life and work of American composer George Gershwin.
 
0102Irving Berlin2011032220111023Barry Manilow looks at the lives and works of ten famous composers of the Great American Songbook.
He explores their genius through rare recordings and de-constructs their songs at his piano.
Recorded at Barry's home in America, the series gives a songwriter's insight into the art and craft of songwriting.
It covers over sixty years of composition examining the work of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen, Frank Loesser, Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Jerry Herman and Kander and Ebb.
Among the rare recordings are songs by Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland, and a never before heard Barry Manilow recording, made when he was three years old.
This week, he looks at Irving Berlin, a self-taught pianist and composer who published more than fifteen hundred songs.
He began writing music for Tin Pan Alley and Broadway in the 1920s and also worked on musical films starring Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby and other Hollywood stars, penning classic hits like White Christmas.
Berlin was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on 10 January 1977, in recognition of his long career and contribution to the popular culture of the United States.
Barry Manilow looks at the life and work of American composer Irving Berlin.
 
0103Harold Arlen2011032920111030Barry Manilow looks at the lives and works of ten famous composers of the Great American Songbook.
He explores their genius through rare recordings and de-constructs their songs at his piano.
Recorded at Barry's home in America, the series gives a songwriter's insight into the art and craft of songwriting.
It covers over sixty years of composition examining the work of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen, Frank Loesser, Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Jerry Herman and Kander and Ebb.
Among the rare recordings are songs by Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland, and a never before heard Barry Manilow recording, made when he was three years old.
This week he celebrates Harold Arlen, composer of the Oscar-winning song Over The Rainbow, who was born Hyman Arluck in Buffalo, New York, back in 1905.
Harold sang in the synagogue where his father was cantor, from the age of seven, and formed his first group (the Snappy Trio) whilst still in his teens.
After moving to New York City in 1925, Arlen achieved fame by writing songs for various reviews and for the shows at Harlem's Cotton Club.
Many of his songs, including Stormy Weather, became jazz standards whilst songs like That Old Black Magic also had their roots in jazz.
During a long, and successful career, Harold wrote over 400 songs and collaborated with the likes of Ted Koehler, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and Yip Harburg.
Barry Manilow celebrates Harold Arlen, who composed Over the Rainbow.
 
0104Frank Loesser2011040520111106Barry Manilow looks at the lives and works of ten famous American composers, playing rare recordings and de-constructing their songs at his piano.
Recorded at Barry's home in America, the series gives a songwriter's insight into the art and craft of songwriting, covering over 60 years of composition.
This week he celebrates Frank Loesser, the Pulitzer, Tony and Academy award-winning lyricist and songwriter.
Born in New York in 1910, Loesser was briefly a newspaper reporter before his first lyrics (In Love with the Memory of You) were published in 1931.
He moved to Hollywood where he wrote songs for dozens of films and whilst serving in World War II, he began writing music in addition to words.
His compositions included Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition, Heart and Soul [aka Chopsticks - the music was written by Hoagy Carmichael] and he picked up an Oscar in 1949 for Baby, It's Cold Outside.
His major film score was Hans Christian Andersen (1952), which provided Danny Kaye with several memorable songs, while his stage successes included Guys and Dolls (1953) and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963) which is currently playing on Broadway, with Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe.
Frank died of lung cancer in 1969 and was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame the following year.
Barry Manilow turns the spotlight on American lyricist and songwriter Frank Loesser.
 
0105Leonard Bernstein2011041220111113Barry Manilow turns his attention to the composer Leonard Bernstein, who was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, on 25 August 1918.
Bernstein is particularly unusual - whereas Gershwin was a popular composer who aspired to write classical music - Bernstein was a classical musician who wrote popular music.
Through musical successes such as On The Town, Candide and West Side Story he brought a complexity of arranging styles and musicianship that was unrivalled amongst Broadway composers.
Barry shows how Bernstein's ability to orchestrate his own melodies had such a great impact on musical theatre and defined Bernstein as a composer.
As he deconstructs West Side Story's Officer Krupke, Barry illustrates Bernstein's expert use of dissonant chords and rhythm structures.
Barry Manilow turns his attention to the composer Leonard Bernstein.
 
0106Jule Styne2011041920111120Barry Manilow continues to look at the lives and works of his favourite composers, de-constructing their songs at his piano.
This week he celebrates Jule Styne, the vocal coach turned Broadway and Hollywood composer, who was born in England in 1905.
During a successful career, which included collaborations with Frank Loesser (previously featured in this series), Sammy Cahn (Time After Time), Leo Robin (Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend) and Stephen Sondheim (Gypsy), Styne won two Grammy awards, a Tony award, an Oscar and was inducted into the Songwriters' Hall of Fame.
This programme includes a never-before-heard Barry Manilow recording, made when he was just three years old.
Barry's grandfather recognised that his young grandson had talent and at the weekend they would take a walk over the Brooklyn Bridge, into Manhattan, where there was a recording booth.
You put in a quarter and made a recoding and, remarkably, the ones Barry made in this way have survived! We hear evidence of Barry's precocious talent in a tune written by Jule Styne, Papa Won't You Dance with Me.
Barry Manilow celebrates the English-born composer Jule Styne.
0107Rodgers And Hart2011042620111127Barry Manilow continues to look at the lives and works of his favourite composers, de-constructing their songs at his piano.
This week he celebrates a songwriting duo - Rodgers and Hart.
Richard Rodgers wrote with Larry Hart for twenty years in one of the most successful of songwriting partnerships.
He then went on to write with Oscar Hammerstein for another twenty years - a feat which no other composer has equalled.
Tonight we begin a two part exploration of the work of Richard Rodgers, beginning with his relationship with Lorenz Hart.
The son of German immigrants, lyricist Lorenz Hart began his theatrical career by translating German plays, while the New York-born Richard Rodgers studied composition at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard School), before their partnership began in 1919.
After five years of failure Rodgers was about to give up and become a clothing salesman, when the two had a breakthrough hit - Manhattan.
From that point on Rodgers and Hart created an almost unbroken stream of hits, including the shows On Your Toes, A Connecticut Yankee and Pal Joey.
Among the pair's songs: My Romance; The Lady Is a Tramp; and a song that started life as The Prayer, followed by The Bad in Every Man, before becoming a smash hit as - Blue Moon.
Barry Manilow celebrates the songwriting duo Rodgers and Hart.
0108Rodgers And Hammerstein2011050320111204Barry Manilow looks at the second episode in Richard Rodger's career, his songwriting partnership with the lyricist and librettist Oscar Hammerstein II.
The grandson of theatre impresario Oscar Hammerstein, Oscar II was writing books and lyrics for Broadway musicals by the early 1920s.
Among his early collaborators were Vincent Youmans, Rudolph Friml and Jerome Kern (with whom he wrote Showboat in 1927), before he formed his famous partnership with Richard in 1943.
During their 16-year collaboration, Rodgers and Hammerstein produced the enduring classics Oklahoma! Carousel, The King and I, The Sound of Music and the Pulitzer Prize-winning South Pacific.
After Hammerstein's death in 1960, Rodgers wrote his own lyrics to No Strings and collaborated with Stephen Sondheim on Do I Hear a Waltz.
His last show was 1970's Two by Two.
Barry Manilow celebrates the songwriting partnership of Rodgers and Hammerstein.
0109Jerry Herman2011051020111211Barry Manilow continues his songwriter's insight into the Great American Songbook.
This week he celebrates the composer and lyricist Jerry Herman.
Gerald Herman was born in New York in 1931 and raised in Jersey.
Self-taught as a musician, he studied drama at the University of Miami, where he began writing for revue.
His first big success on Broadway came with 1961's Milk and Honey, which picked up Grammy and Tony nominations, but it was Hello, Dolly! that really launched him into the big time.
Opening in 1964, Hello, Dolly! ran for ran for 2,844 performances and became Broadway's longest-running musical.
It won ten Tony awards, including Best Composer and Lyricist, while the 1969 film adaptation picked up three Oscars.
Herman's later works include Mame, Mack and Mabel, and La Cage Aux Folles, while subsequent accolades include the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein Awards, induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a Tony Awards' Lifetime Achievement Award, and a 2010 Kennedy Center Honor.
Barry Manilow celebrates celebrates the composer and lyricist Jerry Herman.
0110 LASTKander And Ebb2011051720111218Barry Manilow concludes this series with a look at composer John Kander and lyricist and librettist Fred Ebb, whose long and successful songwriting partnership ended with the latter's death in 2004.
They've been rewarded with Tonys on Broadway, Oscars in films, and Emmys on television, and as Kennedy Center honourees they were praised for tackling "serious, challenging subjects - Nazism, abortion, murder, capital punishment, prison torture, greed, corruption - with an originality and fearlessness rarely seen in popular entertainment".
Kander and Ebb were behind some of the great creations of the musical stage including Cabaret, Chicago, Kiss of the Spider Woman, as well as New York, New York, a song immortalized by Frank Sinatra.
As a neighbour of Fred Ebb's in New York, Barry Manilow was the first to hear the famous opening vamp of this tune.
He heard it over and over again, as the pair searched for the lyric, while brushing his teeth in the bathroom!
Barry Manilow concludes the series with a look at Kander and Ebb.
0201Jerome Kern2013010320140708International superstar Barry Manilow returns with a second series celebrating the lives and work of the great songwriters.
Over ten programmes, Barry covers some 70 years of song writing, beginning with the father of the popular song, Jerome Kern (the man who took us from three quarter time to four beats in the bar). Barry traces the development of the songwriter's art through legends like Cole Porter, great partnerships like Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, and extraordinary songsmiths like Johnny Mercer and Sammy Cahn.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry illustrates the development of the popular song, from the traditional partnership of lyric and melody writing, through to studio-derived tracking designed to sell on the radio and jukebox.
He comments on the influence of British writers like Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse; looks at the transition of style from musical theatre to pop song, via Bacharach and David; and finishes with the dominance of the Motown sound and writers Holland Dozier Holland.
This is a fascinating insider's look at the songwriters art, told through the lives and work of some of its greatest exponents.
0202Cole Porter2013011020140715Barry Manilow continues his second series celebrating the lives and work of great songwriters.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry looks at the work of another giant of the Great American Songbook.
He was a wealthy, well-travelled playboy, who triumphed over tragedy and wrote sophisticated, witty, wonderful music and lyrics - Cole Porter 
0203Harry Warren2013011720140722Barry Manilow continues his second series celebrating the lives and work of great songwriters.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry looks at the life and work of a man who wrote over 800 songs, which appeared in 300 films.
He was Oscar-nominated eleven times; and had 42 top ten hits and 21 number ones - yet few know his name - Harry Warren.



 
0204Howard Dietz And Arthur Schwartz2013012420140729Barry Manilow continues his second series celebrating the lives and work of great songwriters.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry looks at the life and work of a man who wrote over 800 songs, which appeared in 300 films.
This week's show celebrates two extraordinary songwriters, one amazing team. Two business men who went on to write some of the greatest songs in the American Songbook, who they did it without giving up their day jobs as an attorney and publicist - Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz.
Barry Manilow continues his second series celebrating the lives and work of great songwriters.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry looks at the life and work of a man who wrote over 800 songs, which appeared in 300 films.
This week's show celebrates two extraordinary songwriters, one amazing team. Two business men who went on to write some of the greatest songs in the American Songbook, who they did it without giving up their day jobs as an attorney and publicist - Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz.
0205Johnny Mercer2013013120140805Barry Manilow continues to celebrate the lives and work of great songwriters.
This week he looks at the life and work of a musical colossus. A man who wrote an unimaginable number of hit songs over a 40 year period with numerous composers and did it without any formal musical training - Johnny Mercer.
The music includes That Old Black Magic, I Remember You, Goody Goody, Too Marvellous For Words, Skylark and Moon River.



 
0206Alan Jay Lerner And Frederick Loewe2013020720140812Barry Manilow continues his celebration of songwriting greats. This week it's the turn of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, two legendary writers of musical theatre whose work includes Camelot, Brigadoon and My Fair Lady.
The featured music includes With A Little Bit of Luck, I Could Have Danced All Night, Get Me To the Church on Time, The Rain in Spain, Almost Like Being In Love and How To Handle A Woman.
Barry Manilow continues his celebration of songwriting greats. This week it's the turn of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, two legendary writers of musical theatre whose work includes Camelot, Brigadoon and My Fair Lady.
The featured music includes With A Little Bit of Luck, I Could Have Danced All Night, Get Me To the Church on Time, The Rain in Spain, Almost Like Being In Love and How To Handle A Woman.

 
0207 2013021420140819International superstar Barry Manilow returns with a second series celebrating the lives and work of the great songwriters.
Over ten programmes, Barry covers some 70 years of song writing, beginning with the father of the popular song, Jerome Kern (the man who took us from three quarter time to four beats in the bar). Barry traces the development of the songwriter's art through legends like Cole Porter, great partnerships like Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, and extraordinary songsmiths like Johnny Mercer and Sammy Cahn.
Sitting at the piano in his Palm Spring home, Barry illustrates the development of the popular song, from the traditional partnership of lyric and melody writing, through to studio-derived tracking designed to sell on the radio and jukebox.
He comments on the influence of British writers like Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse; looks at the transition of style from musical theatre to pop song, via Bacharach and David; and finishes with the dominance of the Motown sound and writers Holland Dozier Holland.
This is a fascinating insider's look at the songwriters art, told through the lives and work of some of its greatest exponents.
0208Anthony Newley And Leslie Bricusse20130221 Two of the greatest British songwriters are the subject of Barry's series 'They Write the Songs' this week. Two men from opposite sides of the tracks, one a working class boy; the other a university graduate who came together to write some revolutionary musical theatre, hit songs and film soundtracks - Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse.
0209Burt Bacharach And Hal David20130228 Barry Manilow marks the transition from the writers of the classic Great American Songbook to those of a new post Beatles era with this week's song writing partnership. New, complex musical arrangements with changing rhythms and crafted lyrics to match are the hallmarks of Burt Bacharach and Hal David.
Music includes Anyone Who Had A Heart, Broken Hearted Melody, Magic Moments, Make It Easy on Yourself, Close To You, Raindrops Keep Fallin on My Head, The Look of Love, What the World Needs Now.
0210 LASTHolland Dozier Holland20130307 The writing team who formed the Motown sound, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland are considered to be one of the greatest in pop music. Not only did they produce countless hit records for the likes of The Supremes and The Marvelettes, but their work also marks the emergence of 'the track' as being the dominant influence in songwriting and record production - even over lyric or melody writing. In this, the last of the series, Barry Manilow celebrates their contribution and reflects on the development of songwriting over eighty years.
Barry Manilow continues his series celebrating the lives and work of the great songwriters.

Duration

  • 57 Minutes

Genre

  • Genre: Documentaries, Life Stories, Factual, Easy Listening, Soundtracks & Musicals, Music

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