Walking The Lobster

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
Comments
0120180212

Writer John Walsh explores the male desire to stand out, sartorially and in attitude.

Writer John Walsh explores the male desire to stand out in all manner of attire, in all eras.

To set the scene he describes a poet of the boulevard who took something strange for a walk, this being a template for the characters who follow. Then there's reference to a Mr Tituss Burgess and to the author himself who is, sartorially, rather hit and miss.

Producer Duncan Minshull.

0220180213

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out, sartorially and in attitude.

Writer John Walsh explores the male desire to stand out in all manner of attire, in all eras.

This time his exemplars hark back to the ancient world, to Caesar and Alcibiades, who wore certain colours and certain styles to signal - well, what exactly? Then the author can't resist denouncing his own look during his student years..

Producer Duncan Minshull.

0320180214

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out, sartorially and in attitude.

Writer John Walsh explores the male desire to stand out in all manner of attire, in all eras.

It is the 1720s and we encounter Richard Nash, known to all as Beau Nash, a 'committed hedonist and contrarian'. Then there's Oscar Wilde. And we learn about the difference between 'dandyism' and 'flamboyance', before the author's own look is examined again.

Producer Duncan Minshull.

0420180215

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out, sartorially and in attitude.

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out in all attires, in all eras.

In drab and repressive times certain individuals flew their flags for flamboyance - Mikhail Bulgakov and Curzio Malaparte. There's also Julian MacLaren Ross to admire, and then the author himself attempts to contribute. Successfully?

Producer Duncan Minshull.

05 LAST20180216

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out, sartorially and in attitude.

Writer John Walsh examines the male desire to stand out in all attires, in all eras.

The series concludes with an examination of 'mass showing off', often during times of social upheaval. Take the Macaronis and latterly Les Sapeurs as examples. And how does the author himself compete with these 'flam boys'?

Producer Duncan Minshull.