Three Pounds In My Pocket

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeFirst
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02012015080520160109 (R4)The turbulent years from 1968 to 1976 for South Asians in Britain.

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

02022015081220160116 (R4)Kavita Puri looks at the turbulent years from 1976 to 1981 for South Asians in Britain.

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

02032015081920160123 (R4)Early pioneers to Britain from the Indian subcontinent in conversation with their children

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

030120191206For the past five years, Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of British South Asians to post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls. By the 1980s, the ‘three pound generation’ had been here for decades – they were not going back. And their children – many born here – were coming of age. This series begins with the aftermath of race riots in 1981.

The 1980s saw a cultural flourishing take place for the South Asian community in Britain, but later in the decade there would be a backlash. And in 1984, events on the Indian subcontinent would prove to be of monumental significance for British Sikhs. The Indian Army’s storming of the Golden Temple in Amritsar, the holiest shrine of Sikhism, created anger and disbelief among British Sikhs – and led them to question their relationship both with India and the UK.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter
Dr Edward Anderson, University of Cambridge

Dramatic upheavals in the 1980s for Britain's South Asians.

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

For the past five years, Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of British South Asians in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls. By the 1980s, the ‘three pound generation’ had been here for decades – they were not going back. And their children – many born here – were coming of age. This series begins with the aftermath of race riots in 1981.

The 1980s saw a cultural flourishing take place for the South Asian community in Britain, but later in the decade there would be a backlash. And in 1984, events on the Indian subcontinent would prove to be of monumental significance for British Sikhs. The Indian Army’s storming of the Golden Temple in Amritsar, the holiest shrine of Sikhism, created anger and disbelief among British Sikhs – and led them to question their relationship both with India and the UK.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter
Dr Edward Anderson, University of Cambridge

030220191213Kavita Puri hears stories of the pioneering migrants from the Indian subcontinent and their children. She hears how the politics of 1980s Britain was shaping not only the ‘three pound’ generation of early migrants but also their children.

It was a period during which there was the largest intake yet of MPs – all Labour - from ethnic minority backgrounds. Under Margaret Thatcher’s premiership, the Conservatives began to court the South Asian vote. We meet the first female British South Asian to be chosen as a parliamentary candidate for the Tories.

By the mid-1980s, many of the 'three pound generation' had been in Britain for longer than they had lived on the Indian subcontinent. They and their children were becoming ever more ingrained into British life, part of its fabric. And as the decade drew to an end, we see how dramatic events would lead to the South Asian community fragmenting.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, Exeter University
Dr Edward Anderson, Cambridge University

Dramatic upheavals in the 1980s for Britain's South Asians.

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, Exeter University
Dr Edward Anderson, Cambridge University

030320191220Kavita Puri hears what that catch-all term “Asian” really means for British South Asians. Although the Indian subcontinent is a vast place, the main migrant groups from the early "three pound" generation came from a handful of places. Each of these regions has its own distinctive language, food and tradition. All these years on, what matters to them and their children: is it the region they first came from on the Indian subcontinent, or the country? Their religion? A mix? Or does it no longer matter? And we hear how for some it's not just the “Asian” bit of British South Asian that can be hard to define, right now it’s also the “British” part. These are personal reflections rarely voiced.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, Exeter University
Dr Edward Anderson, Cambridge University

Personal reflections rarely voiced from British South Asians.

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

Kavita Puri hears what that catch-all term “Asian” really means for British South Asians. Although the Indian subcontinent is a vast place, the main migrant groups from the early "three pound" generation came from a handful of places. Each of these regions has its own distinctive language, food and tradition. All these years on, what matters to them and their children: is it the region they first came from on the Indian subcontinent, or the country? Their religion? A mix? Or does it no longer matter? And we hear how for some it's not just the “Asian” bit of British South Asian that can be hard to define, right now it’s also the “British” part. These are personal reflections rarely voiced.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, Exeter University
Dr Edward Anderson, Cambridge University

Kavita Puri hears what that catch-all term “Asian ? really means for British South Asians. Although the Indian subcontinent is a vast place, the main migrant groups from the early "three pound" generation came from a handful of places. Each of these regions has its own distinctive language, food and tradition. All these years on, what matters to them and their children: is it the region they first came from on the Indian subcontinent, or the country? Their religion? A mix? Or does it no longer matter? And we hear how for some it's not just the “Asian ? bit of British South Asian that can be hard to define, right now it’s also the “British ? part. These are personal reflections rarely voiced.

040120210108Since 2014 Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of British South Asians in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

This series picks up where the last one finished - the fatwa against Salman Rushdie in 1989 - and begins by looking at the 1990s. The decade began with Norman Tebbit and his so-called 'cricket test', which questioned the loyalty of those who supported India over England in international cricket. It was a far cry from the multicultural Britain that would be ushered in by Tony Blair's New Labour in 1997.

Amidst this changing political landscape, the children of the three pound generation were finding mainstream cultural success. Goodness Gracious Me was a hit on national television, films like East is East and Bhaji on the Beach found success, and there were hit records from acts like Apache Indian, Bally Sagoo and Panjabi MC. Regular British Asian music nights at commercial venues began, such as Bombay Jungle at Soho's Wag Club, and soon hundreds were queuing up in central London to get in.
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University

British South Asians and the 1990s: a golden decade

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

Amidst this changing political landscape, the children of the three pound generation were finding mainstream cultural success. Goodness Gracious Me was a hit on national television, films like East is East and Bhaji on the Beach found success, and there were hit records from acts like Apache Indian, Bally Sagoo and Panjabi MC. The first weekly British Asian music night began in 1993 - it was called Bombay Jungle and soon hundreds were queuing up in central London to get in.
Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

0402202101152001: the year everything changed for British South Asians. Since 2014, Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of this community in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

After the optimism and progress of the 1990s, there was an abrupt change in 2001. The year began positively enough - in Spring, Foreign Secretary Robin Cook declared chicken tikka masala a national dish. It may not have been something that many - if any - British South Asians cooked at home, but Cook's speech was an imagining of Britain as diverse, open and multicultural.

Later that year, there was civil unrest in areas with large numbers of British South Asians, including Oldham, Burnley and Bradford. Racial tensions in Oldham were stoked by the British National Party. Their leader Nick Griffin made some electoral gains in the General Election in June. And then a few months later, on September 11th, al-Qaeda attacked the Twin Towers in New York City.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.

040320210122Different generations of South Asians reflect on what it means to belong in Britain. Since 2014, Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of this community in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

Many of these early pioneers expected to return to the Indian subcontinent. Their instinct on arrival was to keep their heads down, work hard, and accept the humiliations that came their way. For their children - many of whom were born here - their relationship to Britain was quite different: this was their home. There was nowhere else for them to go back to.

Following this summer's wave of protests after the death of George Floyd, we look at the conversations that have opened up among British South Asians - and the different demands for progress and equality made by the different generations.

Producer: Ant Adeane
Editor: Hugh Levinson

Historical consultants:
Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter
Dr Edward Anderson, Northumbria University

Kavita Puri hears the stories of Asians who came to Britain from the 1950s onwards.