Under The Influence

Episodes

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01Jon Boden2011032820120716

on the influence of apocalyptic science-fiction on him as a folk singer.

is a folk musician who loves post-apocalyptic literature, works such as 'The Changes Trilogy' by Peter Dickinson, in which the people of England develop a dread of technology, Russell Hoban's 'Riddley Walker', set in the aftermath of such destruction that even the language has fragmented and Cormac McCarthy's 'The Road', in which a father and his son desperately push a cart with their few possessions, some tins of food and a pistol through a devastated land.

He thought this was at odds with his work as a performer of traditional English song, music that sometimes celebrates a bucolic idyll. But, after becoming a father, he began to consider the implications of contemporary geo-politics. With the end of an oil dependent economy, would reality and the world depicted in the literature he enjoys coincide? Or might this lead to a world closer to that described in traditional song, and the kind of society that produced that music?

Producer: Julian May.

03Shobana Jeyasingh2011033020120717

The choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh was born in India, is now based in Britain and makes work seen all over the world. Tonight she reflects on the influence of Indian and Western dance traditions, and the importance, sometimes, of escaping these. She considers, too, how reading freed her, and so how words have been vital to her entirely non-verbal art.

Producer: Julian May.

on how different dance traditions inform her choreography.

on how different dance traditions inform her choreography.

The choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh was born in India, is now based in Britain and makes work seen all over the world. Tonight she reflects on the influence of Indian and Western dance traditions, and the importance, sometimes, of escaping these. She considers, too, how reading freed her, and so how words have been vital to her entirely non-verbal art.

Producer: Julian May.

052011040120120720

The poems of Kei Miller are rich and languorous. Their language reflects the speech of his native Jamaica, where he was born in 1978, and has a heightened, sometimes Biblical aspect. It sounds almost as if it were written for performance rather than to be read. Yet this is rigorous and literary work. In this essay, Miller reveals how the poetry of the American W. S. Merwin, who worked to communicate experience rather than express a meaning, has a profound effect on his own approach to composing poetry.

Producer: Julian May.