Episodes

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Episode Eight20190123

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Eight:
Having been abandoned by Titch in the Arctic, Washington is on his own and working in a small town in Canada. He wonders if he will ever see his new friend Tanna again.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Washington is in Canada. He wonders if he will see Tanna again.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Five20190118

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Five:
Following Philip’s suicide, Wash and Titch have to leave Faith plantation as quickly as possible. But all does not go according to plan.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. After Philip\u2019s suicide, Wash and Titch have to leave.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Four20190117

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Four:
Philip has disturbing news for his cousins, Titch and Erasmus Wilde. Wash has been horribly disfigured by the accident with the cloud-cutter. Philip’s depressive nature overcomes him - with disastrous consequences for Washington.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Philip has disturbing news for Titch and Erasmus Wilde.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Nine20190124

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Nine:
Just when all seems to be going well for him, Washington has to fight for his life. But Tanna and her father will be the means for him to start a new chapter.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Washington has to fight for his life.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode One20190114

Set in the 1830s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode One:
It's 1830. Washington Black is a young field-slave working on the British-owned Faith plantation in Barbados. He is protected and helped by an older African woman, Big Kit. When a ruthless new master arrives at Faith, Wash’s life changes forever.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Wash\u2019s life changes when a new master arrives at Faith sugar plantation.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Seven20190122

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Seven:
Wash and Titch have found Titch’s father working in the Arctic. But the relationship between Titch and his father is both complicated and unsettling for Washington.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Wash and Titch have found Titch\u2019s father working in the Arctic.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Six20190121

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Six:
Wash and Titch are now in America, staying with the English sexton Edgar Farrow. Titch must decide what to do next, having discovered that his father appears to be still alive and carrying out research in the Arctic.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Wash and Titch are now in America.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Ten20190125

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Ten:
With Tanna by his side, Washington goes in search of Titch, who he now believes is alive and well. His travels will take him far and wide but he has no idea what the reception will be if he finds him.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Washington goes in search of Titch.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Three20190116

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Three:
Titch makes preparations for the launch of his cloud-cutter - a prototype hot-air balloon. Washington has discovered that he has a rare artistic talent but, when Titch’s cousin Philip arrives at the plantation, it has serious repercussions.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. Titch prepares for the launch of his cloud-cutter - a hot air balloon.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun

Episode Two20190115

Set in the 1830’s, Washington Black is an epic, historical novel. It begins on a slave plantation in Barbados and, by the most unexpected and inventive means, transports its young protagonist, Wash, off the island and on a journey that takes him around the world - in pursuit of freedom and the man whose approval he so desperately seeks.

Esi Edugyan's novel explores the nature of evil, moral delusion, and the limits of responsibility. It's also a coming-of-age story where survival marks the transition from boy to man.

Underpinning the more sobering aspects of the novel is a glorious celebration of the creative spirit and the power of the imagination. Despite everything, Washington’s ability to connect with and inspire others, and to draw strength from his own inner life, is an inspiration and a joy that speaks to the contemporary world.

Episode Two:
Washington and Big Kit experience the master’s cruelty first-hand. His brother, Christopher Wilde, is uncomfortable with their treatment. Christopher, known as Titch, has an unexpected request for Washington, which will change the course of his life.

The author Esi Edugyan has degrees from the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her first novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was written when she was 25 and published in 2004. Her second, Half Blood Blues, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2011. Washington Black won the 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Esi lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

Writer: Esi Edugyan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Alex Lanipekun
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4

By Esi Edugyan. The master\u2019s brother, Titch, has a request for Wash.

Esi Edugyan's epic historical novel, abridged by Jeremy Osborne and read by Alex Lanipekun