Episodes

First
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20060123

Peter France presents a series exploring dry-stone walls - features that criss-cross our landscape and speak volumes about our history and way of life through time.

1/5. Ancient Walls

On a remote farm in Yorkshire, farmer Tom Lord tells Peter why he thinks his stone walls could be 800 years old, and built to deter wolves.

20060124

Peter France presents a series exploring dry-stone walls - features that criss-cross our landscape and speak volumes about our history and way of life through time.

Building a dry-stone wall is not like building with bricks and mortar. Each lump of stone has a different size, shape and texture. To be a good waller you need the skills that combine creating 3D pieces of art with jigsaw puzzles.

20060125

Peter France presents a series exploring dry-stone walls - features that criss-cross our landscape and speak volumes about our history and way of life through time.

3/5. Wild Walls

Dry-stone walls make wonderful habitat for our small mammals and reptiles. All those dry and safe nooks and crannies are useful hiding places, and the walls themselves provide corridors through an otherwise fragmented landscape. Peter travels from the Mendips to the Isle of Purbeck to discover Britain's wild walls.

20060126

Peter France presents a series exploring dry-stone walls - features that criss-cross our landscape and speak volumes about our history and way of life through time.

4/5. Rock Hard Walls

It seems obvious to say dry-stone walls are made of rocks, but when you stop to think about it, they are wonderful, visual adverts for British geology. Because wallers use the rocks they find at their feet, these intriguing features tell us a lot about what made the British Isles.

20060127

Peter France presents a series exploring dry-stone walls - features that criss-cross our landscape and speak volumes about our history and way of life through time.

5/5. Walling in the Future

Peter explores if dry stone walls have a future in a modern agricultural landscape. Are they now just museum pieces doomed to slow decay, or will our landscape have walls in 200 years time? Rural crafts are very popular again, but will they live on outside garden design?

2011022620120512

by Ed Harris

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall. The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs. They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves. They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass. And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities. The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods. Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

Paul - Javone Prince

Anna - Louise Brealey

Joyce - Dona Croll

Hugh - Sam Dale

Kasey - Jessica Raine

Dylan - Nyasha Hatendi

Clarence - Sean Baker

Alex - Stuart McLoughlin

with Jo Monro

Producer/Director: Jonquil Panting

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama. He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams. His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL. He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

His plays for radio include ABSOLUTE SILENCE, PORSHIA, starring Robert Webb, AROMATHERAPY, starring Martin Freeman, THE MOMENT YOU FEEL IT, starring Richard Briers and Rory Kinnear, and TROLL, starring Rosie Cavaliero and Jack Klaff.

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall.

The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs.

They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves.

They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass.

And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities.

The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods.

Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama.

He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams.

His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL.

He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

Ed Harris's play addressing social inequality and unseen divisions in our cities.

2011022620120512

by Ed Harris

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall. The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs. They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves. They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass. And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities. The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods. Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

Paul....Javone Prince

Anna....Louise Brealey

Joyce....Dona Croll

Hugh....Sam Dale

Kasey....Jessica Raine

Dylan....Nyasha Hatendi

Clarence....Sean Baker

Alex....Stuart McLoughlin

with Jo Monro

Producer/Director: Jonquil Panting

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama. He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams. His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL. He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

His plays for radio include ABSOLUTE SILENCE, PORSHIA, starring Robert Webb, AROMATHERAPY, starring Martin Freeman, THE MOMENT YOU FEEL IT, starring Richard Briers and Rory Kinnear, and TROLL, starring Rosie Cavaliero and Jack Klaff.

2011022620120512

by Ed Harris

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall. The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs. They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves. They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass. And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities. The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods. Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

Paul....Javone Prince

Anna....Louise Brealey

Joyce....Dona Croll

Hugh....Sam Dale

Kasey....Jessica Raine

Dylan....Nyasha Hatendi

Clarence....Sean Baker

Alex....Stuart McLoughlin

with Jo Monro

Producer/Director: Jonquil Panting

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama. He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams. His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL. He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

His plays for radio include ABSOLUTE SILENCE, PORSHIA, starring Robert Webb, AROMATHERAPY, starring Martin Freeman, THE MOMENT YOU FEEL IT, starring Richard Briers and Rory Kinnear, and TROLL, starring Rosie Cavaliero and Jack Klaff.

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall.

The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs.

They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves.

They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass.

And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities.

The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods.

Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama.

He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams.

His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL.

He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

Ed Harris's play addressing social inequality and unseen divisions in our cities.

by Ed Harris

Paul and Anna wake up one morning to find their neighbourhood has been enclosed by a wall. The gates are guarded and anyone wanting to cross into the rest of the city has to apply for a pass.

They are told the Wall is there to protect them against violence between rival postcode gangs. They are told that their local community is being challenged by central government to do more for themselves. They are told that only certain individuals will qualify for a pass. And that they don't.

The Wall takes a provocative look at growing social inequality, using an image we're more used to seeing as a symbol of divided cultures abroad - in Gaza, or Baghdad, or Berlin, or in the ghettoes of the second World War - and to explore the unseen divisions in our own cities. The Wall doesn't just divide neighbourhoods. Soon it's tearing apart the people inside them.

Paul - Javone Prince

Anna - Louise Brealey

Joyce - Dona Croll

Hugh - Sam Dale

Kasey - Jessica Raine

Dylan - Nyasha Hatendi

Clarence - Sean Baker

Alex - Stuart McLoughlin

with Jo Monro

Producer/Director: Jonquil Panting

The writer Ed Harris spent time as a binman, husky trainer and care worker, before finding his way first to performance poetry, and then to drama. He's been Writer on Attachment at the Chichester Festival Theatre, where his epic play, LUCY, won the Chichester Festival Theatre Slams. His play NEVER EVER AFTER for Chalkfoot, was short-listed for the Meyer-Whitworth prize, and for his own theatre company, Squaremoon, he's written THE COW PLAY and TOTAL. He's currently writing MONGREL ISLAND for the Soho Theatre.

His plays for radio include ABSOLUTE SILENCE, PORSHIA, starring Robert Webb, AROMATHERAPY, starring Martin Freeman, THE MOMENT YOU FEEL IT, starring Richard Briers and Rory Kinnear, and TROLL, starring Rosie Cavaliero and Jack Klaff.