War That Changed The World, The [world Service]

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2014071920140720 (WS)

The Waging of War: The second of ten discussions on the impact of the First World War c...

The Waging of War: The second of ten discussions on the impact of the First World War comes from Dresden in Germany.

2014071920140720 (WS)

The Waging of War: The second of ten discussions on the impact of the First World War comes from Dresden in Germany.

The Waging of War: The second of ten discussions on the impact of the First World War c...

2014090620140907 (WS)

Ten discussions on the impact of the First World War, from the viewpoint of some of the...

Ten discussions on the impact of the First World War, from the viewpoint of some of the countries that fought.

2014090620140907 (WS)

Ten discussions on the impact of the First World War, from the viewpoint of some of the...

Ten discussions on the impact of the First World War, from the viewpoint of some of the countries that fought.

20141018

The First World War brought the end of the Tsars in Russia. Allan Little hosts a debate exploring the legacy of the revolution.

2014101820141019 (WS)

The First World War brought the end of the Tsars in Russia. Allan Little hosts a debate...

2014101820141019 (WS)

The First World War brought the end of the Tsars in Russia. Allan Little hosts a debate...

The First World War brought the end of the Tsars in Russia. Allan Little hosts a debate exploring the legacy of the revolution.

Australia: The Legend of Anzac2015041820150419 (WS)

Australia and the legend of Anzac

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Australia's experience of WW1 is like no other country's in the world. In association with the British Council, BBC presenter Razia Iqbal and an Australian audience debate the role the 'legend of Anzac' played in the hundred year history of Australia since the first Anzac Day. With Marilyn Lake from the University of Melbourne, Bruce Scates of Monash University and theatre director and playwright Wesley Enoch - a relative of one Aboriginal WW1 soldier, Horace Thomas Dalton.

(Photo: Ferry carrying members of the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force, ANMEF, leaving Sydney harbour, exact date unknown.)
(Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images)

Australia: The Legend of Anzac20150418

Australia and the legend of Anzac

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Australia's experience of WW1 is like no other country's in the world. In association with the British Council, BBC presenter Razia Iqbal and an Australian audience debate the role the 'legend of Anzac' played in the hundred year history of Australia since the first Anzac Day. With Marilyn Lake from the University of Melbourne, Bruce Scates of Monash University and theatre director and playwright Wesley Enoch - a relative of one Aboriginal WW1 soldier, Horace Thomas Dalton.

(Photo: Ferry carrying members of the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force, ANMEF, leaving Sydney harbour, exact date unknown.)
(Credit: Fairfax Media via Getty Images)

Britain: The Psychology Of War2014080220140803 (WS)
20140804 (WS)

What did the world\u2019s first industrial war do to the minds of people who fought in it?

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

One hundred years ago World War One set the course for the twentieth century; for the countries that took part nothing would be the same again. In this worldwide series of events with the British Council, we look at the impact of the war from around the world.

The third debate of the series comes from The Imperial War Museum in London as we explore the psychology of war. What drove men to volunteer for the war? What drove them to the edge of sanity when they got there?

Historian and broadcaster Amanda Vickery is joined by a panel of experts and a live audience to explore the mental impact of fighting the war at home and abroad. World War One experts Dan Todman (Queen Mary, University of London) and Michael Roper (University of Essex) are joined by the celebrated cultural historian, Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck, University of London), who presents her specially commissioned essay, Shell Shock and the Shock of Shells.

(Photo: Gas casualties of the British Army 55th Division on the Western Front, dated 10th April 1918)
(Credit: Lightroom Photos/TopFoto)

France: Heroism2014120620141207 (WS)

How World War One killed the ancient idea of heroism

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

"The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue" said Napoleon. Life in the trenches during the war, amongst rats, mud, shelling, barbed wire and unprecedented numbers of dead, called upon new reserves of both. But what did the war do to the ancient idea of heroism? With death, degradation and grief on such an unprecedented scale how did the concepts of duty, sacrifice and honour survive? At Napoleon's last resting place, the Hôtel National des Invalides, on the centenary of the outbreak of the first industrialised war, Amanda Vickery, her guests and audience explore heroism and World War One. With more women entering the work place than ever before, did the war redefine what it meant to be a man as well as a woman?

She is joined by André Loez, Sciences Po Paris and Emmanuelle Cronier, University of Picardie, and professor of literature Laurence Campa from L'université de Paris Ouest Nanterre and an audience in Paris. Christian Carion, joins them to explore the Christmas Truce - the subject of his Oscar-nominated film Joyeux Noël - in an essay on courage selected by our partners the British Council. It marks the centenary of the spontaneous ceasefire which took place across the Western Front at Christmas 1914.

(Photo: An undated archive picture shows French soldiers moving a 95 mm cannon, on the rear guard near the front, at unknown location in France, 1916 World War One)
(Credit: Reuters)

France: Heroism20141206

How World War One killed the ancient idea of heroism

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

"The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue" said Napoleon. Life in the trenches during the war, amongst rats, mud, shelling, barbed wire and unprecedented numbers of dead, called upon new reserves of both. But what did the war do to the ancient idea of heroism? With death, degradation and grief on such an unprecedented scale how did the concepts of duty, sacrifice and honour survive? At Napoleon's last resting place, the Hôtel National des Invalides, on the centenary of the outbreak of the first industrialised war, Amanda Vickery, her guests and audience explore heroism and World War One. With more women entering the work place than ever before, did the war redefine what it meant to be a man as well as a woman?

She is joined by André Loez, Sciences Po Paris and Emmanuelle Cronier, University of Picardie, and professor of literature Laurence Campa from L'université de Paris Ouest Nanterre and an audience in Paris. Christian Carion, joins them to explore the Christmas Truce - the subject of his Oscar-nominated film Joyeux Noël - in an essay on courage selected by our partners the British Council. It marks the centenary of the spontaneous ceasefire which took place across the Western Front at Christmas 1914.

(Photo: An undated archive picture shows French soldiers moving a 95 mm cannon, on the rear guard near the front, at unknown location in France, 1916 World War One)
(Credit: Reuters)

Germany: The Waging of War2014071920140720 (WS)

How did technological and industrial development revolutionise World War One?

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The tank, gas, flame throwers, Zeppelins - the weapons of World War One were like nothing that had been experienced before. At a special event with the British Council, Amanda Vickery and her guests explore the waging of war, its methods and morality at the German Military Museum in Dresden. How did the technological and industrial development revolutionise war? Did Germany really use methods that were so different from other countries? German leaders accepted ‘moral responsibility’ for the war at the Treaty of Versailles. Our German historians – Sönke Neitzel and Annika Mombauer – and an audience in Dresden debate whether Germany was fairly blamed. They also explore how the experience of this war impacted on the tragedies experienced by cities like Dresden in the war that came after.

The artist and photographer Herlinde Koelbl has spent six years studying how more than 30 different national armies relate to the targets they shoot at in training. Does the enemy have a face? To what extent do people think of themselves as other people’s targets. She delivers an essay on the mind-sets and cultural differences between combatants in World War One.

(Photo: A German Zeppelin leaves its hangar, Germany, unspecified)
(Credit: TopFoto)

Germany: The Waging of War20140719

How did technological and industrial development revolutionise World War One?

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The tank, gas, flame throwers, Zeppelins - the weapons of World War One were like nothing that had been experienced before. At a special event with the British Council, Amanda Vickery and her guests explore the waging of war, its methods and morality at the German Military Museum in Dresden. How did the technological and industrial development revolutionise war? Did Germany really use methods that were so different from other countries? German leaders accepted ‘moral responsibility’ for the war at the Treaty of Versailles. Our German historians – Sönke Neitzel and Annika Mombauer – and an audience in Dresden debate whether Germany was fairly blamed. They also explore how the experience of this war impacted on the tragedies experienced by cities like Dresden in the war that came after.

The artist and photographer Herlinde Koelbl has spent six years studying how more than 30 different national armies relate to the targets they shoot at in training. Does the enemy have a face? To what extent do people think of themselves as other people’s targets. She delivers an essay on the mind-sets and cultural differences between combatants in World War One.

(Photo: A German Zeppelin leaves its hangar, Germany, unspecified)
(Credit: TopFoto)

India2014110820141109 (WS)

Razia Iqbal is joined in Delhi by guests and an audience to explore the impact of the First World War on Imperialism.

Razia Iqbal is joined in Delhi by guests and an audience to explore the impact of the F...

India: Imperialism2014110820141109 (WS)

Historians, experts and a Delhi public audience debate the impact of WW1 on imperialism

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The Indian army was key to allied military effort in World War One. More than one million men served on the Western Front, at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and in Africa. There were far more Indian soldiers defending the Empire than there were British men in the field. Some were forced to enlist, some signed up because they would be paid, and some were moved by desire to come to British King's aid at his time of need. Gandhi encouraged recruits, saying "We are not entitled to self-rule until we come forward and enlist in the army". Home Rule was not granted however, bitter discontent grew and although its history in not well known in India, the war and its aftermath had a huge effect on the country and its role in the British Empire.

In this special debate staged in partnership with the British Council, the BBC's Razia Iqbal is joined by historians professor Mridula Mukherjee and Dr Srinath Raghavan and a public audience in Delhi, India, to explore the impact of World War One on Imperialism. Internationally acclaimed writer and politician Dr Shashi Tharoor presents a specially commissioned essay on the theme.

(Photograph:Indian bicycle troops at a crossroads on the Fricourt-Mametz Road, Somme, France, July 1916)
(Credit: Wikicomms - photo taken by UK government and now in the public domain)

India: Imperialism2014110820141227 (WS)

Historians, experts and a Delhi public audience debate the impact of WW1 on imperialism

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The Indian army was key to allied military effort in World War One. More than one million men served on the Western Front, at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and in Africa. There were far more Indian soldiers defending the Empire than there were British men in the field. Some were forced to enlist, some signed up because they would be paid, and some were moved by desire to come to British King's aid at his time of need. Gandhi encouraged recruits, saying "We are not entitled to self-rule until we come forward and enlist in the army". Home Rule was not granted however, bitter discontent grew and although its history in not well known in India, the war and its aftermath had a huge effect on the country and its role in the British Empire.

In this special debate staged in partnership with the British Council, the BBC's Razia Iqbal is joined by historians professor Mridula Mukherjee and Dr Srinath Raghavan and a public audience in Delhi, India, to explore the impact of World War One on Imperialism. Internationally acclaimed writer and politician Dr Shashi Tharoor presents a specially commissioned essay on the theme.

(Photograph:Indian bicycle troops at a crossroads on the Fricourt-Mametz Road, Somme, France, July 1916)
(Credit: Wikicomms - photo taken by UK government and now in the public domain)

India: Imperialism20141108

Historians, experts and a Delhi public audience debate the impact of WW1 on imperialism

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The Indian army was key to allied military effort in World War One. More than one million men served on the Western Front, at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and in Africa. There were far more Indian soldiers defending the Empire than there were British men in the field. Some were forced to enlist, some signed up because they would be paid, and some were moved by desire to come to British King's aid at his time of need. Gandhi encouraged recruits, saying "We are not entitled to self-rule until we come forward and enlist in the army". Home Rule was not granted however, bitter discontent grew and although its history in not well known in India, the war and its aftermath had a huge effect on the country and its role in the British Empire.

In this special debate staged in partnership with the British Council, the BBC's Razia Iqbal is joined by historians professor Mridula Mukherjee and Dr Srinath Raghavan and a public audience in Delhi, India, to explore the impact of World War One on Imperialism. Internationally acclaimed writer and politician Dr Shashi Tharoor presents a specially commissioned essay on the theme.

(Photograph:Indian bicycle troops at a crossroads on the Fricourt-Mametz Road, Somme, France, July 1916)
(Credit: Wikicomms - photo taken by UK government and now in the public domain)

Jordan: Redrawing the Map of the Middle East2015062020150621 (WS)

Redrawing the map of the Middle East and the legacy of WW1

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

How did World War One change the face of the Middle East? And, how did this seismic and controversial period shape the century to follow? Lyse Doucet presents a public debate from Amman in Jordan, with a panel of experts - in partnership with the British Council.

The programme considers the impact of World War One and how its aftermath still overshadows the political landscape of the Middle East.

The Arab Revolt, launched by the Hashemite dynasty during World War One, unified resistance to the Ottomans and triggered the end of their rule of the Arab world. Strong hopes of a unified Arab state were dashed. Instead a patchwork of mandates, protectorates and colonial rule followed with a promise from the British prime minister that Jewish people would be given a "national home in Palestine".

The issues are discussed by three historians, Khaled Fahmy from the American University in Cairo, Mouin Rabbani of the Institute of Palestine Studies, and Ali Mahafza of the University of Jordan. Theatre director Lina Attel presents a personal essay on 'redrawing the map'.

(Photo: Arab fighters riding on camels in the desert, dated January 1917. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jordan: Redrawing the Map of the Middle East20150620

Redrawing the map of the Middle East and the legacy of WW1

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

How did World War One change the face of the Middle East? And, how did this seismic and controversial period shape the century to follow? Lyse Doucet presents a public debate from Amman in Jordan, with a panel of experts - in partnership with the British Council.

The programme considers the impact of World War One and how its aftermath still overshadows the political landscape of the Middle East.

The Arab Revolt, launched by the Hashemite dynasty during World War One, unified resistance to the Ottomans and triggered the end of their rule of the Arab world. Strong hopes of a unified Arab state were dashed. Instead a patchwork of mandates, protectorates and colonial rule followed with a promise from the British prime minister that Jewish people would be given a "national home in Palestine".

The issues are discussed by three historians, Khaled Fahmy from the American University in Cairo, Mouin Rabbani of the Institute of Palestine Studies, and Ali Mahafza of the University of Jordan. Theatre director Lina Attel presents a personal essay on 'redrawing the map'.

(Photo: Arab fighters riding on camels in the desert, dated January 1917. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Sarajevo: Nationalism2014062820140629 (WS)

Nationalism: The first of ten discussions on World War One comes from Sarajevo

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

A world of empires entered the war; the world that came after was one of nation states. Balkan historians join the BBC broadcaster Allan Little to discuss the drive for nationhood during World War One and its impact on nationalism to this day. Exactly 100 years ago a shot rang out on the streets of Sarajevo which set the world on a path to war - was the Archduke’s assassin a nationalist? How did the peace made after World War One influence the ethnic conflicts in the region during the 1990s.

In a special event with the British Council, Allan Little presents our first debate from the Sarajevo War Theatre in Bosnia with guests: Amir Duranovic from the University of Sarajevo, Bojan Aleksov from the University College London, and formerly University of Belgrade. The celebrated Bosnian Theatre director Haris Pasovic gives his very personal take on nationalism and the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand.

(Photograph: The first armed airplane of the Serbian Army, a Bleriot XI-2, dated 1915. The pilot is named as Tomić.Letters are cyrillic, OLUJ, meaning STORM.)
(Credit: Wikicomms, in the public domain. Original in the Museum of Yugoslav Aviation in Belgrade)

Sarajevo: Nationalism20140628

Nationalism: The first of ten discussions on World War One comes from Sarajevo

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

A world of empires entered the war; the world that came after was one of nation states. Balkan historians join the BBC broadcaster Allan Little to discuss the drive for nationhood during World War One and its impact on nationalism to this day. Exactly 100 years ago a shot rang out on the streets of Sarajevo which set the world on a path to war - was the Archduke’s assassin a nationalist? How did the peace made after World War One influence the ethnic conflicts in the region during the 1990s.

In a special event with the British Council, Allan Little presents our first debate from the Sarajevo War Theatre in Bosnia with guests: Amir Duranovic from the University of Sarajevo, Bojan Aleksov from the University College London, and formerly University of Belgrade. The celebrated Bosnian Theatre director Haris Pasovic gives his very personal take on nationalism and the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand.

(Photograph: The first armed airplane of the Serbian Army, a Bleriot XI-2, dated 1915. The pilot is named as Tomić.Letters are cyrillic, OLUJ, meaning STORM.)
(Credit: Wikicomms, in the public domain. Original in the Museum of Yugoslav Aviation in Belgrade)

St. Petersburg: Revolution2014101820141019 (WS)

The Romanovs ruled Russia for centuries until World War One brought a revolution

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The Romanovs ruled Russia for centuries until World War One brought revolution and an abrupt end to their imperial reign. In this special debate from St Petersburg, the BBC’s special correspondent Allan Little explores the legacy of revolution from one of its most iconic sites, the Romanovs' Winter Palace, now the Hermitage Museum – with our series partners the British Council. Allan is joined by Russian World War One experts Alexander Semyonov, professor of History at St Petersburg Higher School of Economics and Liudmila Novikova, Moscow Higher School of Economics and a public audience at Catherine the Great's Theatre. They discuss revolution and the hidden impact of the World War One on Soviet Russia and how it still affects Russian policy today.

The Russian novelist and well-known public commentator Tatyana Tolstaya delivers a specially commissioned essay which evokes the way revolution and war changes individual lives through the story of her own great-grandmother.

Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo: Russian soldiers who had joined the 1917 Revolution, with the red flag fixed to their bayonets)
(Credit: TopFoto)

St. Petersburg: Revolution20141018

The Romanovs ruled Russia for centuries until World War One brought a revolution

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

The Romanovs ruled Russia for centuries until World War One brought revolution and an abrupt end to their imperial reign. In this special debate from St Petersburg, the BBC’s special correspondent Allan Little explores the legacy of revolution from one of its most iconic sites, the Romanovs' Winter Palace, now the Hermitage Museum – with our series partners the British Council. Allan is joined by Russian World War One experts Alexander Semyonov, professor of History at St Petersburg Higher School of Economics and Liudmila Novikova, Moscow Higher School of Economics and a public audience at Catherine the Great's Theatre. They discuss revolution and the hidden impact of the World War One on Soviet Russia and how it still affects Russian policy today.

The Russian novelist and well-known public commentator Tatyana Tolstaya delivers a specially commissioned essay which evokes the way revolution and war changes individual lives through the story of her own great-grandmother.

Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo: Russian soldiers who had joined the 1917 Revolution, with the red flag fixed to their bayonets)
(Credit: TopFoto)

Tanzania: Race and Colonial War2015041120150412 (WS)

A debate from Tanzania on the little-known history of WW1

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

More than one million people died in East Africa during WW1, as the British and German Empires battled each other away from the muddy fields of Europe. The war is all but forgotten in Tanzania, from where Audrey Brown chairs a debate in partnership with the British Council. We hear from historians Bill Nasson of Stellenbosch University in South Africa, Santanu Das from Kings College London, and Tanzanians with family memories, like Oswald Masebo from Dar es Salaam University.

(Photo:Locally-recruited troops under German command in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, then part of German East Africa, circa 1914)
(Credit: Getty Images)

Tanzania: Race and Colonial War2015041120150415 (WS)

A debate from Tanzania on the little-known history of WW1

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

More than one million people died in East Africa during WW1, as the British and German Empires battled each other away from the muddy fields of Europe. The war is all but forgotten in Tanzania, from where Audrey Brown chairs a debate in partnership with the British Council. We hear from historians Bill Nasson of Stellenbosch University in South Africa, Santanu Das from Kings College London, and Tanzanians with family memories, like Oswald Masebo from Dar es Salaam University.

(Photo:Locally-recruited troops under German command in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, then part of German East Africa, circa 1914)
(Credit: Getty Images)

Tanzania: Race and Colonial War20150411

A debate from Tanzania on the little-known history of WW1

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

More than one million people died in East Africa during WW1, as the British and German Empires battled each other away from the muddy fields of Europe. The war is all but forgotten in Tanzania, from where Audrey Brown chairs a debate in partnership with the British Council. We hear from historians Bill Nasson of Stellenbosch University in South Africa, Santanu Das from Kings College London, and Tanzanians with family memories, like Oswald Masebo from Dar es Salaam University.

(Photo:Locally-recruited troops under German command in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, then part of German East Africa, circa 1914)
(Credit: Getty Images)

The Psychology Of War2014080220140803 (WS)
20140804 (WS)

What did the world’s first industrial war do to the minds of people who fought in it?

One hundred years ago World War One set the course for the twentieth century; for the countries that took part nothing would be the same again. In this worldwide series of events with the British Council, we look at the impact of the war from around the world.

The third debate of the series comes from The Imperial War Museum in London as we explore the psychology of war. What drove men to volunteer for the war? What drove them to the edge of sanity when they got there?

Historian and broadcaster Amanda Vickery is joined by a panel of experts and a live audience to explore the mental impact of fighting the war at home and abroad. World War One experts Dan Todman (Queen Mary, University of London) and Michael Roper (University of Essex) are joined by the celebrated cultural historian, Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck, University of London), who presents her specially commissioned essay, Shell Shock and the Shock of Shells.

(Photograph: From left to right, Dan Todman, Amanda Vickery, Michael Roper, Joanna Bourke)

The War that Changed the World - in Words20150808

The War that Changed the World - in Words2015080820150812 (WS)

100 years on, how does WW1 affect life today around the globe? From Sarajevo to Washington DC, the BBC World Service and the British Council have explored its legacy, with experts and audiences around the world.

The War that Changed the World has discussed revolution in Russia, nationalism in Sarajevo, the morality of war in Dresden, the psychology of war in London, nation-forming in Istanbul, Imperialism in India, heroism in Paris, race and colonial war in East Africa, the legend of Anzac in Australia; the redrawing of the Middle East map in Jordan and foreign policy in the USA.

A writer, artist, politician or cultural figure from each of these countries has given their point of view with a specially written essay on the impact of the war on their country. In this special programme presented by Razia Iqbal, history and politics - the past and the present - are drawn together to give a international perspective on the legacy of the world’s first truly global war.

The War that Changed the World - in Words2015080820150812 (WS)

100 years on, how does WW1 affect life today around the globe? From Sarajevo to Washington DC, the BBC World Service and the British Council have explored its legacy, with experts and audiences around the world.

The War that Changed the World has discussed revolution in Russia, nationalism in Sarajevo, the morality of war in Dresden, the psychology of war in London, nation-forming in Istanbul, Imperialism in India, heroism in Paris, race and colonial war in East Africa, the legend of Anzac in Australia; the redrawing of the Middle East map in Jordan and foreign policy in the USA.

A writer, artist, politician or cultural figure from each of these countries has given their point of view with a specially written essay on the impact of the war on their country. In this special programme presented by Razia Iqbal, history and politics - the past and the present - are drawn together to give a international perspective on the legacy of the world’s first truly global war.

The War that Changed the World - in Words2015080820150809 (WS)

The impact of World War One, as seen by cultural figures around the world.

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

100 years on, how does WW1 affect life today around the globe? From Sarajevo to Washington DC, the BBC World Service and the British Council have explored its legacy, with experts and audiences around the world.

The War that Changed the World has discussed revolution in Russia, nationalism in Sarajevo, the morality of war in Dresden, the psychology of war in London, nation-forming in Istanbul, Imperialism in India, heroism in Paris, race and colonial war in East Africa, the legend of Anzac in Australia; the redrawing of the Middle East map in Jordan and foreign policy in the USA.

A writer, artist, politician or cultural figure from each of these countries has given their point of view with a specially written essay on the impact of the war on their country. In this special programme presented by Razia Iqbal, history and politics - the past and the present - are drawn together to give a international perspective on the legacy of the world’s first truly global war.

The War that Changed the World - in Words2015080820150812 (WS)

The impact of World War One, as seen by cultural figures around the world.

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

100 years on, how does WW1 affect life today around the globe? From Sarajevo to Washington DC, the BBC World Service and the British Council have explored its legacy, with experts and audiences around the world.

The War that Changed the World has discussed revolution in Russia, nationalism in Sarajevo, the morality of war in Dresden, the psychology of war in London, nation-forming in Istanbul, Imperialism in India, heroism in Paris, race and colonial war in East Africa, the legend of Anzac in Australia; the redrawing of the Middle East map in Jordan and foreign policy in the USA.

A writer, artist, politician or cultural figure from each of these countries has given their point of view with a specially written essay on the impact of the war on their country. In this special programme presented by Razia Iqbal, history and politics - the past and the present - are drawn together to give a international perspective on the legacy of the world’s first truly global war.

The War that Changed the World - in Words20150808

The impact of World War One, as seen by cultural figures around the world.

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

100 years on, how does WW1 affect life today around the globe? From Sarajevo to Washington DC, the BBC World Service and the British Council have explored its legacy, with experts and audiences around the world.

The War that Changed the World has discussed revolution in Russia, nationalism in Sarajevo, the morality of war in Dresden, the psychology of war in London, nation-forming in Istanbul, Imperialism in India, heroism in Paris, race and colonial war in East Africa, the legend of Anzac in Australia; the redrawing of the Middle East map in Jordan and foreign policy in the USA.

A writer, artist, politician or cultural figure from each of these countries has given their point of view with a specially written essay on the impact of the war on their country. In this special programme presented by Razia Iqbal, history and politics - the past and the present - are drawn together to give a international perspective on the legacy of the world’s first truly global war.

Turkey: Modernity and Secularism2014090620140907 (WS)

Emerging as a new republic after World War One, how has this influenced Turkey today?

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Divested of its empire, Turkey emerged from the aftermath of the First World War as a new republic, led by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the hero of Gallipoli. It developed a secular and modern identity and attempted to break with the Ottoman past. However as Turkey currently re-examines its own constitution, the legacy of the First World War has come back into focus in a compelling way.

In this special debate from Istanbul, Razia Iqbal is joined by the historians Akşin Somel and Ahmet Kuyaş to discuss the new political ethos of modernity, which was embraced after World War One, and the history it attempted to leave behind.

The acclaimed novelist Elif Shafak explores memory, forgetting and the legacy of World War One in a specially commissioned essay selected by the British Council.

(Photo: Turkish marines on the march to the Dardanelles, known as Çanakkale in Turkey)
(Credit: TopFoto)

Turkey: Modernity and Secularism20140906

Emerging as a new republic after World War One, how has this influenced Turkey today?

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Divested of its empire, Turkey emerged from the aftermath of the First World War as a new republic, led by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the hero of Gallipoli. It developed a secular and modern identity and attempted to break with the Ottoman past. However as Turkey currently re-examines its own constitution, the legacy of the First World War has come back into focus in a compelling way.

In this special debate from Istanbul, Razia Iqbal is joined by the historians Akşin Somel and Ahmet Kuyaş to discuss the new political ethos of modernity, which was embraced after World War One, and the history it attempted to leave behind.

The acclaimed novelist Elif Shafak explores memory, forgetting and the legacy of World War One in a specially commissioned essay selected by the British Council.

(Photo: Turkish marines on the march to the Dardanelles, known as Çanakkale in Turkey)
(Credit: TopFoto)

USA: Isolationism2015062720150628 (WS)

How WW1 changed America's place in the world and its attitude to world affairs

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a public debate from the US Library of Congress in Washington, to discuss the relevance and legacy of World War One for the United States, in association with the British Council.

On 1 May 1915, one century ago, the British ocean liner Lusitania set sail from New York to Liverpool. She never arrived. In an event which was to have massive consequences, a German U-boat torpedoed the Lusitania on 7 May off the southern coast of Ireland. She sank in less than 20 minutes, with the loss of 1198 lives. The death toll was 128 Americans, and their deaths caused a storm of protest which was a crucial turning point in American public and political opinion about World War One. This event scorched itself on the American consciousness and was constantly reiterated by those, like Teddy Roosevelt, who were determined that America would enter the war against Germany.

In 1917 America mobilised two million men to fight in Europe, shifting the balance of power and leading to the defeat of Germany and the central powers. This was the first time America had entered into a European war, overthrowing the so-called 'Monroe Doctrine' that it should never become entangled in European affairs.

How did World War One change America's place in the world? And what did this demonstration of American power do to the debate about the United States of America's restraint in World Affairs?

We are joined by historians Jennifer Keene and Ross Kennedy in front of a public audience. David Frum, political writer and former special advisor to President George W. Bush, presents an essay on the USA and isolationism.

(Photo: The 369th Infantry return to New York from the Western Front. Credit: Getty Images)

USA: Isolationism20150627

How WW1 changed America's place in the world and its attitude to world affairs

The effect of World War One from a global perspective

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a public debate from the US Library of Congress in Washington, to discuss the relevance and legacy of World War One for the United States, in association with the British Council.

On 1 May 1915, one century ago, the British ocean liner Lusitania set sail from New York to Liverpool. She never arrived. In an event which was to have massive consequences, a German U-boat torpedoed the Lusitania on 7 May off the southern coast of Ireland. She sank in less than 20 minutes, with the loss of 1198 lives. The death toll was 128 Americans, and their deaths caused a storm of protest which was a crucial turning point in American public and political opinion about World War One. This event scorched itself on the American consciousness and was constantly reiterated by those, like Teddy Roosevelt, who were determined that America would enter the war against Germany.

In 1917 America mobilised two million men to fight in Europe, shifting the balance of power and leading to the defeat of Germany and the central powers. This was the first time America had entered into a European war, overthrowing the so-called 'Monroe Doctrine' that it should never become entangled in European affairs.

How did World War One change America's place in the world? And what did this demonstration of American power do to the debate about the United States of America's restraint in World Affairs?

We are joined by historians Jennifer Keene and Ross Kennedy in front of a public audience. David Frum, political writer and former special advisor to President George W. Bush, presents an essay on the USA and isolationism.

(Photo: The 369th Infantry return to New York from the Western Front. Credit: Getty Images)

01The War That Changed The World2014062820140629 (WS)

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01The War That Changed the World2014062820140629 (WS)

Nationalism: The first of ten discussions on the First World War comes from the Sarajevo War Theatre in Bosnia.

Nationalism: The first of ten discussions on the First World War comes from the Sarajev...