War And Words [world Service]

Episodes

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On All Fronts20150816

On All Fronts20150816

With the intervention of Japan and the US into the war, the conflict spreads worldwide. The Axis' advance through Russia is unrelenting, until they are checked by the heroism of the Russian forces at the city of Stalingrad (today, Volgograd). Hitler is forced to retreat, and soon, too, the long siege of Leningrad is lifted. In North Africa, the grinding struggle of the Desert War eventually also brings victory for the Allies, and forms a base from which, slowly and inexorably, they win back occupied Italy. The tide is turning. Meanwhile in Tehran, the Allies meet to plan Operation Overlord, the top-secret assault on occupied Normandy.

Richard Dimbleby and Godfrey Talbot tracked the Desert War with sound pictures and vivid recordings of the battles, the like of which the Corporation had never before broadcast. Likewise from Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas’s very Welsh literary flourishes imparted a painterly descriptive flare to his accounts of bombing raids in Italy. In this episode too are rarities, such as the UK premiere of Shostakovich’s Leningrad symphony, performed in solidarity with Russia, and the same composer’s arrangement – in Russian – of the British folksong, Blow the Wind Southerly, performed in Moscow and relayed to listeners in the UK.

(Photo: Anzio beach landing, Italy. Credit: Getty)

On All Fronts20150816

With the intervention of Japan and the US into the war, the conflict spreads worldwide. The Axis' advance through Russia is unrelenting, until they are checked by the heroism of the Russian forces at the city of Stalingrad (today, Volgograd). Hitler is forced to retreat, and soon, too, the long siege of Leningrad is lifted. In North Africa, the grinding struggle of the Desert War eventually also brings victory for the Allies, and forms a base from which, slowly and inexorably, they win back occupied Italy. The tide is turning. Meanwhile in Tehran, the Allies meet to plan Operation Overlord, the top-secret assault on occupied Normandy.

Richard Dimbleby and Godfrey Talbot tracked the Desert War with sound pictures and vivid recordings of the battles, the like of which the Corporation had never before broadcast. Likewise from Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas’s very Welsh literary flourishes imparted a painterly descriptive flare to his accounts of bombing raids in Italy. In this episode too are rarities, such as the UK premiere of Shostakovich’s Leningrad symphony, performed in solidarity with Russia, and the same composer’s arrangement – in Russian – of the British folksong, Blow the Wind Southerly, performed in Moscow and relayed to listeners in the UK.

(Photo: Anzio beach landing, Italy. Credit: Getty)

On All Fronts20150816

With the intervention of Japan and the USA into the war, the conflict spreads worldwide.

The story of twenty momentous years from 1936 - 56, through the words of BBC reporters

With the intervention of Japan and the US into the war, the conflict spreads worldwide. The Axis' advance through Russia is unrelenting, until they are checked by the heroism of the Russian forces at the city of Stalingrad (today, Volgograd). Hitler is forced to retreat, and soon, too, the long siege of Leningrad is lifted. In North Africa, the grinding struggle of the Desert War eventually also brings victory for the Allies, and forms a base from which, slowly and inexorably, they win back occupied Italy. The tide is turning. Meanwhile in Tehran, the Allies meet to plan Operation Overlord, the top-secret assault on occupied Normandy.

Richard Dimbleby and Godfrey Talbot tracked the Desert War with sound pictures and vivid recordings of the battles, the like of which the Corporation had never before broadcast. Likewise from Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas’s very Welsh literary flourishes imparted a painterly descriptive flare to his accounts of bombing raids in Italy. In this episode too are rarities, such as the UK premiere of Shostakovich’s Leningrad symphony, performed in solidarity with Russia, and the same composer’s arrangement – in Russian – of the British folksong, Blow the Wind Southerly, performed in Moscow and relayed to listeners in the UK.

(Photo: Anzio beach landing, Italy. Credit: Getty)

Peace and War20150809

The gathering storm-clouds in the 1930s \u2013 German rearmament and the Spanish Civil War.

The story of twenty momentous years from 1936 - 56, through the words of BBC reporters

The gathering storm-clouds of war in the 1930s – German rearmament, the Spanish Civil War and the Munich crisis – and the story of the conflict through the so-called Phoney War, the Battle of Britain and the entry of Japan and the USA into the conflict with the attack on Pearl Harbor.

It was the moment when the BBC radio came into its own and, through rapidly honed reporting skills, became unequalled in its ability to bring back to listeners at home and around the world the gritty reality of combat – in both victory …and defeat.

(Photo: circa 1939: Refugees crossing the border at Le Perthus in the Pyrenees into France during the Spanish Civil War. Credit: Three Lions/Getty Images)

The Price of Peace20150823

The Price of Peace20150823

Follow the troops’ last-minute preparations for the landings, through the vivid despatches of Frank Gillard, Guy Byam and others for the newly created BBC programme designed specifically to cover the enormous number of breaking stories that D-Day would unleash. It was called War Report and it was the acme of the BBC’s wartime reporting - Frank Gillard under intense artillery fire in the battle of Tilly-sur-Seulles – and then eventually gaining access to the devastated village once the battle has subsided.

Here we join Richard Dimbleby with the newly liberated inhabitants of Caen, thanking the Allies for their deliverance, and – just a few miles away – hear the bells of the local church, rung in wild joy to commemorate the village’s new-found freedom. Just outside Florence, as the Allied advance slowly liberates Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas finds, in the dark recesses of a Tuscan farmhouse, a treasure trove of masterpiece paintings, including Botticelli’s legendary Primavera.

But it’s not all joy and deliverance. The Far Eastern war is still intense and tightly fought, and despite the rejoicing in Europe as VE (Victory in Europe) Day dawns, there are still months of fighting before Japan is defeated in August 1945.

And the seeds sown by the final declaration of peace bear bitter fruit as the postwar world is newly divided by ideology and former Allies turn to enemies in the Cold War.

The Price of Peace20150823

Follow the troops’ last-minute preparations for the landings, through the vivid despatches of Frank Gillard, Guy Byam and others for the newly created BBC programme designed specifically to cover the enormous number of breaking stories that D-Day would unleash. It was called War Report and it was the acme of the BBC’s wartime reporting - Frank Gillard under intense artillery fire in the battle of Tilly-sur-Seulles – and then eventually gaining access to the devastated village once the battle has subsided.

Here we join Richard Dimbleby with the newly liberated inhabitants of Caen, thanking the Allies for their deliverance, and – just a few miles away – hear the bells of the local church, rung in wild joy to commemorate the village’s new-found freedom. Just outside Florence, as the Allied advance slowly liberates Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas finds, in the dark recesses of a Tuscan farmhouse, a treasure trove of masterpiece paintings, including Botticelli’s legendary Primavera.

But it’s not all joy and deliverance. The Far Eastern war is still intense and tightly fought, and despite the rejoicing in Europe as VE (Victory in Europe) Day dawns, there are still months of fighting before Japan is defeated in August 1945.

And the seeds sown by the final declaration of peace bear bitter fruit as the postwar world is newly divided by ideology and former Allies turn to enemies in the Cold War.

The Price of Peace20150823

The events of D-Day gave way to an Allied victory but war rages on in the Far East.

The story of twenty momentous years from 1936 - 56, through the words of BBC reporters

Follow the troops’ last-minute preparations for the landings, through the vivid despatches of Frank Gillard, Guy Byam and others for the newly created BBC programme designed specifically to cover the enormous number of breaking stories that D-Day would unleash. It was called War Report and it was the acme of the BBC’s wartime reporting - Frank Gillard under intense artillery fire in the battle of Tilly-sur-Seulles – and then eventually gaining access to the devastated village once the battle has subsided.

Here we join Richard Dimbleby with the newly liberated inhabitants of Caen, thanking the Allies for their deliverance, and – just a few miles away – hear the bells of the local church, rung in wild joy to commemorate the village’s new-found freedom. Just outside Florence, as the Allied advance slowly liberates Italy, Wynford Vaughan-Thomas finds, in the dark recesses of a Tuscan farmhouse, a treasure trove of masterpiece paintings, including Botticelli’s legendary Primavera.

But it’s not all joy and deliverance. The Far Eastern war is still intense and tightly fought, and despite the rejoicing in Europe as VE (Victory in Europe) Day dawns, there are still months of fighting before Japan is defeated in August 1945.

And the seeds sown by the final declaration of peace bear bitter fruit as the postwar world is newly divided by ideology and former Allies turn to enemies in the Cold War.