Trending [world Service]

Episodes

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#bbctrending In Istanbul20140808

Twitter turnaround in the Turkish elections?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Has Turkey’s Prime Minister made a Twitter turnaround? BBC Trending heads to Istanbul to find out. On Sunday 10th August Turkey’s voters will go to the polling stations to select their first democratically elected President.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined at Bilgi University in Istanbul to discuss the trends and memes of the elections and the changing voice on social media.

The current Prime Minister Recip Tayyip Erdogan, leader of the Justice and Development, or AK Party, has benefited from a huge campaign on social media as part of his bid for the presidency. But this is the man who had previously blocked platforms he’s now using, like Twitter and YouTube. We speak to Yavuz Degirmenci, part of the AK Party’s Istanbul branch about the role of social media this time around.

Mukul also takes a walk through the election trends and memes that are tickling Turkey this week and finds out the latest on a blocked Twitter account leaking government information. He also looks into the digital legacy of the 2013 Gezi protests. Plus, from little screen to big screen: the story of a YouTube comedy series in the slums of Turkey’s capital city, Ankara.

Mukul is joined on the panel by Professor Erkan Saka, Cagil Kasapoglu from BBC Turkish and BBC Trending’s Esra Dogramaci.

The programme was produced by India Rakusen

#bbctrending In Istanbul2014080920140810 (WS)

Twitter turnaround in the Turkish elections?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On Sunday 10th August Turkey will head to the polls to vote for its first democratically elected President.

#BBC Trending is in Istanbul to talk trends and online battles in a country where social media has in the past been blocked. Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined at Bilgi University in Istanbul to discuss the trends and memes of the elections and the changing voice on social media.

Mukul finds out why Turks are so quick to turn silly trends into something political and biting, as he and the team explore the election memes that are tickling Turkey this week. BBCtrending meets the Mark Zuckerberg of Turkey, Sedat Kapanoglu. He’s the brain behind Eksi Sozluk, an online forum that predates Wikipedia and drew a little inspiration from the vintage BBC comedy Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Plus from little screen to big screen: how a YouTube comedy series set in the slums of Turkey’s capital city, Ankara, has found its way into the movies.

Mukul is joined on the panel by Professor Erkan Saka, Cagil Kasapoglu from BBC Turkish and BBC Trending’s Esra Dogramaci.

The programme was produced by India Rakusen

#blackface At The World Cup Goes Viral2014062820140629 (WS)

Fans with #blackface trigger racism debate at the World Cup

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An image of fans with blacked-up faces at the recent Germany v Ghana game has sparked a heated debate on social media - and revealed vastly different perspectives in Germany and the US. Presenter Mukul Devichand explores the issue with those who didn’t find it offensive as well as the person who took the picture.

We also have a whip around the office for more of the latest World Cup trends. From Suarez to Messi and from biting to beards – it’s a whole different ball game online.

And with the Indonesian elections just around the corner we hear from the voices on the archipelago that are spearheading the social media campaigns in this two horse race. Mukul finds out why Tintin, zombies and the rock band Queen have all made an appearance.

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Trending’s very own Cordelia Hebblethwaite, and from Jakarta by Alice Budisatrijo, the BBC’s Indonesia correspondent.

#freespeechstories: Arrested For A Tweet2015012420150125 (WS)

Kenyan blogger arrested for causing public anxiety, and wedding crashers' stories

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

France’s far right party, the Front National, is a family affair. Jean-Marie Le Pen founded the party, his daughter Marine took over the leadership and Marion Le Pen, their respective granddaughter and niece is one of the party’s only two MPs.

But they do not necessarily see eye-to-eye. This week, Marion Le Pen disobeyed her aunt by sharing a controversial video, and as we find out, this is not the first time their disagreements play out on social media, revealing internal divisions within the party itself.

Crashing Weddings
Viewed over 54 million times, Maroon 5’s latest video features the band gate-crashing weddings. Although it turned out the gate crashing was fake, it breathed new life into a discussion on the website Quora that has been going on for five years, where people are sharing their best wedding crashing stories. We hear from one of them.

Kenyan Blogger Arrested
Earlier this month in Kenya an influential anti-corruption blogger, Abraham Mutai, was arrested, prompting an online campaign #FreeMutai. He has since been released, but he tells us how he is now worried that people don’t feel free to speak anymore.

(Photo: Marion Maréchal-Le Pen. Credit: Bertrand Langlois/Getty Image)

#indyref: Scottish Referendum Online2014081620140817 (WS)

#Indyref: the online voice of the Scottish Referendum

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Passions are running high in the run up to the Scottish Referendum, when the country will vote for or against independence from the rest of the United Kingdom. The debate is being played out across social platforms in the shape of songs, communities, hashtags and even online abuse, or trolling.

BBC Trending headed up to Scotland to meet the voices behind some of this digital noise. Presenter Anne-Marie Tomchak met Richard Crawford in the Highlands, a volunteer who spreads the word of the Better Together Campaign from his home by running local Facebook communities. Then to Edinburgh where Anne-Marie met Lady Alba, or Zara Gladman, a 28-year-old volunteer from Glasgow for the Yes Scotland campaign. She’s making parody videos on YouTube. We also hear from the people heading up the official social media accounts for both campaigns.

Presenter Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined from Edinbrugh by social media expert Mike McGrail.

The programme was produced by Anna Meisel.

#jesuischarlie \u2013 One Year On2016010220160103 (WS)

How a fringe newspaper became a worldwide symbol for freedom of expression.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

#Je suis Charlie

Ever since it was created in the 1960s, Charlie Hebdo has always prided itself on being “mean and nasty” and holding nothing sacred. And yet, a year ago after 11 of its staff were killed in a shooting, its name has inspired one of the world’s most recognisable slogans “Je suis Charlie”, a rallying cause for free speech, which spread around the world via social media and inspired many causes.

The recognition and support brought the paper wealth and an international audience, but also a level of scrutiny it had never before experienced, with its past and current covers now being shared around the world, debated and often criticised as people argue over the limits of satire.

Also, Anne-Marie Tomchak reports on the viral body image issues of the year past.

Produced by Estelle Doyle

Image credit: Joaquim Roncin

#metoo: The Story So Far2017122220171224 (WS)
20171225 (WS)

How the biggest campaigning hashtag of 2017 - #MeToo - is changing the world.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look back at one of 2017’s most widely used hashtags: #MeToo.

It’s toppled politicians and changed the discussion on the roles and relations of men and women around the world. But how did the trend start and what might happen next?

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Actress Rose McGowan’s allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein were the catalyst for the #MeToo movement / Credit: Aaron Thornton / Stringer / Getty Images

#MeToo: What\u2019s Next? (Part 1 of 2)2018072020180723 (WS)
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It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

It has changed the conversation about sexual assault - but what\u2019s ahead for #MeToo?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s the future of #MeToo? In October 2017, the hashtag became a worldwide movement in the wake of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein – who denies the charges against him. But what began as a fightback against sexual harassment and assault has now become a broader movement. And the hashtag and the campaign have been translated into dozens of languages and cultures around the world.

In the first of a two-part series, we host a panel discussion with writer Kirsty Allison, gender justice expert Natalie Collins and Washington Post columnist Megan McCardle – with contributions from Nigerian lawyer Ayesha Osori and a Russian woman who was the victim of sexual assault. Has #MeToo created a deeper solidarity between women - or are some excluded from the conversation? What concrete changes have happened – and what’s on the horizon?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producers: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Picture Caption: A #MeToo sign at a rally in South Korea
Picture Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

#MeToo: What\u2019s Next? (Part 2 of 2)2018072720180730 (WS)
20180729 (WS)
20180728 (WS)

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

We continue to look at the global effect of #MeToo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We look at what lies ahead for #MeToo, the hashtag which became a world movement in October 2017.

In the second of a two-part series, we have a panel discussion with Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle, author Kirsty Allison and gender justice specialist Natalie Collins. We hear from journalist and activist, Meghna Pant who describes an incident known as “eve teasing”, a common term used in some South Asian countries to encompass a wide variety of sexual street harassment.

We also explore place of men in the #MeToo debate after American actor Terry Crews appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling them that he was sexually assaulted by a “successful Hollywood agent”. Is there space for men in the movement?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: John Scott

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

#neveragain: Special Report From Washington2018032320180325 (WS)
20180326 (WS)

A special report from inside the student pro-gun control march in Washington.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A special report from Washington, where thousands of students are marching in favour of stricter gun control laws.
Trending has been following three student activists affected by gun violence.
The students are demanding bans on powerful semiautomatic rifles and a comprehensive raft of measures to stop school shootings.

The #NeverAgain movement has become a social media phenomenon and has already changed America’s conversation about guns.

But will Saturday’s march create lasting change?

Presenters: Anisa Subedar, Mike Wendling
Producers: Reha Kansara, Natalia Zuo

(Photo: Violet - pro gun-control protestor from New York. Credit: BBC)

#pantsdown In Kenya, And The \u2018evil Tongue\u2019 Online2014100420141005 (WS)

Pastors caught with their pants down trend in Kenya

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

#Pantsdown has been tweeted thousands of times by Kenyans following a film in which a church pastor is caught in a compromising situation with a woman who isn’t his wife. The video on YouTube has had over 250,000 views and there are other similar films out there. Now Kenyans are using #PantsDown to discuss the morality of the Anglican church. Anne-Marie Tomchak speaks to one blogger who believes the films are scams, and asks a pastor whether members of the clergy are being targeted.

We find out how the daughter of Hong Kong’s Chief Executive has enraged people in the region by thanking tax payers for her luxury fashion items on Facebook. We also learn about the power of lashon Hara - Hebrew for ‘evil tongue’ or gossip - after a video about a rabbi buying lamb started spreading online.

Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined in the studio by India Rakusen from the Trending team and down the line by Ruth Nesoba from BBC Nairobi and Heather Chen from BBC News Asia.

(Photo: Man with jeans pants down. Credit: Shutterstock)

#savekessab: Why Armenians Are Tweeting About Syria2014040520140406 (WS)

The controversial #SaveKessab trend. And, why is the internet obsessed with goats?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week, we look at the controversial Twitter campaign led by Armenians - #SaveKessab. It's been tweeted more than 100,000 times - mainly in the US, where it's been given a boost by celebrity endorsement, including Kim Kardashian and Cher.

But, as we hear, some Syrians are unhappy about the campaign.

We speak to the man who started a Twitter campaign in Ethiopia, aimed at highlighting how restrictive state media is there. And why is the internet so obsessed with goats? Answers from an expert. And a goat!

This week's programme is presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak. She is joined in the studio by Paul Brown from BBC Monitoring, Mahmoud Ali Hamad from BBC Arabic and Mike Wendling.

Producer: India Rakusen

\u2018blessers\u2019 - South Africa\u2019s Sugar Daddy Problem2016052120160522 (WS)

The online backlash against relationships based on money and gifts

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In South Africa a 'blesser' is a man who showers gifts and money on women in exchange for a relationship or sex. An online backlash against these sugar daddies has been trending this week. Even the health minister has spoken out because of fears the 'blesser' phenomenon is contributing to high rates of HIV among young women.

And in Bangladesh, Wikipedia is fighting online pirates who are using its site to allow people to secretly download bootlegged Hollywood films for free. The pirates are hiding movie files on websites which poorer people can access for free in Bangladesh, as part of a scheme to encourage internet use. The practice is illegal, but some say it poses difficult questions about internet access in the developing world.

\u2018not In My Name\u20192017063020170701 (WS)
20170702 (WS)

A brutal murder in India sparks a viral, global hashtag.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The death of a teenager in India led to an online campaign, which within days sparked a trending hashtag and worldwide street protests. We pick apart the #NotInMyName campaign.

It’s a movement borne out of a teenagers death at the hands of a mob, and it’s found a voice both on and offline.

And, viral videos coming out of West Africa have been showing people bouncing rice balls. But those behind the videos are not bouncing their food for fun. We talk about the rice rumours making waves in this part of the world.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producers: Kayleen Devlin and Anisa Subedar

Image: Indian protesters hold placards as they gather for a 'Not in my name' silent protest / Credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

\u201cfrom Today I Want To Live And Be Known As A Boy\u201d: The Trending Videos Of Transgender Children2015022820150301 (WS)

Stories of transgender children; Ukrainian and Russians students reach out on Youtube

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Great Student debate
Russian and Ukrainian students are reaching out to each other via videos in which they debate the conflict in Eastern Ukraine. The videos have attracted millions of views, though in most cases, disagreement still prevails. But one video stood out: in it, a group of Russian students say they are ashamed of their country and ask the Ukrainians for forgiveness. We hear from one of them.

Transgender Children
Social media is for sharing. Sharing news, stories, even what you’re eating. But is it ok to share personal details about your kids? BBC Trending asks whether its right for parents to post videos about young transgender children who want to live and be known as a different gender from the one they were born as. Whilst parents are eager to share their family’s story with friends online, what are the implications if those stories are viewed millions of times across the world? BBC Trending speaks to the mother of a young child who wants to live as a girl, and finds out what the transgender community makes of these videos.

Photo: Colorful paper notes with gender symbols. Credit: Shutterstock

09/03/201820180311 ()
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Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A Transgender Twitter Fight2018062220180623 (WS)
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One short message led to a Twitter ban \u2013 and highlighted a much bigger online battle

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

It was one short tweet. A transgender activist Miranda Yardley called another transgender activist, Aimee Challenor, a “man”. It certainly wasn’t the first controversial or potentially offensive remark that Miranda Yardley had tweeted out, but it does appear that it was the final straw for Twitter, which handed her a permanent ban. While Miranda says that her views should be protected under the principle of free speech, Aimee says the tweet - and other comments posted online - were part of a long pattern of bullying and harassment. Trending explores the complicated political world of transgender activism and how philosophical battles within transgender communities are playing out on social media.

Presenter: Lee Kumutat
Reporter: Mike Wendling

(Photo: Illustration of people going from woman to man Credit: Getty Images)

A Vegan Youtube Court Drama2018060820180609 (WS)
20180610 (WS)
20180611 (WS)

Anna Scanlon found a home on vegan YouTube. But suddenly it all changed.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Anna Scanlon made videos about her vegan lifestyle. It was a good way to build connections and keep in touch with people from back home. But one day she angered a fellow vegan blogger.
What happened next was, she says, a nightmarish scenario in which she became a target for abuse and unfounded rumours. She was even accused of performing sex acts on camera.
She appealed to social media companies but got little response. And now she has filed a lawsuit which is about to lead to a trial – and which might have big implications when it comes to defamation online.

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Reporter: Gem O’Reilly

(Photo: Anna Scanlon)

American Students Rally For New Gun Measures2018022320180225 (WS)
20180226 (WS)

How US students are changing the debate over gun control

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

After every mass shooting in America there is a familiar cycle of political debate and usually, little action to change the country’s gun laws. But after a shooting at a high school in Florida killed 17 people, students across America have come together using social media. They’re saying ‘enough is enough’, using online organising tools and taking to the streets. But there are powerful forces in favour of keeping existing laws or even loosening current restrictions. So will the students have a real impact on the gun control debate after the news moves on?
Plus a look at an app designed to give people anonymous feedback online. It hit the top download charts in dozens of countries but is now down from two of the biggest online stores, the ones run by Apple and Google, in the wake of allegations of teenage bullying. We have an exclusive interview with the CEO of the company which developed Sarahah.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporters: Kelly Leigh-Cooper and Elizabeth Cassin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Photo: Violet Massie-Vermeer
Photograph by Deborah Lowery

After every mass shooting in America there is a familiar cycle of political debate and usually, little action to change the country’s gun laws. But after a shooting at a high school in Florida killed 17 people, students across America have come together using social media. They’re saying ‘enough is enough’, using online organising tools and taking to the streets. But there are powerful forces in favour of keeping existing laws or even loosening current restrictions. So will the students have a real impact on the gun control debate after the news moves on?
Plus a look at an app designed to give people anonymous feedback online. It hit the top download charts in dozens of countries but is now down from two of the biggest online stores, the ones run by Apple and Google, in the wake of allegations of teenage bullying. We have an exclusive interview with the CEO of the company which developed Sarahah.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporters: Kelly Leigh-Cooper and Elizabeth Cassin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Photo caption: Student activist holds sign saying 'hashtag me next' / Credit: Kendall Grace Woods / Instagram: @itskendallgw

An Egyptian Plagiarism Scandal And Sex In The African City2014032220140323 (WS)

'If you copy and paste, you\u2019ll be found out with haste' - a truism for the digital era?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

If you copy and paste, you’ll be found out with haste – a new saying for the digital era? The comedian Bassem Youssef is a heart surgeon whose satirical TV programme has won him both friends and enemies. But this week he faced plagiarism allegations and admitted copying sections of a serious article from a popular American politics website, then republishing it under his own name.

Of course it did not take long for social media users to notice the similarity, but while Bassem Youssef apologised, the writer he copied found himself at the centre of another social media storm. British author Ben Judah initially took the plagiarism in his stride, but later found himself the target of anti-Semitic attacks from Egyptians. The Trending team tries to make sense of the controversy and talks to an Egyptian blogger who condemns the anti-Jewish Tweets.

Also on the programme, a TV series about a close-knit group of stylish female friends who talk obsessively about relationships, fashion and life in the big city – sound familiar? But wait - there’s a twist. An African City is an online TV series set and filmed in Accra. It has of course been compared to Sex in the City, but how close does it hew to reality, and how are African women reacting?

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Owen Bennett-Jones, Ahmed Nour from the BBC’s Cairo bureau, and BBC Trending’s Sex in the City expert commentator Anne Marie-Tomchak.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Antifascists V Alt.right2017021820170219 (WS)

We investigate the dirty tricks used online by Antifascists and the Alt.Right in the US

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The Alt.Right in the US is locked in a fierce ideological battle with Antifa - a group of anti-fascists. We investigate online dirty tricks by both sides.

And debunking myths in India. How the country is getting to grips with the spread of fake news on an untrackable social platform.

Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Image: Protest, Credit: Getty Images)

Are Viral Videos To Blame For Rising Us Murder Rates?2016062520160626 (WS)

The idea - known as the \u2018Ferguson Effect' \u2013 is dividing opinion in America

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Why have murder rates spiked in several US cities? The head of the FBI, James Comey, has asked whether police are holding back from their work through fear of being filmed on camera phones and going viral on YouTube. The theory has been dubbed the ‘Viral Video Effect’, or the ‘Ferguson Effect’ after the city that witnessed unrest after a black teenager was killed by a white police officer.

The theory has polarised opinion, but could there be any truth in it? We hear from experts on both sides of the debate, and speak to Richard Rosenfeld who has published the most recent piece of research.

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Photo: Yellow cordon that reads 'Police Line Do Not Cross'. Credit: Shutterstock)

Arrested for Saving Memes in Russia2018091420180917 (WS)
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Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

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Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are some Russians put on extremist watch lists for saving or posting memes online?

Maria Motuznaya was investigated by police after saving edgy memes on her account on the social network VKontakte. They showed a character from the series Game of Thrones and smoking nuns, and in at least one case, a racial slur.

She’s not alone. Maria and hundreds of Russians are being placed on an extremist watch list for using memes declared to be racist, offensive or against the Russian Orthodox Church. People on the list have their bank account frozen and Maria and others face criminal charges. Why is this happening - and will a campaign launched by a Russian blogger make a difference?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Lee Kumutat

(Photo: A pair of hands in handcuffs hold a mobile phone showing the VKontakte website. Credit: Anton Vaganov/Interpress/TASS)

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

Bangalore For The Indian Elections2014041220140413 (WS)

How is social media impacting on India\u2019s biggest ever election?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Mukul Devichand is joined by BBC Hindi’s Neha Bhatnagar as well as a live audience in the National Law School in Bangalore. They’ll be discussing how online activity is shaping and impacting on India’s general elections, the biggest voting event in the world.

Mukul finds out how a slap from a rickshaw driver went viral, and explores whether the "E-Empowerment" movement can really change the political realities of India.

We look at the rise of the AAP Party, born out of social media, and meet all three political parties through the sarcastic lens of YouTube comedian Gusimran Khamba.

Produced by Estelle Doyle

Bangladesh\u2019s Murdered Bloggers2015080120150802 (WS)

Why were three bloggers murdered in Bangladesh?

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This year three atheist bloggers in Bangladesh were brutally attacked and murdered - seemingly for challenging religious belief. The suspects are Islamic extremists. It comes after a polarised online debate between secular and atheist bloggers, and Islamists.

This week, BBC Trending is on location in the capital Dhaka, meeting bloggers living in fear and discussing what is happening with a special panel, including the country's Minister of Information Hasanul Haq Inu, and a public audience. We look at how the clash between secular and religious views trended and then turned sour, and meet voices from all sides of the debate - drawn from the internet generation. Plus, who are the Goats of Bangladesh - and why are they going viral on Facebook.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Bangladesh's Murdered Bloggers2015073020150802 (WS)

Why are atheist bloggers being murdered for their views in Bangladesh?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Already this year, three atheist bloggers in Bangladesh have been brutally attacked and murdered - seemingly for challenging religious belief. The suspects are Islamic extremists. It comes after a polarised online debate between secular and atheist bloggers and Islamists. BBC Trending is on location in the capital Dhaka, meeting bloggers living in fear and discussing what is happening with a special panel - including the country's Minister of Information Hasanul Haq Inu and a public audience. We look at how the clash between secular and religious views trended and then turned sour, and meet voices from all sides of the debate, drawn from the internet generation.

We also look at other trends from Bangladesh. The battle for justice for a 13-year-old boy who was killed by an attacker, who posted the video on Facebook, seems to have resulted in arrests. Plus, who are the Goats of Bangladesh - and why are they going viral on Facebook?

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Bbc Trending In Mexico: 6 Months After The Ayotzinapa 432015032820150329 (WS)

An audience in Mexico City debates whether recent protests add up to a \u2018Mexican Spring\u2019

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Six months ago this week, 43 students from Ayotzinapa teachers training college in Mexico went missing while on their way to a protest - feared murdered by the cartels with government complicity. Angry Mexicans took to the streets but also went online, with millions of tweets targeting the government. It has prompted what many say is the country's biggest political crisis in two decades.

BBC Trending has assembled a panel of some of Mexican social media's most influential voices, for a special extended edition. In front of an audience in Mexico City, we'll be asking whether the millions of Mexicans using Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to protest levels of violence, and to stand up for freedom of speech, add up to a "Mexican Spring"?

The programme features reporting from Guerrero state, from the spot the students clashed with police. We explore the Facebook networks of ordinary Mexicans who say hundreds of their missing relatives are buried in mass graves in the same hills the authorities have been searching for the bodies of the 43.

Social media is also being used to lampoon Mexico's wealthy. We report on the "Mirrey" ("My King") phenomenon. Young men photographed with shirts open and in nonchalant poses, the sons of the rich and powerful, are attracting ironic comments and millions of views. What's really behind it?

On the stage with Mukul Devichand will be Chumel Torres, the YouTube star many call "Mexico's Jon Stewart," leading investigative journalist Lydiah Cacho and political commentator Federico Arreola.

(Photo: Mexico students' crime protest. Credit: Alfredo Estrella / Getty Images)

Be Careful What You Say About Spinach2014011820140119 (WS)

A Twitter storm about spinach in Malaysia and Brazilian flashmobs

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Malaysian Prime Minister made a speech earlier this week about the state of the economy. But his mention of kangkung (or water spinach) tickled the Malaysians’ sense of humour, and frustrations, so much that #kangkung jokes have been trending all week. But things changed when a blog post from BBC Trending was seemingly blocked – why?
And, #rolezinhos. These flash mobs held by young, mostly black people in malls in Sao Paolo are causing friction in Brazil.
“Cameroon would be that kid who keeps saying I'm half French, drink wine on weekends and dance with big girls”. What high school stereotype would each African country be?
#BBCTrending’s Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Tse Yin Lee from BBC Monitoring and Fernanda Nidecker from BBC Brazil.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Being \u2018black On Campus\u20192015111420151115 (WS)

Students share their experience of being \u2018Black on Campus\u2019

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Black students protesting against racism in Missouri have attracted global attention all week. The head of the university has resigned. But there are now signs that the online campaign has spread to other campuses across the United States as students share their experiences of being ‘Black on Campus.’

(Photo: Mizzou Legacy Circle. Credit: Getty Images)

Being White In Taiwan2015112120151122 (WS)

What does a video of an Englishman being racially abused tell us about life in Taiwan?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Smartphone footage of an Englishman being racially abused in Taiwan has been viewed more than two million times on YouTube. We ask what the video tells us about Taiwanese culture, and how ‘foreigners’ – and Westerners in particular – are perceived in the country.

And we examine claims that India is ‘choking’ Nepal, by stopping fuel and medical supplies getting into the country. That’s what one popular hashtag, driven by people in Nepal, has claimed - but the Indian government denies the allegations.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image Credit: DreamLucid / YouTube

Braingasms2014022220140223 (WS)

Fake photos in Venezuela, siding with Chinese prostitutes, and braingasms.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Some Venezuelan political activists shared photos online that were fake. Instead of showing violence against Venezuelan demonstrators, they’re shots from Syria, Greece, even Barcelona.
In China, a CCTV state TV film exposing widespread prostitution in the southern city of Dongguan generated an internet backlash, when social media users came out on the side of the prostitutes. But how do the colours of the German flag come into this? And does the sound of soft whispers make you tingle?

There’s a growing online community who share this sensation. It’s called ASMR, Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response. And ASMRtists, now hope that science will take them seriously.

Presented by Mukul Devichand. Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

Calling Out The Trolls2015120520151206 (WS)

A man has been fired after being called out for posting misogynistic abuse on Facebook.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Meet Clementine Ford, the Australian columnist who was bombarded by misogynistic abuse on Facebook. She reported one of her trolls to his employer, and it cost him his job.
And we hear from the Mexican politician who live-streamed himself accusing a woman of dropping litter. The confrontation has been watched hundreds of thousands of times, but is public shaming a fair or effective way to seek retribution?

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Image Credit: Shutterstock)

Can Rap Be Halal?2015062720150628 (WS)

Find out why Deen Squad, two new Muslim rap stars, claim their music is halal

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Deen Squad are two new Muslim rappers who take hit mainstream songs and rerecord them with deeply religious lyrics. They have built up a global following online, but is their music halal?

And how do you police hate speech online? A forum used by white supremacists on Reddit has been allowed to continue, while others that made fun of fat people have been closed down. We bring a civil rights activist and a free speech advocate together to try and answer the question. Joining us in the studio is Abdirahim Saeed from the BBC’s Arabic service.

(Photo credit: Deen Squad)

Can Rap Incite Crime?2016100120161002 (WS)

Controversy has erupted over a rap song that suggests burglars target Chinese homes

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Controversy has erupted in the US over a hip hop song that offers a step-by-step guide to committing burglary and contains lyrics suggesting criminals target Chinese homes. We talk to one of the protesters who is trying to get the track banned.

And, Palestinians are accusing Facebook of censoring some of their social media posts to win favour with the Israeli government. We also hear about counter claims by Israelis, who say Facebook is failing to remove material that incites violence against them.

(Photo: Rapper YG attends the 10th Annual BMI Urban Awards. Credit: David Livingston/Getty Images)

Can Social Media Cause Ptsd?2015052320150524 (WS)

New research suggests social cause could provoke PTSD. What is the evidence?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Can social media cause PTSD? New research suggests that viewing disturbing images shared on social media can cause lasting trauma – a suggestion some PTSD sufferers find outrageous. We weigh up the evidence.

“My child can be a pole dancer but not a doctor” – we talk to the Indian doctor, whose blog went viral after he stated that his profession had become one of the least desirable in the country. A recent study shows that more than 75% of Indian doctors have experienced some form of violence, most often at the hands of patients or their relatives.

And what women really want – a dad’s bod, or a daddy’s body, which is “a nice balance between a beer gut and working out” and apparently a body type women are going nuts for. Mike Wendling, the proud owner of Dad’s body, tests the theory out on the streets of London.

We are joined in the studio by BBC Health reporter Smitha Mundasad @smithamundasad.

(Photo: A woman works alone on a computer. Credit: Thinkstock/OcusFocus)

Can Social Media Help You Lose Weight?2018092120180924 (WS)
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Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you\u2019re trying to get in shape?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you’re trying to get in shape? If you’re trying to lose weight you might have tried out exercise tips and diet recipes you’ve seen online. Some find social media groups a useful source of support, but there are concerns that some of the advice might not be as healthy as it seems, and that social media celebrities are setting unhelpful and unrealistic body expectations. So how can you cut through all the noise, and which social networks might be better than others when it comes to losing weight?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: A woman stands on a bathroom scale
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you\u2019re trying to get in shape?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you’re trying to get in shape? If you’re trying to lose weight you might have tried out exercise tips and diet recipes you’ve seen online. Some find social media groups a useful source of support, but there are concerns that some of the advice might not be as healthy as it seems, and that social media celebrities are setting unhelpful and unrealistic body expectations. So how can you cut through all the noise, and which social networks might be better than others when it comes to losing weight?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: A woman stands on a bathroom scale
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you\u2019re trying to get in shape?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you’re trying to get in shape? If you’re trying to lose weight you might have tried out exercise tips and diet recipes you’ve seen online. Some find social media groups a useful source of support, but there are concerns that some of the advice might not be as healthy as it seems, and that social media celebrities are setting unhelpful and unrealistic body expectations. So how can you cut through all the noise, and which social networks might be better than others when it comes to losing weight?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: A woman stands on a bathroom scale
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you\u2019re trying to get in shape?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you’re trying to get in shape? If you’re trying to lose weight you might have tried out exercise tips and diet recipes you’ve seen online. Some find social media groups a useful source of support, but there are concerns that some of the advice might not be as healthy as it seems, and that social media celebrities are setting unhelpful and unrealistic body expectations. So how can you cut through all the noise, and which social networks might be better than others when it comes to losing weight?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: A woman stands on a bathroom scale
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you\u2019re trying to get in shape?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Do dieting influencers and communities help or hurt when you’re trying to get in shape? If you’re trying to lose weight you might have tried out exercise tips and diet recipes you’ve seen online. Some find social media groups a useful source of support, but there are concerns that some of the advice might not be as healthy as it seems, and that social media celebrities are setting unhelpful and unrealistic body expectations. So how can you cut through all the noise, and which social networks might be better than others when it comes to losing weight?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: A woman stands on a bathroom scale
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Can You Fake A Trend On Twitter?2018030220180304 (WS)
20180305 (WS)

Companies in Saudi Arabia are offering to artificially boost hashtags.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

“Grilled Lamb Delivery” was trending – but why would so many people talk about something so routine and mundane?
As it turns out, one of the top trends in Saudi Arabia was being promoted by automated accounts – or “bots”. And it wasn’t an isolated occurrence.
This week we find out how companies make it look like lots of real people are talking about a subject online. And what it means for Twitter’s list of top trends.
We also bought our own hashtag – and found out how many accounts we could get to tweet out “Congratulations Fahima”!

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Reporter: Fahima Abdulrahman
Studio Managers: Rod Farquar and James Beard

Picture caption: A cartoon bot army. Automated accounts have artificially boosted hashtags in Saudi Arabia.
Picture credit: BBC

Cartoonists Of The \u2018caliphate\u20192017050520170506 (WS)
20170507 (WS)

Supporters of so-called Islamic State are spreading their ideology \u2013 through cartoons.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week BBC Trending investigates a change in how the so-called Islamic State group is marketing itself. Typically associated with videos showing killings and destruction, supporters of the terrorist group are now employing less confrontational means in order to recruit followers – namely, the use of cartoons aimed at both adults and children.

Also, we talk about one of the most popular social stories this week. A well-known family pranking Youtube channel is shut down after a backlash from the Youtube community.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: A member of the Iraqi forces walks past a mural bearing the logo of the so-called Islamic State group / Credit: Ahmad Al-Rubaye / AFP / Getty Images

Cash For Catastrophes?2016082720160828 (WS)

Meet the people who buy and sell viral videos of news events for thousands of dollars.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Photo caption: Aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow Crash / Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid, Getty.

Cash For Catastrophes?2016100820161009 (WS)

Meet the people who buy and sell viral videos of news events for thousands of dollars.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image caption: The aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow crash / Image credit: Getty Images

Child Safety Whistleblowers2017080420170805 (WS)
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Whistleblowers from YouTube\u2019s voluntary child safety scheme raise concerns.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An exclusive brought to you from BBC Trending this week: whistleblowers from inside YouTube’s voluntary Trusted Flaggers Scheme, which helps identify potential child groomers, tell us that the company are failing to respond to the vast majority of reports from them and the public.

Also on the programme, an unsolved murder of a young man in Washington DC last year has sparked widespread conspiracy theories online. But these aren’t just any kind of conspiracy theories – they’re ones with links to people in positions of power. Why has one murder led to such a huge response online? And what does this all mean for the grieving family who are left behind?

Producers: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: close up of YouTube image / Credit: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Chilli Controversy: #ladychiles2014083020140831 (WS)

A maid filmed taking food sparks #LadyChiles backlash in Mexico

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A national chilli dish in Mexico was served up this week with a side order of angry debate after a maid was filmed apparently taking more than her share of dinner. Her employer filmed the moment the maid was confronted and the video was posted to social media. Presenter Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out why thousands have been angrily tweeting #LadyChiles.

And we look at the satirical video ‘Armagayddon’ which was released by an Irish gay rights group and marked the beginning of the countdown to the referendum on same-sex marriages in Ireland. Anne-Marie discusses the importance of social media in the debate.

And we find out why social media restrictions on journalists in India have ignited the trend #TwitterPasswords.

Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined in the studio by fellow Irish BBC journalist Ciara Riordan, BBC Trending’s Sam Judah and from Mexico by the BBC correspondent Will Grant.

The programme was produced by India Rakusen.

(Image: Red chilli pieces by the side of a plate. BBC Copyright)

China\u2019s \u2018feminist Five\u2019 And Homophobia In Iceland2015042520150426 (WS)

After the release of the \u2018Feminist Five\u2019 is feminist conversation back online in China?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In Iceland, folk musician Gylfi Aegisson objected to local authorities in the town of Hafnarfirði who are planning to introduce LGBT sex education into schools. Some people found his comments to be homophobic after Aegisson set up a Facebook group urging people to 'protect children'. A gay rights lobby group took offence to his views and created new hashtags using his comments starting an Icelandic Twitter trend. We hear from Árni Grétar Jóhannss from Samtokin ’78 and radio presenter Adolf Erlingsson from Radio Iceland.

On 8 March, International Women’s Day, five feminists were detained and arrested in China. Last week they were released on bail but banned from going online or giving interviews. We discuss whether the ability to discuss feminism on Chinese social media has been quashed or whether the arrests have empowered people to continue the feminist discussion, in spite of the censors. And, what is really behind the arrests of the five women? BBC China’s Vincent Ni joins Mukul in the studio.

(Photo: Feminist activist Wu poses for a photograph with papers. Credit: Reuters)

China\u2019s Crack Down On Online Videos2017071420170715 (WS)
20170716 (WS)

China has brought in new regulations prohibiting a huge range of online videos.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

New Chinese regulations have resulted in a crack down of online videos. Chinese censors have banned around 84 categories of material including prostitution, drug addiction, extra marital affairs but the classification of homosexuality as an ‘abnormal’ sexual activity has caused anger online.

And how India social media is reacting to a new tax placed on menstrual hygiene products and forcing people to talk about a subject that is traditionally taboo.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producers: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: A still from the popular Chinese online video series “Addicted”, one of the shows that may fall afoul of new censorship rules
Credit: China Huace Film

New Chinese regulations have resulted in a crack down of online videos. Chinese censors have banned around 84 categories of material including prostitution, drug addiction, extra marital affairs but the classification of homosexuality as an ‘abnormal’ sexual activity has caused anger online.

And how India social media is reacting to a new tax placed on menstrual hygiene products and forcing people to talk about a subject that is traditionally taboo.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producers: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: A still from the popular Chinese online video series “Addicted?, one of the shows that may fall afoul of new censorship rules
Credit: China Huace Film

China\u2019s Livestreaming: A Strange Love Story2017072120170722 (WS)
20170723 (WS)

What does the phenomenon of livestreaming tell us about modern China?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The first of two special editions of BBC Trending brings to you a unique Chinese love story involving one of China’s most well-known live streamers, and a fan who watches her on a screen every single day.

Live streaming is big business in China, with half of the online Chinese community using livestreaming apps in 2016.

The first part of this special edition tells the story of Lele Tao, one of China’s most well-known livestreaming bloggers. In this episode, we find out her back story, look in to the impact livestreaming has on her life, and question what the phenomenon of livestreaming itself tells us about modern China.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Megha Mohan and Anisa Subedar

China\u2019s Livestreaming: The Super Fan2017072820170729 (WS)
20170730 (WS)

What does live streaming tell us about modern China? This week, we meet a super fan.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The final in a two-part special edition of BBC Trending bringing you a strange love story involving one of China’s most well-known live streamers, and a fan who pays to watch her live stream every single day.

Last week we introduced you to Lele Tao, a well-known live streamer in China. This week we meet Shage, who is a devoted fan of Lele’s. We delve into Shage’s back story, his motivations, and witness Lele and Shage’s first ever face-to-face interaction.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producers: Megha Mohan and Anisa Subedar

Image: Shage using his phone / Credit: BBC

China\u2019s Online Search For Stolen Children2016012320160124 (WS)

The online hunt for abducted children in China.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An image of a three-year-old girl being abducted has flooded social media in China. The girl has now been found, but the search sheds light on the country's huge digital campaigns trying to return tens of thousands of missing children to their parents.

How a Bollywood actress wowed the web over the grilling she received during a TV interview.

Meet Bill, the new stick figure that went viral this week. Bill has plenty of advice to offer on the type of content is shared online and will attempt to regulate human interaction. He’s known by different names around the world with a universal theme but there is only one Bill.

Presented by Chris Foxx @thisisFoxx with Kerry Allen @kerrya11en, Anisa Subedar @OnlyAnisa and Nooshin Soluch. Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image: CCTV of child
Image credit: Huaxi Metropolis Daily

China\u2019s Rush For Divorce2016090320160904 (WS)

Happy couples in Shanghai are getting divorced to buy homes more cheaply

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Happy couples in Shanghai have been rushing to divorce because of rumours of rules change that would make it more expensive for them to buy property.

Our second story looks at the first anniversary of the death of three-year-old Alan Kurdi. Did the iconic image of Syrian toddler’s body washed up on a beach lead to real changes in public opinion and the way governments treat refugees?

Producers: Anisa Subedar and Sam Judah

(Photo credit to Think Stock)

China\u2019s Tampon Taboo2016082020160821 (WS)

Swimmer Fu Yuanhui got China talking by saying her performance was affected by her period

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

It’s not every day that you hear someone talking about their menstrual cycle live on TV. And it’s even more rare if that person is an Olympic athlete from China. But that’s what happened this week when swimmer Fu Yuanhui, admitted she wasn’t at her best because of period pains. It’s opened up a whole new conversation about tampons in China - a country where some have never even heard of them.

Plus, we unpick the story behind a viral video of El Jefe, the last Jaguar in America which some suggest could put jaguar research in jeopardy, and one of the founders of the Norwegian Death Diving Federation tells us why the sport has been trending this week.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah.

Photo: Swimmer Fu Yuanhui with her medal / Photo credit: Gabriel Buoys / Getty

Clowns Strike Fear In France2014110120141102 (WS)

How online prank videos sparked a clown craze; Myths of a female Kurdish fighter

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The media in France would have you believe there is a craze causing fear across the nation – youths dressed as clowns are terrorising unsuspecting members of the public. The police have pointed the finger at social media, both as the cause, and for spreading fear of the clowns. The numbers of people who have been apprehended by police are small, but the chatter online is substantial. We track the growing interest in prank videos involving clowns, and the subsequent online groups calling for the clowns to go away.

In the fight against Islamic State, why has the ‘Angel of Kobane’ gone global? The image of a female Kurdish fighter in the northern Syrian town of Kobane, who apparently killed over 100 men from Islamic state, has been shared thousands of times around the world. In this week’s BBC Trending we unravel the myth of the woman in the image and find out why narratives of bravery against IS are amplified online by people from India, America and the United Kingdom.

(Photo: Clown masks displayed at a costume store. Credit: Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

Conversations With A Hacker2017011420170115 (WS)

Tracking the hackers - Who is Guccifer 2.0?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Donald Trump accepted this week that Russia was responsible for hacking the Democratic Party’s emails. So who is the mysterious Guccifer 2.0 who claims he was behind the hack?

And we investigate the case of an American victim of “revenge porn” who’s trying to vanish completely from the internet. Is it possible to erase your digital footprint?

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Will Yates.

Image: Hooded hacker at computer / Credit: iStock

Could Crowdmapping Create A Safer World?2017010720170108 (WS)

Is crowdmapping an effective tool to tackle political violence and hate crime?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Can crowdmapping be an effective tool to tackle hate crime and political violence?

Billy Willson is a straight ‘A’ student from Kansas who decided to quit university after one semester sparking a debate as to whether higher education is worth the time and money.

And has the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s decision to perform at Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration ceremony divided Mormon communities?

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Image caption: Close up of hands on mobile phone / Image credit: iStock

Could Sending A Gif Be A Crime?2017012120170122 (WS)

How do you go online if flashing lights could hurt you?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

GIFs – online flashing animations – can induce seizures in those with photosensitive epilepsy. So is knowingly sending a GIF to a person with epilepsy a crime? We find out about a case testing exactly that question.

We also look at the bull festival in south India called Jallikattu where animal rights activists are in a heated dispute with those in favour of the tradition both on the streets and on the internet.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.
Presented by Mike Wendling

Reporters: Megha Mohan and Will Yates

Image caption: Fluorescent pattern / Image credit: iStock

Debunking Youtube Rumours2017020420170205 (WS)

Debunking YouTube paedophile rumours and online radicalisation of the far-right

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A disturbing rumour’s been trending online recently - of a paedophile ring on YouTube. BBC Trending’s Mike Wendling investigates and debunks another internet myth.

Also, in the light of last week’s shootings in Quebec, Will Yates delves into the world of online radicalisation of far-right extremists.

(Photo: Close up of hands on a keyboard. Credit: iStock)

Demonetisation\u2019s Fake News Demons2016121720161218 (WS)

False rumours suggesting India\u2019s new bank notes could be radioactive are spreading online

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

India’s demonetisation process has been mired in controversy - and now it faces a new challenge: fake news stories about the country’s new banknotes. Rumours have been spreading online suggesting the notes have been embedded with GPS chips, and are even radioactive.

And – when trolls started stealing a disabled American boy’s photos and turning them into cruel memes, his mother Jenny decided to start fighting back online. We put her in touch with another mother who fought a very similar battle against the trolls… and won.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image caption:bank employee counts 100 Rupee notes / Image credit: Indranil Mukherjee, Getty Images.

Did Facebook Fuel Hate in Myanmar?2018090720180910 (WS)
20180909 (WS)
20180908 (WS)

How Facebook\u2019s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

How Facebook\u2019s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

How Facebook\u2019s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

How Facebook\u2019s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facebook’s dream of a more open and connected world turned into a nightmare in Myanmar. Ethnic tensions between the Buddhist majority and the Rohingya minority had been simmering for decades when the country started opening up to outside business. The price of a smartphone SIM card dropped from around $200 to $2, and Facebook quickly became the app of choice.

But despite multiple warnings, Facebook failed to control hate speech against Rohingyas, and had very few employees who could read Burmese. The company was criticised in a UN report - so what exactly went so wrong online in Myanmar?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Edward Main
Studio Manager: Graham Puddifoot

Photo Caption: Rohingya refugees pictured in August 2017
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Digital Life After Life2018010520180107 (WS)
20180108 (WS)

Ex-prisoners in the US are struggling to cope with the online world after years in jail

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Social media has become an integral part of modern life for most of us - but what if you’d been in jail for the last 30 years? Many recently released so-called juvenile lifers in the US now find themselves grappling with the mysteries of Facebook and Whatsapp. They never expected to get out of prison, so authorities and family members have had to ease them into the online world – with mixed results.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Elizabeth Davies
Producer: Will Yates
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Photo credit: Getty Images

Disability As Inspiration: Positive Or Patronising?2015020720150208 (WS)

Does the use of disability as inspiration over simplify and patronise?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Inspiration Porn
Videos and adverts that show people with disabilities "overcoming" adversity are often posted online, along with the caption “Be Inspired”. Some critics have labelled this "inspiration porn" and see it as oversimplifying disability and using it as an emotional hook for non-disabled people. Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined by bloggers Mel Finefrock and Charlie Swinbourne to discuss.

Ayatollah Genitals
Who would insult Iran’s religious leaders? We meet the man behind the anonymous Persian parody count “Ayatollah Genitals” – a Facebook and Twitter account that mocks the teachings and sermons of Iran’s mullahs.

(Photo: Madison Tevlin singing Copyright: The Tevlin Family)

Disturbing Rip-off Cartoons2017032520170326 (WS)

An investigation into unsuitable children\u2019s cartoons on YouTube.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Thousands of videos aimed at children are posted on YouTube that initially look like some of their favourite cartoon series. On closer inspection all is not quite what it seems as it reveals weird and often disturbing content that is potentially unsuitable for young children. We investigate who is making this content and why? Is the onus on parents to take responsibility for their children’s viewing or should the host platform, YouTube, be doing more?

Reporter/Producer: Will Yates and Anisa Subedar
Presenter: Mike Wendling

Image: Peppa pig with a zombie face / Credit: Candy Family/YouTube

Dj Khaled: Snapchat Superstar2016111920161120 (WS)

Whitney Henry goes in search of Snapchat\u2019s \u2018social media philosopher\u2019

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

DJ Khaled is kind of a big deal on Snapchat. His messages reach millions of young people who find him both hilarious and inspirational. Whitney Henry takes a trip to his home town in Miami to try to find out the key to his success.

And, in a week dominated by tales of ‘Fake News’ and the US election, we take a look at a story that unfolded thousands of miles away – in China. Are Donald Trump’s supporters really trying to smear his opponents using China’s largest social network? Presented by Catrin Nye.

(Photo: DJ Khaled on stage. Credit: Brad Barker/Getty Images)

Do Men Need \u2018consent Lessons\u2019?2015102420151025 (WS)

Meet George Lawlor, the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn\u2019t need them.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We meet the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn’t need ‘consent lessons’. The classes are on offer in a number of British universities to tackle both rape and sexual assault. We speak to the woman who designed one of the courses, and says they are absolutely necessary.
And we hear from the ‘Man who has it all’, a Twitter account that’s actually a scathing satire of the patronising lifestyle articles usually aimed at women.
Finally, in response to recent violence in Punjab, the #SikhLivesMatter hashtag is gathering pace. But it isn’t being driven by people in India. We meet one of the British Sikhs spearheading the campaign to find out what is behind the trend, and what is motiving its supporters.

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Photo Credit: George Lawlor)

Do You \u2018stand With Hate Speech\u2019?2016060420160605 (WS)

#Istandwithhatespeech has caused controversy, but users say they stand against censorship

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The hashtag 'I stand with hate speech' has been trending in several countries this week, causing outrage as tens of thousands of people appeared to support online abuse. But far from its shocking impression, the hashtag’s supporters claim they’re simply taking a stand for freedom of expression on the internet.

Also, we meet some of the Pakistani women who've been reacting to a recent suggestion that men in the country should be allowed to beat their wives, as long as it's done ‘lightly’.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah

(Photo: Angry person, Credit: iStock)

Does Airbnb Have A Race Problem?2016051420160515 (WS)

Twitter users have accused some hosts of rejecting their bookings because they're black.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The hashtag #Airbnbwhileblack has been trending this week after African American twitter users accused some homeowners on the room booking website of rejecting them because of their skin colour. Greg Selden from Virginia says when he used fake white profiles he was accepted at properties who had previously said the room was unavailable.

Plus, has Facebook been censoring conservative news trends? This week it was revealed that a team of journalists review the trending topics which appear in the top right hand corner of the site. That’s led to allegations that the site has promoted more liberal stories.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Emma Wilson

Photo credit: Airbnb publicity video

Does College \u2018party\u2019 App Yeti Encourage Criminal Behaviour?2015121220151213 (WS)

An alleged sexual assault has emerged on the Yeti app. But what is it, how does it work?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An alleged sexual assault has surfaced through the controversial social network Yeti – Campus Stories, also dubbed a college ‘party’ app. How does it work, and why are so many students using it to upload illicit material?

And – a video that suggests an Egyptian man died after being tortured by police has been widely shared on Facebook. It’s the latest in a spate of recent deaths that have spurred people to speak out against the government on social media. Now some are drawing parallels with similar events that triggered the Egyptian revolution in 2011.

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Image: Students on bench / Image credit: Shutterstock)

Does Twitter Have A Child Porn Problem?2016112620161127 (WS)

Images of child porn were reportedly found on Twitter this week, before being removed.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week, a concerned citizen said she had uncovered thousands of Twitter profiles that were publishing and sharing child porn. The network was swift to shut the accounts down, but questions remain about disturbing material proliferating on the platform. Another investigation revealed that some Twitter users were posting graphic sexual conversations alongside non-pornographic images of children.

Also in the programme, a website that says it aims to name and shame left-wing teachers has been launched in the US. Professor Watchlist was started by a right-wing campaign group that brushed off comparisons to McCarthyism. Some academics are fighting back with humour and using social media to make fun of the project.

Presented by Catrin Nye
Produced by Sam Judah

Image caption: Open laptop / Image credit: Shutterstock

Don\u2019t Buy Death2016042320160424 (WS)

The hashtag trying to stop young Somalis from migrating abroad.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why Somalis are using a hashtag to try and persuade young people to not to take the dangerous journey to Europe. #DhimashoHaGadan, which translates as “Don’t buy death”, aims to counteract the positive pictures many emigrates post to social media, even though their new lives may not be as good as they seem.

We speak to the South African students who are publishing the names of alleged rapists online. They say it’s to make people take sexual assault seriously, but others have accused them of mob justice.

Plus, how three Indian students are using Carly Rae Jepsen’s Call Me Maybe to make a point about overbearing mothers-in-law.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Emma Wilson.
Photo credit: Will Ross / BBC

Don\u2019t Punch Me! It\u2019s A Prank2015082220150823 (WS)

BBC Trending explores viral comedy pranks at the Edinburgh Festival.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Over the past year online pranks have continued to spiral and go viral. Pranksters like Vitaly, Joey Salads, FouseyTube and Prank vs Prank get billions of views but some of the videos have been pushing the boundaries and causing controversy. Punches have been pulled, slaps dealt out, and the authorities have stepped in. Is all fair in love, war and pranking? Or are the boundaries of funny bound to be broken?

Mukul Devichand is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by three obliging comedians; wind-up critic Nish Kumar, cheeky prank lover Kai Humphries and hoax sceptic Anna Morris.

With interivews from Vitaly, the Etayyim Brothers and Trigger Happy Tv’s Dom Joly.

Produced by India Rakusen.

(Photo Credit: BBC at Edinburgh)

Duterte\u2019s Online Victory2016120320161204 (WS)

How social media helped Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte win an election

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte swept to power in May, many believed social media played a major role in his victory. But some allege his supporters used trolling and intimidation, in addition to clever campaigning, to bolster his position. We hear from journalists and campaigners in the Philippines - on both sides of the political divide.

(Photo: Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte. Credit: Mohd Rasfan/Getty Images)

Ebola Songs And Ragging In India2014112220141123 (WS)

Africa\u2019s own song to highlight Ebola and a fight for Justice in India

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In this week's programme

India: The case of Roji Roy.

At BBC Trending we’ve been finding out how a nursing student who took her own life in Kerala, south India, has become a symbol against corporate India and the “ruling class”. Following her death at the beginning of November, Keralites began to turn against the mainstream media. They protested that Roji’s death hadn’t been covered due to corporate interests. Thousands have united behind the ‘Justice for Roji Roy’ campaign on Facebook, with over 50 pages now dedicated to her. We find out how Roji’s death has opened up debate in the state.

Syria: The hero boy hoax.

A recent video that appeared to show the grainy images of a boy going to the rescue of a little girl during a shoot out in a street in Syria, it gained millions of views and was reported as seemingly real by media outlets all around the world.

It turned out to be staged by a couple of film makers from Norway, who admitted that it was in fact them that had made the video. They had filmed it in Malta using actors. We speak to a Syrian blogger about his concerns over putting up such a video, and we take a look at the role of the media.

Trending Ebola songs

Bob Geldof brought together artists to re-record Band Aid to raise awareness and money to fight Ebola in West Africa. But it is not the only song. BBC Trending takes a look at other songs by West African artists.

One of the biggest songs right now is Africa Stop Ebola, which famous West African artists including Tiken Jah Fakoly, Amadou and Mariam, Salif Keita, Oumou Sangare and others

While in Guinea,’Un Geste Pour La Vie contre Ebola’ produced by Meurs Libre Production is popular.

(Image: Part of the team singing #AfricaStopEbola with permission from 3D Family)

Egypt Asks Why #wearebeingwatched2014060720140608 (WS)

Egyptian proposals to monitor social media cause a backlash online.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What does shifting online sentiment in Egypt reveal about the country’s political landscape? This week after army man, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, was elected President with 96% of the votes two hashtags trended on Twitter.

#WeAreBeingWatched, or #احنا_متراقبين in Arabic, started after the Egyptian interior ministry announced it was going to monitor ‘influential’ activists online. And #ThankYouBassemYoussef sprang up when satirist Bassem Youssef cancelled his TV Show saying the ‘present climate in Egypt’ is ‘not suitable for a political satire programme’.

We ask blogger Zeinobia and journalist Amira Howeidy how the mood has changed online in Egypt.

God, Goodluck Jonathan and the Kremlin all have one thing in common… they all have a parody account on Twitter. We speak with the comedians and writers behind @thetweetofgod, @notgoodluck, and @kermlinrussia.

And we turn Chinese social media on its head and find out what wasn’t trending on the anniversary of the student protests in Tiananmen Square and why a song from Les Miserables was.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the Trending studio by BBC Chinese Editor Raymond Li.

Exposing Racists And Getting Them Fired, The Vigilantes Policing The Internet2015011720150118 (WS)

From policing to trolling. Can online vigilantes go too far?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Does this offend you?
This week in Spain, #YocanFacu (I am with Facu) was trending in support of the satirist Facu Diaz. He has been accused of mocking victims of terrorism in an online video sketch, which uses the iconography of the Basque armed organisation ETA.

His detractors say that he has overstepped the limits of freedom of expression - while he claims that he is actually being targeted for his close ties with the growing opposition movement, Podemos. So which one is it? BBC Trending’s Anne-Marie Tomchak went to Madrid to investigate.

Fired for being Racist
We meet the man in Texas whose racist Facebook posts inspired a whole community to get him fired.

Racists Getting Fired (and Getting Racists Fired!) is the name of a blog that does exactly what it says on the tin. People are encouraged to find and share incidents of racism online, from memes to tweets to quotes, and expose the apparent racists. The community are then encouraged to call, and email the racists employer until they are fired. It’s online vigilantism, or digilantism, that dares to impact the real world, and it’s not the first.

The complexity of regulating the online world has left a vacuum for people to take moral policing into their own hands. But if just one comment on a public platform can result in harassment and losing your job, have vigilantes gone too far? We speak to Chris Rincon, who lost his job when his Facebook status was aired on the blog. We also hear from the man behind the retweeting moral policing machine @YesYoureRacist.

(Photo: An office worker gets fired by his senior manager. Credito: Shutterstock)

Facebook And Marijuana2016022020160221 (WS)

Facebook removes pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of marijuana

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We take a look at Facebook’s decision to remove pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of recreational marijuana and hear from one company whose page was taken down. The sale of marijuana is legal in four states in America - however it is still illegal under federal law.

Women in Trinidad and Tobago are sharing their experiences of sexual assault and called on the mayor to resign, after he blamed a victim’s ‘vulgar’ behaviour for her death. Finally, why is Kanye West trending on social media? We have a round up for you.

(Photo: Cannabis plant. Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire)

Faces Of Prostitution2015040420150405 (WS)

Australian sex workers fight stigma, and proud to be rich in Mexico

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Australian sex workers are taking selfies and putting them up on Twitter to challenge the stereotype that all prostitutes are victims. Last week an article was published in a popular online Australian women’s magazine to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the prostitute-meets-prince-charming film Pretty Woman. Sex worker Tilly Lawless decided to post a picture of herself on her Instagram under the hashtag #facesofprostitution to object to the article, which she claimed generalised sex workers and depicted all prostitution as harmful. And, then began a mass movement of sex workers posting images showing their faces to the world.

We speak to Tilly Lawless and Laila Mickelwait, the author of the original blog that so many Australian sex workers objected to on social media.

In Mexico, a high school video showing privileged students boasting about their lifestyles has provoked anger on social media. This is the latest manifestation of the 'Mirrey' ('My King') phenomenon – which started with a tumblr page showing young men photographed with shirts open and in nonchalant poses, the sons of the rich and powerful. But what do the real 'Mirreyes' make of the criticism? Mukul Devichand meets a real life Mirrey to find out.

Facing The Taliban: Videos Call Out Religious Extremism In Pakistan2015011020150111 (WS)

Showing \u2018face\u2019 from China to Pakistan in the video challenges trending this week

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Facing the Taliban

Facebook is all about showing your face. But would you show your face online to call out clerics who defend militants? In Pakistan, weeks after the school attack in Peshawar, this is what’s happening in a sombre version of the ice bucket challenge.

The challenge targets Maulana Abdul Aziz, a cleric who leads prayers at the Red Mosque in Islamabad, which is known for its radicalism and Taliban links. While he played no role in the school attacks his refusal to condemn them angered ordinary Pakistanis.

The campaign #ArrestAbdulAziz is led by the activist Jibran Nasir and asks people to post videos online calling for the arrest of the cleric and nominating their friends to follow suit. We talk to him as well as others who took part.

The Baijiu Challenge

Thousands of videos have sprung up across China showing people sipping, drinking and downing the traditional Chinese spirit Baijiu. The trend really got going when a man known as Three Litre Brother drank, you guessed it, three litres in under ten minutes. With some people consuming dangerous amounts state media and the police have stepped in with their own warnings. We find out how the Confucian theory of ‘face’ is driving competitive social drinking in China.

(Photo: One of Jibran Nasir’s videos calling out religious extremism. Credit: Jibran Nasir)

Factually Challenged2016110520161106 (WS)

The people deliberately inventing fake news stories

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We investigate the rise and rise of fake news online. Deliberately making up news stories to fool or entertain people is nothing new. But the arrival of social media has meant real and fictional stories are now presented in such a similar way, it can be increasingly difficult to tell the two apart. With 60% of US adults now getting some news from their Facebook feed, more and more of us are seeing and believing incorrect information.

We meet some of the people deliberately inventing false news stories and try to find out, why they are doing it, how it spreads, and whether it really matters if we are taken in by their hoaxes.

(Photo: Stack of Newspapers. Credit: iStock)

Fake Celebrity Accounts2017042120170422 (WS)
20170423 (WS)

What is behind the disturbing rise of fake celebrity accounts targeting minors?

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We examine the disturbing rise of fake celebrity social media accounts targeting minors. This comes in the wake of a case currently going through the courts in Australia, where a man who allegedly impersonated Justin Bieber online has more than 900 charges of child sex offences against him. We look in to what is behind the rise in these fake accounts, as well as talk to parents of children who have been targeted, and law enforcement professionals who have expressed concern.

Also, we went to Finland to find out more about Hollywood star Shia LaBeouf’s politically charged performance art.

Producer: Kayleen Devlin
Presenter: Mike Wendling

(Photo: Musician Justin Bieber attends the Saint Laurent show. Credit: Kevork Djansezian /Getty Images)

Fake Football News2017070720170708 (WS)
20170709 (WS)

How fake football news impacts clubs, players, and fans.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Britain First, a far-right British political party known for their extreme anti-immigration policies, has been posting and promoting videos designed to appeal to the UK’s largest immigrant community – Polish people. We investigate the possible impact of these videos, and – crucially – why they are reaching out to Britain’s Polish population.

And, when fake news is sometimes good news. Rumours in football and the fake news generated by these rumours are nothing new, but we’ll be looking at the way these stories impact clubs, players and fans.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: Wayne Rooney poses on the red carpet / Credit: Anthony Devlin/AFP/Getty Images

Fake Victim Images2017062320170624 (WS)
20170625 (WS)

Why would people circulate fake victim images minutes after a tragedy?

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We investigate some of the fake victim images which appear online in the wake of a deadly attacks and disasters. Who are the victims and perpetrators, and why are these images circulated?

Also on the programme, we take a look at the online groups of mostly men who swear off not only sex, but masturbation too. They operate under the banner ‘NoFap’, and discuss sexual health issues largely without the guidance of official medical advice.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producers: Kayleen Devlin and Anisa Subedar

(Image: A fake tweet, Credit: Tamara de Anda/Twitter)

False 'flesh Eating' Prophecy Goes Viral2014030120140302 (WS)

\u201cFlesh eating\u201d prophecy causes false panic on social media in the Philippines

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How panic spread on social media in the Philippines when a media report misleadingly uncovered a ‘flesh-eating skin disease’ and then linked it to an apocalyptic prophecy made by an Indian holy man.

More than 20,000 people have followed a Twitter account set up by Oscar Pistorius's PR team - just days before the start of his murder trial. But what will the implications be for the course of justice itself? Could this be the first trial by social media?

And acclaimed novelist Philip Pullman, author of His Dark Materials, joins twitter to tell the story of Jeffrey – a fly. He tells us why he can’t kill this character off.

And what’s the appeal of #TwitchPlaysPokemon – the game that everyone plays and no-one controls?

Presented by Mukul Devichand. Join the conversation on Twitter @BBCTrending

Fashion Brands And The Hijab2017042820170429 (WS)
20170430 (WS)

The backlash against fashion brands that use hijab to sell their products.

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It’s one of the most controversial pieces of clothing but why are some global companies and fashion brands now using the Muslim headscarf to promote their products and what impact is that having on female Muslims?
We speak to women from a Muslim background, and listen in to viral discussions that reveal frustrations with the hijab being used in this way.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Image: A model walks the runway during New York fashion week / Credit: Neilson Barnard / Getty Images

Fighting Sexual Harassment In Iran2016021320160214 (WS)

Iranian women are sharing their experiences of sexual harassment on social media.

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Allegations of sexual harassment at an Iranian TV station are emboldening Iranian women to break their silence and share their experiences. Sheena Shirani, a news reader at Press TV says she endured two years of harassment from her managers. We discuss how much of a problem sexual harassment is in a country where it’s traditionally not acknowledged.

What would you do if you saw a cruel meme mocking your son? Alice Ann Meyer decided to act when this happened to her child. Jameson is four years old and has Pfeiffer Syndrome which can affect cranial and facial features. A meme was created using his picture, comparing him to a ‘pug’. Aliceann speaks to BBC Trending about how she successfully removed the meme with an army of fellow parents.

And Beyonce’s performance invoking the black rights struggle at the Superbowl in the US has sparked a debate. We’ll give you a roundup of what people have been saying.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Sam Judah.

Image: Sheena Shirani
Image credit: Sheena Shirani / Facebook

Floods Of Fake News2017090120170902 (WS)
20170903 (WS)

Hurricane Harvey gave rise to a flurry of fake news. We unpick the online myths

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Hurricane Harvey brought devastating floods to large areas of Texas; and in its wake came a flurry of fake news, much of which which went viral - including a widely shared picture of a shark on a highway and reports of mass looting. BBC Trending’s Mike Wendling sorts the fact from the fiction.

Also - spoiler alert - we hear from the Reddit group that believes giving the game away is all part of the fun of watching the global TV hit Game of Thrones.

And Abdirahim Saeed reports on growing concern in the Gulf States where an illegal market for employing domestic servants is using social media to circumvent the law.

Presented by Megha Mohan
Produced by Anisa Subedar

(image:Vehicles left stranded on a flooded highway in Houston,Texas. Photo credit: Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images)

Gab: Free Speech Haven Or \u2018alt-right Safe Space\u2019?2016121020161211 (WS)

A new social network that pledges to put \u2018free speech first\u2019 has drawn controversy online

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Gab is a new social network that pits itself as an alternative to Twitter because it puts ‘free speech’ first. Some claim it has become a ‘safe space for the alt-right’ because of some of the users it has attracted. We ask the network’s founder why he felt compelled to create it, and speak with one of its users.

And – in China, a care home for elderly people is apparently offering to pay the children of its residents to come and visit their parents. We investigate what lies behind the controversial strategy.

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Will Yates.

Image caption: Gab sign in page / Image credit: Gab

Gaza Hashtags2014071920140720 (WS)

How global sympathies in the Israel-Palestine conflict are expressed on Twitter

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This week the Trending team finds out why deaf people in the UK are throwing buckets of water over themselves and posting the videos online. We also look at the popularity of the hashtag #PrayForGaza and the way the conflict in Israel and Gaza has been discussed globally Finally, in America, the uploaded audio of a call between Ryan Block who wanted to cancel his Comcast internet service and an employee desperate for him not to leave has become a big internet hit – with almost 4 million plays in two days.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined by Mai Noman from BBC Arabic, Laura Gray from BBC Trending and Anthony Zurcher from the BBC Trending team in Washington.

Georgia\u2019s Sex-tape Mystery2016032620160327 (WS)

A string of videos featuring politicians was posted online, angering many in the country.

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A string of sex-tapes featuring Georgian politicians has been posted online, and more are expected soon. But it isn’t clear who’s responsible, or what the people posting them want to achieve.

We also hear from Chinese women who explain why they took the ‘A4 Challenge’, and posted pictures of themselves online showing that their waists are thinner than a piece of A4 paper. The trend has been widely criticised, but some participants say the critics are missing the point.

Produced by Sam Judah and Emma Wilson.

Photo caption: Women in Georgia protesting the publication of sex tapes featuring female politicians
Photo credit: Vano Shlamov / AFP / Getty Images

Harambe: The Meme That Won\u2019t Go Away2016123120170101 (WS)

How did a gorilla shot in a zoo in the US gain such relevance to the online world?

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One of the most successful and long lasting memes of the year was Harambe the gorilla who was shot in a zoo in America. How did this particular animal gain such cultural relevance to the online world? And, meet Joshua Coombes the internet star who volunteers to cut the hair of the homeless on the streets of London.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

(Photo: Tributes to Harambe. Credit: John Sommers II/Getty Images)

Hashtag For \u2018ex-muslims\u20192015112820151129 (WS)

Thousands explained why they left Islam online, but some found the discussion \u2018hateful\u2019

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Thousands explained why they left Islam online, using the hashtag #ExMuslimBecause, but some thought the discussion was badly timed, and labelled it ‘hateful’. We meet the woman behind the campaign, and ask if she intended to create such a pointed conversation.

And, we hear about the outcry on Russian social media, calling on citizens not to holiday in Turkey following the shooting down of a Russian plane. But what lay behind the conversation? Was it started by ordinary Russian citizens, or led by pro-Kremlin accounts?

(Photo: Beads by window. Credit: Shutterstock)

Hashtag Of The Year - #thedress2015122620151227 (WS)

Was discussing the colour of a dress a huge waste of time? Scientists think not.

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Anne-Marie Tomchak talks us through some of her favourite viral songs of the year.

And we revisit one of this year’s biggest talking point - #thedress. People around the world debated which colour it was - dark blue and black or white and gold.

For some, the debate suggested an existential crisis over the nature of sight and reality, which could go as far as harming interpersonal relationships. Others expressed their dismay at the triviality of the whole dispute.

Was discussing the dress a huge waste of time, or did we learn something in the process?

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image: Model in dress. Image credit: Roman Originals

Hillary Clinton\u2019s \u2018body Double\u20192016091720160918 (WS)

Meet Hillary Clinton\u2019s lookalike \u2013 the woman at the heart of a fake conspiracy

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Last week when Hillary Clinton almost collapsed at a 9/11 memorial, conspiracy theorists went into overdrive, falsely claiming the presidential candidate was using a body double to avoid questions about her health. We met the lookalike at the heart of the story.

And - news that a gorilla in a Chinese zoo had been named Harambe McHarambeface following a public poll went viral on Reddit. The story sounded too good to be true, so BBC Trending did some digging to find out what had really happened.

Finally – one student’s Facebook rant seems to have triggered widespread violence in Bangalore. But what’s behind the meme warfare – and real world fighting – in the Indian city?

(Photo: Teresa Barnwell dressed as Hillary Clinton. Credit: Teresa Barnwell)

How Anonymous Do You Think You Are?2016041620160417 (WS)

Russian photographer proves how easy it is to track down total strangers on social media.

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A Russian photographer has carried out an experiment to show how easy it is to identify complete strangers.
Egor Tsvetkov took photos of people in public places and then tracked them down on the Russian social media site VKontakte using a facial recognition app.
The experiment 'Your Face Is Big Data' was published online and has been viewed more than 70,000 times.

Also in the programme, police officers in New South Wales are being investigated over alleged trolling of an Australian politician.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Kate Lamble.
Photo credit: Egor Tsvetkov / VKontakte

How Did A Stolen Mobile Phone Trigger Racial Violence In Malaysia?2015071820150719 (WS)

The alleged theft of a phone led to what some are calling a \u2018riot\u2019 in Kuala Lumpur

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When two men from the ethnic Malay majority were arrested for allegedly stealing a mobile phone, it triggered what some are calling a ‘riot’ in Kuala Lumpur, fuelled by a furore on social media. Two journalists from the ethnic Chinese minority were beaten up, and a passing car with ethnically Chinese passengers was mobbed and smashed up. The primem minister took to Facebook in an attempt to calm the situation down.

We also hear how a semicolon is being used as a symbol of support for those dealing with mental health issues, and look into the role of amateur mental health advice blogs. Are sites run by untrained volunteers posing a risk to the safety of those seeking help? Joining us from Manchester is Ged Flynn, from suicide prevention charity Papyrus.

(Photo: Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak. Credit: Getty Images)

How Effective Is \u2018child-shaming\u2019 Online?2015060620150607 (WS)

Meet the dad telling parents to stop \u2018shaming\u2019 their children on social media

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Why do parents ‘shame’ their children online? In the wake of a string of viral ‘shaming’ videos, we meet the dad who has made a film of his own, telling parents to put a stop to the practise. It has been watched more than 20 million times on Facebook.

When Aisha Buhari – Nigeria’s new first lady – wore what appeared to be an expensive watch to her husband’s inauguration ceremony, social media users were not impressed. But what is the significance of the ‘bling’, and what does it tell us about the nation’s mood.

And, find out about the Moroccan film about prostitution that has been banned from cinemas by the government but been viewed by millions online.

Joining us in the studio is BBC Focus on Africa presenter Peter Okwoche.

(Photo: Embarrassed child. Credit: Thinkstock)

How Far Will India's Dog Lovers Go To Save Strays?2015080820150809 (WS)

How stray dogs are leading to a boycott Kerala campaign.

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Vikas Panday from BBC Monitoring tells the trending team how a threat to cull stray dogs has led activists to call for a boycott of the state of Kerala in India. Whether the Keralan government has the right to order the killing of stray dogs is currently a matter of legal dispute, and India's supreme court is expected to make a decision on the matter later this year. We speak to activists in Kerala as we ask if the boycott will damage the state’s vital tourism industry? And a year on from Ferguson we talk to Ayesha Siddiqi, the editor in chief of the New Enquiry magazine, and Ferguson resident Jamell Spann about the role social media has played in the reporting of the death of Michael Brown and the #blacklivesmatter movement.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

How Free Is The Russian Web?2017111020171112 (WS)
20171113 (WS)

Government regulation is increasing ahead of the 2018 presidential election

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For years the Russian internet provided an open platform for news and discussion. Social media was an engine for vastly different content than could be seen in the news presented on the largely state-run television channels.

But over the last few years government regulation has been building up, and the authorities have started to curtail the kind of content that can be posted and seen online.

Who are the young people who are getting caught up in the government crackdown? And just how free is the Russian web?

Producer: Kate Lamble

(Photo: Moscow, Credit: Getty Images)

How Fresh Is Neymar\u2019s Banana?2014050320140504 (WS)

Reclaiming the banana, shoplifting on social media, and Kenya\u2019s twar with South Africa

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

If you committed a crime, would you share it with the world? #BBCTrending investigates Tumblr’s ‘Bling Ring’; a community that gets its kicks from shoplifting. Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined by BBC Trending’s Hannah Moore.

The anti-racism #weareallmonkeys has been tweeted almost 400,000 times in response to footballer Dani Alves eating a banana thrown onto the pitch. But is the campaign all it seems? BBC Brasil’s Bruno Garcez drops in to tell us more.

Plus, Kenya takes on South Africa in a Twitter battle with #someonetellsouthafrica. Mukul gets a ringside interview with comedian and social media hit Erick Omondi to find out why Kenya’s up in arms on social media.

How Iranians Have Morphed The Ice Bucket Challenge2014090620140907 (WS)

Iranians are adapting in order to take part in the Ice Bucket Challenge

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A little town called Pascagoula in Mississippi is the centre of the latest emotional appeal for funds that seemed to be in everyone’s Facebook news feed. And it was very moving - a little girl, AvaLynn age five, quite seriously bruised. Her mother posted photos on a Facebook page called JusticeforAvaLynn, saying her daughter was 'kicked repeatedly in the face until she fell off the slide.' Almost 100,00 likes on Facebook, 200,000 tweets and crucially a fundraising effort by AvaLynn’s mother who asked for $10,000 to help her daughter. But how credible are these sorts of appeals and should they have better checks and balances?

Iranians are taking the ice bucket challenge. But they have to do it with a difference, as they battle with international sanctions stopping donations, a drought and a suspicious regime.

Plus more trends from across the world in just 60 seconds.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Leyla Khodabakhshi, multi media editor from the BBC Persian Service, and April Havens, a journalist based in Southern Mississippi.

The programme is produced by Anna Meisel

How Jokes Can Get You Blocked In Germany2018041320180414 (WS)
20180415 (WS)
20180416 (WS)

Comedians in Germany have been caught up in the country\u2019s strict online hate speech laws.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

At the start of this year, Germany introduced one of the strictest laws on online hate speech in Europe. Social media companies are required to take down illegal hate speech under the threat of massive fines.
But there have been some strange consequences as a result of the new law, and many are worried about its impact on free speech.
Some comedians are now complaining that their material is becoming a casualty in an increasing “culture of deletion”.
This week we’re in Germany speaking to a young stand-up comedian, a cartoonist and the head of a satirical magazine, Titanic. They tell the story of how their deleted jokes made headlines across the country and sparked a debate on whether the new law is undermining freedom of expression.

Reporter: Jan Bruck
Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

Photo Caption: German comedian Sophie Passmann was one of the first people to be caught up in the country’s new hate speech law when one of her jokes on Twitter was deleted
Photo Credit: BBC

At the start of this year, Germany introduced one of the strictest laws on online hate speech in Europe. Social media companies are required to take down illegal hate speech under the threat of massive fines.
But there have been some strange consequences as a result of the new law, and many are worried about its impact on free speech.
Some comedians are now complaining that their material is becoming a casualty in an increasing “culture of deletion?
This week we’re in Germany speaking to a young stand-up comedian, a cartoonist and the head of a satirical magazine, Titanic. They tell the story of how their deleted jokes made headlines across the country and sparked a debate on whether the new law is undermining freedom of expression.

Reporter: Jan Bruck
Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

Photo Caption: German comedian Sophie Passmann was one of the first people to be caught up in the country’s new hate speech law when one of her jokes on Twitter was deleted
Photo Credit: BBC

Comedians in Germany have been caught up in the county\u2019s strict online hate speech laws.

How The \u2018great Meme War\u2019 Moved To France2017040720170408 (WS)
20170409 (WS)

How a small group of French internet users plan to influence the elections.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A group of anonymous keyboard warriors who claim they helped Donald Trump win his presidency have moved their fight to Europe and are trying to help elect a right wing leader for France.

Conversations in secret online messaging forums reveal a systematic effort to sway opinion in favour of a right-wing leader in this year’s forthcoming elections.

But is it working and are politicians paying attention?

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Cartoon Pepe le Pen / Credit: Twitter

How To Spot A Bot2017120820171210 (WS)
20171211 (WS)

Two students have built a programme to identify online bots. How does it work?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

How do you detect a Twitter bot? Ash Bhat and Rohan Padte are students in the United States. They’ve invented an online tool aimed at stopping the spread of political propaganda on Twitter.

Also, how a goal celebration by the footballer Paul Pogba helped spread a massive online protest against slave auctions in Libya.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates
Reporters: Elizabeth Cassin and Ritu Prasad

Caption: How do you identify an online bot? Two students think they have an answer / Credit: BBC

India\u2019s \u2018anti-vaccine Mafia\u20192016071620160717 (WS)

Alternative medicine practitioners are reportedly urging Keralans not to get vaccinated.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A Facebook post lamenting the death of teenage boy in India – from diphtheria – has shone a light on an anti-vaccination movement that appears to be gaining ground. There are claims that some alternative medicine practitioners are encouraging families in the state of Kerala not to get vaccinated against diseases.

And, when a court in the Hague ruled against China over a dispute in the South China Sea, a music video went viral on Weibo. The video showed young Chinese people declaring that they ‘don’t care’ about the ruling. It appears to have been created by a branch of the Chinese government as a form of propaganda – just the latest example of what some are calling ‘digital diplomacy’.

(Photo: Doctor using syringe. Credit: Shutterstock)

India\u2019s Midnight Selfies2017081120170812 (WS)
20170813 (WS)

A viral hashtag in India reveals a new fight in the war over women\u2019s rights.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A visual protest accompanied by a viral hashtag has sparked a new twist in the fight for women's rights in India. It began with one woman driving in her car late at night, and has resulted in the country’s ruling party facing embarrassment and possible damage to their reputation.

Also on the programme, we investigate the curious case of a pro-Trump twitter account which was elevated by the US President over the weekend. The account was quickly exposed as a fake, but it’s not as fake as people initially suspected.

Presenter: India Rakusen
Producers: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: Selfie of Varnika Kundu / Credit: Varnika Kundu

Influencing Ireland\u2019s Abortion Vote2018051820180520 (WS)
20180521 (WS)

Are foreign advertisers interfering with the abortion vote in Ireland?

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On 25 May Ireland will vote on whether to loosen restrictions on abortion. It would be a major change in a country that has some of the strictest abortion laws in the Western world. But along with the referendum to change the country’s constitution has come worries about outside interference with the process. Foreign groups have paid for social media advertisements, and in response both Facebook and Google have taken steps to limit such ads – in Google’s case, they’ve banned referendum-related advertising altogether. We hear from both sides of the abortion debate and talk to one group that’s trying to make political advertising more transparent.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Image: Pro-choice protesters march in Ireland in support of a “yes” vote in the upcoming referendum.
Credit: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

Inside The Dark World Of \u2018incels\u20192018051120180512 (WS)
20180513 (WS)
20180514 (WS)

Who are the men identifying as \u201cincel\u201d, or \u201cinvoluntarily celibate\u201d?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Last month, ten people were killed in Toronto after a man drove a van into pedestrians. In a Facebook status before the attack, the suspect referred to an "Incel Rebellion”.
It prompted huge attention for a previously little-known internet subculture. "Incel" is short for "involuntarily celibate" and refers to groups of men who feel that they can't enter into sexual relationships. They frequently vent anger against sexually successful men ("Chads") and attractive women ("Stacys"). Incel forums include rants aimed at feminism and women, and some encourage violence.
This week, BBC Trending takes an closer look at this dark online subculture. We speak to incels, ex-incels, and a woman who posed as a man online to keep an eye on them. And there’s a surprising twist, as we find out what one incel did shortly after our interview.

Produced and Presented by Jonathan Griffin and Elizabeth Cassin
Studio Manager: Tom Brignell

Photo Caption: Alek Minassian, the 25-year-old suspect in the Toronto van attack
Photo Credit: LinkedIn

Iran\u2019s Sombre Soccer Victory2016101520161016 (WS)

How a ban on cheering led to a new way to support the Iranian football team.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When an important football match for Iran’s national team fell on a day of public mourning, the country’s religious leaders imposed strict rules on how fans could show their support. Cheering was banned, and only religious chanting would be tolerated. In response, Iranian social media users found an innovative way to support their team.

And - we investigate how US prison inmates are arranging a nationwide prison strike in history from their cells, using banned social media.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image caption: Fist against grey background / Image credit: Shutterstock

Iraqi Insurgents\u2019 Twitter App2014062120140622 (WS)

How Iraqi insurgents use social media to amplify their message and gain global support

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week the Trending team finds out how ISIS, the Iraqi insurgents who recently took over vast territories in Iraq, have been using hashtags, apps and more social media tricks to amplify their message and gain global support. Despite internet blocks by the government we connect with an Iraqi blogger in Baghdad, and we speak to an American expert in the use of social media by militant groups.

And in China dissident artist Ai Weiwei has kick started a picture trend on Instagram that’s seen hundreds of people holding their legs up like guns. But there’s more to this than just playful images. We find out what the #LegGun trend is really about.
Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the Trending studio by BBC Monitoring’s Amira Fathallah and from Singapore by Heather Chen from BBC News Asia.

Irish Water Protests And Egyptian Spiderman2014121320141214 (WS)

Spiderman in Cairo, Irish water protests, and the natural hair video

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What happens when a superhero finds himself in Cairo? A 20-year-old photographer filmed his friend dressed as Spiderman, performing everyday tasks around the Egyptian capital, one of the busiest in the World. In Cairo, says the photographer, Spiderman has met his match because life is so impossible that not even a superhero could function.

We follow the debate on Irish social media that has been growing for months. The Irish Government is changing the way people pay for their water and just this week 100,000 people took to the streets of Dublin to protest. Currently most people do not get water bills – it is paid for through taxes. But now the government has set up Irish Water, a semi-state body, which is installing water meters and will start sending bills from 1 January 2015. Online there are numerous videos, tweets and memes calling for the proposed water charges to be dropped. But this is not just about water. After the banking crash of 2008, the Irish economy struggled and the country underwent a series of austerity measures. The new water charges seem to be the final straw. We hear how people have been protesting online, and whether the government is taking any notice.

And we speak to the man who makes comedy films about relationships – from a male perspective. His spoof about an African-American woman who cuts her hair off and goes ‘natural’ has had millions of hits on Facebook, and received mixed comments. We ask him why he made it and whether he thinks it is sexist.

(Photo:Protesters march to the center of Dublin city in anger of the government introducing a second charge for household water. Credit:Simon McLoughlin/Shutterstock)

Is The French National Anthem 'racist'?2014051720140518 (WS)

How one politician's refusal to sing La Marseillaise went viral on social media.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Is the French national anthem racist? The hashtag #LaMarseillaise has been trending this week after a debate stoked by a controversial minister's refusal to sing the song. Christiane Taubira objected to what she called 'karaoke on a public platform' - a rival politician tells Mukul Devichand why he criticised her on Twitter.

Also in the programme the ongoing debate over Native American mascots in US sport and how a student t-shirt caused a social media backlash.

The team also looks into the Facebook page encouraging women in Iran to remove their headscarves... and why are some Russian men shaving their beards?

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Estelle Doyle, Mike Wendling and the cacophonous BBC Trending choir.

Jollof Rice Wars2017082520170826 (WS)
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Which African country makes the best jollof rice?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week BBC Trending shines a spotlight on the social media scene in war-torn Yemen. We focus on the recent detention of one prominent political analyst, and ask what his case and others like it, reveal about of freedom of speech in the country.

And, the question of which African country makes the best jollof rice is one that has been causing heated debate online. Following this week’s celebration of World Jollof Rice Day we speak to people with strong opinions about their favourite recipes.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: A dish of jollof rice / Credit: Shutterstock

Kenya\u2019s #bleached Beauty2014061420140615 (WS)

Why 'Kenya's Kim Kardashian' prompted a worldwide debate on skin bleaching

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We hear why sandwiches have become dangerous in Thailand and are becoming a key feature of the anti-coup movement. Several online activists and personalities have also been summoned by the army for a 'conversation'. One of those summoned is Verapat Pariyawong, a former adviser to the ousted deputy prime minister, currently in London. He tells us why he does not feel Thai people are now free to express themselves anymore.

Also, skin lightening is under the spotlight in Kenya after a well-known socialite, Vera Sidika, revealed she has spent tens of thousands of dollars on the treatment - prompting the hashtag #BleachedBeauty. We talk to Vera Sidika, sometimes dubbed 'Kenya’s Kim Kardashian', as – like Kardashian - she is famed for posting pictures of her voluptuous bottom. But this time, it is her newly lightened skin she is happy to flaunt. And as she tell us, she remains unapologetic.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the Trending studio by BBC Bangkok correspondent Jonathan Head and BBC Nairobi’s Ruth Nesoba.

Kenya\u2019s Minibus \u2018menace\u20192016102920161030 (WS)

Reports of harassment on Kenyan minibuses trigger a \u2018Stop Matatu Menace\u2019 campaign.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In Nairobi one woman's online post about harassment on the city's private-hire minibuses or Matatus, has triggered dozens of similar accounts and complaints on social media of robbery, harassment and dangerous driving. We hear from the woman behind the #StopMatatuMenace hashtag campaign who thinks she has a solution to the problem.

Also, the story of Emmet Till – an African American teenager whose murder in 1955 in a racial attack galvanized the American civil rights movement - is back in the news. A recent picture showing his memorial sign in Mississippi riddled with bullet holes has gone viral on Facebook and sparked a fundraising campaign to replace the sign.

Produced by Shoku Amirani and Sam Judah.

Image caption: Matutu minibus / Image credit: Tony Karumba / Stringer / Getty Images

Killing Spree In Brazil, And \u2018we Are Not Madrasi\u20192014110820141109 (WS)

How to impose a curfew before committing murder; and the north-south divide in India

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Brazil

Earlier this week a police officer was shot dead in the Brazilian city of Belem. Within a few hours, messages supposedly from other police officers were being shared on Facebook and Twitter warning people to stay inside in certain neighbourhoods. There were posts on Facebook and Twitter. There was also an audio message being shared on Whatsapp saying that ‘police officers’ would ‘clean’ the area. Later that night, nine people were murdered. We look at the use of chatapps to spread messages to closed networks.

India

There are many countries around the world which will be familiar with a north south divide – where people in the north of country form stereotypes of the south, and vice versa. Well a group of comedians from the southern five states of India have struck a chord with their latest YouTube video, trying to knock down the stereotypes of the region. We speak to the creators about why they decided to write a song about

Denmark

Chili Klaus, a famous comedian in Denmark, has been making videos of himself eating chilies. For his latest video, he wanted to raise the profile of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra, which is facing closure. He challenged them to performing a piece, after eating a chili. We thought someone on the Trending team should take that challenge. Listen to the programme to find out how India Rakusen fares.

(Image: A police officer inspects the crime scene in a surburb of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Photo credit: YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Liberal Fake News2017041420170415 (WS)
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Has there been a rise in anti-Donald Trump fake news since he became President?

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Has there been a rise in anti-Donald Trump fake news since he became President of the United States? We’re familiar with accusations that right-wing fake news is being shared online, but what about fake news from the left? We find out more about this phenomenon, as well as look into who is sharing these stories, and why they are emerging now.

Produced by Will Yates

(Photo: Credit: Nora Carol Photography)

Life As A YouTube Child Star2018080320180806 (WS)
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JD and Arabella Daho have huge followings online \u2013 but how has that affected their lives?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s it like to be a young YouTube star? Siblings Jaadin and Arabella Daho's lives have significantly changed since they went viral on YouTube in 2015. At just 10 and 11 years old their videos racked up 17 million views.
They have since launched a YouTube career and are the main source of income for their family – their mum is their manager.
But along with the money and fame has come abuse, both online and off. How has YouTube stardom affected these teenagers and their family?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Gem O’Reilly
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: Jaadin and Arabella Daho shooting one of their YouTube videos.
Photo Credit: BBC

JD and Arabella Daho have huge followings online \u2013 but how has that affected their lives?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s it like to be a young YouTube star? Siblings Jaadin and Arabella Daho's lives have significantly changed since they went viral on YouTube in 2015. At just 10 and 11 years old their videos racked up 17 million views.
They have since launched a YouTube career and are the main source of income for their family – their mum is their manager.
But along with the money and fame has come abuse, both online and off. How has YouTube stardom affected these teenagers and their family?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Gem O’Reilly
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: Jaadin and Arabella Daho shooting one of their YouTube videos.
Photo Credit: BBC

JD and Arabella Daho have huge followings online \u2013 but how has that affected their lives?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s it like to be a young YouTube star? Siblings Jaadin and Arabella Daho's lives have significantly changed since they went viral on YouTube in 2015. At just 10 and 11 years old their videos racked up 17 million views.
They have since launched a YouTube career and are the main source of income for their family – their mum is their manager.
But along with the money and fame has come abuse, both online and off. How has YouTube stardom affected these teenagers and their family?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Gem O’Reilly
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: Jaadin and Arabella Daho shooting one of their YouTube videos.
Photo Credit: BBC

JD and Arabella Daho have huge followings online \u2013 but how has that affected their lives?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What’s it like to be a young YouTube star? Siblings Jaadin and Arabella Daho's lives have significantly changed since they went viral on YouTube in 2015. At just 10 and 11 years old their videos racked up 17 million views.
They have since launched a YouTube career and are the main source of income for their family – their mum is their manager.
But along with the money and fame has come abuse, both online and off. How has YouTube stardom affected these teenagers and their family?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Gem O’Reilly
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Caption: Jaadin and Arabella Daho shooting one of their YouTube videos.
Photo Credit: BBC

Live From Bangalore For The Indian Elections20140411

How is social media impacting on India\u2019s biggest ever election?

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Mukul Devichand is joined by BBC Hindi’s Neha Bhatnagar and Parul Agrwawal as well as a live audience in the National Law School in Bangalore. They’ll be discussing how online activity is shaping and impacting on India’s general elections, the biggest voting event in the world.

Mukul finds out how a slap from a rickshaw driver went viral, how much weight a party’s hashtag really has among voters and what a country like India could learn from the social media strategies of the Barack Obama campaigns.

We hear from tech billionaire Nandan Nilekani - also known as India’s political Bill Gates, the head of social media for the AAP Party (or Common Man’s Party) in Delhi Ankit Lal, Comedian Gusimran Khamba and more.

Produced by Estelle Doyle

Look Up: Social Media Rant Goes Viral2014051020140511 (WS)

How the divisive video Look Up soared to over 30 million hits in two weeks

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This week the internet meme ‘Check Your Privilege’ is in the spotlight after Princeton freshman Tal Fortgang accused the expression of shutting down online debate. Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to president of the Conservative Student Association in Ottowa, Canada, Harrison Fleming and Mikki Kendal a ‘Hood Feminist’ blogger in Chicago.

YouTube video Look Up went viral this week, reaching over 30 million hits in two weeks. Anne-Marie Tomchak has been speaking with the writer and director Gary Turk about why he made the video, which encourages people to put social media aside, and how it has been criticised as anti-progressive.

And, how a gruesome murder near Sao Paulo in Brazil led to a dispute over Voodoo rumours on Facebook. Mukul is joined by Fernanda Nidecker of BBC Brasil.

Lord Dinkan: The Cartoon Mouse God2016040920160410 (WS)

The rise of India's new mouse worshipping religion and fake Facebook events.

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Dinkoism is a new Indian religion whose followers worship a cartoon mouse with superpowers. More than 40,000 people like the group’s worldwide Facebook pages and this month they’re even marching to try and become recognised as a religious minority. But Dinkoism was really set up by rationalists in the state of Kerala to parody organised religions and many people have found it offensive.

Would you want to attend a Summer Safari Waterpark? This week many people who signed up for a series of attractive events on Facebook were disappointed to find there were no concrete plans behind them. Now people are questioning whether they were invented just to collect people’s personal data.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Photo credit: jith,in

Love On The Train2014071220140713 (WS)

How a student started a trend calling for better disabled access to public transport

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An image painted by anonymous street artist "Black Hand" went viral after it appeared on Valiasr, the Main Street in Iran's capital, Tehran. It shows a woman in Iranian sport's kit holding high a bottle of washing liquid like a trophy. The image was snapped and shared quickly on Persian Facebook – but what does it tell us about women and sport in Iran? Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined by a former Iranian Women's Basketball player to discuss women in sport in Iran, and why they have been denied access to sporting arenas.

Mukul also speaks to an Italian student who has sparked a trend calling for better access to public transport for people with disabilities in Italy. Iacopo Melio, who lives in Florence, started a #VorreiPrendereilTreno, or "I Would Like to Take the Train" and wrote a powerful blog post in which he explained how the issue hampers his chances of finding true love. And one Italian politician actually took notice…
Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Trending’s Cordelia Hebblethwaite and BBC Persian’s Maryam Zohdi.

Malaysia\u2019s Naughty Boy, Baltimore Riots And Chinese Speaking English2015050220150503 (WS)

Who is Alvin Tan and why is he facing trial on sedition charges in Malaysia?

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Alvin Tan describes himself as a sex blogger, trouble maker and freedom of speech activist. He is currently facing trial for insulting the month of Ramadan and posting pornographic pictures on the internet. We find out how he became so big on social media, why he is claiming asylum in the US, and what conservative Malaysia thinks of their infamous naughty boy.

BBC Trending's Mike Wendling wraps up the social media reaction to the riots in Baltimore after the death in custody of black man, Freddie Gray. And Tse Yin Lee joins us from BBC Monitoring to discuss the vagaries of learning English when you are Chinese. Why did hundreds of thousands of Chinese take to social media after the chief executive of Chinese telecoms giant company Xiaomi addressed a conference in India, in English?

Photo: MALAYSIA-INTERNET-ISLAM-SEX-COURT-RELIGION (Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Manga Series Banned In China2015072520150726 (WS)

Popular Japanese manga series Death Note is banned in China

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In China, the hugely popular comic series, Death Note has been banned. It is a Japanese comic series that tells the story of Light Yagami - a teenager who discovers a notebook that allows you to kill anyone by simply writing their name down on the pages. Despite the ban, Japanese animation continues to flourish through informal channels.

We explore themes of nostalgia which was at the root of the 'growing up’ hashtags. It began with #growingupblack which then spawned a host of copycat trends which included growing up Mexican, growing up Bengali and growing up African. We ask a comedian and a comedy writer why they thought the hashtags struck a chord with millions of people. Joining us in the studio is comedy writer Yasmeen Khan.

(Photo: Man reading a comic book. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Manipulating The Internet2013122820131229 (WS)

The growing business of fake followers and trends

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Mukul Devichand interviews a man who supplies 'bots' - that is, software routines that artificially create trends or boost follower numbers using fake identities. It's a legal grey area - not a crime but a violation of Twitter and other networks terms of service.

But is there a moral dimension to acquiring 'fake followers'? We meet a man who bought thousands of them, lost them and now suffers from deep pangs of regret.

Also featuring David Cuen, BBC languages social media editor, in the studio.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

Meninism Versus Asian Feminism2013122120131222 (WS)

America\u2019s Asian Feminists and the Meninists come face to face

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Two hashtags about gender have been trending this week in the USA, #NotYourAsianSidekick and #MeninistTwitter. We bring together the first people to tweet both and find out what the conversations they started tell us about America.

And we talk to the Yemeni father who wants his daughter’s suitor to get one million Facebook likes to marry her.

Also featuring Mai Noman from BBC Arabic in the studio.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

Mexico\u2019s Fake News Problem2018052520180526 (WS)
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Who is spreading fake news in advance of elections in Mexico?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This year Mexico will hold both its presidential and congressional election at the same time. With such high stakes, political parties are being accused of systemically using bots and cyber trolls to spread online propaganda – even though they deny this. Researchers and activists have catalogued examples of bots and troll farms being used to promote specific candidates
Initiatives such as Verificado 2018 and the blog Lo Que Sigue (“What’s Next”) are popping up around the country to help combat the spread of fake news and online propaganda. But will such efforts have any impact?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Reha Kansara

(Photo: Automated accounts boosted the 2012 presidential campaign of Enrique Pena Nieto. Credit: Getty Images)

This year Mexico will hold both its presidential and congressional election at the same time. With such high stakes, political parties are being accused of systemically using bots and cyber trolls to spread online propaganda – even though they deny this. Researchers and activists have catalogued examples of bots and troll farms being used to promote specific candidates
Initiatives such as Verificado 2018 and the blog Lo Que Sigue (“What’s Next”) are popping up around the country to help combat the spread of fake news and online propaganda. But will such efforts have any impact?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Reporter: Marcos Martinez
Producer: Reha Kansara
Studio Managers: Graham Pudifoot and Mike Woolley

Picture Caption: Automated accounts boosted the 2012 presidential campaign of Enrique Pena Nieto
Picture Credit: Getty

Mexico\u2019s Narco War Goes Social20131208

Why Mexican drug cartels love social media

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A YouTube video posted by one of Mexico’s most dangerous drug lords is currently attracting thousands of views. Over the last few years, drug cartels have embraced social media to both promote their message and intimidate those against them. But what does their online popularity tell us about how Mexicans feel about their country?

Plus, a new app in Brazil that allows women to rate their ex-boyfriends.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

Mystery Donor\u2019s Largesse To French Gamers2015013120150201 (WS)

The mystery donor \u2018rewarding\u2019 French gamers, and named and shamed by Ecuador\u2019s President

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Should politicians have a thick skin when people abuse them online? Not the President of Ecuador - he's responded with hard-line tactics. People in the public eye often get "trolled" online - subjected to personal or rude attacks. During his latest weekly presidential TV address, Ecuador's President, Rafael Correa, seemed to have decided enough was enough. He used the speech to name and shame people who had written abusive comments about him on Twitter and Facebook. Trending hears from some those who were the target of his ire.

Amhai, the mystery "donor", has given hundreds of thousands of dollars streamers - gamers who broadcast their playing on live stream sites such as Twitch. This week "he" started giving money to French gamers. But who is Amhai and why were those French gamers advised to give their money back? Trending investigates.

(Image: Video game controls. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Nato\u2019s Claims Of Russian \u2018misinformation\u20192017021120170212 (WS)

Explaining the stories the world is sharing

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A Russian-funded online new agency has an office in Scotland. We look into allegations of ‘misinformation’. Is it another just another perspective on news or is an example of what some call ‘Russia’s state-run propaganda machine’?

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Will Yates.

Image caption: Online agency branding / Image credit: BBC

Neo-nazi, Feminist And Jihadi - All At Once2015091920150920 (WS)

How one man is accused of joining several extremist causes, using multiple alter egos

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Joshua Goldberg, a 20-year-old from Florida, stands accused of inciting others to behave violently - from a computer in his parent’s home, using a string of false identities. We hear from the victim of an online hate campaign that Goldberg appears to have played a key role in.

Also, we meet the woman who started the #IStandWithAhmed campaign to support Ahmed Mohamed, a young Muslim boy arrested in Texas on suspicion of creating a 'hoax bomb'. The device, of course, was a clock, and Ahmed has now won praise from around the world.

(Photo: A young man wearing a hooded top using three different computers. Credit: Shutterstock)

Next Level Cricket Rivalry2016031220160313 (WS)

Indian and Bangladeshi cricket fans wage online warfare.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Indian and Bangladeshi cricket fans have a long standing history of sporting jibes with one another but after a recent match, they took their rivalry online where it all became less than amiable. As a result, some government sites in Bangladesh were hacked and taken down.

‘Common Core’ is a set of national educational standards in the United States in Maths and English that starts at Kindergarten. A video explaining a simple maths problem using a common core method went viral and again raises the debate about whether Common Core maths methods in schools work.

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Sam Judah

Image credit: Munir Uz Zaman / AFP / Getty Images

Nigeria\u2019s Secret Transgender Groups2017031820170319 (WS)

Nigeria\u2019s transgender community speak to us about secret online groups

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

After comments by writer and author Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche divided opinion, we speak to members of some of Nigeria’s secret gay and transgender on groups who rely on each other on social media for support. They communicate with each other in private and closed ambiguously named WhatsApp and Facebook groups.
Joey Daley from Ohio has documented his mother Molly’s dementia. One film in which she failed to recognise him for the first time was viewed nearly 2 million times. Joey speaks to BBC Trending about how it feels to care for someone with dementia.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Image/Credit: Miss Sahhara)

Nigerians Discuss: Bird, Witch Or Victim?2014101820141019 (WS)

How Nigerians \u201csaw\u201d a bird fly into an electrical wire and turn into a woman.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Videos circulated this week in Nigeria and Ghana of a woman sprawled on the ground, covered in blood, her skin burnt and peeling. She was surrounded by a crowd taking pictures and videos of her, on a street in Oshodi, Lagos. But how did she get there in that state? On Twitter the rumours were that a bird hit an electrical wire and fell to ground as a woman - she apparently confessed to being a witch.

Online views are mixed - some accept she must have been a witch, others ask for evidence, some think it's funny, while there are those that say - there is no witchcraft, this woman was attacked.

In this week’s programme the presenter Mukul Devichand takes a closer look at the incident and online reaction. Could the police and crowd have done more to help the woman? Will social media change attitudes to such incidents in Nigeria?

Also this week, we speak to two Syrian sisters, currently leaving in Sweden, about their video “To Our Countries”. In it, they sing and quote poetry in Arabic and ask the people of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Palestine to unite in the midst of conflict in the region.

And #Kobane was trending this week. It was used over 1 million times on Twitter in response to the ongoing siege of the Syrian town of Kobane where Kurdish militia are fighting the Islamic State. We find out how Kurds unite and converse on social media when we speak to a pro-Kurdish activist Mark Campbell, the creator of #TwitterKurds, a hashtag that has never strayed far from the top trends over the last three years.

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Charlotte McDonald from the Trending Team and Mamdouh Akbiek from BBC Arabic.

The programme was produced by Anna Meisel

North Korea's Youtube Stars2018040620180407 (WS)
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YouTubers are uploading footage from one of the world\u2019s most secretive states.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Vloggers are setting up YouTube channels in one of the most closed countries in the world. North Korea has strict regulations about what types of information can be accessed by citizens inside the country. But the country does allow overseas photographers to set up YouTube channels about life in North Korea. Of course, operating a social media account in Pyongyang comes with trade-offs. On the programme this week, Singaporean YouTuber Aram Pan provides an insight into the secretive state.

Plus, why is the internet being cut off again and again in the disputed north Indian state of Kashmir? We speak to people on the ground to find out more.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporters: Natalia Zuo, Reha Kansara
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

Picture caption: Statues of late North Korean leaders Kim Il-Sung (L) and Kim Jong-Il (R) at Mansu hill in Pyongyang
Picture credit: Getty Images

Off Grid Conversations On Ebola In Sierra Leone2014101120141012 (WS)

How Sierra Leoneans are discussing Ebola on private chat apps.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa, first reported in March 2014, has rapidly become the deadliest occurrence of the diseases since its discovery in 1976. At the time of the broadcast it has claimed almost four thousands lives in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.

In this week’s programme we take a closer look at how the Ebola virus has been trending on social media, both in the countries affected and worldwide. The presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to one passionate Sierra Leonean from Virgina, USA about her unique way of helping people back home. And we gain unique access to private chat app groups where Sierra Leoneans are moving their online conversations to in the fear of being penalised by the authorities for speaking up.

Meanwhile, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has launched his Clean India campaign. Relying on the highly successful ice bucket challenge model, he nominated nine high profile people to take up the Swachh Bharat challenge. But have they taken it up?

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Ravin Sampat from the Trending Team and Andree Massiah, the BBC’s social media producer on Ebola.

The programme was produced by Anna Meisel

Online Rape Stories \u2013 Truth Or Fiction?2016011620160117 (WS)

Believing or blaming the victim - two rape stories test fiction and reality in SA

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On this week’s programme,

Two stories about rape in South Africa; one about a woman who posted about her experience on Instagram to find people didn’t believe her and another which gripped the nation but was totally made up.

And why are people so upset about a statue of the British colonialist Cecil Rhodes at Oxford University? We hear from the students who want it taken down.

Presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak @AMTomchak - with Nkem Ifejika @Nkemifejika and Emma Wilson @EmmaWilson1.

(Photo: Hands typing on a laptop computer. Credit: Shutterstock)

Parodies Of Islamic State2015030720150308 (WS)

Is it ok to laugh at Islamic State?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week a video of an Egyptian wedding went viral when the groom staged a mock Islamic State kidnapping. It was meant to surprise the guests and make people laugh at the terrorist group. Surprising, yes, but it is not the first video of this kind to trend. As the internet fills with more and more comic parodies of Islamic State’s propaganda videos, do they dilute the danger or are they a defence against fear? We speak to Neil Durkin from Amnesty International, and Egyptian tweeter Mona El-Ashry.

Baby Rappers in France
Another viral clip caused outrage this week, this time in France. Children pose as gangsta rappers in a video, which shows them waving guns, wads of cash, making drug references and sexist remarks. Pretty typical of a gangsta rap? Possibly, but the young age of those rapping - estimated to be between 8 and 13 years - has shocked many in France and generated an intense debate about the banlieue (the suburbs), where the children are from, and where the Charlie Hebdo attackers lived.

(Image: Facebook video of IS parody posted by Ahmed Shehata. Copyright: Ahmed Shehata)

Passengers Rise Up Against Pakistan\u2019s \u2018vip Culture\u20192014092020140921 (WS)

How social media turned on VIPs in Pakistan after politicians arrived late for a flight

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

It is not unusual in Pakistan for commercial flights to be delayed because VIP figures are not on time. But this week passengers had enough of it and rose up against two politicians who turned up late and held their flight up. A video of the heated incident has been trending globally, prompting a debate about ‘VIP culture’ in Pakistan. Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to passengers who were on board as well as one of the politicians who was mobbed.

And, BBC Trending plays the name game as we find out why drag queens in America and the UK are making a noise about Facebook’s name policy. Plus, the minute Scotland reacted to the results of the independence referendum.

Produced by India Rakusen

Playing It Safe2017031120170312 (WS)

- the death of a famous gamer shocks the online streaming community.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Twitch is a live video streaming platform used widely in the gaming community. The death of a well-known gamer has opened a huge debate about player safety.

And we look at poet Neil Hilborn who has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. His poem about the difficulties of dating went viral again for the second time.

Produced by Will Yates and Anisa Subedar

Image: Silhouette of gamer / Credit: Shutterstock

Political Public Shaming2017060920170610 (WS)
20170611 (WS)

The conflict in Venezuela has moved outside the country \u2013 both on and offline.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The conflict in Venezuela has now moved beyond the country’s borders – both on and offline. It involves Venezuelan exiles publicly shaming people living abroad who are connected to the government. BBC Trending hears from those who are targeted and targeting.

Also, offensive messages on social media have resulted in some students having their admissions revoked from one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producers: Anisa Subedar and Kayleen Devlin

Image: A masked Venezuelan opposition activist uses her mobile phone / Credit: Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP / Getty Images

Politicians And Their Deleted Tweets2015082920150830 (WS)

Websites flagging up MP\u2019s deleted tweets have been banned by Twitter.

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Websites flagging up MP’s deleted tweets have been banned by Twitter. But has the social network made the right decision? We’re joined by the founder of Politwoops who believes the ban has made the platform – and politicians – less transparent. UKIP MP Douglas Carswell blocked Politwoops because he found it “annoying” but he thinks Twitter has overreacted. And we meet Thomas van Linge, a 19-year-old Dutchman who’s been mapping the Syrian conflict - from his bedroom.

(Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

Prime Minister Of India For Half An Hour2014052420140525 (WS)

Meet the 19-yr-old who inadvertently grabbed the "Prime Minister of India" Twitter handle

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Qaiser Ali says he just wanted to get a better name for his twitter account. But by grabbing the official “Prime Minister of India” twitter handle, he inadvertently stepped in a huge social media spat between India’s soon to be Prime Minister and the new one. But how could the handle be available to start with? We find out how the digital handover between India’s new and past Prime Ministers didn’t quite go to plan.
Also in the programme, the new account in Brazil which names and shames people who post offensive comments online about their maids. We speak to the anonymous man behind the twitter account and find out why the abuse is so widespread.
And the security guard who not only became a trending topic overnight with #givegregtheholiday, but more importantly for him, actually got a holiday from it.
Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Bruno Garcez from BBC Brasil, Vikas Pandey of BBC Hindi and India Rakusen from the Trending team.
Produced by India Rakusen

Quilting Wars2017061620170617 (WS)
20170618 (WS)

How the fractious politics of America is tearing apart the US quilting community.

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Quilting – it’s an innocent-sounding traditional art, and one with a rich social and political history. And the art is not immune to America’s fractious political climate, as a conflict has erupted online amongst those within the quilting world. We hear about the secretive Facebook comments which have ripped apart those in the quilting community.

Also on the programme, in the wake of the surprising results from the UK general election we’ll dissect a new political phenomenon found on Facebook.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Kayleen Devlin

Image: Close up of Quilt / Credit: Eric Suszynski

Recycled Shoe Photo And Russian Zen2014122020141221 (WS)

An image shared in Pakistan, and coping with economic woes.

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Sharing images of the Peshawar attack

The support on social media was overwhelming in the aftermath of the Taliban attacks on Pakistani schoolchildren. People exchanged messages of support and widespread condemnation of the attackers. And they also shared images, some quite graphic. One of the images circulating on Twitter and Facebook was that of a tiny, blood-soaked child’s shoe, held on a man’s outstretched palm.

“This not any blood stained shoe of a child, it’s a blood stained shoe of Humanity… that died in Peshawar”, wrote one twitter user.

It was soon pointed out that the image of the child’s shoe was not from the school attacks in Pakistan; some speculated it was taken over the summer, during the last Gaza/Israel conflict. Others that it was from Gaza war in 2010. We tracked down the man who took the photo and find out where it really came from.

This year’s trends

Many of the top social platforms have been creating end of year lists of what have been the biggest trends on their sites. We discuss what was popular on Twitter and Facebook. We also speak to Kevin Allocca, who has been involved with making this year’s YouTube Rewind video – featuring some of the biggest videos of the year.

Russian zen and the rouble

The Russian economy is in the doldrums at the moment - falling oil prices, economic sanctions, the rouble has fallen dramatically in value on the foreign exchanges. It’s pretty bleak news.

Many Russians have been channelling their woes into making a number of videos laced with humour and stoicism.

We sample a few, including Zenrus, a site which displays a dashboard showing foreign exchange rates between roubles, dollars and Euros, and the price of oil in real time. While at the same time, the site plays soothing music.

Robot News And Fake Facts2017012820170129 (WS)

Robot News - who is behind thousands of automated videos popping up online?

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Tens of thousands of automated videos have appeared online recently. All feature photos of news events accompanied by a robotic voice. BBC Trending’s very own digital supersleuth Mike Wendling investigates who’s making them and why.

Also, 19 year old Nina Donovan’s poem Nasty Woman went viral this week after actress Ashley Judd read it out at the Women’s March in Washington. Her poem was rounded on by President Trump’s supporters. She talks to Megha Mohan about her new found fame.

And amongst all the talk of a post-truth society, fake news and alternative facts, Will Yates uncovers a brand new phenomenon - the fake Fact-Checker.

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Will Yates.

Image caption: Robotic hands typing on keyboard / Image credit: Shutterstock

Russia And Ukraine, Hip Hop Fighting, And Anonymous Messages2014030820140309 (WS)

The social media standoff between Russia and Ukraine, and an anonymous messaging app

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Conflict on the ground is reflected in social media as BBC Trending talks to a young man recruiting Russians to cross the border into Ukraine. The team also looks into Twitter claims that a pro-Russian woman interviewed on YouTube and Ukrainian TV channels is really an actor.

Going viral is the holy grail of online video and violence is one sure way to get attention. The controversial World Star Hip Hop site hosts bloody videos that would usually get scrubbed from YouTube, but some critics wonder whether it perpetuates racial stereotypes. Ravin Sampat reports on a film-maker whose video on the site got a million hits in 24 hours.

Also trending this week is an anonymous phone messaging app called Whisper – and it’s not the only app that keeps the identity of its users secret. It sees to hark back to the early days of the internet, but does anonymity allow people to get away with misbehaviour – and what’s its social purpose?

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Russian’s Lina Rozovskaya, Suzanne Whiteman from BBC Monitoring, BBC Trending’s Ravin Sampat and a very annoying anonymous app.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Russian Army Selfie Ban2017101320171014 (WS)
20171015 (WS)

Why is the Russian military banning soldiers from posting selfies?

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The Russian military wants to stop its regular soldiers from posting selfies on social media. We find out why. Also, the online spat between two rival filmmakers documenting the life and death of a black transexual woman. And the singer whose post about his new girlfriend caused China’s biggest website to crash.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin at a ceremony for Russia's Navy Day, St Petersburg. Credit: Olga Maltseva/AFP)

Saudi Arabia\u2019s \u2018trash Boy Selfie\u2019 And #black Lives Matter2015041120150412 (WS)

The \u2018Trash Boy Selfie\u2019 causing outrage in Saudi Arabia and the search for the child

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week on BBC Trending we look at stories trending in Saudi Arabia and America.

In Saudi Arabia a remarkable photo - the trash boy selfie – is making the rounds on Twitter and Instagram. Saudis have been outraged by the photo of a young Saudi Arab posing in front of a dumpster with a small African child in it. The photo has prompted a search for the girl under the hashtag #searchforJeddahchild – now tweeted over 200,000 times - and led to wealthy Saudi businessmen, and a famous Saudi rally driver, pledging thousands of dollars to the girl.

And in the US a video emerged this week of a white police officer in South Carolina shooting, and killing, a black man who was running away from him. The hashtag #BlackLivesMatter once again trended online and was used to highlight the issue of controversial black killings by US Police. Twitter users tell us their response to the killing of Walter Scott and BBC Trending speaks to co-creator of the hashtag, Opal Tometti who tells us why she felt compelled to create it. And we ask whether the global adaptation and appropriation of the hashtag has diluted its original message.

(Photo: Activists hold a rally to protest against police shooting Of Walter Scott In North Charleston. Credit: Richard Ellis/Getty Images)

Saudi Arabia\u2019s Whistleblower2015031420150315 (WS)

Who has apparently beeh leaking secrets about the Saudi royal family?

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In Saudi Arabia, not many secrets about the royal family are known beyond its closed circles. But this week BBC Trending’s Mai Noman has been speaking to Saudi Arabia’s own 'Julian Assange'. He runs a twitter account that is leaking alleged royal secrets out to his 1.7 million followers. But why is he doing this, and who is he?

Violence in El Salvador
El Salvador is one of the most violent countries in central America. So much so that stories of gangs, sex abuse and violence rarely makes the news anymore - except that recently it did with a case so horrific that it went viral. An anthropologist shocked Salvadorians with a column about a school where the principal allegedly sexually abuses school girls. He also complained about the lack of response from institutions such as UN body Unicef which, “at least in theory, are meant to tackle this violence”. BBC Trending speaks with the anthropologist, Unicef and institutions to find out more about his claims.

Musicless Music Videos
Britney Spears went viral this week with over two million views. Except this time, the beats and lyrics of ‘Oops I did it Again’ were stripped away and replaced by squeaks and shuffles. It’s the latest in the trend of ‘Musicless Music Videos’ on YouTube. We speak to Mario Wienerroither, an Austrian sound designer, about his love of sound, and why his neighbours think he might be a little crazy.

(Photo: Saudi Arabian Royal Crest. Credit: Getty Images)

Sexuality And Sexual Harassment In China And Turkey2015022120150222 (WS)

Sexual harassment and sexuality, debates on social media in China and Turkey this week.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On Wednesday 11th February a 20 year old Turkish woman, Ozgecan Aslan, was brutally murdered by a man who was attempting to rape her. Women – and men – showed their outrage by pouring onto the streets of Turkey’s cities, dressed in black and protesting about the rise in violence against women in their country. Many aimed their anger and frustration at the Turkish Government.

The response on social media has been equally huge and just as angry, with over 6.5 million people tweeting about Ozgecan, and Turkish women sharing their stories online about their everyday experiences of sexual harassment. We speak to the BBC’s Selin Girit about the swelling anger and a volunteer member of the ruling AKP party defends the government’s records on women’s rights.

It’s Chinese New Year week, and that means the world’s largest annual human migration with around 2.8 billion trips being made by Chinese students, migrant workers and office employees who trek thousands of miles to spend the holiday with their families. But not everyone is welcome home.

This year a video called Coming Home has been trending in China and across the world. It asks parents to welcome their gay children home for the holidays and encourages families to accept homosexuality. It was created by gay rights activists PFLAG in China has had millions of views. BBC trending speaks to the man behind the video about being gay in China, and finds out why his videos about homosexuality have in the past been be taken offline.

Should You Go Online With Allegations Of Domestic Violence?2015071120150712 (WS)

'You have to walk away': one woman's dramatic domestic violence plea.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week millions of Facebook users watched an emotional video by an Irish woman, in which she spoke out about alleged abuse at the hands of her partner.
But is it necessarily a good idea to take to social media to highlight domestic violence?
We talk to a woman whose story of abuse at the hands of her father went viral in 2011. Hillary Adams tells BBC Trending that while she had second thoughts at the time, she now has no regrets.

We ask whether the Chinese government is winning its fight to supress dissident voices online. A few years ago Sina Weibo - the country's equivalent of Twitter - was crawling with tales of political scandal. Today those stories are harder to find, and even government figures suggest the community has become more docile.

(Photo credit: AP)

Should You Punish Your Children Over Bad Grades?2015121920151220 (WS)

A Chinese mother threatened to drown her daughter apparently over bad marks in school.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A viral video shows a mother in China punishing her daughter for allegedly getting bad grades. She dangles her over a fast flowing river while shouting at her. When does discipline cross the line? Why are some Chinese parents so tough on their children? Do ‘tiger mums’ practice the best parenting?

Also we speak to the agony aunt who’s using Instagram to dish out relationship advice to her followers in Nigeria.

Produced by Emma Wilson.

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Silenced Online In Libya And The Russian 'rotten West' Meme2014111520141116 (WS)

The Libyan activists targeted online and killed. And the 'Rotten West' meme in Russia.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Libya
Activists in Libya have been receiving threats online from people who do not like their views. Some have even been assassinated. The killing of 18-year-old prominent activist Tawfik Bensaud two months ago provoked anger online and there was an outpouring of support using the hashtag #IamTawfik. But more recently many activists have kept a low profile online after they were directly threatened on a number of Facebook pages.

Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to Tawfik Bensaud’s cousin Huda El Khoja, and to one of the founders of Libyan Youth Movement on Facebook, Ayat Mneina. He is joined in the studio by Mohamed Madi of BBC World Online

Russia
'Rotten West', a new page on Russian site Vkontakte, has gathered thousands of followers in the past weeks. Its satirical irony pairs grim pictures from Russia with references to western cities to make fun of Russians who laugh at the apparently decaying West. Although the creator of the group, Anna from Moscow may not be all that she seems. Mukul is joined by Natasha Touzovskaya, from the BBC's Russian Service, to find out more.

(Image: Tawfik Bensaud with kind permission of the Bensaud family)

Snapchat Surgery2016070920160710 (WS)

The new social media subculture where millions watch gory videos of live plastic surgery.

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We look at the new Snapchat subculture where millions of people tune in to gory live videos of plastic surgery operations. It’s raised some worrying questions about how young women are being advertised to on the app.

Plus why has a British author’s account of her time in Zambia outraged Africans online?

Produced by Kate Lamble and Anisa Subedar

Social Media Versus The Government2015032820150402 (WS)

In Mexico City we hear from some influential people on Mexican social media

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Six months ago this week, 43 students from Ayotzinapa teachers training college in Mexico went missing while on their way to a protest - feared murdered by the cartels with government complicity. Angry Mexicans took to the streets but also went online, with millions of tweets targeting the government. It has prompted what many say is the country's biggest political crisis in two decades.

BBC Trending has assembled a panel of some of Mexican social media's most influential voices, for a special extended edition. In front of an audience in Mexico City, we ask whether the millions of Mexicans using Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to protest levels of violence and stand up for freedom of speech, add up to a 'Mexican Spring'? On the stage with Mukul Devichand will be Chumel Torres, the YouTube star many call 'Mexico's Jon Stewart,' leading investigative journalist Lydiah Cachos and political commentator Frederico Arreola.

The programme will also feature reporting from Guerrero state, from the spot the students clashed with police. We explore the Facebook networks of ordinary Mexicans who say hundreds of their missing relatives are buried in mass graves in the same hills the authorities have been searching for the bodies of the 43.

(Photo:Mexico students' crime protest. Credit: Alfredo Estrella / Getty Images)

Social Media: Not What, But Where You Say It2015010320150104 (WS)

A look into where discussions are taking place on social networks

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We take a look at where people are having social media discussions instead of what is being is being talked about this week.

We interview David Karp, the founder and CEO of Tumblr, a micro-blogging site with more than 200 million blogs. There are over 86 million posts on the site every day, and more than half of visitors are under 25.

Are people moving from public social networks like Twitter to more private platforms such as chat apps? In 2014 we saw a number of places where Whatsapp and Firechat were being used to communicate privately to avoid government censors. We speak to the BBC’s app editor Trushar Barot to find out why different platforms are popular.

Plus, we speak to model and actress Lily Cole who has spent the past year setting up an online community that can share and help people out. Called Impossible, the website is being used in around 70 countries.

Also, the Trending team offer their imaginative predictions of what will trend in 2015.

(Image: A customer inspects a new phone in a store. Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

South Carolina\u2019s Clown Scare2016091020160911 (WS)

Sightings of sinister clowns have left a US community in fear

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Sightings of suspicious clowns have left a US community in fear. We investigate the eerie goings-on to see whether the town could be the victim of a viral elaborate prank, or witnessing an outbreak of mass hysteria.

Plus, we look at how the destruction of a famous natural landmark has made some social media users question their impact on the environment.

(Photo: Grunge clown. Credit: Shutterstock)

Space Invasive Comedy And Iraq\u2019s \u2018angel Of Death\u20192015032120150322 (WS)

Who is the man Iraqi\u2019s are calling the Angel of Death, Abu Azrael?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Who is the man Iraqi’s are calling the Angel of Death? With several Facebook pages dedicated to photos of him, videos of the man in action, and memes hailing the new hero, Trending investigates the social media campaign behind Abu Azrael.

Has this bearded, bulked up character really just emerged from the rubble of Tikrit just as Iraqi’s need a saviour? Or is he part of an organised campaign that is joining the online propaganda war alongside ISIS? We speak to the journalist in Baghdad who has met him and a US based researcher in Shia militias and jihadism who explains Abu Azrael’s backstory.

Also, we look at the growing trend of ‘space invasive comedy’ among YouTube users and comedians who use members of the public as part of their act. We speak to internet prankster Vitaly Zdorovetskiy who has over eight million subscribers to his YouTube channel about why he thinks his comedy works, and to Giandomenico Iannetti, professor of Neuroscience who explains how our internal signals respond to being a target of pranks and why we find it so uncomfortable to have our space invaded.

(Photo: Facebook photo posted by Abu Azrael. Credit: Abu Azrael)

Spider Dog2014091320140914 (WS)

The story behind YouTube sensation Spider Dog

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Spider Dog is the latest global YouTube sensation. Who is behind it? BBC Trending's Anna Meisel heads to Poland to meet the man who has terrified over 80 million viewers, made a fortune from his films, and claims he just wants to make Poles smile more. But why’s he so unpopular with the local police?

#BurnIsisFlagCHallenge and others burning the ISIS flag have started a big debate about how to challenge the image of Islamic State radicals. The US government has released its own anti-IS video too. So what’s behind this social media fightback? We hear from one of those who started the flag-burning campaign in Lebanon. Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the Trending Studio by BBC Arabic’s Abdirahim Saeed

(Image: Dog in a spider dog prankster outfit, known as Spider-Dog. Credit: S A Wardega)

Street Battles In America2017102020171021 (WS)
20171022 (WS)

Inside the extremist groups battling it out on US streets

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This year has seen a sharp rise in the number of confrontations in America between far right white supremacists and a group known as antifa – the anti fascists.

White nationalists will claim their fight is to defend the first amendment and protect the right to free speech but their opponents believe it’s an excuse to promote often racist ideologies.

A fight that lived online between the two groups has now seen itself being played out on the streets in America in traditionally liberal towns like Berkeley, California and Portland, Oregon. But who is winning and what are they fighting for?

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar

(Photo: Women at Protest, Credit: BBC)
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Sweden\u2019s \u2018troll Factory\u20192017030420170305 (WS)

Why is a far right group in Sweden secretly recording phone calls with journalists?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We investigate a far right website in Sweden that has been secretly recording phone calls with journalists and academics and then posting heavily-edited versions of the conversations online. The man behind it says he is trying to broaden the debate about immigration. But the site’s targets say their words are being distorted and that their treatment amounts to deliberate intimidation. And a leading actress speaks out about the ‘casting couch’ culture in the Indian film and TV industries.

(Photo: Hand dialling on a desk phone. Credit: Shutterstock)

Tales Of A Sexist Double Standard2017100620171007 (WS)
20171008 (WS)

How three viral stories sparked a discussion about sexist double standards in Pakistan.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Sexist double standards. It’s a topic that’s older than social media itself, but which has nonetheless recently been a talking topic on social media in Pakistan. We delve into this issue through the lens of three viral stories - all of which shed a different light on the debate - and we hear from those who are fighting back.

Also, a Facebook group which runs under the provocative title “Dysfunctional Veterans” has gained a massive following online. We look into this online effort to help former US soldiers, and hear from the man who set it up.

Presenter: Kayleen Devlin
Producer: Will Yates

Image:Asma Shirazi, one of the Pakistani women who took to social media to criticise double standards / Credit: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Sexist double standards. It’s a topic that’s older than social media itself, but which has nonetheless recently been a talking topic on social media in Pakistan. We delve into this issue through the lens of three viral stories - all of which shed a different light on the debate - and we hear from those who are fighting back.

Also, a Facebook group which runs under the provocative title “Dysfunctional Veterans? has gained a massive following online. We look into this online effort to help former US soldiers, and hear from the man who set it up.

Presenter: Kayleen Devlin
Producer: Will Yates

Image:Asma Shirazi, one of the Pakistani women who took to social media to criticise double standards / Credit: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Terrorist Puppet?2014011120140112 (WS)

Exclusive report with Abla Fahita the Egyptian hand puppet accused of being a terrorist

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We talk to Abla Fahita, the Egyptian hand puppet and YouTube star investigated for being part of a terror plot. What does this tell us about the current atmosphere in military-run Egypt as thousands are investigated for Brotherhood connections?

We also look at how the quenelle has been trending in social media. The gesture, seen by many as anti-Semitic, has been called a symbol of anti-establishment thinking by the thousands posting images of themselves using it.

And we investigate the latest viral dance craze, the Penguin Dance.

With Matt Danzico and Mai Norman in the studio.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

The #100 Sareepact2015041820150419 (WS)

How friends in India started a surge in sari wearing

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week on BBC Trending we look at sari stories in India and ask what is the filter bubble and what does it have to do with the UK election?

In India, two friends Anju Kadam and Ally Matthan made a pact to wear the traditional sari for 100 days during 2015. After posting their intentions on Facebook within days other women pledged their desire to wear their own saris and started to share photos from across the world. The #100sareepact has now had thousands of likes on Facebook. Both men and women continue to send detailed and emotional stories of their memories of saris.

Also on BBC Trending, have you ever wondered why you’re given certain content on your social media feeds? Well, you’re probably suffering from the effects of the filter bubble – social media algorithms which decide what you want to see based on who you follow, where you’re located, and what you’ve clicked on previously. We hear from data scientist, Gilad Lotan who explains how filter bubbles work and why they might influence political campaigns on social media.

Photo: Ally Matthan and Anju Maudgal in Sari's (Credit: Anju Maudgal)

The #deletefacebook Debate2018033020180331 (WS)
20180401 (WS)
20180402 (WS)

A viral tweet reveals surprising facts about your personal information on social media

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

After revelations about Facebook and the data firm Cambridge Analytica, there’s a surge in people talking about privacy and social media. Despite the best efforts of tech journalists over the years, many are only now realising how much personal information ends up in the hands of the big social networks.

On the programme this week we speak to a security expert whose tweet about privacy and social media went viral. Dylan Curran has some eye-opening details and some tips on how to keep your information secure online.

Plus, continuing coverage of the student gun control movement in America, we catch up with the three students we’ve been following since the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. After the march on Washington, what’s next for #NeverAgain?

Producer: Ed Main
Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporters: Alex Dackevych, Reha Kansara
Studio Manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo: Mark Zuckerberg
Photo Credit: Getty Images

The \u2018bride Price\u2019 Story That Got China Talking2016030520160306 (WS)

A story shared on Weibo has shed light on the practice of \u2018bride price\u2019 payments in China

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A story shared on Weibo, about a girl forced to have an abortion when her boyfriend could not pay her family to marry her, has raised the issue of ‘bride price’ payments in China.

That follows our first story about Ese, a Nigerian girl who was abducted last August, but returned to her family this week thanks in part to a hashtag campaign - ‘#FreeEse’.

(Photo: A bride in her wedding dress holding bunch of flowers. Credit: Wang Zhao/Getty Images)

The \u2018husband-proof\u2019 Shopping List2017092920170930 (WS)
20171001 (WS)

Why one woman\u2019s shopping list for her husband went viral.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We hear from the Indian couple behind the viral ‘husband-proof’ shopping list, finding out how the list came about and their response to its success on social media.

And, a personal tale of online harassment and intimidation. We talk to a Finnish journalist who spent years as the target of pro-Russian trolls, and we also talk to the grandson of the World War 2 veteran who found overnight internet fame after an image of him kneeling in support of American football players protesting the US national anthem went viral.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

Image: the 'husband-proof' shopping list / Credit: Era Golwalkar

The \u201crosa Parks\u201d Of Saudi Arabia2016010920160110 (WS)

We speak to a black Saudi woman who\u2019s being trolled for marrying an American white man.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We hear from Nawal Al-Hawsawi, a black Saudi woman who’s received racist abuse online for tweeting about her support for inter-racial relationships. She’s been called the “Rosa Parks” of Saudi Arabia for her campaigning against racism.

Also we hear from the makers of a viral video criticising Facebook’s plans to bring ‘free internet’ to those without access in rural India. Facebook ask ‘Who could possibly be against this?’ It turns out, quite a few people are.

Produced by Emma Wilson.

Image Credit: Nawal Al-Hawsawi.

The Battle Between Anonymous And The Kkk2015110720151108 (WS)

What happened when hacker group Anonymous declared war on the Ku Klux Klan

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The hackers group Anonymous released the names of hundreds of people they say are members of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan. It comes after a public relations campaign by Anonymous conducted mostly on social media. But what happens when hackers get it wrong? BBC Trending speaks to a woman who got caught up in the online war who says she was falsely labelled as a KKK sympathiser.

We also look at what happened in Brazil after a 12-year-old contestant on cooking competition Masterchef Junior was harassed online. The incident prompted feminist Juliana de Faria to create a campaign for women to share their first experiences of sexual harassment. Thousands of women joined the debate and shared their stories online.

(Photo: KKK annual gathering in Tennessee. Credit: Getty Images)

The Biggest Trends Of 20162016122420161225 (WS)

The US Elections, the EU Referendum, livestreaming and \u2018creepy clown\u2019 sightings

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Four of the biggest stories on the internet this year divided opinion around the world. We discuss the most popular memes of US Elections, the highlights of the EU referendum in the UK, why people around the world were scared of clowns and how livestreaming made its mark on the digital world.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Picture: Woman in wookie mask, Credit: Candace Payne/Facebook

The Boy Who Lived And Was Commemorated On Youtube2015101020151011 (WS)

How the internet mourned a teenager from one of YouTube\u2019s most famous families

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When teenager Caleb Bratayley passed away this week, there was an outpouring of grief online. His was a member of one of YouTube’s most famous families, who became well known for simply uploading vast swathes of their day to day lives. Why did Bratayley become so popular, and why is there such a big audience for ‘family vlog’ channels?
We also hear from an Instagram user posting pictures of the good life… from Syria. He lives in Lattakia, in a part of the country largely untouched by the war.
Finally, we find out about Afghanistan’s first satirical Facebook page ‘Kabul Taxi’. Used to lampoon the country’s most powerful politicians, the page was recently taken down. It spawned dozens of tribute accounts, however, all serving the same purpose, and just this week the original page has been restored.

(Photo: Caleb Bratayley. Credit: Bratayley/YouTube)

The Call For Peruvians To Take Justice Into Their Own Hands2015091220150913 (WS)

The new online vigilante movement in Peru calling for extreme violence

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Over the last couple of weeks, there has been a surge of Facebook groups calling Peruvians to take justice into their own hands and sharing videos showing beatings of alleged criminals. We talk to the woman who started the movement Catch a Thief and Leave Him Paralysed, and ask the country’s Interior Minister why Peruvians feel they have no other option but to punish criminals themselves.

And, we hear from the woman who enraged the internet when she made a video called Dear Fat People. It was viewed over 20 million times and led to an online backlash from people saying it was offensive and hurtful. A comedian from Canada, Nicole Arbour talks to BBC Trending’s Mukul Devichand and tells him why she feels her critics are missing the point of satire.

@MukulDevichand is joined in the studio by Gabriela Torres @gacato.

(Photo: Chapa Tu Choro Facebook page, used with permission from Chapa Tu Choro organisation)

The Chapel Hill Shootings Hashtag; And Moral Policing Valentine\u2019s Day In India.2015021420150215 (WS)

Why was #ChapelHillShooting so quick to label the murder a hate crime?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Patrolling Valentine’s Day in India

It’s Valentine’s Day and love is in the air, or not if some right-wing Hindu groups in India have their way. The groups are planning to patrol social media and the streets looking for young couples in the throes of love. Their intention is to marry the couples on the spot, in an attempt to protect Indian traditions and culture.

But will they succeed? We speak to the National General Secretary of the Hindu Mahasabha group and the man behind an online Love Letters movement, letters of defiance which have been appearing on Facebook all week in protest. And we hear from a woman who is planning to celebrate Valentine’s Day with her loved one in Delhi.

Who is Behind #ChapelHillShootings?

On Tuesday 10th February in the college town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, three students, were shot and killed by a middle-aged white man.

Before the facts had been confirmed, the murders sparked global outrage on social media with people debating whether the Muslim students had been targeted because of their religion. BBC Trending tracked #ChapelHillShooting, which has been posted over three million times, to the activist Abed Ayoub, legal and policy director of the American-Arab anti-discrimination committee in Washington D.C.

(Image: Women take part in a vigil for three young Muslims killed in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Credit: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Deleted Protest Posts2017092220170923 (WS)
20170924 (WS)

Rohingya activists claim their protest posts are being deleted by social media companies

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We investigate claims that posts by Rohingya activists are being unfairly deleted by social media companies.

Also the American footballer who’s divided a nation - why Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem is still making waves across the US.

And the weird and wonderful world of comedienne Heather Land whose “I ain’t doin it” videos have attracted a massive online following.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

(Photo: A Bangladesh border guard attempts to clear Rohingya Muslim refugees off a road near a refugee camp. Credit: Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images)

We investigate claims that posts by Rohingya activists are being unfairly deleted by social media companies.

Also the American footballer who’s divided a nation - why Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem is still making waves across the US.

And the weird and wonderful world of comedienne Heather Land whose “I ain’t doin it? videos have attracted a massive online following.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

(Photo: A Bangladesh border guard attempts to clear Rohingya Muslim refugees off a road near a refugee camp. Credit: Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images)

The Extreme World Of \u2018pick-up Artist\u2019 Hate2014053120140601 (WS)

After mass murder in California, a look at the misogyny of \u2018pick-up artist\u2019 haters

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

After the murder of six people in California, the spotlight turned to the ‘pick-up artist’ (PUA) community, when it emerged that the shooter had posted anti-woman rants and videos online.

Elliot Rodger was apparently involved in an extreme offshoot that ostensibly warned men against gurus who claim to have secret tactics to woo women.

But the website PUAHate.com became a magnet for frustrated men airing their hatred not just towards pick-up coaches, but towards women as well.

We talk to a journalist who plumbed the depths of misogyny on the site, and to a writer who explained why the hashtag #YesAllWomen started to trend after last week’s horrific events.

BBC Trending also talks to the man behind the Russian group StopXam, which is trying to get Russian drivers to be just a little bit more polite. Their videos showing members risking life and limb by stopping cars in the middle of Moscow traffic have been viewed millions of times, and they have been endorsed by Russian President Vladimir Putin. But does any of that help when drivers, irritated at their tactics, pull out weapons?

Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined in the studio by BBC Trending’s Mike Wendling, Trending blogger Sam Judah, and BBC Russian Service News Editor Famil Ismailov.

The Fake Gunshot Photos That Got India Talking2016073020160731 (WS)

A photoshopped image of Mark Zuckerberg wounded by a pellet gun is trending in Kashmir.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Photoshopped images of Mark Zuckerberg, Narendra Modi and several Bollywood stars - all wounded by pellet guns - are trending in Kashmir. They are part of a campaign to raise awareness about unrest in the region, which also claims Facebook is censoring posts about the story. But what lies behind the allegations?

And – is it possible to trademark a hashtag? Even one as simple as #Rio2016 to celebrate the forthcoming Olympics? We take a look at the US Olympic Committee’s attempts to stop some companies from using the phrase online.

Produced by Sam Judah and Kate Lamble

Image credit: Never Forget Pakistan

The Fake Iraqi Battle That Got \u2018hijacked\u2019 Online2015061320150614 (WS)

Meet the man who made up a battle on social media, and fooled supporters of Islamic State

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What happens when you make up war stories and publish them on Twitter? We meet the man who invented ‘the battle of the cheese bladder’ in Iraq, and fooled supporters of Islamic State and the Shia militia alike.

Plus, why one Pakistani man, recently deported from Scotland, generated an army of supporters online. The #DontDeportMajid hashtag was unsuccessful, but can similar campaigns like this ever be effective? Joining us in the studio is the BBC’s Home Affairs correspondent Dominic Casciani.

(Photo: Fake Stamp.Credit: Totallypic/Shutterstock. And Iraq-Conflict. Credit: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/GettyImages)

The Fake Policeman Causing A Stink In Sweden2015051620150517 (WS)

Meet \u2018B\u00e4ngan Lagerblad\u2019, the fake cop on a mission to reform Sweden\u2019s police force

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week on Trending

Why does Abdishakour Mohamed Ali dress up in a Swedish police uniform from the 1970s?
When he dons the outfit the satirist transforms into ‘Bängan Lagerblad’, a fake policeman on a mission to call out racism in the country’s police force. Presenter Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out why his latest YouTube video is trying to embarrass the authorities.
Ninja Crow
A viral video of a sneaky crow creeping up on a young man got us thinking…. Why are crows so, well, creepy? India Rakusen speaks to crow expert Kevin McGowan.

#IranOnFire
A one day protest in Iran has been amplified online with images of a burning hotel and demonstrations. However it’s not being spearheaded by Iranian or Kurdish supporters, but mainly by Saudi Arabians. Images of violence were being shared with hashtags like #IranOnFire and #Iran_Burning, painting a picture of disruption in the country. Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out why.

(Photo: ‘Bängan Lagerblad’ at a neo-Nazi march in Stockholm. Credit: youtube.com/critical)

The Fake War Photographer2017090820170909 (WS)
20170910 (WS)

How someone masquerading as a war photographer fooled the internet

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On the face of it, Eduardo Martins had an inspiring and seemingly legitimate story. He seemed to be a young, conscientious photographer working in conflict zones who found success after overcoming hardship. His images were used on a number of reputable news sites, and his Instagram following reached into the tens of thousands. There is, though, one big problem with this story: it’s a total fabrication. A BBC Brasil investigation has exposed Eduardo Martins as a fake identity. Martins – whoever he really is – took another man’s self-portraits and passed them off as his own, and stole the work of a real war photographer. In this edition of the programme, Trending talks to BBC Brasil’s Silvia Salek and meets the people behind this extraordinary tale.

Also on the programme, how pro-Russian twitter bots are being used to harass and intimidate journalists and researchers in an attempt to discourage them from covering stories.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Will Yates

(Photo: Some of the images that Eduardo Martin used to bolster his Instagram following. Credit: Max Hepworth-Povey/BBC)

The Far Right And Sweden2018020220180204 (WS)
20180205 (WS)

Why are right-wing extremists obsessed with one Nordic country?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why is the far right so obsessed with Sweden? It has a population of only around 10 million people and is known for having some of the world’s most progressive social policies. That does not seem like very fertile territory for the far right. But on internet chat forums, Facebook and Twitter, reports about crime and immigration in Malmo and Stockholm routinely go viral.

So why all the attention on this one country? And what links do Swedish activists have with the global alt-right? We travel to Stockholm to find out.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Will Yates

(Photo: Swedish flag. credit: Getty Images)

This week we’re asking one question: Why is the far right so obsessed with Sweden?

It has a population of only around 10 million people and is known for having some of the world’s most progressive social policies. That doesn’t seem like very fertile territory for the far right.
But on internet chat forums, Facebook and Twitter, reports about crime and immigration in Malmo and Stockholm routinely go viral.
So why all the attention on this one country? And what links do Swedish activists have with the global alt-right?
We travel to Stockholm to find out.

Presented by Mike Wendling and Will Yates
Produced by Will Yates
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton
Photo credit: Getty Images

The Fat Debate2014092720140928 (WS)

The rise and controversy of the \u2018Fat Acceptance Movement\u2019 online

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Anne-Marie Tomchak speaks to a woman in Australia who had to shut down her online business selling clothes for oversized women, after she became a victim of trolling.

Anne-Marie also takes a look at the rise of the controversial Fat Acceptance Movement online. She is joined by a 27-year-old blogger who describes herself as “pretty damn fat and unabashedly so” and a founder of the National Campaign Against Obesity to discuss the implications of the movement.

We also take a look at conflict between the old and young in China. Vincent Ni from BBC Chinese tells us how a dispute over a bus seat reveals distrust between the generations.

And, is there a place for women in battle? The first female fighter pilot from the United Arab Emirates has been stirring up a heated gender debate under the hashtag #SyriaUnderAttack. BBC Trending’s Mai Noman joins us to explain.

Produced by India Rakusen.

(Photo: An obese stomach. Credit: Clara Molden/ PA Wire)

The Feminist Who Exposes Rapists On Youtube2015062020150621 (WS)

The Indian campaigner who set out to \u2018shame\u2019 rapists online

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In India, a woman discovered that men were sharing videos of rape on WhatsApp, a private chat app. In response, she uploaded the videos to YouTube to ‘shame’ the rapists, but was she right to do so?

We ask why the president of Uzbekistan suddenly changed the names of stations in the capital. He gave passengers no prior warning, and so many passengers missed their stop.

And, find out how the ancient art of calligraphy is experiencing a renaissance on social media. We meet one star calligrapher whose handwriting videos have won him thousands of followers. Joining us in the studio is Venera Koichieva from the BBC’s Central Asian Unit.

(Photo Credit: Brad Barket/ Getty Images)

The Filipino Prisoners Who Want To Stay In Jail2016081320160814 (WS)

Photos of a crowded jail have gone viral, but some prisoners feel \u2018lucky\u2019 to be there.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Photos of an overcrowded jail in the Philippines – taken by photographer Noel Celis – have gone viral, but remarkably some prisoners told him they felt ‘lucky’ to be there. They say many have met with a much worse fate as the new president Rodrigo Duterte cracks down on the country’s illegal drug trade.

And – in Egypt the story of a puppy trapped underneath giant rocks in the city of Alexandria for more than three weeks has touched many. How did animal rights activists use social media to finally bring about a happy ending?

Produced by Sam Judah and Kate Lamble

Image caption: Prisoners in an overcrowded jail in the Philippines / Image credit: Noel Celis, Getty Images

The Free Speech Fight2017081820170819 (WS)
20170820 (WS)

Who is responsible for hosting hate and criminal activity online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A special edition exploring the collision zone between free speech and criminal activity with a focus on two stories out of the US.

After a week of violent clashes and soul searching in Charlottesville, big internet giants step in and quell the voice of one notorious website. We talk to one person who campaigned to have the website shut down, and another who wrote for it.

And, a classified ads site accused of facilitating sex trafficking has prompted action for a change in US law. Critics say if the law goes through it could result in an attack on free speech on the internet.

Presenter: India Rakusen
Producers: Kayleen Devlin and Anisa Subedar

Image: Counter protesters shout at members of the Ku Klux Klan during a rally / Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The Hip Hop Doc2016092420160925 (WS)

A viral Justin Bieber parody is highlighting painkiller addiction in the US.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A viral Justin Bieber parody is highlighting problems with prescription painkiller addiction in the United States. Z Dogg MD is a real doctor who uses a rap alter ego to discuss medical issues, and his new song has received over a million hits at a time when congress is debating whether to invest in a series of new treatment programmes.

Plus, we look at how a viral photo has started a conversation about poverty in the central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan, and investigate why a Chinese company has threatened to fire any staff members who buy the new iPhone.

(Photo/Credit: ZDoggMD)

The History Of \u2018fake News\u2019 (part 1)2018011220180114 (WS)
20180115 (WS)

The meaning of \u201cfake news\u201d has been completely transformed \u2013 so what does it mean now?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The term “fake news” has been impossible to escape over the past year.

It started with teenagers in Macedonia pumping out posts to make cash on Facebook during the 2016 US presidential election

But it has since turned into a political football. Hillary Clinton blames it in part for her loss to Donald Trump. Meanwhile the president uses it as a stick to beat his enemies. Around the world, journalists, demagogues and all sorts of people throw the phrase around with abandon.

Misinformation and spin has of course been with us for centuries, but in the last year the meaning of “fake news” has been completely transformed. What does it mean now, and is it even a useful description these days?

Mike Wendling is joined by three experts who have been looking at the world of social media misinformation for years: Buzzfeed Media Editor Craig Silverman;
Clare Wardle of Harvard’s Shorenstein Center and First Draft News; and Alexios Mantzarlis of the Poynter Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio Manager: James Beard

Image Credit: Getty Images

The History Of \u2018fake News\u2019 (part 2)2018011920180121 (WS)
20180122 (WS)

How do we tackle online misinformation? And what new forms is it taking?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

President Donald Trump recently handed out his “fake news” awards - they went to mainstream organisations who messed up and pundits whose predictions were off, with a special prize for people reporting on very real investigations into the president’s ties to Russia.
It’s all a distraction, but has the term “fake news” outlived its usefulness?
In this week’s BBC Trending we find out what can be done about social media misinformation - and what impact it has around the world.
Mike Wendling is joined by a panel of experts from Buzzfeed, the Poynter Institute, and First Draft News - people who’ve been studying the phenomenon of viral falsehoods since well before most journalists and politicians were obsessed by it.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio manager: Neil Churchill
Photo credit: Getty Images

The History Of €fake News’ (part 1)20180112

The meaning of “fake news? has been completely transformed – so what does it mean now?

The term “fake news? has been impossible to escape over the past year.

It started with teenagers in Macedonia pumping out posts to make cash on Facebook during the 2016 US presidential election

But it has since turned into a political football. Hillary Clinton blames it in part for her loss to Donald Trump. Meanwhile the president uses it as a stick to beat his enemies. Around the world, journalists, demagogues and all sorts of people throw the phrase around with abandon.

Misinformation and spin has of course been with us for centuries, but in the last year the meaning of “fake news? has been completely transformed. What does it mean now, and is it even a useful description these days?

Mike Wendling is joined by three experts who have been looking at the world of social media misinformation for years: Buzzfeed Media Editor Craig Silverman;
Clare Wardle of Harvard’s Shorenstein Center and First Draft News; and Alexios Mantzarlis of the Poynter Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio Manager: James Beard

Image Credit: Getty Images

The meaning of “fake news” has been completely transformed – so what does it mean now?

The term “fake news” has been impossible to escape over the past year.

It started with teenagers in Macedonia pumping out posts to make cash on Facebook during the 2016 US presidential election

But it has since turned into a political football. Hillary Clinton blames it in part for her loss to Donald Trump. Meanwhile the president uses it as a stick to beat his enemies. Around the world, journalists, demagogues and all sorts of people throw the phrase around with abandon.

Misinformation and spin has of course been with us for centuries, but in the last year the meaning of “fake news” has been completely transformed. What does it mean now, and is it even a useful description these days?

Mike Wendling is joined by three experts who have been looking at the world of social media misinformation for years: Buzzfeed Media Editor Craig Silverman;
Clare Wardle of Harvard’s Shorenstein Center and First Draft News; and Alexios Mantzarlis of the Poynter Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio Manager: James Beard

Image Credit: Getty Images

The History Of €fake News’ (part 2)20180119

How do we tackle online misinformation? And what new forms is it taking?

President Donald Trump recently handed out his “fake news? awards - they went to mainstream organisations who messed up and pundits whose predictions were off, with a special prize for people reporting on very real investigations into the president’s ties to Russia.
It’s all a distraction, but has the term “fake news? outlived its usefulness?
In this week’s BBC Trending we find out what can be done about social media misinformation - and what impact it has around the world.
Mike Wendling is joined by a panel of experts from Buzzfeed, the Poynter Institute, and First Draft News - people who’ve been studying the phenomenon of viral falsehoods since well before most journalists and politicians were obsessed by it.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio manager: Neil Churchill
Photo credit: Getty Images

President Donald Trump recently handed out his “fake news” awards - they went to mainstream organisations who messed up and pundits whose predictions were off, with a special prize for people reporting on very real investigations into the president’s ties to Russia.
It’s all a distraction, but has the term “fake news” outlived its usefulness?
In this week’s BBC Trending we find out what can be done about social media misinformation - and what impact it has around the world.
Mike Wendling is joined by a panel of experts from Buzzfeed, the Poynter Institute, and First Draft News - people who’ve been studying the phenomenon of viral falsehoods since well before most journalists and politicians were obsessed by it.

Producer: Will Yates
Studio manager: Neil Churchill
Photo credit: Getty Images

The Influencer Business2018083120180903 (WS)
20180902 (WS)
20180901 (WS)

How do you know when someone\u2019s selling you something on social media?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Earlier this year, a baker in Liverpool in north-west England vented her frustration on Twitter over constantly being asked by social media influencers for free cakes. Laura Worthington tweeted: “I wasn't kidding when I said this happens a lot.” Many other businesses publicly sided with Laura Worthington on social media… but were they being fair? We investigate the impact of influencers – people with large and/or powerful social media followings. What are the rules and ethics around advertising and promotion? And can we really trust the people behind big social media accounts? After all, their reputations rest in part on the idea of authenticity.

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Lee Kumutat
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo Caption: Influencer Lisa Linh promotes a number of brands – including hotels and credit card companies
Photo Credit: Lisa Linh

How do you know when someone\u2019s selling you something on social media?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Earlier this year, a baker in Liverpool in north-west England vented her frustration on Twitter over constantly being asked by social media influencers for free cakes. Laura Worthington tweeted: “I wasn't kidding when I said this happens a lot.” Many other businesses publicly sided with Laura Worthington on social media… but were they being fair? We investigate the impact of influencers – people with large and/or powerful social media followings. What are the rules and ethics around advertising and promotion? And can we really trust the people behind big social media accounts? After all, their reputations rest in part on the idea of authenticity.

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Lee Kumutat
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo Caption: Influencer Lisa Linh promotes a number of brands – including hotels and credit card companies
Photo Credit: Lisa Linh

How do you know when someone\u2019s selling you something on social media?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Earlier this year, a baker in Liverpool in north-west England vented her frustration on Twitter over constantly being asked by social media influencers for free cakes. Laura Worthington tweeted: “I wasn't kidding when I said this happens a lot.” Many other businesses publicly sided with Laura Worthington on social media… but were they being fair? We investigate the impact of influencers – people with large and/or powerful social media followings. What are the rules and ethics around advertising and promotion? And can we really trust the people behind big social media accounts? After all, their reputations rest in part on the idea of authenticity.

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Lee Kumutat
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo Caption: Influencer Lisa Linh promotes a number of brands – including hotels and credit card companies
Photo Credit: Lisa Linh

How do you know when someone\u2019s selling you something on social media?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Earlier this year, a baker in Liverpool in north-west England vented her frustration on Twitter over constantly being asked by social media influencers for free cakes. Laura Worthington tweeted: “I wasn't kidding when I said this happens a lot.” Many other businesses publicly sided with Laura Worthington on social media… but were they being fair? We investigate the impact of influencers – people with large and/or powerful social media followings. What are the rules and ethics around advertising and promotion? And can we really trust the people behind big social media accounts? After all, their reputations rest in part on the idea of authenticity.

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Lee Kumutat
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo Caption: Influencer Lisa Linh promotes a number of brands – including hotels and credit card companies
Photo Credit: Lisa Linh

How do you know when someone\u2019s selling you something on social media?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Earlier this year, a baker in Liverpool in north-west England vented her frustration on Twitter over constantly being asked by social media influencers for free cakes. Laura Worthington tweeted: “I wasn't kidding when I said this happens a lot.” Many other businesses publicly sided with Laura Worthington on social media… but were they being fair? We investigate the impact of influencers – people with large and/or powerful social media followings. What are the rules and ethics around advertising and promotion? And can we really trust the people behind big social media accounts? After all, their reputations rest in part on the idea of authenticity.

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Lee Kumutat
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio manager: Nigel Appleton

Photo Caption: Influencer Lisa Linh promotes a number of brands – including hotels and credit card companies
Photo Credit: Lisa Linh

The Live Streaming Arab Spring?2016072320160724 (WS)

How FaceTime and Periscope helped alter the course of the Turkish coup.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Last week Turkey underwent an attempted coup from a section of the army who aimed to overthrow President Erdogan. Although it ultimately failed, images of tanks rolling down the streets and resisting protesters gripped viewers across the world. But in this case the pictures didn’t come from live TV news, instead the coup was streamed online by people across the country. Services like Periscope and Facebook Live were even credited with helping alter the course of events. So will this help make these new platforms more prominent?

In January, Facebook announced they would ban private gun sales from their network, targeting transactions where no background checks take place. But despite the ban, thousands of sales are still posted to the site. We meet the new ‘militia’ of protestors who are trying to co-ordinate to fight the adverts.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah

(Photo: Turkey stand against coup, Credit: Getty Images)

The Man Who \u2018abducted\u2019 Children As Part Of A \u2018social Experiment\u20192015050920150510 (WS)

YouTuber Joey Salads \u2018picked up\u2019 children to make a point, but did his idea backfire?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week on Trending… the man who ‘abducted’ children as part of a ‘social experiment, Jordan’s efforts to combat Islamic State online, and the mysterious button that’s been pressed by nearly a million people.

Why did Joey Salads pretend to abduct children at a local park? The YouTuber says he was conducting a social experiment as a warning to parents about the dangers posed to their children. But was he right to publish such an inflammatory video?

We’re joined by the BBC’s Dominic Casciani who reports from Jordan’s e-Mufti. The country’s government has launched an online offensive against IS, but how effective is the project proving?

And finally, we press ‘The Button’, Reddit’s April fool’s joke that has taken on a life of its own. The seemingly pointless game has spawned an entire mythology complete with warring clans, and now a major American think-tank has waded into the debate.

(Photo: YouTuber Joey Salads used a dog to ‘pick up’ children. Credit: Joey Salads)

The Medical Scandal Uncovered By A Tweet2015100320151004 (WS)

A single tweet led to a slew of accusations about medical malpractice in France.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When a French woman became concerned about the way her routine gynaecology exam was carried out, her husband asked a simple question about standard procedures on Twitter. The tweet triggered a slew of accusations about medical malpractice in France.
We also hear from Emily Bingham, whose Facebook plea for people to stop asking ‘when will you have a baby?’ struck a chord online.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo: Doctors hand holding a speculum / Photo Credit: BBC)

The Migrant Worker In Saudi Arabia Who Asked For Help2016031920160320 (WS)

An Indian migrant worker in Saudi Arabia films himself pleading for help.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Abdul Sattar Mukandar from India went to Saudi Arabia to work as a driver. He sent a video explaining his working conditions to an activist in India who posted it online where it was seen by millions. His employers denied his allegations and took legal action against Abdul Sattar under a Saudi social media law.
A photo taken during the anti-government protests in Brazil began an online debate of the country’s racial and economic divide.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Photo credit: Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images

The Mysterious Brazilian Bloggers2018030920180311 (WS)
20180312 (WS)

How were fake social media characters used during Brazil\u2019s 2010 election?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A BBC investigation has found that a fake blog and fake social media accounts were created to support the campaign of the former Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff. The story goes all the way back to the 2010 election which Rouseff won. As Brazilians look forward to a presidential election later in 2018, we hear from Juliana Gragnani on her investigation.

Also, who’s behind the odd messages from male strangers that appear in your inbox on Facebook, or in your DMs on Twitter? Journalist Hussein Kesvani tells BBC Trending what happened when he struck up a conversation with a man who was in search of ‘Fraaandship’.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

Image: Former Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff speaks during a campaign rally to launch Lula's presidential candidacy in Sao Paulo in January
Credit: Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

The Mysterious Wikipedia Editor2018061520180616 (WS)
20180617 (WS)
20180618 (WS)

One man who\u2019s made hundreds of thousands of edits has riled up anti-war activists.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Who is “Philip Cross”? That’s the name on an account that has made more than 130,000 Wikipedia edits since 2004. But it’s not so much the volume of his work but his subject matter that has irritated anti-war politicians and journalists around the world. His detractors claim that he’s biased against them and that his influence has made some entries unreliable. It’s a charge that’s rejected by the foundation behind Wikipedia, but the person behind Philip Cross remains elusive. So what happened when we tried to track him down?

Presenters: Lee Kumutat, Jonathan Griffin
Studio Manager: Mike Woolley

Picture Caption: Screenshot of the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia, one of the world’s most popular websites.
Picture Credit: Getty

The 'nice Pic, Phwoar!' Moment2014010420140105 (WS)

Embarrassment on social media

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week, BBCtrending radio re-tells the stories of how McDonalds, Ryanair and others engaged with the public - and sometimes fell flat. Anne-Marie Tomchak meets the head of communications for Ryanair, whose CEO tweeted 'nice pic, Phwoar' during a real social media engagement session.

So what are the secrets of looking good on social media? And how do you cope when the whole world suddenly targets you on-line, for example for having the same name as a celebrity.

Featuring Esra Dogramaci, BBC digital media consultant, in the studio.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending

The On-air Groping That Got Mexico Talking2015103120151101 (WS)

A female presenter in Mexico was groped live on television sparking a national debate

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When presenter Tania Reza was groped live on air by her co-host, Enrique Tovar, the clip went viral. As the saga unfolded, she and her co-host were both fired after making a video brushing it off as a social media stunt. Tania then claimed that she was pressured into making the video with Enrique. So what does the incident – and the huge reaction online - tell us about women’s rights in Mexico?

We also investigate one of the internet’s most popular memes known as the Sceptical Third World Kid. What’s the story behind the photo? And are depictions of third-world children exploitative?

(Photo: Tania Reza. Photo Credit: Televisa Prensa)

The People Who Remove Your Facebook Posts20181005

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The People Who Remove Your Facebook Posts2018100520181006 (WS)

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The People Who Remove Your Facebook Posts2018100520181007 (WS)

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The People Who Remove Your Facebook Posts2018100520181008 (WS)

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The People Who Remove Your Facebook Posts2018100520181008 (WS)
20181007 (WS)
20181006 (WS)

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

They decide what you can and can\u2019t see. Who are Facebook\u2019s content moderators?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

The Perfect Promposal2016050720160508 (WS)

Are viral videos of disabled students being asked to the prom inspirational or insulting?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Promposals (that is prom proposals for most of us) have been sweeping the internet recently. But some of the videos that have gained the most attention are those of students asking their disabled friends to the high school dance. They have gained a mixed reaction online, so is this recent trend inspirational or insulting to disabled people?

We speak to the woman who shared her experiences of pre-marital sex in Pakistan. Zahra Haider ended up trending on Twitter after she claimed the country made her feel repressed when she later moved to Canada.

Plus, an update on the young Afghani who became an internet sensation after he was photographed wearing a Lionel Messi football shirt made from a plastic bag.

(Photo credit: Amy Wright)

The Picture That Has Delhiites Debating \u2018ladies Only\u2019 Seats2014031520140316 (WS)

But will segregation do anything to curb sexual violence in Delhi?

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A picture of two men sitting down went viral in India – they were plonked underneath a sign reading ‘ladies only’. Women-only seats and carriages are common in India, but there’s disagreement among commuters as to whether segregation will do anything to curb sexual violence in Delhi.

BBC Trending also speaks to the activists using Google Maps to scrub anti-Korean graffiti from the streets of Tokyo. Plus the team finds out why President Obama chose a comedy video series to try to boost the numbers signing up to his flagship healthcare plan.

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Reporter Mariko Oi, Rupa Jha from the BBC’s Delhi Bureau, and BBC Trending’s Mike Wendling.

The Police Who Ran Away Moments Before An Assassination2016020620160207 (WS)

Footage of a shooting in Mexico shows armed police fleeing the scene just beforehand

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A video showing an assassination in Mexico has shocked many in the country, because it shows armed police running away from the scene just beforehand. Why did the police run away? And will the video change anything?

We also talk about the man accused of being a ‘rape advocate’. A petition to ban Roosh V from Australia received more than 100,000 signatures. But who is he, and why is he so controversial?

(Photo: Armed policemen. Credit: Reporteros Asociados de Sinaloa/Facebook)

The Porn Star Who Went To Iran For A Nose Job2016080620160807 (WS)

Candy Charms has put a spotlight on the Islamic republic as a destination for rhinoplasty

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The British-American porn star Candy Charms has become the talk of social media in Iran. The adult entertainer raised some eyebrows because she travelled to the Islamic republic to get a nose job. Her story has put the spotlight on Iran as a top destination for rhinoplasty and it has re-ignited a campaign to save the Iranian nose.

Plus, the offensive joke which has started a debate about freedom of speech in Canada, and we make a pit stop to speak to one of the most popular truckers on the internet.

(Photo: Candy Charms. Credit: Instagram)

The Prank Call Crimewave2016043020160501 (WS)

We investigate the online prank call community who live stream their crimes.

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This year a series of fast food restaurants across America have been damaged by their own employees. In each case workers smashed out windows after receiving a call from the fire department who warned them about a gas leak.

But the thousands of dollars in damage were really the result of illegal prank calls, broadcast live on the internet. This week on Trending we’ve been investigating the online communities responsible, hoping to find out who’s behind the crimes, why they’re committing them and whether they’re getting out of hand.

Produced by Kate Lamble.

Photo credit: Coon Rapids Police Force

The Prison Pen Pal Debate2016052820160529 (WS)

We meet the woman who found her imprisoned rapist looking for love online.

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Robert Torres is serving four consecutive life sentences for four counts of aggravated rape. Lori Williams, one of his victims, was alarmed to find him advertising for a romantic relationship on a prisoner pen pal website. She started a petition to outlaw the practice for violent and sexual offenders in Texas, and was overwhelmed with support from the public online. We hear from Lori herself, and ask a number of experts how the issue should be dealt with.

And - as their country faces a tomato shortage, lots of Nigerians have taken to Twitter to moan about the 100 tonnes of tomatoes wasted every year in Spain’s Tomatina festival. We hear from people in the African country, as well as the mayor of the Spanish town that hosts the annual food fight.

Produced by Sam Judah and Kate Lamble
Photo credit: Shutterstock

The Rise Of Extreme Pranking2018020920180211 (WS)
20180212 (WS)

Why has there been a rise in disturbing internet pranks that simulate real life attacks?

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Why has there been a disturbing rise in internet pranks that simulate real life attacks? We have an exclusive interview with YouTuber Arya Mosallah, who had his channel terminated after some of his videos which some thought resembled acid attacks were removed from the site.
And we look at the ethics and morals of the people making videos in the pranking genre. How far is too far – and what damage could come to the people targeted by the pranksters, and even the pranksters themselves?

Presenter: Anisa Subedar
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

Image: Illustration of toy gun / Credit: Getty Images

The Russian Blogger Running For President2017111720171119 (WS)
20171120 (WS)

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny is using social media to build a movement

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For the second in our special series from Russia, we trace how opposition leader Alexei Navalny has used social media to move from writing LiveJournal blogs about corruption to trying to run for president.

We meet his supporters, from teenage activists to professional social media strategists as well as those who call his team “a mixture of LGBT people, Satanists and Nazis”.

Does Navalny have a shot at winning the presidency – and how is he changing politics in the process?

Producer: Kate Lamble

Image: Alexei Navalny after he was doused with green dye by a protester in March 2017 / Credit: Navalny.com

The Sandy Hook Hoaxers2017033120170401 (WS)
20170402 (WS)

Families are battling fake online theories that claim their children were never killed.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A paranoid conspiracy theory has acquired a new, disturbing power in America. It has been spread by an alternative media outfit – with links to President Trump.

Twenty-six people, mostly young children, died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. They were the victims of a man named Adam Lanza, who killed himself after the slaughter. It was a shocking tragedy, even in a country used to regular gun violence.

Soon false rumours began to circulate online, that the attacks were staged using actors. Although they had no basis in truth, hundreds of YouTube videos, blogs, and tweets repeated the conspiracy theories. And the rumours were pushed by an alternative media mogul named Alex Jones. His online news site Infowars has millions of listeners and viewers. He’s interviewed President Trump, who has repeated Infowars stories on his Twitter feed and in speeches.

One of the fathers who lost their children in the shooting was Lenny Pozner, whose son Noah was killed. And, as it happens, Lenny Pozner was also a fan of Infowars, which is how he first found out that people were saying that his family tragedy – and those of dozens of others – had been entirely staged.

As the ‘hoaxers’ went to greater extremes to spread their fake news – even targeting grieving parents - Lenny Pozner led the online fight back. With the help of the Sandy Hook community, tried to turn the tables on the conspiracy theorists.

Conspiracy theories are a perennial feature of American life. But now they can be picked up by extremists and spread virally through social media - and they can reach the ears of the president himself.

Producer: Sam Judah
Presenter: Mike Wendling

(Image: A mourner hangs a sign on the front of his home near Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012 / Credit: Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images)

The Sandy Hook Hoaxers \u2013 Update2018081020180813 (WS)
20180812 (WS)
20180811 (WS)

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory. Twenty-six people, mostly young children, died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. They were the victims of a man named Adam Lanza, who killed himself after the slaughter. It was a shocking tragedy, even in a country used to regular gun violence.
Soon false rumours began to circulate online, that the attacks were staged using actors. Although they had no basis in truth, hundreds of YouTube videos, blogs, and tweets repeated the conspiracy theories. And the rumours were pushed by an alternative media mogul named Alex Jones. His online news site Infowars has millions of listeners and viewers. He’s interviewed President Trump, who has repeated Infowars stories on his Twitter feed and in speeches.
One of the fathers who lost their children in the shooting was Lenny Pozner, whose son Noah was killed. As the “hoaxers” went to greater extremes to spread their fake news – even targeting grieving parents - Lenny Pozner led the online fight back.
In April, the parents of Noah Pozner filed a defamation lawsuit against Jones. And now, amid concern about conspiracies and “fake news”, big social media companies have shut down Infowars and Alex Jones accounts.
This is an update of a story that was originally broadcast in March 2017.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Sam Judah
Studio managers: James Beard and John Scott

Photo Caption: Alex Jones, founder of Infowars
Photo Credit: Getty Images

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory. Twenty-six people, mostly young children, died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. They were the victims of a man named Adam Lanza, who killed himself after the slaughter. It was a shocking tragedy, even in a country used to regular gun violence.
Soon false rumours began to circulate online, that the attacks were staged using actors. Although they had no basis in truth, hundreds of YouTube videos, blogs, and tweets repeated the conspiracy theories. And the rumours were pushed by an alternative media mogul named Alex Jones. His online news site Infowars has millions of listeners and viewers. He’s interviewed President Trump, who has repeated Infowars stories on his Twitter feed and in speeches.
One of the fathers who lost their children in the shooting was Lenny Pozner, whose son Noah was killed. As the “hoaxers” went to greater extremes to spread their fake news – even targeting grieving parents - Lenny Pozner led the online fight back.
In April, the parents of Noah Pozner filed a defamation lawsuit against Jones. And now, amid concern about conspiracies and “fake news”, big social media companies have shut down Infowars and Alex Jones accounts.
This is an update of a story that was originally broadcast in March 2017.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Sam Judah
Studio managers: James Beard and John Scott

Photo Caption: Alex Jones, founder of Infowars
Photo Credit: Getty Images

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory. Twenty-six people, mostly young children, died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. They were the victims of a man named Adam Lanza, who killed himself after the slaughter. It was a shocking tragedy, even in a country used to regular gun violence.
Soon false rumours began to circulate online, that the attacks were staged using actors. Although they had no basis in truth, hundreds of YouTube videos, blogs, and tweets repeated the conspiracy theories. And the rumours were pushed by an alternative media mogul named Alex Jones. His online news site Infowars has millions of listeners and viewers. He’s interviewed President Trump, who has repeated Infowars stories on his Twitter feed and in speeches.
One of the fathers who lost their children in the shooting was Lenny Pozner, whose son Noah was killed. As the “hoaxers” went to greater extremes to spread their fake news – even targeting grieving parents - Lenny Pozner led the online fight back.
In April, the parents of Noah Pozner filed a defamation lawsuit against Jones. And now, amid concern about conspiracies and “fake news”, big social media companies have shut down Infowars and Alex Jones accounts.
This is an update of a story that was originally broadcast in March 2017.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Sam Judah
Studio managers: James Beard and John Scott

Photo Caption: Alex Jones, founder of Infowars
Photo Credit: Getty Images

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An update on the people behind a paranoid conspiracy theory. Twenty-six people, mostly young children, died at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. They were the victims of a man named Adam Lanza, who killed himself after the slaughter. It was a shocking tragedy, even in a country used to regular gun violence.
Soon false rumours began to circulate online, that the attacks were staged using actors. Although they had no basis in truth, hundreds of YouTube videos, blogs, and tweets repeated the conspiracy theories. And the rumours were pushed by an alternative media mogul named Alex Jones. His online news site Infowars has millions of listeners and viewers. He’s interviewed President Trump, who has repeated Infowars stories on his Twitter feed and in speeches.
One of the fathers who lost their children in the shooting was Lenny Pozner, whose son Noah was killed. As the “hoaxers” went to greater extremes to spread their fake news – even targeting grieving parents - Lenny Pozner led the online fight back.
In April, the parents of Noah Pozner filed a defamation lawsuit against Jones. And now, amid concern about conspiracies and “fake news”, big social media companies have shut down Infowars and Alex Jones accounts.
This is an update of a story that was originally broadcast in March 2017.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Sam Judah
Studio managers: James Beard and John Scott

Photo Caption: Alex Jones, founder of Infowars
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Scientists Encouraging Online Piracy2015101720151018 (WS)

Meet the scientist who set up a \u2018Pirate Bay for academics\u2019 to swap research online.

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Across the internet, scientists are swapping academic papers in secret - most of the time illegally – using a Twitter hashtag ‘#ICanHazPDF’. We ask the scientist who came up with the idea why thousands of people are using it, and how they justify their actions.
And, this week, Salman Rushdie dubbed the internet trolls who back the Indian Prime Minister ‘Modi Toadies’. But who are they? Are they a sign of growing intolerance in India? We hear from a leading liberal journalist, and a spokesman from Modi’s BJP party in an attempt to find out.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo: Scientist at computer / Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

The Silver Snipers2018062920180701 (WS)
20180630 (WS)
20180702 (WS)

Five Swedish pensioners test their aim at a professional eSports tournament.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The booming global gaming industry is dominated by young people. But five pensioners who call themselves the “Silver Snipers”are proof of gaming’s wider appeal. Trending follows the team as they head to DreamHack, a professional eSports tournament in Sweden.

Not only is gaming a hobby that connects them with their grandchildren’s generation, but it’s also helped them through some tough times in life.

They’re keen to shoot their virtual enemies, and they have plenty of young fans, but can the Silver Snipers take down their arch rivals from Finland, the Grey Gunners?

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Natalia Zuo
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Mike Wendling

Image caption: A team photo of the Silver Snipers / Credit: BBC

Five Swedish pensioners test their aim at a professional eSports tournament.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The booming global gaming industry is dominated by young people. But five pensioners who call themselves the “Silver Snipers”are proof of gaming’s wider appeal. Trending follows the team as they head to DreamHack, a professional eSports tournament in Sweden.

Not only is gaming a hobby that connects them with their grandchildren’s generation, but it’s also helped them through some tough times in life.

They’re keen to shoot their virtual enemies, and they have plenty of young fans, but can the Silver Snipers take down their arch rivals from Finland, the Grey Gunners?

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin and Natalia Zuo
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Mike Wendling

Image caption: A team photo of the Silver Snipers / Credit: BBC

The Star Pupil Who Scored Zero In Every Exam2015090520150906 (WS)

Maryam Malak, considered one of Egypt\u2019s top students, scored zero in her exams. Why?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Meet Maryam Malak, considered one of Egypt’s top performing students before she scored zero in all seven of her exams. The incident caused outcry in the country, and many believe corrupt officials are to blame.

We also hear about the social media battle being launched by some of the drivers of London’s iconic black cabs against taxi-app firm Uber, and the drivers of London’s iconic black cabs. By monitoring Twitter, a small but vocal minority of established London cabbies are targeting Uber customers that make complaints on the social network. Often they’re advising them to switch back to black cabs, but sometimes they’re trolling their rival’s passengers and sending them abuse online.

(Photo: Exam multiple choice paper. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Students Marching On Washington20180323

They\u2019ve changed America\u2019s conversation on guns. Now they are marching on Washington.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

The Students Who Say \u2018afrikaans Must Fall\u20192016022720160228 (WS)

Why do some students want to ban lectures in Afrikaans at a South African university?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Violence has erupted over the use of Afrikaans at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Some students want to see the language banned from lecture theatres, and say its presence is a form of racism. But others think it should remain.

And a Hollywood Actor – Terry Crews – has posted several videos to Facebook about fighting his addiction to pornography. It sparked a wave of support in online communities dedicated to abstaining from porn. We hear from a self-confessed porn addict, and a doctor who says pornography isn’t addictive in the same way as alcohol or gambling.

Produced by Sam Judah and Emma Wilson

Image caption: A student protest at the University of Pretoria, South Africa
Image credit: Twitter / @JehovahsFinest

The Taxi Driver\u2019s Rant That Went Viral2016102220161023 (WS)

A taxi driver\u2019s rant - bemoaning the state of the nation - has gone viral in Egypt

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A taxi driver’s political rant has gone viral in Egypt, prompting a debate about the state of the nation. Soon after it became popular, the video started disappearing online, leading to claims of censorship – and inspiring others to post similar videos of their own.

Also, in the wake of #RhodesMustFall, #FeesMustFall and #AfrikaansMustFall, a new hashtag is trending in South Africa - #ScienceMustFall. It is being used to ridicule one university student’s unusual demands for the ‘decolonisation’ of science. But does science really have a Eurocentric bias? Despite the online mockery, some believe the student was making an important point.

(Photo: Taxi driver through window. Credit: Al Hayat TV)

The Things Kids Do On Social2014020120140202 (WS)

How a cartel daughter embarrassed her dad and a 16-year-old fooled the football world

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This week, widespread anger in Mexico with the daughter of a drug cartel leader, after she posted glamourous pictures of herself on Instagram. Also, how 16-year-old Sam Gardener managed to convince the football world he was an experienced football journalist via a fake twitter personality.

And, should Russia have handed over Leningrad to the Nazis during the second world war? Asking this question caused a social media storm in Russia. We find out why.

With special guests Rafael Chacon of BBC Mundo and Oleg Antonenko of BBC Russian. Presented by Mukul Devichand.

The Trending Olympics2014020820140209 (WS)

An Olympic tweet-off, a food controversy in Iran \u2013 and a very irritating bird.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Western journalists are tweeting hilarious pictures of shambolic Olympic hotel rooms in Sochi. Some Russians are in on the joke but others say the coverage has been unfair. This week on BBC Trending, we watch the two sides line up against each other.

Also on the programme, we find out more about the social media outrage which forced an unprecedented event in modern Iranian history – a presidential apology.

Plus coverage of a debate in Saudi Arabia between a cleric and football supporters. And in slightly less important news, some members of the team turn their attention to the most popular mobile game of the moment.

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Russian’s Lina Rozovskaya, Camelia Sadeghzadeh from BBC Monitoring Iran, Sumaya Baksh from BBC Monitoring Arabic - and BBC Trending’s Flappy Bird Correspondent Mike Wendling.

The Truth Behind #wearethepeople2014021520140216 (WS)

The finance gurus using people power to encourage investment in the Iraqi dinar

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

#wearethepeople has been tweeted more than four million times in the past three weeks. It looks like an anti-government protest, but who’s really behind it? The Trending team investigates how financial ‘gurus’ are using the hashtag to encourage people to buy Iraqi dinar.

Plus, who takes more pictures of their meals – Asians or hipsters? Food expert Lawrence Lo shares his tips on how to take the best snap of your steak.

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.

The Truth Behind a Viral Murder Video20180928

A BBC team used open-source info to find out who was responsible for a shocking crime

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Truth Behind a Viral Murder Video2018092820180929 (WS)

A BBC team used open-source info to find out who was responsible for a shocking crime

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Truth Behind a Viral Murder Video2018092820180930 (WS)

A BBC team used open-source info to find out who was responsible for a shocking crime

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Truth Behind a Viral Murder Video2018092820181001 (WS)

A BBC team used open-source info to find out who was responsible for a shocking crime

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The Turkish Journalists Defying A Media \u2018crackdown\u20192016111220161113 (WS)

Journalists are using social media to get round censorship in Turkey.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Following an attempted coup earlier this year, the Turkish government has closed more than 150 news outlets. We meet one of the journalists defying the closures, by creating a new Periscope channel to live stream news from the country.

And – presenter Catrin Nye hears about a Chinese social media star who built his reputation by handing out cash to the poor. He’s been exposed this week by a video that shows him taking his gifts back once off air.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image caption: Two journalists live on Periscope / Image credit: Haber Sizsiniz

The Venezuelans Trading Medicine On Twitter2016061120160612 (WS)

Patients are turning to social media to source vital medical supplies.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Patients in the troubled South American country are turning to social media to source vital medical supplies. We hear from a former patient and a doctor who have both struggled to find medicine. If the government declared a state of emergency, international aid agencies could provide fresh supplies, but the government says the situation is manageable.

And – we find out why people are putting their names in parenthesis on Twitter. What started as a campaign led by anti-Semitic trolls turned into an act of defiance, as both Jewish and non-Jewish people tried to reclaim the racist symbol.

Produced by Sam Judah and Kate Lamble.

Photo: Olga Ramos

The Women 'shouting' Their Abortions2015092620150927 (WS)

Should women 'shout' their abortion online?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We hear why women around the world are sharing deeply personal stories about having an abortion and publishing their experiences to social media. And, we talk to one of those who strongly object to what is being shared.

And, we speak to the daughter of a Yemeni doctor who tried to tell the world about the war in his country. Not everyone liked what he had to say - and he disappeared over a month ago. Joining us in the studio are Anne-Marie Tomchak @AMTomchak and Mai Noman @MaiNoman.

(Photo: Baby in Marble, Credit: Thinkstock)

The Youtube Stars Selling Cheating2018050420180505 (WS)
20180506 (WS)
20180507 (WS)

An exclusive investigation into star YouTubers who are promoting academic cheating online

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An exclusive investigation by BBC Trending looks at the YouTubers who are promoting academic cheating online. More than 250 popular YouTube channels – including some fronted by children as young as 12 – have been paid to advertise Edubirdie, an essay-writing company. Many of the adverts, which collectively have had hundreds of millions of views, urge students to hire a “super smart nerd” to write their essays. It’s not illegal, but students caught handing in other people’s work can face serious consequences. So are the video stars misusing their power to influence their audience – and what is YouTube doing about it?

Presenter: Ed Main
Reporter: Branwen Jeffreys
Producer: Anisa Subedar
Studio Managers: Neil Churchill and James Beard

Photo: Popular YouTuber Adam Saleh has advertised Edubirdie on his channel.
Photo credit: Adam Saleh/YouTube

There Are 23 Amazing Reasons This Radio Programme Will Change Your Life2014122720141228 (WS)

The wave of digital upstarts that are transforming journalism

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A wave of digital upstarts is transforming the business of journalism. Using listicles like '19 Things You Didn’t Know Cats Could Do' and clickable stories such as 'Which Fictional Company Should You Actually Work At?' – these stories are designed to be shared on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks.

Of all the news start-ups in recent years BuzzFeed has arguably received the most, well, buzz – but it's a crowded field with competitors including Vice, Mashable and others.

The trend towards sharing isn't just the domain of a few high-tech start-ups – as newspapers and the BBC get to grips with the digital era, they're increasingly looking at ways to get their stories to people through social media.

Mukul Devichand has been talking to some of the top names in the new news business, to find out what makes a story spread online, whether pictures of cats will always triumph over hard news, and what this all means for the future of journalism – established players and upstarts alike.

(Image of a cat with headphones on. BBC Copyright)

This Comment Has Been Removed\u20262015081520150816 (WS)

Is this the end of online comments?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Is it time to get rid of the comments section? This month the Daily Dot decided it wasn’t worth the trouble and closed theirs down. They follow technology site The Verge, Slate and several other online publishers who are reassessing the need for online comment. But how do you foster engagement and dialogue without inadvertently feeding the trolls in the process? Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined by Nicholas White, the editor of the Daily Dot and Riese, the editor of Autostraddle, an online community for LGBT people.
Comments are also crucial to the appeal of a new live streaming application, Periscope. But we hear how some of the most followed women on the app feel it is leaving them exposed to sexist trolling; and some tips for handling this.
And we talk to the Turkish teacher who is defying a proposed government ban on the country’s prep schools by teaching his students directly via that same live streaming app.

@AMTomchak is joined in the studio by Gunney Yildiz @guneyyildiz.

(Picture Credit: Shutterstock)

Tipsters On Trial2016061820160619 (WS)

We investigate the social media betting tipsters who make money when you lose.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Will you be betting on Euro 2016? Most people will probably rely on national allegiances if they decide to gamble, but thousands of social media users, particularly in Britain, are now taking advice on where to place their money from strangers. Twitter and Facebook accounts that claim to be able to more accurately predict the outcome of games.

But while this new breed of tipsters might offer free advice, many are actually in league with the bookies. They’re offered around 30% of all the money their followers lose. So how much faith should people have in these new gambling gurus?

Produced by Kate Lamble.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

Toddler Peeing In Public Divides The Chinese Internet2014042620140427 (WS)

How a wee on a Hong Kong street made a splash on Weibo

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

As a video of a child urinating in the streets of Hong Kong goes viral on Chinese social media, we find out how the huge reaction reveals cultural tensions between Hong Kong and mainland China. BBC Chinese’s Martin Yip joins Mukul from Hong Kong.

The hashtag #EPNvsInternet attracted nearly one million tweets in Mexico. A social media campaign under the hashtag protested a new bill proposed by the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto, which seeks further controls over online activity.

And BBC Trending have been out on the tiles in Bangalore, India. We find out why the city’s nightlife is a point of contention in the coming elections, and how young people are using social media to seek out parties.

This week presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the Trending studio by BBC social media editor for World Service David Cuen and BBC Trending’s very own Benjamin Zand.

Tracking #macronleaks2017051220170513 (WS)
20170514 (WS)

How the American alt-right helped #MacronLeaks go viral.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In the run up to the French election, the president-elect Emmanuel Macron’s campaign was hit by a huge email hack. We reveal the full story of how the news spread on social media.
We’ll find out how it spread from obscure corners of the internet, to Twitter, to the mainstream media; and we hear from the American far-right activist at the centre of the story.

Presented by Megha Mohan and Mike Wendling
Produced by Will Yates

Image: Emmanuel Macron and his wife singing with choir / Credit: AFP

Travelling Without Male Consent2017052620170527 (WS)
20170528 (WS)

We unpick the story of a viral hashtag which challenged Saudi 'guardianship' rules

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We unpick the case of Dina Ali, the 24-year-old Saudi national whose story triggered a viral hashtag challenging Saudi Arabia’s 'guardianship' rules, which give male guardians control over women. Where is Dina now? And why was the hashtag she inspired so significant?

Also, they may be separated by thousands of miles but this week Manchester in England and Marawi in the Philippines had something in common – deadly attacks and an outpouring of goodwill messages from the online community. We examine the social media reactions following deadly attacks.

Presenter: Megha Mohan
Producer: Kayleen Devlin

(Image: Woman standing alone, Credit: Getty Images)

Trolls, 'the Devil', And Death2016120320161204 (WS)

An investigation into how the Philippines' war on drugs is being fought on and offline

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

President Rodrigo Duterte was elected to power in the Philippines promising to tackle crime and to feed the corpses of drug dealers to the fish. In the months since he took office almost 5,000 people are believed to have been killed by police and vigilantes.

The BBC Trending team investigates how Duterte's 'war on drugs' is playing out in real life, and how a sophisticated social media strategy is ensuring support for the controversial policy.

Produced by Kate Lamble
Presented by Megha Mohan

(Photo: Police officer patrols a neighbourhood in the Philippines. His gun bears a badge with the words 'Duterte Iron Fist')

Turkey\u2019s Social Media Ban And A Saudi First Kiss2014032920140330 (WS)

Saudi Arabia\u2019s nose bumping answer to the globally trending video \u2018First Kiss\u2019

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Over the last week, events on social media moved fast in Turkey as first Twitter then YouTube were blocked under a controversial new internet law. Mukul Devichand has been late night tweeting to get the latest and speaks to journalist Solchuk Goltasli to find out more.

BBC Trending also catches up with the women behind a new Facebook campaign in Ukraine. The group are raising money for the military by selling t-shirts with the provocative slogan ‘Don’t Give It to a Russian’. Plus comedian Hatoon Kadi tells us what’s really behind the Saudi Arabian parody of the trending video ‘First Kiss’, and why YouTube is so big in the country.

Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by BBC Arabic’s Mai Noman, BBC Digital Consultant Esra Dogramaci and down the line from Kiev in Ukraine is Masha Kondrachuk from BBC Monitoring.

Producer: India Rakusen

Twitter Bots Target Uk By-election2017022520170226 (WS)

Why did a mysterious group of pro-Russia Twitter accounts target a UK election?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why did a strange network of Twitter accounts, usually the source of pro-Russian messages, pump out tweets about a very specific British election? BBC Trending’s Mike Wendling investigates.

And Fabienne Menoud, a black 26 year old Bollywood fan from Switzerland, has posted an open letter online accusing the Indian film industry and its fans of being racist. We examine her claims.

Produced by Anisa Subedar and Will Yates.

Presented by Catrin Nye.

(Photo: Tweet of World Gazette poster. Credit: @Azzurra_Baldino/Twitter)

Undercover With The Alt-right2018021620180218 (WS)
20180219 (WS)

Patrik Hermansson spent a year undercover with extremist groups. He tells us his story

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

When far-right groups gathered in Charlottesville in Virginia last year, a spy was among them. Patrik Hermansson had spent months embedded in extremist organisations. Patrik, a researcher for the British anti-racist group Hope Not Hate, first approached the alt-right online. His social media interactions quickly turned into face-to-face meetings and eventually he was recruited to give speeches in front of groups in the United States.

Patrik Hermansson’s operation is now over and he tells us his story, including how in Charlottesville he saw violence and death – the culmination of the ideologies he had witnessed throughout his time with the alt-right.

Reporters: Mike Wendling and Will Yates
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Patrik Hermansson, the anti-racist activist who infiltrated the alt-right in Europe and the United States / Credit: Hope Not Hate

When far-right groups gathered in Charlottesville in Virginia last year, a spy was among them. Patrik Hermansson had spent months embedded in extremist organisations. Patrik, a researcher for the British anti-racist group Hope Not Hate, first approached the alt-right online. His social media interactions quickly turned into face-to-face meetings and eventually he was recruited to give speeches in front of groups in the United States.

Patrik Hermansson’s operation is now over and he tells us his story, including how in Charlottesville he saw violence and death – the culmination of the ideologies he had witnessed throughout his time with the alt-right.

Reporters: Mike Wendling and Will Yates
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Photo: White nationalists march in Charlottesville in August 2017. Credit: Getty Images)

Using The F-word To Promote Feminism2014102520141026 (WS)

How young girls swearing have sent a new feminist campaign viral

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We take a look at one of the biggest trending videos this week - ‘F-Bombs for Feminism’. It shows young girls dressed as princesses whilst swearing, and it’s angered many with its shock tactics. But it’s not just a campaign video as the t-shirt company who made it are openly for profit.

Also, the Trending team investigate why a woman, known as Felina, in Tamaulipas, Mexico was kidnapped, and apparently murdered, because of her twitter account. Tamaulipas is one of the most dangerous states in Mexico with two of the biggest drug cartels in the country locked in conflict.

Tweets from the woman’s account captured the attention of thousands in Mexico and across the border into the United States. Her account used to anonymously share information about local violence and crime within Tamaulipas, but this time it sent out a sombre warning to similar accounts and finally an image of her death.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Anne-Marie Tomchak and Greg Brosnan from the Trending team.

Produced by India Rakusen

(Image from ‘F-Bombs for Feminism’ by FCKH8)

Victorian Social Media2014012520140126 (WS)

India\u2019s first social media politician, Victorian Facebook and how sex is now sharable.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

In this week’s programme presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak, we find out why Delhi’s chief minister, Arvind Kejriwal, is attracting so many jokes on Indian social media about his honesty and bravery. A new conversation in Britain around the hashtag #VictorianFacebook attempts to revive the Victorian era. We hear how the Victorians themselves would have been more familiar with social media than we may think.

And a naughty trend on social media: the new sites that want us to share our sex interests and lives with one another. But sharing sexual content online has its pitfalls as the victims of revenge porn known too well.

With Neha Bhatnagar, Matthew Sweet and Estelle Doyle in the studio.

Vietnam\u2019s Facebook Blockers2014080220140803 (WS)

Why are Vietnamese human rights activists having their Facebook accounts suspended?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On this week’s Trending we explore why human rights activists are having their Facebook accounts suspended in Vietnam. So called ‘opinion shapers’ are complaining that the profiles of activists contain false information resulting in Facebook suspending accounts. But who are these people who want to shut down accounts and what can Facebook do in such a tricky situation? We speak to David Nguyen, a human rights lawyer currently under house arrest about his experience.
Also on the programme, what a video of a child firing a rocket propelled grenade shows us about the gun problem in Libya. We speak to Tripoli based journalist Hassan Morajea about his run-ins with children with guns.
And who is the mysterious woman in black walking across the USA? We attempt to solve the mystery..
Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined in the studio by Ly Truong from the Vietnamese service, Mohamed Madi from World Online and Annie Waldman from the US Trending team.

Produced by Anna Meisel and Laura Gray

Virtually Making A Fortune?2018082420180827 (WS)
20180826 (WS)
20180825 (WS)

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality? In the virtual world of Decentraland, users can build whatever they can imagine on their own plots of land. Some hope to make a profit by trading goods and services using the social platform’s own cryptocurrency. Could this be the birth of a new virtual economy or a cryptocurrency bubble waiting to burst?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joanne Whalley
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: James Beard
Editor: Ed Main

Photo Caption: This is Decentraland
Photo Credit: This is Decentraland

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Virtually Making a Fortune?2018082420180827 (WS)
20180826 (WS)
20180825 (WS)

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality? In the virtual world of Decentraland, users can build whatever they can imagine on their own plots of land. Some hope to make a profit by trading goods and services using the social platform’s own cryptocurrency. Could this be the birth of a new virtual economy or a cryptocurrency bubble waiting to burst?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joanne Whalley
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: James Beard
Editor: Ed Main

Photo Caption: This is Decentraland
Photo Credit: This is Decentraland

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality? In the virtual world of Decentraland, users can build whatever they can imagine on their own plots of land. Some hope to make a profit by trading goods and services using the social platform’s own cryptocurrency. Could this be the birth of a new virtual economy or a cryptocurrency bubble waiting to burst?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joanne Whalley
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: James Beard
Editor: Ed Main

Photo Caption: This is Decentraland
Photo Credit: This is Decentraland

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality? In the virtual world of Decentraland, users can build whatever they can imagine on their own plots of land. Some hope to make a profit by trading goods and services using the social platform’s own cryptocurrency. Could this be the birth of a new virtual economy or a cryptocurrency bubble waiting to burst?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joanne Whalley
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: James Beard
Editor: Ed Main

Photo Caption: This is Decentraland
Photo Credit: This is Decentraland

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Why are people spending real money to buy land that only exists in virtual reality? In the virtual world of Decentraland, users can build whatever they can imagine on their own plots of land. Some hope to make a profit by trading goods and services using the social platform’s own cryptocurrency. Could this be the birth of a new virtual economy or a cryptocurrency bubble waiting to burst?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joanne Whalley
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Studio Manager: James Beard
Editor: Ed Main

Photo Caption: This is Decentraland
Photo Credit: This is Decentraland

Weapons Of Mass Deception2018060120180602 (WS)
20180603 (WS)
20180604 (WS)

The online dirty tricks and social media bots rupturing relations in the Middle East.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

It is almost a year since Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, Bahrain and their allies cut off diplomatic ties with Qatar. This week, BBC Arabic journalist Owen Pinnell helps us reveal how allegations of hacked websites, bot armies and other online dirty tricks have fuelled the ongoing tensions between the two sides.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin
Editor: Edward Main

Photo Credit: Reuters

What Are #ramadanproblems?2014070520140706 (WS)

How a global hashtag brings fasting Muslims together

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

It’s the first week of the Islamic month of Ramadan and ‘Happy Fasting’ has been tweeted thousands of times along with #RamadanProblems. Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined by BBC Asian Network’s Murtz to talk about how the Muslim community comes together online to support, pray, learn and laugh.

And this week the Trending team puts their investigative hats on to verify some of the images shared on Twitter under #GazaUnderAttack. Anne-Marie asks to what extent we can trust the content shared on social media and whether we, as netizens, should bear any responsibility for the content we upload and share.

Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined in the studio by BBC Arabic’s Abdirahim Saeed and BBC Asian Network’s Murtz.

What Happened To #kony2012?2017051920170520 (WS)
20170521 (WS)

And the the priest mixing Buddhist chants with techno beats

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Kony2012 was a social media campaign which led to a US-backed manhunt for an African warlord. 5 years on the hunt’s been called off and Joseph Kony is still on the run. We look back at a turning point in online activism.

Also, the Buddhist priest mixing traditional chants with techno beats in an effort to attract younger people to his temple in Japan.

And why an American man is suing his date for texting during a film.

Presented by Mukul Devichand
Produced by Kayleen Devlin

(Photo: Joseph Kony. Credit: Stuart Price/Getty Images)

What is #QAnon?2018081720180820 (WS)
20180819 (WS)
20180818 (WS)

The online conspiracy theory that is firing up supporters of President Trump

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Back in October 2017, an anonymous figure posted a series of cryptic messages on an online message board. The user, who signed themselves "Q", claimed to have top security clearance within the US government. Despite there being no credible evidence for the claims, “Q” has sparked a vast, endlessly-complicated pro-Trump conspiracy theory. The far-fetched story has since jumped from fringe message boards to the floor of a President Trump rally. We look at the story behind the mysterious “Q”.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

The online conspiracy theory that is firing up supporters of President Trump

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Back in October 2017, an anonymous figure posted a series of cryptic messages on an online message board. The user, who signed themselves "Q", claimed to have top security clearance within the US government. Despite there being no credible evidence for the claims, “Q” has sparked a vast, endlessly-complicated pro-Trump conspiracy theory. The far-fetched story has since jumped from fringe message boards to the floor of a President Trump rally. We look at the story behind the mysterious “Q”.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

The online conspiracy theory that is firing up supporters of President Trump

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Back in October 2017, an anonymous figure posted a series of cryptic messages on an online message board. The user, who signed themselves "Q", claimed to have top security clearance within the US government. Despite there being no credible evidence for the claims, “Q” has sparked a vast, endlessly-complicated pro-Trump conspiracy theory. The far-fetched story has since jumped from fringe message boards to the floor of a President Trump rally. We look at the story behind the mysterious “Q”.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

The online conspiracy theory that is firing up supporters of President Trump

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Back in October 2017, an anonymous figure posted a series of cryptic messages on an online message board. The user, who signed themselves "Q", claimed to have top security clearance within the US government. Despite there being no credible evidence for the claims, “Q” has sparked a vast, endlessly-complicated pro-Trump conspiracy theory. The far-fetched story has since jumped from fringe message boards to the floor of a President Trump rally. We look at the story behind the mysterious “Q”.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

What Is \u2018milkshake Duck\u2019?2017121520171217 (WS)
20171218 (WS)

How a fictional bird came to represent the dark side of internet fame

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

"Milkshake Duck" is internet slang for an ordinary person who is briefly cheered, but then swiftly turned upon. We explain why the family of an 11-year-old boy is the latest example of the phenomenon. And where did the idea come from in the first place?

Also, BBC Brasil investigation has revealed that an army of so-called social media cyborgs tried to influence the country’s presidential election. BBC Brasil’s editor Silvia Salek has the lowdown.

And, a new chapter in the Harry Potter story - as written by robots.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

Caption: A picture of a duck / Credit:Getty Images

What Is 4chan?2017060220170603 (WS)
20170604 (WS)

How one website has become influential in online politics today.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

How an anonymous social network spawned some of the biggest and most recognisable online political movements. We look at the origins, the people who use it and what the future holds.

Also, a new reality television show in South Africa on polygamy has ignited a wide internet discussion. We speak to Musa Mseleku and one of his wives, Thobile Khumalo on how they navigate their polygamous lifestyle.

Presented by Megha Mohan and Mike Wendling
Produced by Anisa Subedar

Image: Logo from the 4Chan website depicting a girl with purple hair holding a purple gift box / Credit: 4Chan

What Is €milkshake Duck’?20171215

How a fictional bird came to represent the dark side of internet fame

"Milkshake Duck" is internet slang for an ordinary person who is briefly cheered, but then swiftly turned upon. We explain why the family of an 11-year-old boy is the latest example of the phenomenon. And where did the idea come from in the first place?

Also, BBC Brasil investigation has revealed that an army of so-called social media cyborgs tried to influence the country’s presidential election. BBC Brasil’s editor Silvia Salek has the lowdown.

And, a new chapter in the Harry Potter story - as written by robots.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

Caption: A picture of a duck / Credit:Getty Images

What Is It Like To Be A Woman In Nigeria?2015070420150705 (WS)

Meet the members of a book club who sparked a global conversation about everyday sexism.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Meet Florence Warmate and her friends from a tiny book club in Abuja. Inspired by famous Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, they sparked a global conversation about everyday sexism.
Find out what happened to the HIV-positive man who stood in a park in Finland with his eyes closed, and asked passers-by if they dared to touch him.

And we hear why journalists in Burundi have been forced underground. In the midst of a government imposed media blackout, members of one group are risking their lives by continuing to produce news reports – and posting them on social media.

Joining us from Nairobi is BBC Journalist Maud Jullien.

Produced by Sam Judah and Estelle Doyle

Photo: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Photo Credit: Stuart C. Wilson / Getty Images

What It Takes To Make A Youtube Star2014041920140420 (WS)

When FouseyTube hit two million, it\u2019s creator celebrated by jumping out of a plane

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This week Anne-Marie Tomchak has been finding out who the man behind YouTube hit FouseyTube really is. Twenty-four year old Yousef Saleh Erakat makes comedy sketches, pranks and ‘social experiments’ from his home in California, and he’s just hit two million subscribers. BBC Trending have been discovering what drives the YouTube star.

Mike Wendling is in the studio sporting yoga pants and bringing the latest roundup of stories from the BBC Trending team.

And Anne-Marie is joined by Aliyu Tanko from BBC Hausa to discuss social media activism in Nigeria. This week a man was released from prison following the campaign #FreeCiaxon, but just how effective is online protest in the country?

Produced by India Rakusen

What\u2019s Nexit?2016070220160703 (WS)

Is #Frexit next? The social media trends inspired by the UK's vote to leave the EU.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

First came #Brexit, could #Frexit, #Ausexit or #Texit follow? We take a look at the social media movements which have been inspired by Britain voting to leave the European Union.

And we ask why, less than an hour after a terror attack in Istanbul, Turkey's government banned Facebook and Twitter in the country.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Anisa Subedar

(Photo caption: Neon exit sign / Photo credit: Shutterstock)

When A Democrat Met A Republican2018042720180428 (WS)
20180429 (WS)
20180430 (WS)

Inside one attempt to pop political filter bubbles in America

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Deb describes herself as “far to the left”. Tom’s a big fan of Donald Trump. Trending went to Minnesota as part of the BBC’s Crossing Divides season to look at a grassroots effort to bring people like Deb and Tom together.
According to research, the ideological gap between Democrats and Republicans has never been wider. But one innovative project called Better Angels brings together people from the left and the right with a series of structured questions and strict ground rules. What happened when Deb and Tom met face-to-face – and could it really lead to any lasting change?

Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Credit: BBC (Deb Mosby/Tom Chamberlain)

Deb describes herself as “far to the left? Tom’s a big fan of Donald Trump. Trending went to Minnesota as part of the BBC’s Crossing Divides season to look at a grassroots effort to bring people like Deb and Tom together.
According to research, the ideological gap between Democrats and Republicans has never been wider. But one innovative project called Better Angels brings together people from the left and the right with a series of structured questions and strict ground rules. What happened when Deb and Tom met face-to-face – and could it really lead to any lasting change?

Reporter: Anisa Subedar
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo Credit: BBC (Deb Mosby/Tom Chamberlain)

Where Do Memes Come From?2018070620180707 (WS)
20180708 (WS)
20180709 (WS)

The world of funny viral images and videos is being hacked by fringe groups.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

They spread like wildfire, but where do they come from? This week, the world of memes. What goes viral online might seem random, but memes can be engineered and hacked to carry political messages.
Trending talks to Gianluca Stringhini, associate professor at University College London. His team has been looking into fringe internet groups – they’ve found that some far-right websites and message boards have a disproportionate impact on the memes that spread on mainstream social networks.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producer: Anisa Subedar
Studio Manager: Mike Wooley

Picture Caption: One example of the “Distracted Boyfriend” meme
Picture Credit: Getty/iStock/BBC

White People And Dreadlocks2016040220160403 (WS)

Millions watch video of white student being harassed over his dreadlocks.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Two million people watched a video of a confrontation between two American students over his dreadlocks. What’s wrong with white people having dreadlocks?

One student had a problem with Cory Goldstein’s dreadlocks, because he is white and she believed he is “appropriating” her culture.

Also in the programme, a Mexican father seeking justice on social media for his daughter’s alleged rape.

Presented by Mike Wendling.
Produced by Emma Wilson and Sam Judah.
Photo Credit: Golden Gate Xpress

Who Are Antifa?2017102720171028 (WS)
20171029 (WS)
20171030 (WS)

Far right supporters and hard left groups known as \u201cantifa\u201d are fighting on US streets.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This year has seen a sharp rise in the number of confrontations in America between far right white supremacists and a group known as antifa – the anti fascists.

But what is ‘free speech’? White nationalists will claim their fight is to defend the first amendment and protect the right to free speech but their opponents believe it’s an excuse to promote often racist ideologies.

We look at these two groups in traditionally liberal towns like Berkeley, California and Portland, Oregon.

But who is winning and what are they fighting for?

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: American police officers / Credit: BBC

Who Are Antifa?20171030

Far right supporters and hard left groups known as “antifa” are fighting on US streets.

This year has seen a sharp rise in the number of confrontations in America between far right white supremacists and a group known as antifa – the anti fascists.

But what is ‘free speech’? White nationalists will claim their fight is to defend the first amendment and protect the right to free speech but their opponents believe it’s an excuse to promote often racist ideologies.

We look at these two groups in traditionally liberal towns like Berkeley, California and Portland, Oregon.

But who is winning and what are they fighting for?

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: American police officers / Credit: BBC

Who Hates Germany's New Hate Speech Law?2017091520170916 (WS)
20170917 (WS)

We investigate a new German law which will force social networks to delete hate speech.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We investigate new German legislation which will force social networks to delete hate speech - or face massive fines. Some support it, and the government is determined to go ahead, but critics say it will restrict free speech.

Also, how the online row over a media start-up officially endorsed by Hilary Clinton has exposed the deep split in the Democratic Party.

Plus, some of the trends of the week - including a lovelorn pianist and a seven year old neurology expert.

Presented by Kayleen Devlin
Produced by Will Yates

Picture caption: Syrian refugee Anas Modamani (left) and Goetz Froemming, a candidate for Germany’s anti-immigration AfD party, disagree about the need for Germany's tough new online speech law.
Copyright: BBC

Who Pushed The \u2018calexit\u2019 Hashtag?2017110320171105 (WS)
20171106 (WS)

What\u2019s the connection between Moscow and groups that want to break up the United States?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We investigate connections between Moscow and groups that want to break up the United States. Also, the list of "sexual predator" professors that has sparked an online debate in India. And, the disgusting story of a university roommate from hell.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

Image: A protester holds a 'Calexit' sign / Credit: Chelsea Guglielmino / Getty Images

Who Pushed The €calexit’ Hashtag?20171103

What’s the connection between Moscow and groups that want to break up the United States?

We investigate connections between Moscow and groups that want to break up the United States. Also, the list of "sexual predator" professors that has sparked an online debate in India. And, the disgusting story of a university roommate from hell.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Will Yates

Image: A protester holds a 'Calexit' sign / Credit: Chelsea Guglielmino / Getty Images

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

Who\u2019s Pushing Syria Conspiracies?2018042020180421 (WS)
20180422 (WS)
20180423 (WS)

Influential Twitter accounts are pushing conspiracy theories about Syria.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

There’s a disinformation war over the conflict in Syria. With reporting on the ground increasingly difficult, who can you trust to bring you the truth?

BBC Trending has unearthed a network of very influential Twitter accounts, some with tens or hundreds of thousands of followers, who push conspiracy theories.

Plus authorities in the UK say social media is fuelling an escalation in knife attacks. We look into those claims and ask, have social networks really changed the nature of street violence?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporters: Mike Wendling, Gem O’Reilly
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin
Studio Manager: Nigel Appleton

Picture Caption: Profile picture of Sarah Abdallah, part of a network of pro-Syrian government accounts identified by the social media research company Graphika
Picture Credit: Twitter/@sahouraxo

Who's Pushing Syria Conspiracies?20180420
Why Are People Calling For An #isismediablackout?2014082320140824 (WS)

The online response to the beheading of James Foley

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

On Tuesday night the jihadist group Islamic State released a video of the beheading of American journalist James Foley. The graphic film was shared on Youtube, Twitter and Facebook, not only by jihadist supporters, but by others upset by the content because of its brutality. Many responded to the sharing of the film by calling for an #ISISmediablackout. James Fletcher speaks to Joseph Carter, research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, about who was sharing the video and why.

James also speaks to Jon Novick, a filmmaker with dwarfism who used a secret camera to capture and expose the way people react to him on the streets of New York. And who are the ‘Cyber-Hindus’ and what are they trying to achieve with their recent spate of pro-Hindu hashtags?

Plus more trends from across the world in just 60 seconds.

Presenter James Fletcher is joined in the studio by Joseph Carter, research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and from Delhi by Vikas Pandey from BBC Monitoring.

Produced by Anna Meisel

Picture: American journalist James Foley who was killed by Islamic State militants. Credit: Associated Press

Why Conspiracy Theories Take Off Online2018012620180128 (WS)
20180129 (WS)

Why do conspiracy theories go big on social media?

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Some conspiracy theories spread like wildfire online, despite the truth really being out there (and easily searchable). What makes people continue to share conspiracies?

And, after a video showing 16-year-old Ayrton Little from Louisiana getting accepted into Harvard University went viral, we take an in-depth look at the school where he studied. It has 100% graduation rate and students can only get one of two grades: “A” or “F”.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Photo: A plane flying in the sky. Credit: Getty Images)

Some conspiracy theories spread like wildfire online, despite the truth really being out there (and easily searchable). What makes people continue to share conspiracies?

And, after a video showing 16-year-old Ayrton Little from Louisiana getting accepted into Harvard University went viral, we take an in-depth look at the school where he studied. It has 100% graduation rate and students can only get one of two grades: “A? or “F?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporters: Chris Bell and Alex Dackevych
Producer: Anisa Subedar
Studio Manager: James Beard

Photo credit: Getty Images

Why Did \u2018black Twitter\u2019 Users Get Banned?2017120120171203 (WS)
20171204 (WS)

Meet one of the people snared by Twitter\u2019s new anti-abuse rules.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

What happens when Twitter is your favourite platform but the company then suspends or terminates your account? The new Twitter rules meant one ‘black Twitter’ user was banned – along with many of his online friends. What happened next?

Also, Donald Trump started a diplomatic spat with Britain after retweeting inflammatory videos originally posted by the deputy leader of a far-right UK group. Who was behind those videos, and how have they built an international anti-Islam hub on Facebook?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producers: Elizabeth Cassin and Anisa Subedar

Image: Unclebantzz, a member of a loose group known as “black Twitter”, found his Twitter account suspended after the company instituted new anti-abuse rules / Credit: BBC

Why Did €black Twitter’ Users Get Banned?20171201

Meet one of the people snared by Twitter’s new anti-abuse rules.

What happens when Twitter is your favourite platform but the company then suspends or terminates your account? The new Twitter rules meant one ‘black Twitter’ user was banned – along with many of his online friends. What happened next?

Also, Donald Trump started a diplomatic spat with Britain after retweeting inflammatory videos originally posted by the deputy leader of a far-right UK group. Who was behind those videos, and how have they built an international anti-Islam hub on Facebook?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Producers: Elizabeth Cassin and Anisa Subedar

Image: Unclebantzz, a member of a loose group known as “black Twitter”, found his Twitter account suspended after the company instituted new anti-abuse rules / Credit: BBC

Women Against Feminism2014072620140727 (WS)

Why are some women turning against feminism?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We meet the women behind the movement ‘Women Against Feminism’ which is becoming increasingly popular on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr. We hear the reaction of feminists who say their ideas have been misunderstood. Also on the programme, why a video mocking North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has been watched over 55 million times in China and what it shows about the relationship between the two countries.

Presenter Mukul Devichand is joined by Vincent Ni from the BBC Chinese Service and Anne-Marie Tomchak from BBC Trending.

World Cup Extravaganza2018071320180714 (WS)
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20180716 (WS)

As the full-time whistle blows, a recap of the big social media trends of the World Cup.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This year’s World Cup had it all: anxiety and heartbreak, joy and jubilation. And every emotion was reflected on social media. As the global feast of football concludes, Trending looks back at the big trends and how the “beautiful game” dominated online chatter across the globe.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Photo: A French fan celebrates. Credit: Getty Images)

As the full-time whistle blows, a recap of the big social media trends of the World Cup.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This year’s World Cup had it all: anxiety and heartbreak, joy and jubilation. And every emotion was reflected on social media. As the global feast of football concludes, Trending looks back at the big trends and how the “beautiful game” dominated online chatter across the globe.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Photo: A French fan celebrates. Credit: Getty Images)

As the full-time whistle blows, a recap of the big social media trends of the World Cup.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

This year’s World Cup had it all: anxiety and heartbreak, joy and jubilation. And every emotion was reflected on social media. As the global feast of football concludes, Trending looks back at the big trends and how the “beautiful game” dominated online chatter across the globe.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Anisa Subedar

(Photo: A French fan celebrates. Credit: Getty Images)

Yamecanse In Mexico And Serial Podcast Detectives2014120620141207 (WS)

Outcry over 43 missing students, and unpicking a murder case

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

An online campaign around the hashtag #Yamecanse has been expressing the sentiment “I have had enough”. Videos, messages and photos have been voicing frustration with authorities over the country’s problem with corruption, crime and the drug cartels. The campaign was a reaction to the disappearance of 43 students after clashing with police. It has been 10 weeks since the students went missing, but the campaign has broadened out to a general protest against the state of the country. It is aimed not just at those in Mexico, but also calls on the international community to take action.

USA
Millions of people are hooked on the podcast Serial, a spin-off of the US public radio show This American Life. Serial revisits a real life murder case that happened in Baltimore 15 years ago. A suspect was found guilty at trial at the time, and is currently still in jail - though he insists he is innocent. The case has taken on a life of its own on social media, with half a million people discussing it on Reddit and some of them turning detective as they think they can shed new light on the case.

We look at the the investigations occurring on Reddit and find out what happens when the online community becomes part of the story.

(Photo: People hold posters during a march demanding justice in the case of the 43 missing students. Credit: Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images)

'you Are Not Your Marks!'2015053020150531 (WS)

There is more to life than college entrance is the message going viral in India

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Your exam results should not define your future - that is the message going viral in India this week, as millions of school students brace themselves for results day. We talk to its author, the comedian Vir Das. We find out why a genre of gay erotic fiction that is hugely popular among teenage girls called Dan Mei has been banned in Vietnam. And, we hear from the campaigners who are wearing miniskirts as a protest in Tunisia, in reaction to a Facebook campaign 'Be a man and veil your women', which is spreading in the Arab world.

Joining Mike Wendling in the studio, Vikas Pandey @BBCVikas, Nader Ibrahim @nader_sm, and Ly Truong @bbcvietnamese

(Photo:Indian school children prepare for their exams. Credit: Raveendran/Getty Images)

Youtube And Child Safety2017122920171231 (WS)
20180101 (WS)

A summary of revelations about child protection measures and predators on YouTube.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

We reveal what happened after our investigation on YouTube which revealed the extent of predators on the site. What changes have YouTube made and how did the report affect advertising on the site - and its parent company Google?

And the remarkable story of an international investigation which was started by a reader of the BBC Trending blog. As a result, a dangerous predator is now in jail.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Anisa Subedar
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Girl looking at computer screen / Credit: Getty Images

Youtube Star Lefloid And A Filipina Rescue2014112920141130 (WS)

German celebrity vlogger, and a Filipina maid in Saudi Arabia

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A German YouTube Star
Charlotte McDonald has been to Berlin to meet one of Germany’s biggest YouTube personalities, Le Floid. The 27-year-old vlogger is the man behind ‘LeNews’, a channel that takes a different twist on current affairs in a bid to get people talking.

Rescue in Saudi Arabia
When a Filipina domestic worker in Saudi Arabia posted a video of her living conditions it was shared over 400,000 times across the world. We find out how the video led to her removal from the house and provoked debate in Saudi Arabia.

The Trending Minute
We talk flying lambchops, #fergusonriottips, dancing in Iran and Pit Bulls in America – all in 60 seconds.

(Image: YouTube star LeFloid in Berlin. BBC copyright)

Youtube\u2019s Child Protection Problems2017112420171126 (WS)
20171127 (WS)

A Trending investigation finds a glitch in YouTube's tool for reporting obscene comments.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Part of YouTube's system for reporting sexualised comments left on children's videos has not been functioning correctly for more than a year, volunteer moderators have told Trending.

Sources inside YouTube’s “Trusted Flagger” programme say there could be up to 100,000 predatory accounts leaving indecent comments on videos.

A BBC Trending investigation has discovered a flaw in a tool that enables the public to report abuse.

But YouTube says it reviews the "vast majority" of reports within 24 hours, and that it has taken steps to shut down predatory accounts.

Presenters: Elizabeth Cassin and Mike Wendling
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Woman holding a tablet device with the YouTube logo showing on the screen.
Credit: Getty Images / iStock

Youtube\u2019s Neo-nazi Problem2018031620180318 (WS)
20180319 (WS)

YouTube admits it\u2019s having trouble dealing with neo-Nazi hate music on its platform.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

A BBC Trending investigation has found huge inconsistencies in how YouTube deals with neo-Nazi hate music. These are songs which use extreme violent language and imagery to advocate murder and violence against minority groups.
Many of the hate music videos are from punk and hardcore bands active in the 80s and 90s – but they found a new life on the internet.
Natalia Zuo explains how the BBC Trending team carried out an experiment to put YouTube’s reporting systems to the test.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Natalia Zuo
Producer: Elizabeth Cassin
Studio Manager: Neil Churchill

Photo: A screen grab from a neo-Nazi music video on YouTube
Credit: YouTube

Youtube’s Child Protection Problems20171124

A Trending investigation finds a glitch in YouTube's tool for reporting obscene comments.

Part of YouTube's system for reporting sexualised comments left on children's videos has not been functioning correctly for more than a year, volunteer moderators have told Trending.

Sources inside YouTube’s “Trusted Flagger” programme say there could be up to 100,000 predatory accounts leaving indecent comments on videos.

A BBC Trending investigation has discovered a flaw in a tool that enables the public to report abuse.

But YouTube says it reviews the "vast majority" of reports within 24 hours, and that it has taken steps to shut down predatory accounts.

Presenters: Elizabeth Cassin and Mike Wendling
Producer: Anisa Subedar

Image: Woman holding a tablet device with the YouTube logo showing on the screen.
Credit: Getty Images / iStock

Youtube's Neo-nazi Problem20180316
Zika Whatsapp Support Group2016013020160131 (WS)

The Zika Whatsapp Support Group, and are British Muslim women 'traditionally submissive'?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Brazilian woman sets up support group on Whatsapp for mothers with Zika virus. BBC Trending finds out more.

Also, are British Muslim women ‘traditionally submissive?’ Women respond with #traditionallysubmissive online following reported comments by the British Prime Minister.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Anisa Subedar.

Image: Baby being examined
Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

01Banning Television2013110220131103 (WS)

Twitter storm hits Pakistani TV channel.

BBC Trending is the new show which hand-picks a selection of stories trending on social media around the globe - and explores what these stories tell us about how the world is changing. It’s presented by Mukul Devichand. You can also follow our regular updates on the BBC Trending blog (bbc.com/trending). Spotted an interesting trend? Tweet us using #BBCtrending.

This week a Twitter storm called for one of Pakistan’s most popular TV channels to be banned. Is it ok to take Selfies at funerals and other sensitive locations? And a travel nightmare for one Indian catches the attention of millions.

Trending, explaining the stories the world is sharing

BBC Trending is the new show which hand-picks a selection of stories trending on social media around the globe - and explores what these stories tell us about how the world is changing. It’s presented by Mukul Devichand. You can also follow our regular updates on the BBC Trending blog (bbc.com/trending). Spotted an interesting trend? Tweet us using #BBCtrending.

This week a Twitter storm called for one of Pakistan’s most popular TV channels to be banned. Is it ok to take Selfies at funerals and other sensitive locations? And a travel nightmare for one Indian catches the attention of millions.

02Girls And Boys In Turkey2013110920131110 (WS)

Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan sparked a debate this week on social media over whether male and female students should live together. Thousands aired their views on Twitter. Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out what they have been saying.

BBC Trending also takes a look at the murky world of dark hashtags- where people appear to be selling everything from cocktails of prescription drugs to guns through social media sites.

Should male and female students live together?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan sparked a debate this week on social media over whether male and female students should live together. Thousands aired their views on Twitter. Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out what they have been saying.

BBC Trending also takes a look at the murky world of dark hashtags- where people appear to be selling everything from cocktails of prescription drugs to guns through social media sites.

03Malaysian Graffiti2013111620131117 (WS)

Painting walls – vandalism or treasured art?

A Lithuanian street artist makes waves with his graffiti in Johor Bahru, a city with a reputation for street crime in Malaysia.

BBC Trending also takes a look at spam. As different social media platforms become more popular- are they going to be subject to spam? Is it time we created a word just for Twitter? We try to coin the term “twam.?

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Painting walls \u2013 vandalism or treasured art?

A Lithuanian street artist makes waves with his graffiti in Johor Bahru, a city with a reputation for street crime in Malaysia.

BBC Trending also takes a look at spam. As different social media platforms become more popular- are they going to be subject to spam? Is it time we created a word just for Twitter? We try to coin the term “twam.”

04From Yemen With Love2013112320131124 (WS)

Online campaign to allow forbidden love

Girl meets boy, but her father disapproves. It is a story as old as time, but unlike Romeo and Juliet, a couple arrested in Yemen have sparked a major Facebook campaign. #BBCtrending traces the love story of Huda, a Saudi girl, and Arafat, a Yemeni boy – and asks what it tells us about Yemeni society.

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

Girl meets boy, but her father disapproves. It is a story as old as time, but unlike Romeo and Juliet, a couple arrested in Yemen have sparked a major Facebook campaign. #BBCtrending traces the love story of Huda, a Saudi girl, and Arafat, a Yemeni boy – and asks what it tells us about Yemeni society.

05China Uncensored2013113020131201 (WS)

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

The anti-American video being shared on Chinese social media

On Chinese social networks, anti-American and nationalist anger is currently on raw display – in response to recent events in the South China Sea. Trending traces the story of a rousing anti-American film that was created by the army, shared across social networks and then appears to have been censored. What does it tell us about China’s online anger? Plus, how Facebook recognised a country that half the world does not.

Join us on Twitter #BBCTrending.

062013120720131208 (WS)

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

07China Jokes About Smog2013121420131215 (WS)

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...

Humour, and smog, engulf Chinese social media; and Kenya is sick at 50

As smog spreads over China, people are taking to social media not to share weather updates, or complaints about the authorities, but jokes. Some funnier than others. But how has the government responded? Plus, as Kenya celebrates its 50th birthday, a new hashtag, #Sickat50, is also trending. What does it mean?

Join the conversation on Twitter #BBCTrending.