Time Travels [Radio Scotland]

Episodes

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Broadcast
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Ancient Mysteries, Murder Weapons And Frocks2019051420190519 (RS)
20191226 (RS)
Susan Morrison meets the mysteries of Ancient Glasgow as channelled through the off-beat and scintillating mind of the city's first media archaeologist Ludovic Mclellan Mann, born 150 years ago this month. Introducing her to the Mann himself is the Urban Prehistorian, Dr Kenny Brophy of Glasgow University, as they huddle in Langside Library to check out the ley-lines.

Then we're calling New Zealand to hear about the woman who once owned Dunfermline. Dr Jemma Field in Auckland spills the beans on the royal fashions of Anna of Denmark, the much-underestimated queen of James VI and we'll be finding out what not to wear when it comes to getting stuck in 16th century doorways.

Continuing our New Zealand theme, we're finding out about famous Kiwi forensic scientist, Sir Sydney Smith who adopted Edinburgh as his home and we'll be visiting the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh where Head of Heritage, Iain Milne, introduces us to one of the most unusual collections in any library - Sir Sydney's teaching collection of murder weapons.

Susan Morrison finds out what's new, fun or fascinating in Scottish history.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Animal Magic20201206The predacious great diving beetle of Fife - a beastie the world is not yet ready for (or at least Susan Morrison isn’t ready for it) - we’ll be exploring its role in pointing to the Kingdom’s history of general sogginess and water bodies with entomologist Dr Jack Maclachlan of the University of Maine who’s in pursuit of Fife’s lost lochs. Then to Sierra Leone to find out what a Scottish qualified doctor made of the idea of ‘human leopards’ with Dr Christine Whyte of Glasgow University. Finally to one of the most vibrant courts in Scottish history where Dr Amy Blakeway of St Andrews University introduces us to James V and his menagerie of pets - including the plus-size parrot and the naughty dogs.

Beetles, human leopards and a royal parrot get their moment in history

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Bandits, Pows And Statues20200802Highland outlaws sound like a great cover for a romance novel, but the reality was sordid and brutal criminal gangs. Dr Allan Kennedy of Dundee University introduces us to the most famous outlaw of his day - Gilderoy and his sticky end. On a more solemn note, we’re chatting to Ally Heather, presenter of BBC Scotland’s ‘Rebel Tongue’ about his grandfather Far East POW Andy Coogan and how Andy reacted to the ending of WW2 by the dropping of the atom bomb - only 30 miles away from him. Then we’re taking a fresh look at some of Glasgow’s most prestigious Victorian street furniture with historian Marenka Thompson-Odlum. If you live in Glasgow you’ve probably seen the David Livingstone statue but did you ever look properly at those panels on it?

Susan Morrison with Highland outlaws, the shadow of the atom bomb and Glasgow monuments

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Boys In Trouble202012131968 - the summer of love, youth unrest in Paris, London, Chicago, Falkirk… wait, Falkirk? Well, it was hardly major rioting but the letters page of the local paper was ablaze about underage sex and drugs - something had to be done! Dr Charlie Lynch of Glasgow University tells us about Falkirk’s moral panic as the permissive society reached the Forth Valley. But we’ve a stranger darker story to tell from the 1880s - when a ruthless manipulative conman and abuser turned up in Dundee. Brother Alphonse was a fake monk. Yes, that was indeed a way to make a living. But he also had a ghastly secret. Dr Hannah Telling of the Institute of Historical research uncovers an uncannily modern can of worms.

Boys in trouble - scapegoated in the 1960s, preyed upon in the 1880s by a dangerous conman

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Burning Questions20201227

Burning questions of the day - racism, heresy and witchcraft. Pioneering pan-Africanist Dr James Africanus Beale Horton came to Edinburgh from Sierra Leone for his qualifications only to find the famous university town was a hot bed of a new kind of racism - Dr Henry Dee and Dr James Kennaway take us into that world. Moving back in time: you’ve heard of Henry VIII but how much do you know about the dramatic life and times of his rival James V of Scotland when both heretics and traitors burned? Dr Amy Blakeway of St Andrews University looks at the darker side of James’s brilliant Renaissance reign. James grandson, James VI, presided over burning people too - for witchcraft. We hear from Ashleigh Angus from Curtin University Australia on the Orkney rebels and the accused witches who were in their camp.

Rebels against Kings, racist science and the church.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Burning Questions20201227Burning questions of the day - racism, heresy and witchcraft. Pioneering pan-Africanist Dr James Africanus Beale Horton came to Edinburgh from Sierra Leone for his qualifications only to find the famous university town was a hot bed of a new kind of racism - Dr Henry Dee and Dr James Kennaway take us into that world. Moving back in time: you’ve heard of Henry VIII but how much do you know about the dramatic life and times of his rival James V of Scotland when both heretics and traitors burned? Dr Amy Blakeway of St Andrews University looks at the darker side of James’s brilliant Renaissance reign. James grandson, James VI, presided over burning people too - for witchcraft. We hear from Ashleigh Angus from Curtin University Australia on the Orkney rebels and the accused witches who were in their camp.

Rebels against Kings, racist science and the church.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Contraception Clinics And Statue Smashers20201122It took more than chutzpah to open a contraceptive clinic in 1920s Aberdeen. Family planning pioneer, Fenella Paton had money, connections and courage. Dr Alison McCall shows us why the clinic was needed and how it made a difference.
Dr Christine Whyte of Glasgow University takes us far out to sea where terrified children were rescued from enslavers, but what happened to them next? Humanitarian intervention can be a tricky subject.
Statue smashing - a favourite intervention of the 16th century Scottish Reformers who also liked to burn artworks and chop them up - but what did people feel about that at the time, and what did the authorities mean to do about it? Dr Bess Rhodes of St Andrews University takes us to a pivotal moment for the Scottish Reformation.

When contraception is a dirty word, how do you open a clinic in 1920s Aberdeen?

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

How unmarried women wanting the pill caused a Scottish stushie in the 70s.

Executioners, Egypt And The Family Home2019061120190616 (RS)Glasgow wanted to lead the world in social improvement in Victorian and Edwardian times and came up with a new approach in the shape of the Family Home, a special purpose-built lodging house for single parent families where the single parent was the father. Dr Valerie Wright of Glasgow University tells Susan how the city fathers felt they couldn't possibly expect men to do housework and cook and clean so they provided them with, basically, an institution to do all that while they went out to work! Taking us back to the dark days of the 17th century, Dr Mark Jardine and resident historian Dr Louise Yeoman are on the trail of not one but two executioners in Irvine and Ayr. Getting prisoners hanged and beheaded could be a real headache when the hangman wouldn't play along. Finally what's a Scots archaeologist to do if he gets TB and digging in northern climes is severely bad for his already precarious health? Alexander Henry Rhind (b.1833) gave up his native Caithness for the Valley of the Kings and because of his scientific approach, his finds are still telling us new stories today. Dr Margaret Maitland of National Museums of Scotland brings us up to date with the latest discoveries from Rhind’s work.

Susan Morrison finds out about The Family Home and goes on the trail of two executioners.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Flyting, Scolding And Communism20200705Vile insults in the 16th century, communist women and the old soldier who lived in a cave.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan gets a crash course in vile insults in the 16th century from minister Rev. Nikki Macdonald and finds out how the Kirk of Scotland used to view the sins of the tongue. Project manager Jeni Park introduces Susan to the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage Project at National Library of Scotland via a fascinating collection of recordings of communist women. Louise Yeoman looks into the story of the old soldier Jimmy Gilligan who lived in Caiplie Caves near Anstruther until the eve of the second world war.

High Flats, Quacks And Witches2019052820190602 (RS)
20200101 (RS)
20200531 (RS)
Susan Morrison finds out what's new, fun or fascinating in Scottish history.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Dr Valerie Wright of Glasgow University takes us into the world of the High Flats just over fifty years ago and what people thought of their new cities in the sky - it wasn't all doom and gloom, but then again there's getting a big 1960s pram up all those stairs when the lift wasn't working. Toddlers getting on your nerves? Needing a lie down after that - what would an 18th century doctor prescribe? Dr James Kennaway of Roehampton University introduces Susan to John Brown, one of the most irresponsible doctors of the Scottish Enlightenment - a one-man party who liked to hit the opium, booze and banqueting and recommended his patients did the same. Nowadays NHS Health Scotland would be trying to hunt him down and gag him before he gave out any more 'health advice'. It goes without saying - don't try this at home! Finally we're off to the historic Kirk of Calder with Ciaran Jones of Edinburgh University and our resident historian Dr Louise Yeoman. We're on the case of a demonic possession from the 1720s and there's a shocking twist in the tale.

Susan Morrison finds out what's new, fun or fascinating in Scottish history.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Highland Murder Mystery, Shopping On Credit And Plague.2020052620200531 (RS)
20200614 (RS)
Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Where did the witch-hunt go? It seeped into people's psyches and sometimes, long after Scotland stopped burning witches, it could still come to the surface. Historian of emotions, Dr Katie Barclay and witch historian Dr Louise Yeoman investigate an unusual highland murder case from 1817, just before the Sutherland clearances. Meanwhile Dr Tawny Paul shows Susan how to run up your credit bill in 18th century Edinburgh - one of the few powers women had in that society! In 17th century Ayr, the minister had a bold, and so far as we know, unique plan to fight the Bubonic Plague, Dr Michelle Brock has studied it. Join Susan to visit all these moments in time.

Human Remains And Glasgow Women2020062820200719 (RS)Susan Morrison’s mum Peggy returns with historian of the home Dr Yvonne McFadden of Strathclyde University to tackle the 20th century kitchen - retina-searing yellow formica and all. Cat Irving, Human remains conservator from the Surgeons’ hall museum opens her casebook to tell us about her job which is preserving bits of people who’ve had a very bad day indeed. She’s got a 19th century nautical tale of human endurance for us. Dr Rebecca Mason of the Institute of Historical research has been studying what Glasgow women got away with in the civil courts in the 17th century - they knew their rights and went to law for them.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Illegitimate Kids, Roman Harbours, African Lakes2019070920190714 (RS)
20200524 (RS)
Susan Morrison hears how Scots of yesteryear squabbled over who looked after their bairns.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison hears how Scots of yesteryear squabbled over who looked after their bairns and finds out about their grand ideas of corporate responsibility in Africa which didn't quite work out, and we're also on the lookout for the Romans at sea - where might they have had harbours in what's now modern-day Scotland?

Susan chats to Dr Katie Barclay of Adelaide University about how community care worked or failed to work for illegitimate children in the late 18th century - resulting in the sort of alimony battles we're more used to in the divorce courts. Louise Yeoman heads for Cramond to meet Andrew Tibbs of Durham University who's trying to make sense of how the Romans used the sea (and not just those famous Roman roads) to move their troops. Dr Ben Wilkie from Australia joins us in the studio to talk about his new research on the African Lakes Corporation which operated in what's now modern day Malawi - he's looking at how some Scottish companies with good intentions paved the way for empire and exploitation.

Susan Morrison hears how Scots of yesteryear squabbled over who looked after their bairns and finds out about their grand ideas of corporate responsibility in Africa which didn't quite work out, and we're also on the lookout for the Romans at sea - where might they have had harbours in what's now modern-day Scotland?

Susan Morrison hears how Scots of yesteryear squabbled over who looked after their bairns.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Jacobite Songs And Cruel Husbands20200628Jacobite songs, a strange witchcraft confession and cruelty in Victorian marriages.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison chats to Dr Nicky Small of the Perthshire duo Plaidsong who combines being a Jacobite historian with singing Jacobite songs. You’ve probably heard of songs like Land o the Leal, Will Ye No Come Back Again, Wi' a hundred pipers an' a', but you maybe don’t know the name Carolina Lady Nairne. Nicky sings her songs and tells her story. Then it’s off to the 17th century and the time of the witchhunts - Ciaran Jones of Edinburgh University opens up the strange Fife witch case where a husband accused his own wife and begged her to confess to being a witch. Moving into the later 19th century, Ashley Dee of the Open University introduces Susan to ‘refined cruelty’ the Victorian equivalent of domestic abuse by coercive control and the horrifying stories behind it.

Luxury Yachts, Asylum Art And The Irish Border2019061820190623 (RS)Susan Morrison and Daisy Cunynghame look at art in the asylum - including drawings made for Scottish physician Alexander Morrison to help diagnose mental health conditions through sensitive depictions of his patients. Daisy is the archivist at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and she’s the curator behind their new exhibition which has just opened, ‘Moonstruck - 500 years of mental health… from witchcraft and home remedies to straitjackets and ECT’. We’ll also be hearing from Professor Alvin Jackson of Edinburgh University about the history of that contentious Irish Border that’s been in the news so much recently. Dr Eric Graham introduces us to Leith’s other royal yacht, no, not Britannia but the King of Thailand’s SY Maha Chakri, built by Ramage and Fergusons there. Later in the programme we’re back afloat with the 100th anniversary of the scuttling of the German Fleet at Scapa Flow and some voices from the archives.

Susan Morrison and archivist Daisy Cunynghame look at art in the asylum.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Medieval Ale Wives, 1940s Housewives And Victorian Knights Of The Realm2019070220190707 (RS)Susan Morrison uncovers the forgotten stories of the enterprising female brewers in Medieval Scotland, also known as 'ale wives.' Professor of History and Scottish Studies at the University of Guelph in Canada, Professor Elizabeth Ewan sheds light on the tumultuous life and brewing practices of Inverness brewster Elspet Barnet, and the ale-tinged humorous poetry of the time. Susan also visits the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh to view some artifacts from the Eglinton Tournament featured in the 'Wild and Majestic: Romantic Visions of Scotland' exhibition. The Medieval-style tournament of 1839 - an extravagant folly to some, and a romantic masterpiece to others - drew crowds of around 100,000 people from around the UK to Ayrshire. Finally, Susan explores the innovation of the washing machine and what it meant to Scottish housewives such as her Mum, from the 1940's to 1970's, and how they changed the face of housework across the board.

Susan Morrison on the medieval ale wives' story and the folly of the Eglinton Tournament.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison uncovers the forgotten stories of the enterprising female brewers in Medieval Scotland, also known as 'ale wives.' Professor of History and Scottish Studies at the University of Guelph in Canada, Professor Elizabeth Ewan sheds light on the tumultuous life and brewing practices of Inverness brewster Elspet Barnet, and the ale-tinged humorous poetry of the time. Susan also visits the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh to view some artifacts from the Eglinton Tournament featured in the 'Wild and Majestic: Romantic Visions of Scotland' exhibition. The Medieval-style tournament of 1839 - an extravagant folly to some, and a romantic masterpiece to others - drew crowds of around 100,000 people from around the UK to Ayrshire. Finally, Susan explores the innovation of the washing machine and what it meant to Scottish housewives such as her Mum, from the 1940's to 1970's, and how they changed the face of housework across the board.

Susan Morrison on the medieval ale wives' story and the folly of the Eglinton Tournament.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's rich past

Medieval Queens, Pirates And A Respectable Murder20200726You’ve heard of pirates of the Caribbean, but have you heard of the pirates of the wild Scottish South West? Forget Tortuga and Port Royale, Scott Carballo, pirate historian, dobs in the burghs of Dumfries and Galloway as hives of seaborne sixteenth-century scum and villainy. Historian Dr Hannah Telling is back with another heartbreaking tale of the Victorian court system and violence against women - this time how a man being seen as respectable could help his case in even the most horrific domestic violence and murder. And Dr Amy Hayes introduces us to the woman married to one of Scotland’s most hot-tempered and short-lived medieval Kings, the resourceful, competent and cultured Queen Mary of Guelders.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Private Lives20201220Long before Outlander, there was Annie S Swan, Scotland’s bestselling author of romantic novels, taking us deep into the personal lives of her characters as they fought to save stately homes or marry the right man. She wrote at least 200 full novels over her life, but Dr Amy Burge of Birmingham University feels Annie, a stalwart of The People’s Friend hasn’t had her due with her strong female characters and page-turning books. Annie probably would have blanched about writing about the real private lives of the lower classes though, but Dr Katie Barclay of Adelaide University is fascinated by them. She shows Susan how people in cramped tenements and overcrowded But and bens kept each other secrets or chose not to. From Katie’s world of servants hiding illegitimate babies to the 20th century to Scotland’s heartfelt upheavals over the Abortion Act of 1967, Kristin Hay of Strathclyde University shows it’s a more complicated story than you might think.

Secrets, romance and highly personal decisions through the centuries.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Queen's Evidence, Minstrels And Slander20200712Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Victorian millworker Eliza Eldon was found drowned in 1853 but had she been raped too, as a mysterious anonymous letter claimed? Who wrote the letter and how could justice be done for Eliza? Dr Hannah Telling introduces Susan to the legal concept of Queen's evidence and how it worked in practice. Ally Heather presenter of 'The Rebel Tongue' introduces Susan to his favourite Jacobite bard, Mussel Mou'ed Charlie Leslie who tramped the North East with his songs and broadsheets, and the Reverend Nikki MacDonald is back with more sins of the tongue - and how clamping down on them could save you from a witch-trial.

Queens, Countesses And Communists2019052120190526 (RS)
20191227 (RS)
It’s 200 years since the birth of Queen Victoria - one of our longest reigning monarchs. Professor Alvin Jackson of Edinburgh University author of 'Two Unions: Ireland, Scotland, and the Survival of the United Kingdom' tells Susan Morrison what Victoria ever did for us, why in Scotland we loved her but in Ireland she was never a hit in the same way.

Then we're checking out the dating profile for a single Countess in the year 1404 who owns her own castle and needs a man who can frighten off Scotland's most murderous noble family - the Albany Stewarts. Louise Yeoman heads to Kildrummy to find out from Dr Katy Jack how Isabella Countess of Mar was no mere damsel in distress. But that's quite enough landed aristocracy, next stop the Spanish Civil War where Dr Fraser Raeburn of Edinburgh University, working on a new book, takes us into the deep roots of volunteering for Spain among the jobless and radicalised workers of the 1930s.

Susan Morrison finds out what's new, fun or fascinating in Scottish history.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Sex And The Single Girl20201129From the 17th century to the 1970s, sex and the single girl has always caused anxieties. Trouble brewed in the 1970s when unmarried women started to ask for the pill. Oral historian, Kristin Hay of Strathclyde University has been interviewing folk to find out what it was like. She’s on kristin.hay@strath.ac.uk if you want to join her project on contraception use in Scotland. But it was always the case that the guardians of morality worried about what all the single ladies were up to - especially when there were large number of young free and (at least pretending to be) single soldiers in town for them to get involved with. Dr Mikki Brock of W&L University takes Susan to 1650s Ayr when Oliver Cromwell’s Army came to town.

Sex and the single girl in the 17th century and in the 1970s

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Soldiers, Spies And Garngad Riots2019060420190609 (RS)Susan Morrison looks back on 75 years since the D-Day landing with the story of Norwegian double agents 'Mutt' and 'Jeff' (a.k.a John Moe and Tor Glad) whose bravery and deception helped divert Nazi troops from the beaches in France as part of Operation Fortitude North during the Second World War. Reader in History at the University of Liverpool Dr Andrew Davies takes Susan through the mean streets of 1930's Garngad in Glasgow, and tells of the injustice faced by residents who testified against the police - in particular a police chief so renowned he was dubbed 'Hitler' - after riots took hold of their neighbourhood. Linda Connor, whose grandmother was a witness to the riots and was subsequently imprisoned for six months due to perjury, recounts the impact the ruling had on the families at that time. And Tomiwa Folorunso chats to the award winning author, illustrator, poet and puppeteer Ashley Bryan about his experience as an African American artist in a segregated army unit in wartime Glasgow, before braving the devastating bombings on Omaha Beach.

Susan Morrison uncovers the secret ops of WWII double agents and Glasgow's Garngad riots.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Spirit Guides And Spinster Flats20200621Susan Morrison looks into housing for women in post-war Glasgow.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison finds out from, Dr Valerie Wright of Glasgow University about how the city sought to house its single working women after WW2 - and did it in style in Crathie Court nicknamed ‘The Spinster Flats’. Moving to Ayrshire, witchcraft historians Dr Lizanne Henderson of Glasgow and Laura Moffat of Strathclyde University introduce us to the strange 16th century case of Bessie Dunlop who allegedly made friends with a ghost and chatted to fairies, and then it’s off to Enlightenment Edinburgh with Dr Kevin Sienna of Trent University in Ontario for a bad case of the pox - how did they treat syphilis back then?

Stevedores, Spies And Garngad Riots2019060420190609 (RS)Susan Morrison looks back on 75 years since the D-Day landing with the story of Norweigan double agents 'Mutt' and 'Jeff' (a.k.a John Moe and Tor Glad) whose bravery and deception helped divert Nazi troops from the beaches in France as part of Operation Fortitude North during the Second World War. Reader in History at the University of Liverpool Dr Andrew Davies takes Susan through the mean streets of 1930's Garngad in Glasgow, and tells of the injustice faced by residents who testified against the police - in particular a police chief so renowned he was dubbed 'Hitler' - after riots took hold of their neighbourhood. Linda Connor, whose grandmother was a witness to the riots and was subsequently imprisoned for six months due to perjury, recounts the impact the ruling had on the families at that time. And Tomiwa Folorunso chats to the award winning author, illustrator, poet and puppeteer Ashley Bryan about his experience as an African American artist in a segregated army unit in wartime Glasgow, before braving the devastating bombings on Omaha Beach.

Susan Morrison uncovers the secret ops of WWII double agents and Glasgow's Garngad riots.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

The Gold Rush, Bewitched Bovines And Nuclear War2019062520190630 (RS)
20200102 (RS)
Nuclear journalist, Julie McDowall introduces Susan to living on the eve of destruction with the local government plans made for World War 3 - where to put the bodies? How to evacuate the cities? Collapsible coffins complete with tassels... It would all have done us no good whatsoever if The Bomb had actually dropped but people felt they ought to at least try. On a less doom-laden note, trying to get to California was all the rage in 1849 when Scotland went mad for the Gold Rush. Devin Grier of Edinburgh University introduces Susan to the hazards of the journey and the many ways to lose your fortune, even if you did strike gold. Finally, was there a cow’s eye view of witchcraft? Dr Lizanne Henderson of Glasgow University has been researching why cows come into so many witchcraft accusations, and whether they might actually have been affected by some of the 17th century magical practices people tried on them.

Devin Grier of Edinburgh University introduces Susan to the hazards of the 1849 Gold Rush.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

The Show Of Presents And Matches Definitely Not Made In Heaven2019071620190721 (RS)
20200103 (RS)
Did you or a pal have a 'show of presents' before your wedding? Do you even know what one of those was? Susan Morrison's mum Peggy Morrison had one in the 1950s and she's back with historian Dr Yvonne McFadden of Glasgow University to spill the beans on what it involved and what could possibly go wrong. Speaking of things that could go wrong with weddings, we're off to the 18th century and a doomed attempt to woo the Provost of Edinburgh with a hotline to God - Dr Martha McGill of Warwick University has the inside track on Rachel Brown's godly schemes to get her man. But matters are much more serious in the 19th century, Ashley Dee from the Open University studies a very modern subject - coercive control by abusive husbands. One unusual variant of this was marriages where the husband had venereal disease but did not want to be honest with his wife. Ashley chats to Susan about two of her cases.

Susan Morrison on 20th century wedding traditions and 19th century 'husbands from hell'.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

01012017051620170521 (RS)Susan Morrison goes on the trail of a vanished royal dockyard and a female slave-owner.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

01022017052320170528 (RS)Susan Morrison hears about Saughton Park's unexpected connection to Senegal.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

01032017053020170604 (RS)Susan Morrison gets a preview of the Diaspora tapestry before it returns to Prestonpans.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0104Mary Queen Of Scots's Most Terrible Year2017060620170611 (RS)Susan Morrison explores Mary Queen of Scots's most terrible year.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0105Ecurie Ecosse And Perth Racecourse2017061320170618 (RS)Susan Morrison celebrates the sixtieth anniversary of Ecurie Ecosse's historic Le Mans win

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0106The Pirates Of Craignish2017062020170625 (RS)
20180102 (RS)
20200426 (RS)
Susan Morrison goes on the trail of the Black Flag pirates, who cast up in Argyll.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

You've heard of the Pirates of the Caribbean but these are the Pirates of Loch Craignish.

They were a desperate band of cut-throats who'd ravaged the Atlantic from one side to the other under the skull and crossbones, till they made their big hit on a Portuguese galleon stuffed with gold. Rich beyond their wildest dreams, they wanted to sneak back home and retire in luxury but that's where it all went horribly wrong.

Their ship hits a storm and whirlpool and they end up in Loch Craignish. Now they must escape from Argyll without the sheriff-depute's posses catching them, but they threw all their weapons overboard in the storm. Can they make it? Or will they swing for their crimes on Leith Sands? Maritime historians Dr Eric Graham and David Wilson and Professor Allan MacInnes take us on an epic journey of piracy and general badness from Africa to Argyll via the Caribbean and the coast of Brazil. In our Time Travels summer special, Susan Morrison investigates the pirates of Loch Craignish.

0107100 Years Of The Scottish Women's Institute2017062720170702 (RS)Susan Morrison celebrate 100 years of the Scottish Women's Rural Institutes.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0108Scotland's First Criminal Dissection And The Mummy's Tomb2017070420170709 (RS)Susan Morrison learns about dissecting dead criminals and explores ghostly afterlives.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0109Lenin Of The Rovers And The Wick Voices Project2017071120170716 (RS)Susan Morrison checks out a revolutionary footballer player and the Wick Voices Project.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0110The Lost Village Of Lassodie2017071820170723 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0201Michael Pit And Goth Pubs2017091220170917 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0202Qe2, Knights And Fiery Archaeology2017091920170924 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0203Covenanting Martyrs And Unidentified Human Remains2017092620171001 (RS)
20180103 (RS)
20200517 (RS)
Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison heads to Glasgow's Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons to find out from digital heritage officer Kirsty Earley what happened when only the posh could afford pain relief in childbirth and how prime minister's wife Lucy Baldwin tried to change that.

Travelling to or from Glasgow on the M8? That little church you pass at Kirk of Shotts hides a sad story from the 17th century in its graveyard. Dr Mark Jardine tells Susan about the martyr graves of the radical Covenanters and a strange find he made as a child nearby.

What happens when you find a skeleton or a skull? Archaeologist David Connolly tells Susan about the times when archaeologists call the police and the police call archaeologists.

Our World War I at home story this week is a second chance to hear Brian Taylor's story of Arthur Woodburn, the Secretary of State for Scotland who started his political career as a conscientious objector in the grim old prison which was razed to become the site of St Andrew's House.

0204Ancestors And Animals2017100320171008 (RS)
20180101 (RS)
Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0205Victorian Crimes And Communist Spies2017101020171015 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0206El Alamein And The Russian Revolution2017101720171022 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0207Silver And Slavery2017102420171029 (RS)Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

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Susan Morrison and Louise Welsh explore our darker history in a Halloween special.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0209Raith Rovers Shipwreck And The Scottish Inquisition2017110720171112 (RS)
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Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past in an exciting new history series.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

From Raith Rovers 1923 shipwreck to the Second Sight with a detour via the Scottish Inquisition, Susan Morrison gets to grips with Scotland's varied past.

Football historian Dan Gray, takes Susan back to the 1920s when playing in Europe didn't mean a glamorous life of first class air travel and swanky hotels, but sharing your travels with a cargo of chilled beef and roughing it after a shipwreck.

Dr Donald William Stewart of the University of the Highlands and Islands introduces Susan to some of the earliest accounts of the Second Sight, right back to the 16th century.

And nobody expects the Scottish Inquisition! Except Dr Katie Stevenson of National Museums of Scotland, of course she expects it, because she's an expert on Scotland's crack medieval heresy hunters.

Susan Morrison mines the rich depths of Scotland's past.

0210Monuments And Movies2017111420171119 (RS)Susan Morrison joins the debate on taking down monuments.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0301Picts And Pyjamas2018051520180520 (RS)Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison crosses the centuries from the year 500 to today as she goes in search of Scotland's past. We'll be hearing about the emigrant experience from days of sail to days of email from Professor Marjory Harper who's just written a new book on the Scottish diaspora. In our World War 1 at Home Series with Lucie Whitmore of Glasgow University we'll be discovering what to wear to bed in case of a Zeppelin raid, because of course, you don't want to die of embarrassment when the neighbours see your nightwear. Getting out and about, Susan's off to the East Neuk of Fife with archaeologist Peter Yeoman to find out about Pictish monasteries and their dead.

The century-crossing Scottish history series returns, with Susan Morrison.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0302Privateers And The Darker Side Of Empire In Australia2018052220180527 (RS)Chatting to Dr Ben Wilkie down the line from Warrnambool, Susan Morrison finds out more about the darker side of Scottish settlement in Australia - and how Scots treated the indigenous people who were already living there. Moving back to the 18th century with Eric Graham, we're on the trail of a gallant and dashing privateer Luke Ryan who scourged the coast of Scotland and gained the favour of Marie Antoinette, and moving forward to the 20th century, we'll hear about Helen Crawfurd, the minister's wife who became a window-smashing suffragette.

Susan Morrison crosses the centuries to discover Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0303The Scot Who Stayed In Argentina2018052920180603 (RS)
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In our Time Travels World Cup special this week, we head to Argentina in 1978 for the remarkable story of the Scots fan who stayed on for 15 years. It's Hamish McDonald's cousin Alan Grant - who married Silvina from Cordoba, whom he met on manoeuvres with Ally's Tartan Army. But settling down with Silvina to raise a family meant that Alan was starting out family life under a brutal dictatorship which often murdered people who weren't too different to him in their outlooks. Dr Laura Webb of Swansea University who studies the literature of the Argentinian 'Dirty War' tells us more about just what the wandering Scotland fan was getting himself into for the love of football and love of Silvina. Hamish and Alan share the family story with Susan Morrison. And in our WW1 at Home series we meet suffragette Margaret Skinnider and find out from Dr Kirsty Lusk what Margaret did in the 1916 Easter Rising.

Time travelling to the World Cup of 1978 with Susan Morrison and Hamish MacDonald.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0304Suffragette Special2018060520180610 (RS)As Scotland marks 100 years since the majority of women got the vote, Susan Morrison presents a Suffragette Special.

She'll speak to Jean Cameron , organiser of the Edinburgh Processions event and Clare Hunter who'll fill us in on the history of Processions and banner -making. Sarah Pederson sheds some light on the story of Aberdeen Suffragette Caroline Philips; and Louise Yeoman reveals the rifts which developed between the key players in the Suffragette movement later in the war.

Susan Morrison marks the anniversary of the majority of women getting the vote.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0305Global Scots And Gilbert's Mistresses2018061220180617 (RS)Susan Morrison marvels at the complicated life of Gilbert Innes - an Enlightenment banker and pillar of the community who secretly had at least thirty mistresses and acknowledged 32 illegitimate children (67 made a claim on his estate on his death). As Dr Katie Barclay reveals, Gilbert's 18th century alternative lifestyle came at a terrible price for the women involved, whose voices we can hear through their letters to him. What a surprise his sister Jane got when she sneaked into his office and read those letters...

Plus a new exhibition at Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh 'The remaking of Scotland: nation, migration, globalisation 1760-1860' explores how Scotland was undergoing massive change - venturing to all corners of the world abroad and rapidly industrialising at home. But it's a chequered history - as senior curator Dr Lucinda Lax explains, colourful characters, innovation and adventure are offset by troubling stories of slavery and imperialism.

And in our regular WW1@Home series we'll be exploring revolutionary socialist James Connolly's Edinburgh roots.

Susan Morrison crosses centuries in our new Scottish history series.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0306Princess Nuns And Brides In Uniform2018061920180624 (RS)Susan Morrison joins Dig Ventures as they go on the hunt for a missing 7th Century Monastery. This was the early monastery of Coldingham, run by Anglo-Saxon princess St Aebbe, but reputed by hostile commentators to be a high class bolthole for the posh, the pious and the powerful! The project are using 'crowd-sourced' archaeology to choose the most likely digging spots.

Plus you might think that weddings would have been scaled back in the cash-strapped era of World War 2. Not the case - the 'perfect' wedding with the white dress and idyllic church setting may actually have became more popular, but brides in uniform were also a thing. Murray Maclean encourages us to find out what granny and grandad's wedding photos might tell us about the war.

And in our regular WW1@Home series, Susan finds out about East Lothian's airship war and hears how one came to a dramatic end in the Firth of Forth.

Susan Morrison explores Second World War weddings.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0307Bannockburn Thanksgiving And First World War Brides2018062620180701 (RS)Medieval historians Bess Rhodes and Michael Brown transport Susan back in time to St Andrews and the 700th anniversary of the consecration of its cathedral as a thanksgiving gift for the victory of Bannockburn. Here on the day, you could have seen a splendid ceremony, shiny cloth of gold, wafting incense, glittering gems, rock crystal crosses and stars of the show: King Robert Bruce, Sir James Douglas and the nobles and clergy of the realm. This was all about national unity now, for people who hadn't always been on the same side.

Meanwhile Katie Barclay returns to give Susan a tip or two on how to be an Enlightenment Woman (spoilers - Susan would be rubbish at it) and, in our regular WW1@Home series, Susan hears how two US squadrons came to train in Montrose and left with 12 Brides.

Susan Morrison finds out how King Robert Bruce commemorated Bannockburn.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0308Leadhills Library And Scotland's Highland Heroines2018070320180708 (RS)As the National Health Service turns 70 on the 5th July Susan Morrison celebrates the achievements of one group of determined, gritty nurses who, for 35 years before 1948,.and regardless of hour, weather conditions or remoteness, cared for patients in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Their incredible work would influence the NHS as we know it today.

Plus, a literary treasure trove high in the Lowther Hills - Time Travels explores the oldest subscription library in the UK which was also the world's first library for working people. In our regular World War One at Home series, we hear the story of Aberdeen surgeon, Sir Henry Gray who successfully tackled one of the greatest killers of the war - compound fractures of the thigh bone. And we take a trip to Aberdeenshire to hear the story of Mary Elphinstone who was buried, not once, but twice, in an Inverurie graveyard!

Susan Morrison crosses the centuries to discover Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0309Arsenic And Black Armbands2018071020180715 (RS)Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison is off to the courtroom this week to hear about a murder but not before fitting herself out with mourning dress. Costume historian Lucie Whitmore shows Susan that mourning dress didn't disappear in World War 1, it just changed fashion.

Having adjusted our attire, we're heading for Glasgow's Calton in 1831 to find out how domestic tensions and a troubled youngster led to poison in the porridge. Historian Dr Katie Barclay takes us into the tragic world of 19 year old Alexander Wingate.

Continuing our legal quest, we'll be chatting to playwright and screenwriter May Sumbwanyambe about his new radio drama and forthcoming play and film which bring out new angles on the famous case of Knight v. Wedderburn in 1778 where a young African man, Joseph Knight took on the man who enslaved him to win the right to freedom - and to be a husband and a father who could support his wife and family.

Susan Morrison crosses the centuries to discover Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0310Women's Rights In Ancient Egypt And Drookit Royals2018071720180722 (RS)Some women are mummies and some women unwrap mummies. Susan Morrison investigates feisty Scotswomen who were pioneers of Egyptology, their lives and finds, their struggle to be taken seriously and what were women's lives like in Ancient Egypt anyway? Curator Dr Margaret Maitland of National Museums of Scotland takes Susan into their stores to meet the women of Ancient Egypt and the Scots who studied them.

Put away your tartan, bin your Outlander box-set, and get rid of that shortbread tin - it could all have been so very different. Susan's guests Dr Eric Graham and Dr Mark Jardine tell her about the royal shipwreck which could have changed everything for Scotland and ruined our tourist industry.

A father and his boy sharing one Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone - Professor Tony Pollard of Glasgow University and local historian Tom Barclay of Girvan tell Louise Yeoman the sad but inspiring story of father of the RAF Sir David Henderson and his air-ace son.

Susan Morrison crosses the centuries to discover Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

04Scotland's First Female Mp And The Sketchbook Of Dr Syntax2018120420181209 (RS)From Votes for Women to voting for a woman, with Dr Paul Philippou of Dundee University, we look at the woman who was elected Scotland’s first female MP - Katharine Marjory Stewart-Murray, Duchess of Atholl. She had actually campaigned vociferously against women's rights, but that didn’t stop her becoming an early female cabinet minister and highly controversial anti-fascist politician. From politics in the 1920s to the medical world of the 1820s and the ‘doctor’ who drew babies, John Sheriff nicknamed ‘Dr Syntax’, delivered the infants of the poorest mothers in Edinburgh hospitals and then drew the newborns, but his notebook also covers mothers who murdered, what was he really interested in? Dr James Kennaway of Roehampton University and Dr Katie Barclay of the University of Adelaide take us into his world. Morag Allan Campbell of St Andrews University tells us about how the later prison system treated mothers who killed their babies while of unsound mind, and Dr Bill Knox takes us back to 1918 and the imprisonment of revolutionary socialist John Maclean.

Comedian Susan Morrison on the 'Red Duchess' and a baby-sketching doctor.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

04Women In Politics, Dundee Asylums And Wwii Bomber Raids2018112720181202 (RS)Mary Crichton, normally in charge of a large household with governess and servants, ‘contrived to destroy the water closet by putting in flower plants from the garden’ she was just one of many women from Dundee and Montrose who became ill after childbirth in the 19th century and was diagnosed with ‘puerperal insanity’. Susan Morrison talks to Morag Allan Campbell of St Andrews University about their lives. Moving forward in time, how does a virtual reality re-creation of a Lancaster bombing raid feel to someone who was really there on many of those raids? Former RAF tail gunner Geoffrey Payne steps into a VR recreation of the famous 'F for Freddie' BBC wartime recording and tells us about his recollections. Then we're onto the 1918 campaign trail with Dr Paul Philippou of Dundee University. It was the first election where women could stand for parliament and one women in a Scottish constituency put herself forward - Eunice Guthrie Murray. There were some pitfalls however, as she tried to play down her posh roots in Glasgow Bridgeton!

Comedian Susan Morrison on the 1918 election trail and a virtual reality Lancaster bomber.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

04012018092520180930 (RS)Susan Morrison finds out about miners in World War 1 with Euan Loarridge of Glasgow University who’s researching the 10th battalion of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the mining community around Stirling and Falkirk. In Slamannan kirkyard, they meet Alec Buchanan, a local historian whose grandfather was a miner who served in the Argylls. Having a mining background could be a real advantage in the trenches.

Also today Susan chats to Dr Amy Blakeway of the University of Kent and finds out about some of the bloodiest, most destructive campaigns on Scottish soil, the ‘Rough Wooing’ and why it’s so often overlooked. Really it's like 'Mary Queen of Scots: The Prequel' - should there be a film?

We’re also detouring to Tibet via the banks of the Clyde as Louise Welsh explores the tale of two little girls who came to Daldowie - were Martha and Mary Bogle really the daughters of a high-up Tibetan lady or was their story more complicated?

Susan Morrison crosses the centuries in our Scottish History series.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

04022018100220181007 (RS)Was it a dog’s life in 17th century Scotland? Susan Morrison talks to historian of animal-human relationships, Laura Moffat of the University of Strathclyde about her pet subject. Find out what you were supposed to do if you were bitten by a mad dog back in the day (clue - it involves the worst smoothie in the world), and why James VI shouldn’t have let his wife Anne of Denmark out with his dogs. If dogs had it bad in the 17th century, people had it worse in the 1540s, during the harrowing wars of the ‘Rough Wooing’. Dr Amy Blakeway is back to tell us about women in the ‘Rough Wooing’ and sisters doing it for themselves - those nunneries needed defending. Kicking off our Black History Month coverage, Tomiwa Folorunso, a history graduate who’s a regular contributor to BBC Scotland’s The Social talks to Dr Jacqueline Jenkinson of Stirling University about the Glasgow Port Riots of 1919 when their white compatriots turned on Black British sailors who had suffered alongside them during the war.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0403Ayr, Idi Amin And Troopships2018100920181014 (RS)Susan Morrison goes to Ayr with maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, to find out about the grand Bruce dynasty plan to invade Ireland and grab a crown for Robert Bruce’s younger brother Sir Edward. If it had worked, the two countries might have been united. Helping Susan explore the royal burgh’s oldest building, St John’s Tower, Peter McCall tells her a tale of 19th century home improvement gone mad. In the studio this week as part of our Black History Month series is Dundonian playwright Jaimini Jethwa, telling Susan about her family’s experiences fleeing Idi Amin’s Uganda and coming to 1970s Dundee, while our WW1@Home story is the sinking of the troopships Tuscania and the Otranto off Islay in 1918 with a recording of Lord Robertson of Port Ellen.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0404Charismatic Characters And Wings To War2018101620181021 (RS)Have you heard of Sir Ronald Ross? He discovered how malaria was transmitted and taught people the importance of keeping those pesky mosquitos away, but he didn’t want to be a doctor - he wanted to write! Susan Morrison meets Charlotte Orr of the University of Glasgow who’s researching his unique approach to medical life. Not quite buzzing in the air but on the ground, Susan goes to Pollok Park to try out Wings to War’s WW1 trainer - a replica of the mechanical simulators used as the first step of aviation training in the Great War. She’s helped by Alan Birkbeck and Dr Olivia Lelong. Back to the 19th century, and you had to be fit to make it to political meetings in 1889, Susan joins Kirsty Lusk of Glasgow University to travel in the footsteps of Irish orator and politician Charles Stewart Parnell right up to the top of Calton Hill in Edinburgh where he came on his journey to receive the Freedom of the City.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0405Navigators, Activists And Prisoners2018102320181028 (RS)Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's rich past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0406Poltergeists, Witches And Major Weir2018103020181104 (RS)In winter when the nights were fair drawing in and the wind and rain howling outside, there was nothing Scots of yesteryear liked better than to gather round the fire with their pals and tell tales of devils and warlocks and ghosts and ghouls. We don't have a crackling fire for our spooky Halloween special, but we do have Susan Morrison's front room and a posse of historians on the couch to tell us tales of poltergeists, witches, devils and hellfire. Dr Martha McGill of Warwick University has stories about things that go bump in the night in Darkest Leith. Dr Mark Jardine has a tale from Galloway of Covenanting ministers, devils and a bold atheist beggar. Ciaran Jones of Edinburgh University tells us about the servant girl in Irvine who claimed to have raised the Devil and Dr Louise Yeoman revisits the ghastly tale of Major Thomas Weir 'the warlock' and his downfall.

Comedian and history enthusiast Susan Morrison discovers Scotland's spooky past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0407World War One Special: A Woman's War2018110620181111 (RS)
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In this special World War One edition of Time Travels, Susan Morrison hears about one woman's experiences of war.

The story was brought to us by Radio Scotland listener, Kevin Dunion, who spotted a single woman's name on his local war memorial and was inspired to discover more about her life. Elizabeth Johnston was an Anster lass, known as Johnnie to her friends, who volunteered with the Woman's Auxiliary Army Corp and was stationed in France. Her eloquent accounts of her experience, in articles she wrote for the local newspaper and correspondence, give an insight into the experience of some women during World War One.

It’s a tale of love and tragedy across oceans and battlefields, from France to Canada. And it all starts in Fife….in Anstruther….

In this WWI special, Susan Morrison hears about one Anstruther woman's experiences of war.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

0408Female Spies, Shipwreck And Smoking On The Operating Table2018111320181118 (RS)
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The female is more deadly than the male. History enthusiast Susan Morrison interviews Dr Nadine Akkerman of Leiden University about her new book 'Invisible Agents. Women and Espionage in Seventeenth-Century Britain' where we'll be finding out the fieldcraft used by women spies and hearing the story of one of the Scottish spies Ann Murray, Lady Halkett who pulled a Flora Macdonald-style rescue long before Flora was even thought of. Then there's the problem of naughty women and where you put them when your society isn't really geared up for jails, Dr Eric Graham tells Susan the horrid saga of a cargo of female convicts bound for Australia on the ill-fated ship commanded by Captain John Hunter of Ayr. Then finally, happiness is not having your leg cut off whether smoking or not smoking on the battlefield. Dr James Kennaway of the Surgery and Emotion Project explores smoking in 19th century battlefield surgery and the suprising things it tells us.

Comedian Susan Morrison explores women's espionage history and 'manly' battlefield surgery

Susan Morrison explores the rich and sometimes murky depths of Scotland's past.

Comedian Susan Morrison explores women's history and 'manly' battlefield surgery.