Tony Hatch As Heard On Tv

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20161101
20161101

Eighty years ago tomorrow at precisely 3 o'clock, the BBC officially opened its television service and with a sharp blast of a whistle "the new wonder" was up and running. Leading comedy actress Adele Dixon sang the first song ever to have been written or recorded about the small screen when she warbled "conjured up in sound and sight, by the magic rays of light, that brings television to you", and with that momentous recording the first ever theme tune was launched.

Since that memorable day we have heard many, weird, wonderful and whacky tunes, all designed to stay in your head like an ear worm. Leading composer Tony Hatch feels that they are a call sign, an appointment to view, as soon as you hear the opening bars, you're rushing for the best seat in the house - and he should know as he wrote three of the most memorable, Crossroads, Emmerdale and of course Neighbours amongst many others. Throughout the next hour, he will treat you to a smattering of those familiar and unfamiliar notes. You'll learn why hearing the opening theme to "Newsnight" always brings a smile to the face of composer George Fenton. Why Paul McCartney was furious with Cilla Black when she performed the signature tune to "Cilla" live and how "Morse Code" has been used in more themes than just "Morse". Oh and get your pen and paper ready as Tony will be quizzing you on your sporting theme knowledge.

After the next hour be prepared to have many of those brief bars, buzzing in your head all night.

20161101

Eighty years ago tomorrow at precisely 3 o'clock, the BBC officially opened its television service and with a sharp blast of a whistle "the new wonder" was up and running. Leading comedy actress Adele Dixon sang the first song ever to have been written or recorded about the small screen when she warbled "conjured up in sound and sight, by the magic rays of light, that brings television to you", and with that momentous recording the first ever theme tune was launched.

Since that memorable day we have heard many, weird, wonderful and whacky tunes, all designed to stay in your head like an ear worm. Leading composer Tony Hatch feels that they are a call sign, an appointment to view, as soon as you hear the opening bars, you're rushing for the best seat in the house - and he should know as he wrote three of the most memorable, Crossroads, Emmerdale and of course Neighbours amongst many others. Throughout the next hour, he will treat you to a smattering of those familiar and unfamiliar notes. You'll learn why hearing the opening theme to "Newsnight" always brings a smile to the face of composer George Fenton. Why Paul McCartney was furious with Cilla Black when she performed the signature tune to "Cilla" live and how "Morse Code" has been used in more themes than just "Morse". Oh and get your pen and paper ready as Tony will be quizzing you on your sporting theme knowledge.

After the next hour be prepared to have many of those brief bars, buzzing in your head all night.

01"david Lowe, Mike Perjanik, Anneka Rice, Bob Harris"20170606

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part one of three.

For the next three weeks Tony Hatch, who is no stranger to a theme tune himself having created the classics 'Emmerdale', 'Crossroads' 'Neighbours' and 'Grandstand' amongst many others, will bring the theme tune to the fore once more, finding out the secrets behind many of the most beloved ear worms by talking to some of the most prolific television composers responsible for bringing us these mini-musical masterpieces.

This week Tony will be joined by composer David Lowe who brought with him the tools of his trade and in the studio recreated the current 'BBC News Theme' and the ever popular 'The One Show'. Plus the man responsible for the other major Australian theme "Home and Away", composer Mike Perjanik compares notes with Tony their 2 soap themes, which have been on our screens for an amazing 30 years. Radio 2 presenters Bob Harris and Anneka Rice reveal their favourite themes and why - with both of them choosing subjects quite close to their hearts.

Each week Tony will transport you back to happy childhood memories with tunes that will remind you of rushing to the best seat in the house, testing your knowledge and memory with a medley of children's themes, this week it's the turn of the 1950s and 60s.

You'll hear comedy themes, such as Blackadder and Monty Python, an archive interview between Ally McBeal's Vonda Shepard and Sir Terry Wogan. Stars who sang their own themes tunes, you'll even find out why the theme song to "Frasier" is called "Tossed Salad and Scrambled Eggs" - be prepared to have these bite-size musical morsels running around your head for the rest of the evening.

01David Lowe, Mike Perjanik, Anneka Rice, Bob Harris20170606

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part one of three.

For the next three weeks Tony Hatch, who is no stranger to a theme tune himself having created the classics 'Emmerdale', 'Crossroads' 'Neighbours' and 'Grandstand' amongst many others, will bring the theme tune to the fore once more, finding out the secrets behind many of the most beloved ear worms by talking to some of the most prolific television composers responsible for bringing us these mini-musical masterpieces.

This week Tony will be joined by composer David Lowe who brought with him the tools of his trade and in the studio recreated the current 'BBC News Theme' and the ever popular 'The One Show'. Plus the man responsible for the other major Australian theme "Home and Away", composer Mike Perjanik compares notes with Tony their 2 soap themes, which have been on our screens for an amazing 30 years. Radio 2 presenters Bob Harris and Anneka Rice reveal their favourite themes and why - with both of them choosing subjects quite close to their hearts.

Each week Tony will transport you back to happy childhood memories with tunes that will remind you of rushing to the best seat in the house, testing your knowledge and memory with a medley of children's themes, this week it's the turn of the 1950s and 60s.

You'll hear comedy themes, such as Blackadder and Monty Python, an archive interview between Ally McBeal's Vonda Shepard and Sir Terry Wogan. Stars who sang their own themes tunes, you'll even find out why the theme song to "Frasier" is called "Tossed Salad and Scrambled Eggs" - be prepared to have these bite-size musical morsels running around your head for the rest of the evening.

02"mike Post, Murray Gold, Alan Hawkshaw, Steve Wright, Tim Smith And Jo Whiley"20170613

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part two of three.

In this week's episode, Tony Hatch interviews the maestro of American TV theme music, the multi-Grammy Award winning Mike Post, during the 70s and 80s you couldn't switch on the telly without hearing one of his themes, he's the man responsible for The Rockford Files, Hill Street Blues and The A-Team! Composer Murray Gold tells us how 12 years ago he was given the poisoned chalice which turned into a glorious goblet when he was given the task to update the arrangement to the original Dr Who Theme. The title "Studio 69" may not mean anything to you but we learn from Alan Hawkshaw, the King of library music, that this composition turned into "Dave Allen At Large", and the title "Chicken Man" was used as "The Grange Hill Theme", not only that but it was used for Michael Aspel's "Give Us A Clue"!

Radio 2 presenters Steve Wright, Tim Smith and Jo Whiley reveal their favourite themes and why - they are The Avengers, Banana Splits and The Prisoner but who chooses which?

This week Tony will transport you back to test you on a medley of children's theme and it's the turn of 1970s and 80s and also he asks the question why during those decades was there a fashion for espionage programmes and indeed horses, so expect some "Mission Impossible" and "Black Beauty".

02Mike Post, Murray Gold, Alan Hawkshaw, Steve Wright, Tim Smith And Jo Whiley20170613
02Mike Post, Murray Gold, Alan Hawkshaw, Steve Wright, Tim Smith And Jo Whiley20170613

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part two of three.

In this week's episode, Tony Hatch interviews the maestro of American TV theme music, the multi-Grammy Award winning Mike Post, during the 70s and 80s you couldn't switch on the telly without hearing one of his themes, he's the man responsible for The Rockford Files, Hill Street Blues and The A-Team! Composer Murray Gold tells us how 12 years ago he was given the poisoned chalice which turned into a glorious goblet when he was given the task to update the arrangement to the original Dr Who Theme. The title "Studio 69" may not mean anything to you but we learn from Alan Hawkshaw, the King of library music, that this composition turned into "Dave Allen At Large", and the title "Chicken Man" was used as "The Grange Hill Theme", not only that but it was used for Michael Aspel's "Give Us A Clue"!

Radio 2 presenters Steve Wright, Tim Smith and Jo Whiley reveal their favourite themes and why - they are The Avengers, Banana Splits and The Prisoner but who chooses which?

This week Tony will transport you back to test you on a medley of children's theme and it's the turn of 1970s and 80s and also he asks the question why during those decades was there a fashion for espionage programmes and indeed horses, so expect some "Mission Impossible" and "Black Beauty".

03"simon May, George Fenton, Ken Bruce, Raj & Pablo"20170620

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part three of three.

In the final episode, Tony Hatch interviews two of Britain's greatest TV composers, Simon May and George Fenton. Simon is the man responsible for the Eastenders Theme and tells us how the famous closing "Doof Doof" moment came about and George relives depicting that Blue Whale through music in the award winning series The Blue Planet.

Radio 2 Presenter Ken Bruce sings his theme tune choice and Bollywood expert Raj from BBC Asian Network shares with us his surprising favourite and why.

Tony will test your knowledge of children's theme tunes and this week it's the turn of the 1990s to the noughties.

And did you know that the Mary Tyler Moore Show spawned three spin-off shows each with a very catchy theme, you can find out what they were in the final episode of this 3-part series.

03Simon May, George Fenton, Ken Bruce, Raj & Pablo20170620
03Simon May, George Fenton, Ken Bruce, Raj & Pablo20170620

Tony Hatch As Heard On TV, part three of three.

In the final episode, Tony Hatch interviews two of Britain's greatest TV composers, Simon May and George Fenton. Simon is the man responsible for the Eastenders Theme and tells us how the famous closing "Doof Doof" moment came about and George relives depicting that Blue Whale through music in the award winning series The Blue Planet.

Radio 2 Presenter Ken Bruce sings his theme tune choice and Bollywood expert Raj from BBC Asian Network shares with us his surprising favourite and why.

Tony will test your knowledge of children's theme tunes and this week it's the turn of the 1990s to the noughties.

And did you know that the Mary Tyler Moore Show spawned three spin-off shows each with a very catchy theme, you can find out what they were in the final episode of this 3-part series.