Visitors

By Leila Aboulela, read by Adjoa Andoh.

A doctor in Sudan discovers there are essentials that money cannot buy.

Episodes

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Broadcast
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AP2010100720111207

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegaic drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Shacklock....Roy Hudd

Stella....Emma Fielding

Music....David Chilton

Abridger....Liz Goulding

Producer....Gordon House

Shortly before he died, Peter Tinniswood - one of Radio Drama's iconic dramatists - wrote Visitors. Set on a misty Thames embankment over the course of several evenings, the play recounts the meetings of two hospital "visitors", Shacklock and the much younger Stella, whose relationship - strange, erotic and yet seemingly entirely innocent, is the bedrock of this hauntingly sad and beautiful drama about the shortness of life and the frailty of love. We are in archetypal Tinniswood territory, where nothing is straightforward, where words take on a surreal existence of their own (the visitors' respective patients live in "Indifferent Ward" and "Terrified Ward") and where the quiet beauty of much of the descriptions is undercut by recurring echoes of loss, transience and death. Our two characters' lives, like Vladamir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

If this sounds bleak Afternoon fare it is anything but. The language of the play is a constant pleasure; the speech rhythms drive it forward, the metaphysical playfulness intrigues and delights. This play reminds us that some brilliantly effective Radio Drama can also be expressionistic and poetic, and that Peter Tinniswood's early death was an immense loss for the medium

The play, starring Roy Hudd and Emma Fielding, is scheduled to be broadcast the week the Tinniswood Award, commemorating Peter, is presented to the author of the best original radio play of 2009. Visitors will give a much-needed publicity boost to this valued but under-publicised competition.

Peter Tinniswoood's final (never-performed) play, written just before his death in 2003.

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegiac drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Shortly before he died, Peter Tinniswood - one of Radio Drama's iconic dramatists - wrote Visitors. Set on a misty Thames embankment over the course of several evenings, the play recounts the meetings of two hospital "visitors", Shacklock and the much younger Stella, whose relationship - strange, erotic and yet seemingly entirely innocent, is the bedrock of this hauntingly sad and beautiful drama about the shortness of life and the frailty of love. We are in archetypal Tinniswood territory, where nothing is straightforward, where words take on a surreal existence of their own (the visitors' respective patients live in "Indifferent Ward" and "Terrified Ward") and where the quiet beauty of much of the descriptions is undercut by recurring echoes of loss, transience and death. Our two characters' lives, like Vladimir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

AP2010100720111207

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegiac drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Shacklock - Roy Hudd

Stella - Emma Fielding

Music - David Chilton

Abridger - Liz Goulding

Producer - Gordon House

Shortly before he died, Peter Tinniswood - one of Radio Drama's iconic dramatists - wrote Visitors.

Set on a misty Thames embankment over the course of several evenings, the play recounts the meetings of two hospital "visitors", Shacklock and the much younger Stella, whose relationship - strange, erotic and yet seemingly entirely innocent, is the bedrock of this hauntingly sad and beautiful drama about the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

We are in archetypal Tinniswood territory, where nothing is straightforward, where words take on a surreal existence of their own (the visitors' respective patients live in "Indifferent Ward" and "Terrified Ward") and where the quiet beauty of much of the descriptions is undercut by recurring echoes of loss, transience and death.

Our two characters' lives, like Vladimir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

Peter Tinniswoood's final (never-performed) play, written just before his death in 2003.

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegaic drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Our two characters' lives, like Vladamir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

If this sounds bleak Afternoon fare it is anything but.

The language of the play is a constant pleasure; the speech rhythms drive it forward, the metaphysical playfulness intrigues and delights.

This play reminds us that some brilliantly effective Radio Drama can also be expressionistic and poetic, and that Peter Tinniswood's early death was an immense loss for the medium

The play, starring Roy Hudd and Emma Fielding, is scheduled to be broadcast the week the Tinniswood Award, commemorating Peter, is presented to the author of the best original radio play of 2009.

Visitors will give a much-needed publicity boost to this valued but under-publicised competition.

AP2010100720111207
20101007 (BBC7)
20130913 (BBC7)
20130914 (BBC7)

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegiac drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Shacklock - Roy Hudd

Stella - Emma Fielding

Music - David Chilton

Abridger - Liz Goulding

Producer - Gordon House

Shortly before he died, Peter Tinniswood - one of Radio Drama's iconic dramatists - wrote Visitors.

Set on a misty Thames embankment over the course of several evenings, the play recounts the meetings of two hospital "visitors", Shacklock and the much younger Stella, whose relationship - strange, erotic and yet seemingly entirely innocent, is the bedrock of this hauntingly sad and beautiful drama about the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

We are in archetypal Tinniswood territory, where nothing is straightforward, where words take on a surreal existence of their own (the visitors' respective patients live in "Indifferent Ward" and "Terrified Ward") and where the quiet beauty of much of the descriptions is undercut by recurring echoes of loss, transience and death.

Our two characters' lives, like Vladimir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

Peter Tinniswoood's final (never-performed) play, written just before his death in 2003.

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegaic drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Our two characters' lives, like Vladamir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.

If this sounds bleak Afternoon fare it is anything but.

The language of the play is a constant pleasure; the speech rhythms drive it forward, the metaphysical playfulness intrigues and delights.

This play reminds us that some brilliantly effective Radio Drama can also be expressionistic and poetic, and that Peter Tinniswood's early death was an immense loss for the medium

The play, starring Roy Hudd and Emma Fielding, is scheduled to be broadcast the week the Tinniswood Award, commemorating Peter, is presented to the author of the best original radio play of 2009.

Visitors will give a much-needed publicity boost to this valued but under-publicised competition.

The dramatist's final play observes the brevity of life and the frailty of love.

LS19990111

By Leila Aboulela, read by Adjoa Andoh.

A doctor in Sudan discovers there are essentials that money cannot buy.