Wales - A Twentieth Century Tragedy?

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20200316

Sir Simon Jenkins presents a challenging personal view of the economics of contemporary Wales.

Beginning with the premise that Wales began the twentieth century rich and ended it poor, Simon talks to a variety of people -- historians, economists, entrepreneurs -- about Wales' problems and possibilities -- in the past, the present and the future.

Featuring:
Joe Earle, Chief Executive of Ecnmy.org
Gerald Holtham, Hodge Professor of Regional Economy at Cardiff Metropolitan University
Patricia Hudson, Emeritus Professor of Economic History at Cardiff University
Elin Hywel, CwmniBro.cymru
Martin Johnes, Professor of History at Swansea University
Auriol Miller, Director of the Institute of Welsh Affairs
Adam Price, Leader of Plaid Cymru

With thanks to Mark Hooper, Euryn Roberts and everyone who took part in the workshop in Bangor.

Simon Jenkins explores the past, present and future of Wales.

20200316

Sir Simon Jenkins presents a challenging personal view of the economics of contemporary Wales.

Beginning with the premise that Wales began the twentieth century rich and ended it poor, Simon talks to a variety of people -- historians, economists, entrepreneurs -- about Wales' problems and possibilities -- in the past, the present and the future.

Featuring:
Joe Earle, Chief Executive of Ecnmy.org
Gerald Holtham, Hodge Professor of Regional Economy at Cardiff Metropolitan University
Patricia Hudson, Emeritus Professor of Economic History at Cardiff University
Elin Hywel, CwmniBro.cymru
Martin Johnes, Professor of History at Swansea University
Auriol Miller, Director of the Institute of Welsh Affairs
Adam Price, Leader of Plaid Cymru

With thanks to Mark Hooper, Euryn Roberts and everyone who took part in the workshop in Bangor.

Simon Jenkins presents a challenging personal view of the economics of contemporary Wales.

20200316

Simon Jenkins explores the past, present and future of Wales.

Sir Simon Jenkins presents a challenging personal view of the economics of contemporary Wales.

Beginning with the premise that Wales began the twentieth century rich and ended it poor, Simon talks to a variety of people -- historians, economists, entrepreneurs -- about Wales' problems and possibilities -- in the past, the present and the future.

Featuring:
Joe Earle, Chief Executive of Ecnmy.org
Gerald Holtham, Hodge Professor of Regional Economy at Cardiff Metropolitan University
Patricia Hudson, Emeritus Professor of Economic History at Cardiff University
Elin Hywel, CwmniBro.cymru
Martin Johnes, Professor of History at Swansea University
Auriol Miller, Director of the Institute of Welsh Affairs
Adam Price, Leader of Plaid Cymru

With thanks to Mark Hooper, Euryn Roberts and everyone who took part in the workshop in Bangor.