We Need To Talk About Death

Episodes

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03Death Unexplained20190123

Why is a sudden, but not unexpected, death of someone very old or very ill, referred to a coroner to investigate? What happens then? These investigations are rarely talked about but are surprisingly common.

Joan Bakewell explores the issues with her panel, including His Honour Judge Mark Lucraft QC, in his first broadcast as Chief Coroner of England and Wales.

He reveals what the coroner process involves, from the first investigations to when a post-mortem or an inquest become necessary.

Having heard from listeners who felt implicated after the sudden arrival of the police, and whose bereavement was affected by the process that followed, Joan asks how people can best navigate the system when the death of a relative is referred to a coroner.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Why is a sudden, yet not unexpected, death of someone old or ill, referred to a coroner?

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.

03Death Unexplained2019012320190126 (R4)

Why is a sudden, but not unexpected, death of someone very old or very ill, referred to a coroner to investigate? What happens then? These investigations are rarely talked about but are surprisingly common.

Joan Bakewell explores the issues with her panel, including His Honour Judge Mark Lucraft QC, in his first broadcast as Chief Coroner of England and Wales.

He reveals what the coroner process involves, from the first investigations to when a post-mortem or an inquest become necessary.

Having heard from listeners who felt implicated after the sudden arrival of the police, and whose bereavement was affected by the process that followed, Joan asks how people can best navigate the system when the death of a relative is referred to a coroner.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Why is a sudden, yet not unexpected, death of someone old or ill, referred to a coroner?

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.

03I Can't Afford to Die20190116

The average cost of a funeral has doubled in the past twelve years. As people struggle to meet the soaring cost, Joan Bakewell explores how to achieve a decent send-off for a friend or relative, and even yourself, if you don’t have the money.

Low-cost funerals are now in demand and, as Joan discovers, there are many ways of keeping the cost down. She and her panel discuss the different elements of a funeral to reveal where the money goes, and how you can make savings. Many people today are choosing to do away with the ‘frills’, such as the hearse, limousines and pall bearers, and focussing on the essentials - the coffin, cremation or burial, and the service.

While some can afford a low-cost funeral, an increasing number cannot. The state-funded public health funerals, or ‘paupers funerals’ as they were once called, are on the rise. But securing one from your local authority isn’t always easy. Joan asks why these funerals can be so hard to access, when someone is in genuine need, and where to seek help.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Joan Bakewell explores the options available when you can't afford a funeral.

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.

03I Can't Afford to Die2019011620190119 (R4)

The average cost of a funeral has doubled in the past twelve years. As people struggle to meet the soaring cost, Joan Bakewell explores how to achieve a decent send-off for a friend or relative, and even yourself, if you don’t have the money.

Low-cost funerals are now in demand and, as Joan discovers, there are many ways of keeping the cost down. She and her panel discuss the different elements of a funeral to reveal where the money goes, and how you can make savings. Many people today are choosing to do away with the ‘frills’, such as the hearse, limousines and pall bearers, and focussing on the essentials - the coffin, cremation or burial, and the service.

While some can afford a low-cost funeral, an increasing number cannot. The state-funded public health funerals, or ‘paupers funerals’ as they were once called, are on the rise. But securing one from your local authority isn’t always easy. Joan asks why these funerals can be so hard to access, when someone is in genuine need, and where to seek help.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Joan Bakewell explores the options available when you can't afford a funeral.

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.

03My Dying Wishes20190109

What kind of care would you like at the very end of your life? Where would you like to be? Do you want music playing? Would you want medical staff to try to resuscitate you? If you can’t speak for yourself at the time, how can you be sure the people, involved in your care, do what you want?

Very few of us make our dying wishes known. Even the elderly and frail often shy away from documenting their preferences.

Yet it’s crucial because the health professionals you come into contact with, at the end of your life, may know very little about you.

Advance Care Planning, as it’s called, can be particularly crucial when disaster strikes, such as a cardiac arrest. The paramedics arriving on the scene are kept in the dark if you haven’t documented your wishes, or nominated someone else to vouch for you.

Joan Bakewell reveals why it’s so important to make your wishes known, and how to go about it.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Joan Bakewell explores how to ensure your wishes at the end of your life are respected.

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.

03My Dying Wishes2019010920190112 (R4)

What kind of care would you like at the very end of your life? Where would you like to be? Do you want music playing? Would you want medical staff to try to resuscitate you? If you can’t speak for yourself at the time, how can you be sure the people, involved in your care, do what you want?

Very few of us make our dying wishes known. Even the elderly and frail often shy away from documenting their preferences.

Yet it’s crucial because the health professionals you come into contact with, at the end of your life, may know very little about you.

Advance Care Planning, as it’s called, can be particularly crucial when disaster strikes, such as a cardiac arrest. The paramedics arriving on the scene are kept in the dark if you haven’t documented your wishes, or nominated someone else to vouch for you.

Joan Bakewell reveals why it’s so important to make your wishes known, and how to go about it.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Joan Bakewell explores how to ensure your wishes at the end of your life are respected.

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying.