To The Barricades! [The Essay]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01One Book Above All Others2018051420200803 (R3)

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 1: One Book Above All Others: Joseph Heller's Catch-22 was arguably the most influential novel published in the 60s. Anti-war, anti-hierarchy, and hysterically funny.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

01One Book Above All Others20180514

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.
Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 1: One Book Above All Others: Joseph Heller's Catch 22 was arguably the most influential novel published in the 60s. Anti-war, anti-hierarchy, and hysterically funny.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

02French Philosophy2018051520200804 (R3)

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 2: French Philosophy: By the Sixties, Sartre had become something of a cliche but in France and elsewhere the philosophy of his friend Maurice Merleau-Ponty - wide ranging, interested in time and perception - was the secret influence on students.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

02French Philosophy20180515

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.
Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.
Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 2: French Philosophy: By the Sixties Sartre had become something of a cliche but in France and elsewhere the philosophy of his friend Maurice Merleau-Ponty - wide ranging, interested in time and perception - was the secret influence on students.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

03Czech Cinema2018051620200805 (R3)

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 3:Czech Cinema: The Fifth Horseman is Fear and Closely Watched Trains were more than just high points of the last golden age of European cinema, they were not so heavily coded calls to arms to the youth of Czechoslovakia (and by extension, the youth of the world) to stand up to oppressive regimes.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

03Czech Cinema20180516

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.
Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 3:Czech Cinema: The Fifth Horseman is Fear and Closely Watched Trains were more than just high points of the last golden age of European cinema, they were not so heavily coded calls to arms to the youth of Czechoslovakia (and by extension, the youth of the world) to stand up to oppressive regimes.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

04Marx, Mao, Marcuse20180517

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 4:. Marx, Mao, Marcuse: In 1968 young people ached for revolution the way they ached for sexual romance. Urgently and without a great deal of rational thought. The catch phrases of the three Ms - A revolution is not a dinner party; The philosophers have only interpreted the world, the point is to change it; Free election of masters does not abolish the masters or the slaves - played well on the barricades.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

04Marx, Mao, Marcuse2018051720200806 (R3)

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 4:. Marx, Mao, Marcuse: In 1968 young people ached for revolution the way they ached for sexual romance. Urgently and without a great deal of rational thought. The catch phrases of the three Ms - A revolution is not a dinner party; The philosophers have only interpreted the world, the point is to change it; Free election of masters does not abolish the masters or the slaves - played well on the barricades.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

05Race20180518

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.
Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 5: Race: Is always a central part of all politics in the US. The world of literature is not immune to being flung into its crucible. 1968 was the year when Who has the authority to write about race became central to politics? In America, William Styron, a white Southerner, close friend of James Baldwin, won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel about a slave revolt, The Confessions of Nat Turner. The book was then the subject of a vilification campaign. In this essay he looks at how the racial tensions in America's streets played out in the high cultural world of literature.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

05Race2018051820200807 (R3)

The path students took to the events of 1968 was signposted by cultural markers. There were books to read and films to watch (often derived from literary sources) and each anticipated and shaped the response to political events that would lead to student explosions in Paris, Prague, London and Chicago.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books he and his contemporaries read and the films they watched. He traces the way ideas in literature and cinema are absorbed into the mind and heart and become shapers of action. He also looks at how these books continue to influence those who were in the streets in 1968.

Using his trademark blend of historical research and memoir he recreates a time when, either side of the iron curtain, youth were united not just by music but by books and movies. Inspired by them, they risked everything to try and overthrow the existing order.

Episode 5: Race: Is always a central part of all politics in the US. The world of literature is not immune to being flung into its crucible. 1968 was the year when Who has the authority to write about race became central to politics? In America, William Styron, a white Southerner, close friend of James Baldwin, won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel about a slave revolt, The Confessions of Nat Turner. The book was then the subject of a vilification campaign. In this essay he looks at how the racial tensions in America's streets played out in the high cultural world of literature.

Michael Goldfarb remembers the books and films that influenced the events of 1968.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.