Truth About Diabetes, The [world Service]

Episodes

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The Truth About ...20160205

The Truth About ...20160205

A one-off special panel discussion on one of the world’s most complex and devastating food issues: diabetes.

Presenter Anu Anand is joined by a panel of experts, food industry players and campaigners as they respond live to questions brought up by the documentaries and beyond. On social media, phone, email and live on-air, anyone can be part of the virtual audience for this interactive panel programme. From the role of fast food companies and the controversial sugar tax, to everyday advice on how to cope with the condition, the show will tackle a broad spectrum of diabetes-related issues and questions.

The Truth About ...20160205

A one-off special panel discussion on one of the world’s most complex and devastating food issues: diabetes.

Presenter Anu Anand is joined by a panel of experts, food industry players and campaigners as they respond live to questions brought up by the documentaries and beyond. On social media, phone, email and live on-air, anyone can be part of the virtual audience for this interactive panel programme. From the role of fast food companies and the controversial sugar tax, to everyday advice on how to cope with the condition, the show will tackle a broad spectrum of diabetes-related issues and questions.

The Truth About Diabetes Debate - The Truth About...20160205

A live debate on the impact of diabetes on world health and options for action.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

A one-off special panel discussion on one of the world’s most complex and devastating food issues: diabetes.

Presenter Anu Anand is joined by a panel of experts, food industry players and campaigners as they respond live to questions brought up by the documentaries and beyond. On social media, phone, email and live on-air, anyone can be part of the virtual audience for this interactive panel programme. From the role of fast food companies and the controversial sugar tax, to everyday advice on how to cope with the condition, the show will tackle a broad spectrum of diabetes-related issues and questions.

01Diabetes: South Asia Time Bomb - The Truth About...2016011220160116 (WS)

Anu Anand discovers why South Asians, like herself, are more at risk of type 2 diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Type 2 diabetes is taking on epidemic proportions around the world, and South Asia is at its epicentre.

Presenter Anu Anand travels to Sri Lanka where one in ten adults have type 2 diabetes, and another one in ten have early signs of the disease - so called ‘pre-diabetes’. That’s four million people on this tiny island nation alone.

Palm-fringed beaches lined with stalls selling fresh tropical fruits and sea food are not hard to find here. So why are so many people, in both urban and rural areas, being ravaged by a disease we more commonly associate with Western lifestyles?

Anu asks why rates are so high in South Asia and explores how Sri Lankans are seeking to diagnose, treat and prevent a disease which is ravaging not only adults, but children too.

A big problem with type 2 diabetes is that it is silent. At least half of those with the disease don’t even know they’ve got it, until it has wrecked the body’s blood vessels, causing anything from heart attacks and strokes, to blindness and kidney failure. Life-threatening limb infections requiring amputation are also common.

Such complications of the disease are now overwhelming Sri Lanka’s health service.

The picture is equally stark in India, where Anu lives. Many of her family members have already developed type 2 diabetes. She asks whether she is likely to develop the disease and is alarmed by what she discovers.

Image: Anu Anand, BBC Copyright

01Diabetes: South Asia Time Bomb - The Truth About...20160112

Anu Anand discovers why South Asians, like herself, are more at risk of type 2 diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Type 2 diabetes is taking on epidemic proportions around the world, and South Asia is at its epicentre.

Presenter Anu Anand travels to Sri Lanka where one in ten adults have type 2 diabetes, and another one in ten have early signs of the disease - so called ‘pre-diabetes’. That’s four million people on this tiny island nation alone.

Palm-fringed beaches lined with stalls selling fresh tropical fruits and sea food are not hard to find here. So why are so many people, in both urban and rural areas, being ravaged by a disease we more commonly associate with Western lifestyles?

Anu asks why rates are so high in South Asia and explores how Sri Lankans are seeking to diagnose, treat and prevent a disease which is ravaging not only adults, but children too.

A big problem with type 2 diabetes is that it is silent. At least half of those with the disease don’t even know they’ve got it, until it has wrecked the body’s blood vessels, causing anything from heart attacks and strokes, to blindness and kidney failure. Life-threatening limb infections requiring amputation are also common.

Such complications of the disease are now overwhelming Sri Lanka’s health service.

The picture is equally stark in India, where Anu lives. Many of her family members have already developed type 2 diabetes. She asks whether she is likely to develop the disease and is alarmed by what she discovers.

Image: Anu Anand, BBC Copyright

01The Truth About ...2016011220160116 (WS)

Type 2 diabetes is taking on epidemic proportions around the world, and South Asia is at its epicentre.

Presenter Anu Anand travels to Sri Lanka where one in ten adults have type 2 diabetes, and another one in ten have early signs of the disease - so called ‘pre-diabetes’. That’s four million people on this tiny island nation alone.

Palm-fringed beaches lined with stalls selling fresh tropical fruits and sea food are not hard to find here. So why are so many people, in both urban and rural areas, being ravaged by a disease we more commonly associate with Western lifestyles?

Anu asks why rates are so high in South Asia and explores how Sri Lankans are seeking to diagnose, treat and prevent a disease which is ravaging not only adults, but children too.

A big problem with type 2 diabetes is that it is silent. At least half of those with the disease don’t even know they’ve got it, until it has wrecked the body’s blood vessels, causing anything from heart attacks and strokes, to blindness and kidney failure. Life-threatening limb infections requiring amputation are also common.

Such complications of the disease are now overwhelming Sri Lanka’s health service.

The picture is equally stark in India, where Anu lives. Many of her family members have already developed type 2 diabetes. She asks whether she is likely to develop the disease and is alarmed by what she discovers.

Image: Anu Anand, BBC Copyright

Anu Anand discovers why South Asians, like herself, are more at risk of type 2 diabetes.

02Diabetes: Nothing Good to Eat - The Truth About...2016011920160123 (WS)

Tonga - where obesity is the norm, and over 36% of adults suffer from type 2 diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

The tiny, idyllic Pacific islands which make up the Kingdom of Tonga are setting for an unlikely and acute health crisis. With around 90% of Tongans overweight or obese, and with rates of diabetes in adults approaching 40%, Tongans have seen health deteriorate and life expectancy fall. Katy Watson explores the relationship between size and status in deeply religious Tonga, and hears how a decades-old policy of importation has led to the abandonment of the traditional Tongan diet in favour of foods which many blame for soaring rates of type 2 diabetes.

Tonga was almost untouched by diabetes two generations ago but a diabetes specialist at the local hospital tells Katy how she is “drowning” from her workload. Katy also speaks to a visionary Church Minister who preaches healthy eating. He says it’s up to the church to transform the health of the Kingdom, and that people here are now dying from too much, rather than too little.

Katy hears from the Health Minister, who thinks charging for healthcare could be the solution. Katy also speaks to those fighting to restrict imports of the infamous “mutton flaps” - cheap high fat offcuts of meat that some feel are unfairly dumped on the Pacific Islands without a thought for peoples’ health.

02Diabetes: Nothing Good to Eat - The Truth About...20160119

Tonga - where obesity is the norm, and over 36% of adults suffer from type 2 diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

The tiny, idyllic Pacific islands which make up the Kingdom of Tonga are setting for an unlikely and acute health crisis. With around 90% of Tongans overweight or obese, and with rates of diabetes in adults approaching 40%, Tongans have seen health deteriorate and life expectancy fall. Katy Watson explores the relationship between size and status in deeply religious Tonga, and hears how a decades-old policy of importation has led to the abandonment of the traditional Tongan diet in favour of foods which many blame for soaring rates of type 2 diabetes.

Tonga was almost untouched by diabetes two generations ago but a diabetes specialist at the local hospital tells Katy how she is “drowning” from her workload. Katy also speaks to a visionary Church Minister who preaches healthy eating. He says it’s up to the church to transform the health of the Kingdom, and that people here are now dying from too much, rather than too little.

Katy hears from the Health Minister, who thinks charging for healthcare could be the solution. Katy also speaks to those fighting to restrict imports of the infamous “mutton flaps” - cheap high fat offcuts of meat that some feel are unfairly dumped on the Pacific Islands without a thought for peoples’ health.

02The Truth About ...20160119

02The Truth About ...20160119

The tiny, idyllic Pacific islands which make up the Kingdom of Tonga are setting for an unlikely and acute health crisis. With around 90% of Tongans overweight or obese, and with rates of diabetes in adults approaching 40%, Tongans have seen health deteriorate and life expectancy fall. Katy Watson explores the relationship between size and status in deeply religious Tonga, and hears how a decades-old policy of importation has led to the abandonment of the traditional Tongan diet in favour of foods which many blame for soaring rates of type 2 diabetes.

Tonga was almost untouched by diabetes two generations ago but a diabetes specialist at the local hospital tells Katy how she is “drowning? from her workload. Katy also speaks to a visionary Church Minister who preaches healthy eating. He says it’s up to the church to transform the health of the Kingdom, and that people here are now dying from too much, rather than too little.

Katy hears from the Health Minister, who thinks charging for healthcare could be the solution. Katy also speaks to those fighting to restrict imports of the infamous “mutton flaps? - cheap high fat offcuts of meat that some feel are unfairly dumped on the Pacific Islands without a thought for peoples’ health.

02The Truth About ...20160119

Tonga - where obesity is the norm, and over 36% of adults suffer from type 2 diabetes.

02The Truth About ...2016011920160123 (WS)

Tonga - where obesity is the norm, and over 36% of adults suffer from type 2 diabetes.

The tiny, idyllic Pacific islands which make up the Kingdom of Tonga are setting for an unlikely and acute health crisis. With around 90% of Tongans overweight or obese, and with rates of diabetes in adults approaching 40%, Tongans have seen health deteriorate and life expectancy fall. Katy Watson explores the relationship between size and status in deeply religious Tonga, and hears how a decades-old policy of importation has led to the abandonment of the traditional Tongan diet in favour of foods which many blame for soaring rates of type 2 diabetes.

Tonga was almost untouched by diabetes two generations ago but a diabetes specialist at the local hospital tells Katy how she is “drowning? from her workload. Katy also speaks to a visionary Church Minister who preaches healthy eating. He says it’s up to the church to transform the health of the Kingdom, and that people here are now dying from too much, rather than too little.

Katy hears from the Health Minister, who thinks charging for healthcare could be the solution. Katy also speaks to those fighting to restrict imports of the infamous “mutton flaps? - cheap high fat offcuts of meat that some feel are unfairly dumped on the Pacific Islands without a thought for peoples’ health.

Tonga - where obesity is the norm, and over 36% of adults suffer from type 2 diabetes.

03Diabetes: Challenge in the Bronx - The Truth About...2016012620160130 (WS)

In New York, Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer high rates of diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Smitha Mundasad visits the Bronx in New York City, one of North America’s poorest and most diverse boroughs. Type 2 diabetes is now so common here that people say every family is touched by the disease. Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer particularly high rates and even young children are developing the disease.

Researchers here are working with patients to better understand how type-2 diabetes develops and how to combat it. Smitha discovers that the high blood sugar we associate with this disease is just a symbol of an exceedingly complex process.
Excess fat in the body triggers a chain of events, involving a range of different organ systems, which make the body less able to respond to the hormone insulin. Insulin usually controls the blood sugar level, so when the body can’t respond to it properly sugar levels rise.

Medication & lifestyle changes early on in the disease are both critical. Numerous medications have been developed targeting different parts of the disease process, but research is ongoing to establish the optimal timing and combination.

Here in the Bronx, many people don’t even know they have the disease and some struggle to take medication or make the lifestyle changes. So ethnic minorities suffer higher rates of complications, such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke.

Branded a ‘food desert’ due to the lack of opportunity to access fresh produce, strategies are underway to help people make the necessary lifestyle changes, to help treat and prevent diabetes.

Image: Presenter Smitha Mundasad in the Bronx, New York City. Credit: BBC

03Diabetes: Challenge in the Bronx - The Truth About...20160126

In New York, Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer high rates of diabetes.

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Smitha Mundasad visits the Bronx in New York City, one of North America’s poorest and most diverse boroughs. Type 2 diabetes is now so common here that people say every family is touched by the disease. Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer particularly high rates and even young children are developing the disease.

Researchers here are working with patients to better understand how type-2 diabetes develops and how to combat it. Smitha discovers that the high blood sugar we associate with this disease is just a symbol of an exceedingly complex process.
Excess fat in the body triggers a chain of events, involving a range of different organ systems, which make the body less able to respond to the hormone insulin. Insulin usually controls the blood sugar level, so when the body can’t respond to it properly sugar levels rise.

Medication & lifestyle changes early on in the disease are both critical. Numerous medications have been developed targeting different parts of the disease process, but research is ongoing to establish the optimal timing and combination.

Here in the Bronx, many people don’t even know they have the disease and some struggle to take medication or make the lifestyle changes. So ethnic minorities suffer higher rates of complications, such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke.

Branded a ‘food desert’ due to the lack of opportunity to access fresh produce, strategies are underway to help people make the necessary lifestyle changes, to help treat and prevent diabetes.

Image: Presenter Smitha Mundasad in the Bronx, New York City. Credit: BBC

03The Truth About ...20160126

03The Truth About ...20160126

In New York, Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer high rates of diabetes.

03The Truth About ...2016012620160130 (WS)

In New York, Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer high rates of diabetes.

03The Truth About ...20160126

Smitha Mundasad visits the Bronx in New York City, one of North America’s poorest and most diverse boroughs. Type 2 diabetes is now so common here that people say every family is touched by the disease. Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer particularly high rates and even young children are developing the disease.

Researchers here are working with patients to better understand how type-2 diabetes develops and how to combat it. Smitha discovers that the high blood sugar we associate with this disease is just a symbol of an exceedingly complex process.

Excess fat in the body triggers a chain of events, involving a range of different organ systems, which make the body less able to respond to the hormone insulin. Insulin usually controls the blood sugar level, so when the body can’t respond to it properly sugar levels rise.

Medication & lifestyle changes early on in the disease are both critical. Numerous medications have been developed targeting different parts of the disease process, but research is ongoing to establish the optimal timing and combination.

Here in the Bronx, many people don’t even know they have the disease and some struggle to take medication or make the lifestyle changes. So ethnic minorities suffer higher rates of complications, such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke.

Branded a ‘food desert’ due to the lack of opportunity to access fresh produce, strategies are underway to help people make the necessary lifestyle changes, to help treat and prevent diabetes.

Image: Presenter Smitha Mundasad in the Bronx, New York City. Credit: BBC

03The Truth About ...2016012620160130 (WS)

Smitha Mundasad visits the Bronx in New York City, one of North America’s poorest and most diverse boroughs. Type 2 diabetes is now so common here that people say every family is touched by the disease. Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer particularly high rates and even young children are developing the disease.

Researchers here are working with patients to better understand how type-2 diabetes develops and how to combat it. Smitha discovers that the high blood sugar we associate with this disease is just a symbol of an exceedingly complex process.

Excess fat in the body triggers a chain of events, involving a range of different organ systems, which make the body less able to respond to the hormone insulin. Insulin usually controls the blood sugar level, so when the body can’t respond to it properly sugar levels rise.

Medication and lifestyle changes early on in the disease are both critical. Numerous medications have been developed targeting different parts of the disease process, but research is ongoing to establish the optimal timing and combination.

Here in the Bronx, many people don’t even know they have the disease and some struggle to take medication or make the lifestyle changes. So ethnic minorities suffer higher rates of complications, such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke.

Branded a ‘food desert’ due to the lack of opportunity to access fresh produce, strategies are underway to help people make the necessary lifestyle changes, to help treat and prevent diabetes.

Image: Presenter Smitha Mundasad in the Bronx, New York City. Credit: BBC

In New York, Hispanics, blacks and other ethnic minorities suffer high rates of diabetes.

04Diabetes: Sugar, Death and Taxes - The Truth About...2016020220160206 (WS)

Mexico\u2019s government has introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax to combat diabetes

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Mexicans are the world’s biggest consumers of fizzy drinks, many argue that Mexicans are quite simply addicted to them. They are part of daily life. But Mexico’s government says it is fighting back, and not long ago introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax imposed at a national level. Katy Watson speaks to the ministers who proposed it, the companies who opposed it and the Mexicans who are dying of diabetes, and in some cases still enjoying their favourite sweetened drinks. In a country known for its violence, diabetes is actually a bigger killer than Mexico’s drugs industry, and the disease comes at a huge financial cost to the country.

Katy travels to the Yucatan, one of the poorest areas of Mexico, where the branding of Coca-Cola is on every street corner. She meets families whose relatives have died of diabetes yet refuse to give up daily soft drinks. We meet the children who are members of a growing club of early-onset diabetes 2 and speak to the doctors trying to tackle a problem that they say will get worse before it gets better. Consumer groups think Mexico is the new battle ground for drinks companies but they want more to be done. Industry leaders say tax is not the way – education is what is needed instead.

And we travel to the US, the home of the multinational fizzy drinks industry, where consumers and policymakers are split – Berkeley in California has imposed a sugar tax of its own, the first ever in the US, and sees Mexico as an inspiration. Yet in Washington, industry insiders and lobbyists tell Katy that the pro-regulation camp are going to lose their battle, as ultimately big business will keep giving the consumer what they want.

(Photo: A traditional Mexican breakfast)

04Diabetes: Sugar, Death and Taxes - The Truth About...20160202

Mexico\u2019s government has introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax to combat diabetes

A crucial guide to the things that affect us all. Hear from those with first-hand experience, and experts in the field.

Mexicans are the world’s biggest consumers of fizzy drinks, many argue that Mexicans are quite simply addicted to them. They are part of daily life. But Mexico’s government says it is fighting back, and not long ago introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax imposed at a national level. Katy Watson speaks to the ministers who proposed it, the companies who opposed it and the Mexicans who are dying of diabetes, and in some cases still enjoying their favourite sweetened drinks. In a country known for its violence, diabetes is actually a bigger killer than Mexico’s drugs industry, and the disease comes at a huge financial cost to the country.

Katy travels to the Yucatan, one of the poorest areas of Mexico, where the branding of Coca-Cola is on every street corner. She meets families whose relatives have died of diabetes yet refuse to give up daily soft drinks. We meet the children who are members of a growing club of early-onset diabetes 2 and speak to the doctors trying to tackle a problem that they say will get worse before it gets better. Consumer groups think Mexico is the new battle ground for drinks companies but they want more to be done. Industry leaders say tax is not the way – education is what is needed instead.

And we travel to the US, the home of the multinational fizzy drinks industry, where consumers and policymakers are split – Berkeley in California has imposed a sugar tax of its own, the first ever in the US, and sees Mexico as an inspiration. Yet in Washington, industry insiders and lobbyists tell Katy that the pro-regulation camp are going to lose their battle, as ultimately big business will keep giving the consumer what they want.

(Photo: A traditional Mexican breakfast)

04The Truth About ...20160202

04The Truth About ...20160202

Mexicans are the world’s biggest consumers of fizzy drinks, many argue that Mexicans are quite simply addicted to them. They are part of daily life. But Mexico’s government says it is fighting back, and not long ago introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax imposed at a national level. Katy Watson speaks to the ministers who proposed it, the companies who opposed it and the Mexicans who are dying of diabetes, and in some cases still enjoying their favourite sweetened drinks. In a country known for its violence, diabetes is actually a bigger killer than Mexico’s drugs industry, and the disease comes at a huge financial cost to the country.

Katy travels to the Yucatan, one of the poorest areas of Mexico, where the branding of Coca-Cola is on every street corner. She meets families whose relatives have died of diabetes yet refuse to give up daily soft drinks. We meet the children who are members of a growing club of early-onset diabetes 2 and speak to the doctors trying to tackle a problem that they say will get worse before it gets better. Consumer groups think Mexico is the new battle ground for drinks companies but they want more to be done. Industry leaders say tax is not the way – education is what is needed instead.

And we travel to the US, the home of the multinational fizzy drinks industry, where consumers and policymakers are split – Berkeley in California has imposed a sugar tax of its own, the first ever in the US, and sees Mexico as an inspiration. Yet in Washington, industry insiders and lobbyists tell Katy that the pro-regulation camp are going to lose their battle, as ultimately big business will keep giving the consumer what they want.

(Photo: A traditional Mexican breakfast)

04The Truth About ...20160202

Mexico’s government has introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax to combat diabetes

04The Truth About ...2016020220160206 (WS)

Mexico’s government has introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax to combat diabetes

Mexicans are the world’s biggest consumers of fizzy drinks, many argue that Mexicans are quite simply addicted to them. They are part of daily life. But Mexico’s government says it is fighting back, and not long ago introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax imposed at a national level. Katy Watson speaks to the ministers who proposed it, the companies who opposed it and the Mexicans who are dying of diabetes, and in some cases still enjoying their favourite sweetened drinks. In a country known for its violence, diabetes is actually a bigger killer than Mexico’s drugs industry, and the disease comes at a huge financial cost to the country.

Katy travels to the Yucatan, one of the poorest areas of Mexico, where the branding of Coca-Cola is on every street corner. She meets families whose relatives have died of diabetes yet refuse to give up daily soft drinks. We meet the children who are members of a growing club of early-onset diabetes 2 and speak to the doctors trying to tackle a problem that they say will get worse before it gets better. Consumer groups think Mexico is the new battle ground for drinks companies but they want more to be done. Industry leaders say tax is not the way – education is what is needed instead.

And we travel to the US, the home of the multinational fizzy drinks industry, where consumers and policymakers are split – Berkeley in California has imposed a sugar tax of its own, the first ever in the US, and sees Mexico as an inspiration. Yet in Washington, industry insiders and lobbyists tell Katy that the pro-regulation camp are going to lose their battle, as ultimately big business will keep giving the consumer what they want.

(Photo: A traditional Mexican breakfast)

04The Truth About ...2016020220160206 (WS)

Mexico’s government has introduced the first-ever sugary drinks tax to combat diabetes