Episodes

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01Starry Night And Janna Levin20191014

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, the author of the New York Times best-selling essay collection Roxane Gay, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

So, how does a jazz pianist see Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie? How does one of the first black women to write for Marvel comics see the difficult truths in Kara Walker’s sweeping image of African-American history? What does a top fashion designer decode from the clothes painted by an artist in Harlem in the 1930s?

But we start with possibly the most iconic piece in MoMA's collection - Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh. Professor Janna Levin is one of America's leading cosmologists; her specialism is understanding black holes. How does she see Van Gogh's night sky, painted from inside an asylum as he battled mental illness?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

"The Way I See It" is a co-production of the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Image Credit: Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night, June 1889. Oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/4" (73.7 x 92.1 cm). Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (by exchange). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 472.1941

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

02Steve Martin And The Lonely Synchromists20191015

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features award-winning comedian and actor Steve Martin - he finds two "lonely" works that speak to him; Stanton Macdonald-Wright’s Synchromy and Morgan Russell’s Color Form Synchromy.

Producer: Tom Alban

"The Way I See It" is a co-production of the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Main Image: Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Synchromy, 1917. Oil on canvas, 31 x 24" (78.8 x 61 cm). Given anonymously. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 346.1949

30 of the world's sharpest minds chose a work from MoMA's collection - how do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

03Jason Moran And Piet Mondrian20191016

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features jazz pianist and composer Jason Moran. He shares his view of Piet Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie and feels moved to music by its straight lines and blocks of colour.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

"The Way I See It" is a co-production of the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Main Image: Piet Mondrian, Broadway Boogie Woogie, 1942-43. Oil on canvas, 50 x 50" (127 x 127 cm). Given anonymously. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 73.1943

Jazz pianist and composer Jason Moran shares his view of Mondrian's Broadway Boogie Woogie

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

04Neri Oxman And The Endless House20191017

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Professor Neri Oxman from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She's a world expert in combining art and architecture with biology, computing, and materials engineering. Little wonder, perhaps, she chooses Frederick Kiesler’s design for a project called Endless House - an organic structure that was never built.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

"The Way I See It" is a co-production of the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Main Image: Frederick Kiesler, Endless House Project, 1950–1960. Ceramic, 20 x 11 1/2 x 6" (50.8 x 29.2 x 15.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, MC 25

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection; how do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

05Steven Pinker And Picasso20191018

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Harvard professor Steven Pinker. As an experimental psychologist, Steven has written extensively about violence - and for his choice from the gallery's collection he has selected two of Pablo Picasso’s most gruesome depictions of man's inhumanity, Charnel House and Guernica, now housed in Madrid.

Producer: Tom Alban

"The Way I See It" is a co-production of the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Main Image: Pablo Picasso, The Charnel House, 1944-45. Oil and charcoal on canvas, 6' 6 5/8" x 8' 2 1/2" (199.8 x 250.1 cm). Mrs. Sam A. Lewisohn Bequest (by exchange), and Mrs. Marya Bernard Fund in memory of her husband Dr. Bernard Bernard, and anonymous funds, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 93.1971. © 2019 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection; how do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

06Steve Reich On Richard Serra's Equal20191021

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features composer, and chief exponent of Minimalism, Steve Reich. As he stands in front of eight steel boxes stacked in pairs, each box weighing forty tons, he reflects on the effect Richard Serra's work, "Equal" has on our sense of space. But does it change the way he thinks about his own work?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image: Richard Serra, Equal, 2015. Forged weatherproof steel, 8 blocks, each block 60 x 66 x 72" (152.4 x 167.6 x 182.9 cm). Gift of Sidney and Harriet Janis (by exchange), Enid A. Haupt Fund, and Gift of William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. J. Hall (by exchange), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 504.2015.a-d

Composer and godfather of Minimalism Steve Reich reflects on Richard Serra's work, "Equal

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

07Margaret Cho And Lady Vengeance20191022

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means "to see" art.

Today's edition features stand-up comedian and author Margaret Cho. She has chosen the film "Lady Vengeance", a South Korean film directed by Park Chan-wook. How does she react to rewatching this psychological thriller?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Park Chan-wook, Lady Vengeance, 2005. 35mm film. Gift of CJ Entertainment, The Museum of Modern Art, NY, F2014.35

What will stand-up comedian Margaret Cho see when she rewatches the film "Lady Vengeance"?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

08Doro Olowu On William H. Johnson's "children"20191023

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means "to see" art.

Today's edition features London-based fashion designer Doro Olowu. Doro chooses the 1941 painting "Children" by William H Johnson from MoMA's collection. Johnson depicted scenes of everyday African American life in Harlem and in the South - but what will a modern fashion-conscious eye spot in the work?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: William H. Johnson, Children, 1941. Oil and pencil on wood panel, 17 1/2 × 12 1/2" (44.5 × 31.8 cm). Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange), Agnes Gund, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, and the Hudgins Family, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 6.2016

Fashion designer Doro Olowu chooses a painting by William H Johnson from MoMA's collection

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

08Duro Olowu On William H Johnson's 'children'20191023

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features London-based fashion designer Duro Olowu. Duro chooses the 1941 painting 'Children' by William H Johnson from MoMA's collection. Johnson depicted scenes of everyday African American life in Harlem and in the South - but what will a modern fashion-conscious eye spot in the work?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: William H Johnson, Children, 1941. Oil and pencil on wood panel, 17 1/2 × 12 1/2" (44.5 × 31.8 cm). Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange), Agnes Gund, Marlene Hess and James D Zirin, and the Hudgins Family, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 6.2016

Fashion designer Duro Olowu chooses a painting by William H Johnson from MoMA's collection

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

09Michael Bierut On Ed Ruscha's Oof20191024

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features graphic designer Michael Bierut selects Ed Ruscha's large blue and yellow painting of the word "OOF". Will the man who designed the Visa credit card symbol see three letters?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image: Edward Ruscha, OOF, 1962 (reworked 1963). Oil on canvas, 71 1/2 x 67" (181.5 x 170.2 cm). Gift of Agnes Gund, the Louis and Bessie Adler Foundation, Inc., Robert and Meryl Meltzer, Jerry I. Speyer, Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro, Emily and Jerry Spiegel, an anonymous donor, and purchase, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 256.1988. © 2019 Edward Ruscha

Graphic designer Michael Bierut selects a large blue and yellow painting of the word OOF.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

10John Waters On Lee Lozano's Untitled 196320191025

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features film director John Waters. He chooses Lee Lozano's depiction of a head of a hammer, "Untitled 1963", but what will cult film specialist and director of Pink Flamingos make of such an apparently utilitarian subject?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Lee Lozano, Untitled, 1963. Oil on canvas, two panels, 7' 10" x 8' 4" (238.8 x 254 cm). Gift of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 26.2004.a-b. © 2019 Estate of Lee Lozano

American film director John Waters makes his selection from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

11Roxane Gay And Christ's Entry Into Journalism20191028

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

So, how does a jazz pianist see Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie? How does one of the first black women to write for Marvel comics see the difficult truths in Kara Walker’s sweeping image of African-American history? What does a top fashion designer decode from the clothes painted by an artist in Harlem in the 1930s?

This week we begin with American writer and commentator Roxane Gay, author of The New York Times best-selling essay collection Bad Feminist. She chooses a work by Kara Walker, best known for creating black-and-white silhouette works that invoke themes of African American racial identity. Roxane has selected Walker's massive 11-by-18-foot collage “Christ’s Entry into Journalism” from 2017. Riffing off “Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem,” the piece is covered with ink drawings depicting figures real and imagined, past and present, from James Brown to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Donald Trump.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image: Kara Walker, Christ's Entry into Journalism, 2017. Ink and pencil on paper, cut-and-pasted on painted paper, 140 1/2 × 196" (356.9 × 497.8 cm). Acquired through the generosity of Agnes Gund, the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Carol and Morton Rapp, Marnie Pillsbury, the Contemporary Drawing and Print Associates, and Committee on Drawings and Prints Fund, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 198.2018. © 2019 Kara Walker

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

12Es Devlin On Felix Gonzalez-torres's Perfect Lovers20191029

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features British stage designer and sculptor Es Devlin. Devlin has made large scale touring stage sculptures in collaboration with Beyoncé, Kanye West Adele, U2, and the Royal Opera House in London, as well as designing the London Olympic Closing Ceremony in 2012. She has selected Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ Perfect Lovers - in which two synchronized clocks, like those typically found in offices and public spaces, are displayed side by side. One will inevitably stop before the other. Created whilst Felix Gonzalez-Torres's partner was ill, it embodies the tension that comes from two people living side-by-side as life moves forward towards death. Laycock died of AIDS six years before Gonzalez-Torres's own death in 1996. What will one of the world's greatest set designers see in this simple, poignant work?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Felix Gonzalez-Torres,"Untitled" (Perfect Lovers), 1991. Clocks, paint on wall, overall 14 x 28 x 2 3/4" (35.6 x 71.2 x 7 cm). Gift of the Dannheisser Foundation, The Museum of Modern Art, 177.1996.a-b. © 2019 The Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation, Courtesy Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

13Hisham Matar With Man Sleeping Along The Seine20191030

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Hisham Matar , the American born British-Libyan writer whose memoir of the search for his father, The Return, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. He has chosen a photograph by Hungarian–French photographer Brassaï, which is biographic in its own way, featuring a man sleeping by the River Seine, taken in 1932. What inspiration will the award-winning novelist take from this image?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Man Sleeping Along the Seine (Homme endormi au bord de la Seine),
1932. Gelatin silver print, 11 5/8 x 9 1/8" (29.6 x 23.2 cm). David H. McAlpin Fund, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2526.1967. © Estate Brassaï-RMN

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

14Renee Fleming Chooses Colors For A Large Wall20191031

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features American operatic soprano, Renee Fleming. Winner of the National Medal of Arts and Fulbright Lifetime Achievement Medal winner, she is the only classical singer ever to have performed the U.S. National Anthem at the Super Bowl. Renee has chosen Ellsworth Kelly’s 1951 work, Colors for a Large Wall - a collage of painted, multi-coloured squares. What is it about this work that hits Renee Fleming's high notes?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image: Ellsworth Kelly, Colors for a Large Wall, 1951. Oil on canvas, sixty-four panels, 7' 10 1/2" x 7' 10 1/2" (240 x 240 cm). Gift of the artist, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1067.1969.a-b. © 2019 Ellsworth Kelly

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

15The Director's Choice20191101

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

As the series reaches its halfway point, we're in the company of MoMA's director Glenn Lowry. Overseeing a museum of the scale and prestige of MoMA, which of the works in his care stands out for him personally? Glen explains why Dayanita Singh’s Museum of Chance speaks to him above all the others.

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Dayanita Singh, Museum of Chance, 2013. 162 pigmented inkjet prints and teak structures, variable dimensions. Acquired with support from The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Modern Women's Fund, and Committee on Photography Fund. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 494.2017. © 2019 Dayanita Singh. Courtesy of the Frith Street Gallery, London

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

16Fiona Shaw On Georgia O'keeffe's Lake George, Coat And Red20191202

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

So, how does a jazz pianist see Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie? How does one of the first black women to write for Marvel comics see the difficult truths in Kara Walker’s sweeping image of African-American history? What does a top fashion designer decode from the clothes painted by an artist in Harlem in the 1930s?

We begin this second part of the series with the gaze of Emmy award-winning Irish actor Fiona Shaw, currently playing the sinister secret agent Carolyn Martens in the hit TV series "Killing Eve". She has chosen a work by an artist who has been described as the "Mother of American modernism" - Georgia O'Keefe. Best known for her paintings of enlarged flowers, New York skyscrapers, and New Mexico landscapes, Fiona has chosen an excellent example of her style; "Lake George, Coat and Red". But why has she chosen it - and why does she declare that she wouldn't like to own it?

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

17Bryan Stevenson on Jacob Lawrence\u2019s Migration Series20191203

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of American lawyer and social justice activist Bryan Stevenson. He has chosen The Migration Series, a set of paintings by African-American painter Jacob Lawrence. Depicting the migration of African Americans to the northern United States from the South that began in the 1910s, this a moving piece for Bryan Stevenson - but what does a civil rights lawyer see in the work that others might not?

Producer: Tom Alban.

Main Image: Jacob Lawrence, And the migrants kept coming, 1940-41. Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18" (30.5 x 45.7 cm). Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 28.1942.30. © 2019 Jacob Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

17Bryan Stevenson On Jacob Lawrence's Migration Series20191203

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of American lawyer and social justice activist Bryan Stevenson. He has chosen The Migration Series, a set of paintings by African-American painter Jacob Lawrence. Depicting the migration of African Americans to the northern United States from the South that began in the 1910s, this a moving piece for Bryan Stevenson - but what does a civil rights lawyer see in the work that others might not?

Producer: Tom Alban.

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

Main Image: Jacob Lawrence, And the migrants kept coming, 1940-41. Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18" (30.5 x 45.7 cm). Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 28.1942.30. © 2019 Jacob Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

18Richard Serra on Jackson Pollock20191204

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of heavy weight sculptor of steel, Richard Serra. He chooses Jackson Pollock’s "One: Number 31" - but why choose this work and how does it inform his own?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
Jackson Pollock, One: Number 31, 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8' 10" x 17' 5 5/8" (269.5 x 530.8 cm). Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). Conservation
was made possible by the Bank of America Art Conservation Project. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 7.1968. © 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sculptor Richard Serra reflects on his favourite Jackson Pollock piece

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

18Richard Serra On Jackson Pollock20191204

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of heavy weight sculptor of steel, Richard Serra. He chooses Jackson Pollock’s "One: Number 31" - but why choose this work and how does it inform his own?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
Jackson Pollock, One: Number 31, 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8' 10" x 17' 5 5/8" (269.5 x 530.8 cm). Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). Conservation
was made possible by the Bank of America Art Conservation Project. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 7.1968. © 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sculptor Richard Serra reflects on his favourite Jackson Pollock piece

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

Sculptor Richard Serra reflects on his favourite Jackson Pollock piece.

19Madeleine Thien On Vija Celmins' Bikini20191205

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features a work by a Latvian-American visual artist best known for photo-realistic paintings and drawings of natural environments and phenomena such as the ocean, spider webs, star fields, and rocks. Award winning novelist Madeleine Thien has chosen "Bikini" Celmins' depiction of an atomic blast which took place in Bikini Lagoon on 25 July 1946, part of the United States’ Operation Crossroads – one of a series of twenty-three nuclear detonations in the western Pacific. What has drawn the novelist's eye to this work - and how does she see it?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
Vija Celmins, Bikini, 1968. Graphite on acrylic ground on paper, 13 3/8 x 18 1/4" (34 x 46.4 cm). Gift of Edward R. Broida. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 673.2005. © 2019 Vija Celmins

Booker nominated author Madeleine Thien chooses Vija Celmins' Bikini.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

19Madeleine Thien on Vija Celmins\u2019 Bikini20191205

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features a work by a Latvian-American visual artist best known for photo-realistic paintings and drawings of natural environments and phenomena such as the ocean, spider webs, star fields, and rocks. Award winning novelist Madeleine Thien has chosen "Bikini" Celmins' depiction of an atomic blast which took place in Bikini Lagoon on 25 July 1946, part of the United States’ Operation Crossroads – one of a series of twenty-three nuclear detonations in the western Pacific. What has drawn the novelist's eye to this work - and how does she see it?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
Vija Celmins, Bikini, 1968. Graphite on acrylic ground on paper, 13 3/8 x 18 1/4" (34 x 46.4 cm). Gift of Edward R. Broida. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 673.2005. © 2019 Vija Celmins

Booker nominated author Madeleine Thien chooses Vija Celmins\u2019 Bikini.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

19Madeleine Thien On Vija Celmins's Bikini20191205

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features a work by a Latvian-American visual artist best known for photo-realistic paintings and drawings of natural environments and phenomena such as the ocean, spider webs, star fields, and rocks. Award winning novelist Madeleine Thien has chosen "Bikini" Celmins' depiction of an atomic blast which took place in Bikini Lagoon on 25 July 1946, part of the United States’ Operation Crossroads – one of a series of twenty-three nuclear detonations in the western Pacific. What has drawn the novelist's eye to this work - and how does she see it?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Booker Prize-nominated author Madeleine Thien chooses Vija Celmins's Bikini.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

20Zac Posen On Constantin Brancusi's Bird In Space20191206

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features American fashion designer, Zac Posen. His outfits have been worn by British royalty and Hollywood stars like Glenn Close and Reese Witherspoon, but what has caught his eye in the collection at MoMA?

Producer: Tom Alban

Fashion designer to Hollywood, Zac Posen, makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

21Mark Morris On Florine Stettheimer's Costume Design For Orph\u00e9e20191209

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

In this edition, American dancer, choreographer and director Mark Morris casts his gaze on painter and set designer Florine Stettheimer's painting of her costume for her ballet Orphée.

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

22Sarah Sze And Siddhartha Mukherjee On Louise Bourgeois's Quarantania, I20191210

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of husband and wife Sarah Sze & Siddhartha Mukherjee. Sarah is an award winning sculptor and Siddhartha Mukherjee is a Pulitzer Prize winning oncologist. Will the artist and the scientist see Louise Bourgeois’ "Quarantania, I" sculpture differently?

Producer: Paul Kobrak

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

23Orhan Pamuk On Taglioni's Jewel Casket By Joseph Cornell20191211

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of Nobel Prize winning Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk. He picks American artist Joseph Cornell's jewellery box - a homage to Marie Taglioni, an acclaimed nineteenth-century dancer.

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

24Liz Diller On Marcel Duchamp's Network Of Stoppages20191212

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of leading American architect Liz Diller. How will the designer of New York's High Line and MoMA's new galleries see conceptual artist Marcel Duchamp's 1914 painting Network of Stoppages.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

25Isabella Boylston on Maya Deren and Talley Beatty20191213

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of American ballet dancer Isabella Boylston, currently a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. It's a short Black and white film: A Study in Choreography for Camera by Maya Deren and Talley Beatty, made in 1945

Main Image:
A Study in Choreography for Camera (film still), 1945. 16mm film (black and white, silent), 4 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase from the Estate of Maya Deren

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

25Isabella Boylston on Maya Deren and Talley Beatty20191213

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of American ballet dancer Isabella Boylston, currently a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. It's a short Black and white film: A Study in Choreography for Camera by Maya Deren and Talley Beatty, made in 1945

Main Image:
A Study in Choreography for Camera (film still), 1945. 16mm film (black and white, silent), 4 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase from the Estate of Maya Deren

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

25Isabella Boylston On Maya Deren And Talley Beatty20191213

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of American ballet dancer Isabella Boylston, currently a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. It's a short Black and white film: A Study in Choreography for Camera by Maya Deren and Talley Beatty, made in 1945

Main Image:
A Study in Choreography for Camera (film still), 1945. 16mm film (black and white, silent), 4 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase from the Estate of Maya Deren

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

26Stanley Tucci and Giacometti's Head of a Man on a Rod20191216

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

In this edition, American actor Stanley Tucci chooses Alberto Giacometti's "Head of a Man on a Rod" from 1947.

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Alberto Giacometti, Head of a Man on a Rod, 1947. Bronze, 23 1/2" (59.7 cm) high, including bronze base 6 3/8 x 5 7/8 x 6" (16.0 x 14.9 x 15.1 cm). Gift of Mrs. George Acheson. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 595.1976. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

26Stanley Tucci and Giacometti's Head of a Man on a Rod20191216

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

In this edition, American actor Stanley Tucci chooses Alberto Giacometti's "Head of a Man on a Rod" from 1947.

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Alberto Giacometti, Head of a Man on a Rod, 1947. Bronze, 23 1/2" (59.7 cm) high, including bronze base 6 3/8 x 5 7/8 x 6" (16.0 x 14.9 x 15.1 cm). Gift of Mrs. George Acheson. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 595.1976. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

26Stanley Tucci And Giacometti's Head Of A Man On A Rod20191216

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

In this edition, American actor Stanley Tucci chooses Alberto Giacometti's "Head of a Man on a Rod" from 1947.

Producer: Tom Alban

30 of the world's sharpest minds choose a work from MoMA's collection. How do they see it?

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

27Lady Ruth Rogers on Henri Rousseau's The Dream20191217

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition is the choice of award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers: The Dream, by Henri Rousseau.

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Henri Rousseau, The Dream, 1910. Oil on canvas, 6' 8 1/2" x 9' 9 1/2" (204.5 x 298.5 cm). Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 252.1954

Award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers, makes her choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

27Lady Ruth Rogers On Henri Rousseau's The Dream20191217

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features the choice of award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers.

Producer: Tom Alban

Award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers, makes her choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

27Lady Ruth Rogers on Henri Rousseau's The Dream20191217

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition is the choice of award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers: The Dream, by Henri Rousseau.

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Henri Rousseau, The Dream, 1910. Oil on canvas, 6' 8 1/2" x 9' 9 1/2" (204.5 x 298.5 cm). Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 252.1954

Award-winning chef, Ruth Rogers, makes her choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

28Yves Behar and the IEC's Power Symbol20191218

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Swiss designer Yves Behar, whose choice is a powerful one - literally. He chooses the internationally recognised power symbol, the circle broken with a vertical line. Is it really art? That is how he sees it.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)’s Power Symbol (2011)

Swiss corporate designer Yves Behar makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

28Yves Behar and the IEC's Power Symbol20191218

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Swiss designer Yves Behar, whose choice is a powerful one - literally. He chooses the internationally recognised power symbol, the circle broken with a vertical line. Is it really art? That is how he sees it.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)’s Power Symbol (2011)

Swiss designer Yves Behar makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

28Yves Behar and the IEC's Power Symbol20191218

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Swiss designer Yves Behar, whose choice is a powerful one - literally. He chooses the internationally recognised power symbol, the circle broken with a vertical line. Is it really art? That is how he sees it.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)’s Power Symbol (2011)

Swiss corporate designer Yves Behar makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

28Yves Behar and the IEC's Power Symbol20191218

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Swiss designer Yves Behar, whose choice is a powerful one - literally. He chooses the internationally recognised power symbol, the circle broken with a vertical line. Is it really art? That is how he sees it.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image:
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)’s Power Symbol (2011)

Swiss designer Yves Behar makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

28Yves Behar And The Iec's Power Symbol20191218

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features Swiss designer Yves Behar, whose choice is a powerful one - literally. He chooses the internationally recognised power symbol, the circle broken with a vertical line. Is it really art? That is how he sees it.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Swiss corporate designer Yves Behar makes his choice from the MoMA collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

29David Henry Hwang on Martin Wong's Stanton near Forsyth Street20191219

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features playwright, librettist and screenwriter, David Henry Hwang. He chooses a painting by the artist Martin Wong - Stanton near Forsyth Street (1983).

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Credit: Martin Wong, Stanton near Forsyth Street, 1983. Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 64" (121.9 x 162.6 cm). Courtesy of the Estate of Martin Wong and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York, NY. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 863.2011

Screenwriter and playwright David Henry Hwang makes his choice from MoMA's collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

29David Henry Hwang on Martin Wong's Stanton near Forsyth Street20191219

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features playwright, librettist and screenwriter, David Henry Hwang. He chooses a painting by the artist Martin Wong - Stanton near Forsyth Street (1983).

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Credit: Martin Wong, Stanton near Forsyth Street, 1983. Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 64" (121.9 x 162.6 cm). Courtesy of the Estate of Martin Wong and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York, NY. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 863.2011

Screenwriter and playwright David Henry Hwang makes his choice from MoMA's collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

29David Hwang on Martin Wong's First Letter Home from New York20191219

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features playwright, librettist and screenwriter, David Henry Hwang. He chooses a painting by the artist Martin Wong - Stanton near Forsyth Street (1983).

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Credit: Martin Wong, Stanton near Forsyth Street, 1983. Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 64" (121.9 x 162.6 cm). Courtesy of the Estate of Martin Wong and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York, NY. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 863.2011

Screenwriter and playwright David Hwang makes his choice from MoMA's collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

29David Hwang on Martin Wong's First Letter Home from New York20191219

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features playwright, librettist and screenwriter, David Henry Hwang. He chooses a painting by the artist Martin Wong - Stanton near Forsyth Street (1983).

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Credit: Martin Wong, Stanton near Forsyth Street, 1983. Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 64" (121.9 x 162.6 cm). Courtesy of the Estate of Martin Wong and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York, NY. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 863.2011

Screenwriter and playwright David Hwang makes his choice from MoMA's collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

29David Hwang On Martin Wong's First Letter Home From New York20191219

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features playwright, librettist and screenwriter, David Hwang. He chooses a handwritten letter from artist Martin Wong to his parents, describing his life after moving from San Francisco to New York in 1978.

Producer: Tom Alban

Screenwriter and playwright David Hwang makes his choice from MoMA's collection.

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

30Alastair Sooke20191220

Over the last 29 editions art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, has dived into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

In this final edition, Alastair makes his own selection. And, as with several of his guests in the series he goes for two choices. The first, a painting that bowled him over as a young visitor to MoMA, Matisse’s Red Studio, but what will the second be, and has making this series changed the way he sees art?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Henri Matisse, The Red Studio, 1911. Oil on canvas, 71 1/4" x 7' 2 1/4" (181 x 219.1 cm). Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 8.1949.© Succession H. Matisse/ DACS 2019

Final edition of the series that opens MoMA's collection and challenges the way we see art

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

30Alastair Sooke20191220

Over the last 29 editions art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, has dived into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

In this final edition, Alastair makes his own selection. And, as with several of his guests in the series he goes for two choices. The first, a painting that bowled him over as a young visitor to MoMA, Matisse’s Red Studio, but what will the second be, and has making this series changed the way he sees art?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image:
Henri Matisse, The Red Studio, 1911. Oil on canvas, 71 1/4" x 7' 2 1/4" (181 x 219.1 cm). Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund. Museum of Modern Art, NY, 8.1949.© Succession H. Matisse/ DACS 2019

Final edition of the series that opens MoMA's collection and challenges the way we see art

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.

30Alastair Sooke20191220

Over the last 29 editions art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, has dived into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

In this final edition, Alastair makes his own selection. What will it be, and has making this series changed the way he sees art?

Producer: Tom Alban

Final edition of the series that opens MoMA's collection and challenges the way we see art

Leading creative thinkers choose an artwork from MoMA and talk about how it inspires them.