EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedDescription
01A Dollar A Day20091104 Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life ha.
Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life has been blighted by violence and abuse.
01A Dollar A Day20091105 Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life ha.
01A Dollar A Day20091107 Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life ha.
Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life has been blighted by violence and abuse.
01A Dollar A Day20091108 Mike Wooldridge investigates extreme poverty, meeting Justa in Nicaragua, whose life ha.
01Blind Man Roams The Globe20110105 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new ci.
When he visits a new city, it's the sounds which assail him.
01Blind Man Roams The Globe20110106 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new ci.
01Blind Man Roams The Globe20110108 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new city, it's the sounds which assail him.
When he visits a new ci.
01Blind Man Roams The Globe20110109 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new ci.
01Can China Go Green?20091202 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic power stations and increasing traffic.
01Can China Go Green?20091203 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
01Can China Go Green?20091205 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
01Can China Go Green?20091206 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
01Caribbean Voices20090722 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a literary tradition in the Caribbean.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20090723 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20090726 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20090801 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20090729 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a literary tradition in the Caribbean.
01Caribbean Voices20090730 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20090802 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20100707 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a literary tradition in the Caribbean.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20100708 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20100710 Colin Grant on the role the BBC's Caribbean Voices played in shaping Caribbean literature.
What is the Caribbean voice? In the 1950s, the BBC World Service conjured it up.
Through its weekly programme, Caribbean voices were revealed to be haunting and melodious, salty, pungent, sun-drenched, wry, amusing, earnest and unique.
If a good newspaper acts as a nation talking to itself, then Caribbean Voices distinguished itself as a sounding board for the British colonies in Caribbean.
Poets, playwrights and prose writers (amateur and professional) sent forth their contributions from the Antilles and those stories, selected, edited and fastidiously recorded washed back over the airwaves as the BBC called the Caribbean.
In this two-part series the radio producer and independent historian Colin Grant, examines how Caribbean Voices served to kick start a literary tradition in the Caribbean.
The door of the freelancers' room at the Langham Hotel, with its ochre walls and pea-green dado, was always wide open and a host of soon-to-be famous names walked through: Sam Selvon, Derek Walcott, Andrew Salkey, V.S.
Naipaul and many others.
The series will travel back to the anxious beginnings of these impoverished fledgling writers who tapped out their stories, on the smooth non-rustle paper, to the sound of their bellies knocking on their backbones.
In part one, Colin Grant talks to some of the original contributors, including the Noble Laureate, Derek Walcott and George Lamming about the remarkable beginnings of Caribbean Voices, drawing listeners back to the 1940s where in the midst of war an indomitable Jamaican, Una Marson caught the attention of BBC bosses, and was given the job of reflecting life in Britain to people in the Caribbean and vice-versa.
On one level this might simply be Caribbean servicemen and women stationed in England reading letters home; later there would be meditations on the nature of prejudice that the immigrants found on their arrival, and still later Caribbean Voices became a show-case for burgeoning literary endeavour.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
01Caribbean Voices20100711 Colin Grant on the role the BBC's Caribbean Voices played in shaping Caribbean literature.
01Caribbean Voices, Caribbean Voices - Part One20090725 Colin Grant recalls how the BBC played a part in shaping Caribbean literature.
If a good newspaper acts as a nation talking to itself, then Caribbean Voices distinguished itself as a sounding board for the British colonies in Caribbean.
It was a weekly programme where poets, playwrights and prose writers - amateur and professional - sent forth their contributions from the Antilles and those stories, selected, edited and fastidiously recorded washed back over the airwaves as the BBC called the Caribbean.
In this two-part series Colin Grant examines how the programme served to kick start a literary tradition in the region.
The door of the freelancers' room at the Langham Hotel, with its ochre walls and pea-green dado, was always wide open and a host of soon-to-be famous names walked through; Sam Selvon, Derek Walcott, Andrew Salkey, V.S.
Naipaul and many others.
The series will travel back to the anxious beginnings of these impoverished fledgling writers who tapped out their stories, on the smooth non-rustle paper, to the sound of their bellies knocking on their backbones.
In part one, Colin talks to some of the original contributors, including the Noble Laureate, Derek Walcott and George Lamming about the remarkable beginnings of Caribbean Voices.
He draws listeners back to the 1940s where in the midst of war an indomitable Jamaican, Una Marson caught the attention of BBC bosses and was given the job of reflecting life in Britain to people in the Caribbean and vice versa.
01Caribbean Voices, Caribbean Voices - Part One20090726 Colin Grant recalls how the BBC played a part in shaping Caribbean literature.
01Caribbean Voices, Caribbean Voices - Part Two20090801 Colin Grant recalls how the BBC played a part in shaping Caribbean literature.
If a good newspaper acts as a nation talking to itself, then Caribbean Voices distinguished itself as a sounding board for the British colonies in Caribbean.
It was a weekly programme where poets, playwrights and prose writers - amateur and professional - sent forth their contributions from the Antilles and those stories, selected, edited and fastidiously recorded washed back over the airwaves as the BBC called the Caribbean.
In this two-part series Colin Grant examines how the programme served to kick start a literary tradition in the region.
The door of the freelancers' room at the Langham Hotel, with its ochre walls and pea-green dado, was always wide open and a host of soon-to-be famous names walked through; Sam Selvon, Derek Walcott, Andrew Salkey, V.S.
Naipaul and many others.
The series will travel back to the anxious beginnings of these impoverished fledgling writers who tapped out their stories, on the smooth non-rustle paper, to the sound of their bellies knocking on their backbones.
In part two, Colin asks writers who they think they are, who are their readers and whether they strive for recognition at home or abroad.
He also looks at the impact the populist Jamaican poet, Louise Bennett had on the country's most popular art form, pantomime and how the film 'The Harder The Come', brought Jamaican patois and music to mainstream audiences.
He speaks to the organiser of the literary festival Calabash who feels that present Caribbean authors are not being pigeon holed by history and writing about slavery and colonialism but writing about everything and anything.
Colin also finds out why local bookshops are maybe to blame for the lack of Caribbean literature in the region themselves.
01Caribbean Voices, Caribbean Voices - Part Two20090802 Colin Grant recalls how the BBC played a part in shaping Caribbean literature.
01Citizen Journalism20090902 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen journalism.
Are we all journalists now?
01Citizen Journalism20090903 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
01Citizen Journalism20090905 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen journalism.
Are we all journalists now?
Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
01Citizen Journalism20090906 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
01Farm Swap20090620 Farming is fundamental to our way of life.
But do all farmers have similar objectives? We meet two very different farmers.
But do all farmers have similar objectives?
Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.
01Gold20090812 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symbolism of the most coveted of minerals.
01Gold20090813 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
01Gold20090815 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symbolism of the most coveted of minerals.
01Gold20090816 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
01Great Expectations20100224 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estates in the run up to the London Olympics.
01Great Expectations20100225 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
01Great Expectations20100227 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
01Great Expectations20100228 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
01Health Of A Nation20100113 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform the health care system in America.
01Health Of A Nation20100114 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
01Health Of A Nation20100116 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
01Health Of A Nation20100117 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
01How My Country Speaks20110318 Russian poet Irina Ratushinskay examines what the poetry of her country says about the.
Russian poet Irina Ratushinskay examines what the poetry of her country says about the nation.
01How My Country Speaks20110319 Russian poet Irina Ratushinskay examines what the poetry of her country says about the...
Russian poet Irina Ratushinskay examines what the poetry of her country says about the nation.
01How My Country Speaks   
01Indonesian Journeys2009022620090228Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
01Marching Into History (wed Doc)20101117 In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for chang.
In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for change, as potent today as in the past.
01Marching Into History (wed Doc)20101118 In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for chang.
01Marching Into History (wed Doc)20101120 For hundreds of years the protest march has been a means of voicing passionate concerns.
Whether protesting at injustice, challenging inequalities, fighting for better conditions or showing solidarity for fellow workers - demonstrating has been a way of focusing public anger.
While some mass demonstrations have ended in victory, others have led to retreat, defeat and sometimes tragedy.
Defying the authorities can be a dangerous business.
In this two-part documentary, Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change.
Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change
01Marching Into History (wed Doc)20101121 Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change
01Obama's America20100210 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is at stake and what the future might hold.
01Obama's America20100211 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
01Obama's America20100213 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is at stake and what the future might hold.
01Obama's America20100214 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
01On The Brink2009050620090507Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global slump and depression.
01On The Brink20090509 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global slump and depression.
Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
01On The Brink20090510 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
01One Block In Harlem20110202 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American neighbourhood in the USA.
01One Block In Harlem20110203 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
01One Block In Harlem20110205 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
01One Block In Harlem20110206 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
01Open Eye20110119 Photographer Dalia Khamissy uncovers what happened to the 17,000 people who were kidnap.
Photographer Dalia Khamissy uncovers what happened to the 17,000 people who were kidnapped during the Lebanese civil war.
01Open Eye20110120 Photographer Dalia Khamissy uncovers what happened to the 17,000 people who were kidnap.
01Open Eye20110122 What sort of relationships do photographers form with the people that are the subject of their pictures?
The bond can be an emotional one because the theme is often highly charged.
In this BBC World Service documentary series, two photographers reveal their stories - one of hope and grief, and the other a tale of racial tension.
The story of the men who disappeared during Lebanon's civil war
01Open Eye20110123 The story of the men who disappeared during Lebanon's civil war
01Playing Castro's Tune20090108 Stephen Evans in Cuba looks for the links between Cuban music, the revolution and the w...
Stephen Evans in Cuba looks for the links between Cuban music, the revolution and the way political change impacted on music.
01Playing Castro's Tune20090111 Stephen Evans in Cuba looks for the links between Cuban music, the revolution and the w.
01Queenan's Crime Scenes20100324 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how crime is reflected in their literature.
01Queenan's Crime Scenes20100325 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
01Queenan's Crime Scenes20100327 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how crime is reflected in their literature.
01Queenan's Crime Scenes20100328 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
01Rebranding Nigeria20091021 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and highlight the country's cultural values.
01Rebranding Nigeria20091022 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
01Rebranding Nigeria20091024 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and highlight the country's cultural values.
01Return To White Horse Village20081210 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is turned into a city.
01Return To White Horse Village20081211 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
01Return To White Horse Village20081213 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is turned into a city.
Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
01Return To White Horse Village20081214 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
01Seeking The Endgame20110323 Chess fanatic Simon Terrington explores the game in today's world.
Is modern technology.
Is modern technology changing it and how it's played?
01Seeking The Endgame20110324 Chess fanatic Simon Terrington explores the game in today's world.
Is modern technology.
01Seeking The Endgame20110326 Chess fanatic Simon Terrington explores the game in today's world.
Is modern technology changing it and how it's played?
Is modern technology.
01Seeking The Endgame   
01South Africa's Path To Freedom20100609 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's greatest living writers: Wole Soyinka.
01South Africa's Path To Freedom20100610 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
01South Africa's Path To Freedom20100612 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
01South Africa's Path To Freedom, South Africa's Path To Freedom20100612 Wole Soyinka fought apartheid from outside South Africa during the years of oppression and conflict, and now he makes a special journey to the country to meet some of the key writers who lived through the turbulent years.
In Johannesburg he joins fellow Nobel Prize winner Nadine Gordimer.
At the Constitutional Court he speaks with Albie Sachs, a former judge who was almost killed in a car bomb attack in 1988 in which he lost an arm and the sight of his right eye.
Instrumental in setting up the legal framework for the new nation, Albie Sachs proves an inspiration to Professor Soyinka.
Also in Johannesburg he speaks to South Africa’s Poet Laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile and in Cape Town to Antjie Krog, author of the seminal work Country of My Skull, about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Wole Soyinka also meets the new young black writers who are interpreting their world through fiction.
In Johannesburg he visits the local FM radio station to speak to Karabo Kgoleng, who gives her take on modern South Africa, and visits the township of Alexandra to see if living conditions have actually improved.
Economics, social issues, and the desperate need to improve the lot of the poor are all brought to Wole Soyinka on his journey through the land.
Finally calling in at both the Market Theatre and the new theatre in Cape Town, Wole Soyinka catches Athol Fugard after whom the new theatre is named.
In a dramatic twist, the two end up on stage together as they consider their shared histories.
This is a journey through old and new South Africa by a writer who truly understands the work of the African writer.
It sheds fresh light on the problems of the past and the challenges of the future for the society that now makes up the rainbow nation.
Wole Soyinka explores South Africa through the eyes of its finest writers.
01South Africa's Path To Freedom, South Africa's Path To Freedom20100613 Wole Soyinka explores South Africa through the eyes of its finest writers.
01Textbook Diplomacy20100127 The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequ.
The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequate for a post-apartheid country.
01Textbook Diplomacy20100128 The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequ.
01Textbook Diplomacy20100130 The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequ.
The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequate for a post-apartheid country.
01Textbook Diplomacy20100131 The story of South Africa's struggle to produce school history textbooks that are adequ.
01The Cricket Revolution20090603 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and asks what this could mean for its future.
David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
01The Cricket Revolution20090604 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
01The Cricket Revolution20090606 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and asks what this could mean for its future.
01The Foods That Make Billions20101215 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bottled water and yoghurt into necessities.
01The Foods That Make Billions20101216 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
01The Foods That Make Billions, 15/12/1020101218 In the series, The Foods that Make Billions, Louise Hidalgo looks at how branding and marketing turn relatively cheap commodities into high value products.
In the case of bottled water, terms such as 'nature in a bottle' and 'healthy hydration' have helped to create a whole new market.
People in the business say that clever words alone cannot create a demand without willing consumers.
What those consumers are demanding is choice, convenience and packaging.
However for many, the bottled water industry represents excess and inequality - billions of people do not have access to clean water.
It is a billion dollar industry, but what are the costs?
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as bottled water
01The Foods That Make Billions, 15/12/1020101219 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as bottled water
01The Greening Of The Deserts20090704 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
01The Listening Post20100721 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the histories they carry.
01The Listening Post20100722 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
01The Listening Post20100724 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the histories they carry.
01The Listening Post20100725 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
01The Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090520 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a million protesters in Tiananmen Square.
01The Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090521 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
01The Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090523 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a million protesters in Tiananmen Square.
01The Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090524 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
01The Secret Scientists20090415 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
01The Secret Scientists20090416 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
01The Secret Scientists20090418 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
01The Secret Scientists20090419 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
01Tiger V Dragon20100623 Mukul Devichand looks at the Asian century, which will be dominated by India and China,.
Mukul Devichand looks at the Asian century, which will be dominated by India and China, with nearly half the world's population.
01Tiger V Dragon20100624 Mukul Devichand looks at the Asian century, which will be dominated by India and China,.
01Tiger V Dragon20100626 Mukul Devichand looks at the Asian century, which will be dominated by India and China,.
01Tiger V Dragon, The Power Of The Poor20100626 This is the Asian century.
It will be increasingly dominated by two countries that share nearly half of the world's population: India and China.
But the hype around the economic growth of these two Asian giants, lumped hopefully together as "Chindia," has obscured some much darker truths.
In this provocative series of programmes, Mukul Devichand travels across frontiers, from the controversial new ports China is building in the Indian Ocean to the poor interior villages of these continent-sized countries.
He examines whether China's authoritarianism may in fact be doing much more for the poor than India's sometimes bloody democracy.
He also looks at how the old nationalist rivalries mingle with the intense hunger for oil and other natural resources.
Far from the dream of a co-operative "Chindia," there's a risk India and China may well end up at odds with each other in what some have called an Asian cold war.
Part 1: The Power of the Poor
In the churn and tumult of India and China's rapid economic growth, which country has done more to lift the lives of its hundreds of millions of very poor?
In the first programme of the series, Mukul Devichand travels from Indian sweatshops to villages in rural western China to tell a tale of difficult lives, development and bloodshed which challenges the very idea of democracy.
While India gave the poorest a vote at the ballot box, Communist China delivered rural education and built roads and factories at breakneck speed.
Has Indian democracy failed to deliver where authoritarian China has succeeded?
India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
01Tiger V Dragon, The Power Of The Poor20100627 India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
01Useful Idiots20100804 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave their blessing to tyrannies and tyrants.
01Useful Idiots20100805 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
01Useful Idiots20100807 Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave their blessing to tyrannies and tyrants.
The phrase 'useful idiots', supposedly Lenin’s, refers to Westerners duped into saying good things about bad regimes.
In political jargon it was used to describe Soviet sympathisers in Western countries and the attitude of the Soviet government towards them.
Useful idiots, in a broader sense, refers to Western journalists, travellers and intellectuals who gave their blessing – often with evangelistic fervour – to tyrannies and tyrants, thereby convincing politicians and public that utopias rather than Belsens thrived.
In part one John Sweeney looks at Stalin's Western apologists.
In part two he explores how present day stories of human rights abuses across the world are still rewritten.
John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
01Useful Idiots20100808 Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave their blessing to tyrannies and tyrants.
01What Can I Say?20110216 Gary Bryson explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia with journalist.
Gary Bryson explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia with journalists, filmmakers and political activists.
01What Can I Say?20110217 Gary Bryson explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia with journalist.
01What Can I Say?20110219 
Gary Bryson explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia with journalist.
01What Can I Say?, - Indonesia20110220 
What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
01World Stories20100825 The Rollercoaster of Life in Kabul: Meena Baktash on Kabul's beauty, vibrant culture an.
The Rollercoaster of Life in Kabul: Meena Baktash on Kabul's beauty, vibrant culture and inspiring people.
01World Stories20100826 The Rollercoaster of Life in Kabul: Meena Baktash on Kabul's beauty, vibrant culture an.
01World Stories20100828 The Rollercoaster of Life in Kabul: Meena Baktash on Kabul's beauty, vibrant culture an.
01World Stories20100829 The Rollercoaster of Life in Kabul: Meena Baktash on Kabul's beauty, vibrant culture an.
01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20100512 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral creatures humans are.
Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20100513 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20100515 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral creatures humans are.
Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20100516 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
01Yiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091007 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of.
Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of the language survives.
01Yiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091008 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of.
01Yiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091010 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of...
Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of the language survives.
01 LASTChinua Achebe - A Hero Returns2009032520090326Richard Dowden joins novelist Chinua Achebe on his first trip back to Nigeria for many.
Richard Dowden joins novelist Chinua Achebe on his first trip back to Nigeria for many years.
Can he inspire a new generation?
01 LASTChinua Achebe - A Hero Returns20090326 Richard Dowden joins novelist Chinua Achebe on his first trip back to Nigeria for many.
01 LASTChinua Achebe - A Hero Returns20090328 Richard Dowden joins novelist Chinua Achebe on his first trip back to Nigeria for many.
01 LASTHuman Rights And Wrongs At The Un20090121 Is the UN Human Rights Council protecting the vulnerable from human rights abuses, or i.
Is the UN Human Rights Council protecting the vulnerable from human rights abuses, or is it just fixated on protecting itself?
01 LASTHuman Rights And Wrongs At The Un20090122 Is the UN Human Rights Council protecting the vulnerable from human rights abuses, or i.
01 LASTHuman Rights And Wrongs At The Un20090124 Is the UN Human Rights Council protecting the vulnerable from human rights abuses, or i.
Is the UN Human Rights Council protecting the vulnerable from human rights abuses, or is it just fixated on protecting itself?
01 LASTObama - Professor President20090114 Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the intellectual influences and ideas which shaped Barack.
Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the intellectual influences and ideas which shaped Barack Obama, the scholar, teacher & academic.
01 LASTObama - Professor President20090115 Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the intellectual influences and ideas which shaped Barack.
01 LASTObama - Professor President20090117 Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the intellectual influences and ideas which shaped Barack.
01 LASTObama - Professor President20090118 Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the intellectual influences and ideas which shaped Barack.
02A Dollar A Day20091111 The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash gra.
The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash grant has made an enormous difference.
02A Dollar A Day20091112 The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash gra.
02A Dollar A Day20091114 The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash gra.
The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash grant has made an enormous difference.
02A Dollar A Day20091115 The squatters of Otjivero in Namibia lived a hand to mouth existence but a new cash gra.
02Age Of Terror20090205 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important terrorist attacks of the last 30 years.
Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
02Age Of Terror20090207 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
02Gold20090819 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symbolism of the most coveted of minerals.
02Gold20090820 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
02Gold20090822 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symbolism of the most coveted of minerals.
From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
02Gold20090823 From King Midas to gold-rushes, Nick Rankin takes in the global realities and rich symb.
02Indonesian Journeys2009030420090305Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April general election.
02Indonesian Journeys20090307 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
02Return To White Horse Village20081217 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is turned into a city.
02Return To White Horse Village20081218 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is...
Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is turned into a city.
02Return To White Horse Village20081220 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
02Return To White Horse Village20081221 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
02The Foods That Make Billions20101222 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bottled water and yoghurt into necessities.
02The Foods That Make Billions20101223 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
02The Foods That Make Billions20101225 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bottled water and yoghurt into necessities.
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
02The Foods That Make Billions20101226 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
02The Greening Of The Deserts20090708 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.
02The Greening Of The Deserts20090709 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
02The Greening Of The Deserts20090711 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
02The Secret Scientists20090422 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
02The Secret Scientists20090423 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
02The Secret Scientists20090425 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
02The Secret Scientists20090426 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
02What Can I Say?, - Cambodia20110223 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
02What Can I Say?, - Cambodia20110224 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
02What Can I Say?, - Cambodia20110226 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
02What Can I Say?, - Cambodia20110227 What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
02What Can I Say?, - Cambodia   
02World Stories, World Stories - A Widow's Journey20100901 In 1989 Tamil leader Appapillai Amirthalingam was killed in Sri Lanka.
His wife and son.
His wife and son look at the Tamils' future.
02World Stories, World Stories - A Widow's Journey20100902 In 1989 Tamil leader Appapillai Amirthalingam was killed in Sri Lanka.
His wife and son.
02World Stories, World Stories - A Widow's Journey20100904 In 1989 Tamil leader Appapillai Amirthalingam was killed in Sri Lanka.
His wife and son.
02World Stories, World Stories - A Widow's Journey20100905 In 1989 Tamil leader Appapillai Amirthalingam was killed in Sri Lanka.
His wife and son.
02 LASTBaghdad Boy20101110 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad to face adulthood.
02 LASTBaghdad Boy20101111 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
02 LASTBaghdad Boy20101113 Seven years after an American rocket attack destroyed his home, killed 16 members of his family, and left him without arms, Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad.
Ali became an icon of the Iraq War when images of him with arms amputated were beamed around the world.
This sparked a tidal-wave of sympathy, and a charity fund was set up which brought him to Britain for treatment.
In this two-part documentary, Hugh Sykes catches up with Ali at his family's home on the outskirts of Baghdad.
Ali has lived in the UK since he was 12 years old and - although now a British citizen - he would like to return to Iraq permanently.
The continuous heat and fasting for Ramadan is tough on a teenager who has become used to a western lifestyle.
Now aged 19, Ali rarely wears prosthetic arms and is dependent on the care of others.
But as he faces the possibility of an arranged marriage and uncertain future, what kind of independence can he expect, especially in an unforgiving Baghdad?
Seven years after a US rocket attack left him without arms, Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad
02 LASTBaghdad Boy20101114 Seven years after a US rocket attack left him without arms, Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad
02 LASTBlind Man Roams The Globe20110115 Peter White is blind.
His job as a broadcaster has taken him all over the world.
At first he thought that he was missing out on not being able to see the standard tourist monuments, but when he travels now he has an arsenal of strategies to get to know a place.
He listens to local radio, he takes in the sounds of restaurants, travel systems and the voices of the locals.
In this two-part series he travels to San Francisco and Istanbul - what does he discover about these cities?
Discovering Istanbul through sound
02 LASTBlind Man Roams The Globe20110116 Discovering Istanbul through sound
02 LASTBlind Man Roams The Globe20110112 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new ci.
When he visits a new city, it's the sounds which assail him.
02 LASTBlind Man Roams The Globe20110113 Peter White is blind, and discovers the world through his ears.
When he visits a new ci.
02 LASTCan China Go Green?20091209 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic power stations and increasing traffic.
02 LASTCan China Go Green?20091210 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions, amidst toxic p.
02 LASTCan China Go Green?, Can China Go Green?20091212 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions.
Jonathon Porritt reports from China, where, amidst the toxic power stations and burgeoning numbers of cars, he finds some extraordinary and pioneering green solutions.
In two provocative and counter-intuitive programmes, Jonathon Porritt flies in the face of international protest and fear at what China is 'doing' to the world's environment in order to properly explore what's actually happening across the vast country.
Although the Chinese are avid to grow their economy at all costs, Porritt is convinced that they are effectively leap-frogging the older industrial societies of Europe and America and bringing on real long term environmental solutions, sustainable power and eco design.
02 LASTCan China Go Green?, Can China Go Green?20091213 Jonathon Porritt is in China, where he finds pioneering green solutions.
02 LASTCaribbean Voices20100714 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a literary tradition in the Caribbean.
02 LASTCaribbean Voices20100715 We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
02 LASTCaribbean Voices20100717 Colin Grant on the role the BBC's Caribbean Voices played in shaping Caribbean literature.
If a good newspaper acts as a nation talking to itself, then Caribbean Voices distinguished itself as a sounding board for the British colonies in Caribbean.
It was a weekly programme where poets, playwrights and prose writers - amateur and professional - sent forth their contributions from the Antilles and those stories, selected, edited and fastidiously recorded washed back over the airwaves as the BBC called the Caribbean.
In this two-part series Colin Grant examines how the programme served to kick start a literary tradition in the region.
The door of the freelancers' room at the Langham Hotel, with its ochre walls and pea-green dado, was always wide open and a host of soon-to-be famous names walked through; Sam Selvon, Derek Walcott, Andrew Salkey, V.S.
Naipaul and many others.
The series will travel back to the anxious beginnings of these impoverished fledgling writers who tapped out their stories, on the smooth non-rustle paper, to the sound of their bellies knocking on their backbones.
In part two, Colin asks writers who they think they are, who are their readers and whether they strive for recognition at home or abroad.
He also looks at the impact the populist Jamaican poet, Louise Bennett had on the country's most popular art form, pantomime and how the film 'The Harder The Come', brought Jamaican patois and music to mainstream audiences.
He speaks to the organiser of the literary festival Calabash who feels that present Caribbean authors are not being pigeon holed by history and writing about slavery and colonialism but writing about everything and anything.
We examine how weekly World Service programme Caribbean Voices served to kick start a l.
02 LASTCaribbean Voices20100718 Colin Grant on the role the BBC's Caribbean Voices played in shaping Caribbean literature.
02 LASTCitizen Journalism20090909 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen journalism.
Are we all journalists now?
02 LASTCitizen Journalism20090910 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
02 LASTCitizen Journalism20090913 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
02 LASTCitizen Journalism20090912 Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen j.
Michael Burke investigates the potential and the dangers in the phenomenon of citizen journalism.
Are we all journalists now?
02 LASTFarm Swap2009062420090625Farming is fundamental to our way of life.
But do all farmers have similar objectives?
But do all farmers have similar objectives? We meet two very different farmers.
02 LASTGreat Expectations20100303 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estates in the run up to the London Olympics.
02 LASTGreat Expectations20100304 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
02 LASTGreat Expectations20100306 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estates in the run up to the London Olympics.
02 LASTGreat Expectations20100307 A look at the lives of people who live on one of London's most notorious housing estate.
02 LASTHealth Of A Nation20100120 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform the health care system in America.
02 LASTHealth Of A Nation20100121 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
02 LASTHealth Of A Nation20100124 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
02 LASTHealth Of A Nation20100123 Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform the health care system in America.
Michael Goldfarb looks at the issues surrounding the US government's plans to reform th.
02 LASTHow My Country Speaks20110325 South African poet Lebogang Mashile interviews fellow poets, unravelling their craft, t.
South African poet Lebogang Mashile interviews fellow poets, unravelling their craft, to see what it reveals about her country.
02 LASTHow My Country Speaks20110326 South African poet Lebogang Mashile interviews fellow poets, unravelling their craft, t.
02 LASTHow My Country Speaks   
02 LASTMarching Into History (wed Doc)20101124 In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for chang.
In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for change, as potent today as in the past.
02 LASTMarching Into History (wed Doc)20101125 In the first of two programmes Michael Goldfarb looks at the march as a force for chang.
02 LASTMarching Into History (wed Doc)20101127 For hundreds of years the protest march has been a means of voicing passionate concerns.
Whether protesting at injustice, challenging inequalities, fighting for better conditions or showing solidarity for fellow workers - demonstrating has been a way of focusing public anger.
While some mass demonstrations have ended in victory, others have led to retreat, defeat and sometimes tragedy.
Defying the authorities can be a dangerous business.
In this two-part documentary, Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change.
Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change
02 LASTMarching Into History (wed Doc)20101128 Michael Goldfarb examines the protest march as a force for change
02 LASTObama's America20100217 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is at stake and what the future might hold.
02 LASTObama's America20100218 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
02 LASTObama's America20100220 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is at stake and what the future might hold.
02 LASTObama's America20100221 After a year of President Obama, Simon Schama looks to American history to see what is.
02 LASTOn The Brink20090513 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global slump and depression.
02 LASTOn The Brink20090514 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
02 LASTOn The Brink20090516 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
02 LASTOn The Brink20090517 Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global slump and depression.
Michael Robinson reports on the increasingly desperate efforts to stave off a global sl.
02 LASTOne Block In Harlem20110209 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American neighbourhood in the USA.
02 LASTOne Block In Harlem20110210 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
02 LASTOne Block In Harlem20110212 Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
02 LASTOne Block In Harlem20110213 
Around the world the name Harlem is synonymous with people's knowledge of the black experience in America - it means ghetto, cultural achievement, political activism and impoverished despair.
But in the last decade the area has been going through dramatic changes.
First, former President, Bill Clinton, opened his post-White House office there.
Then, as Manhattan real estate prices rocketed, wealthy people, many of them white, began moving in.
Michael Goldfarb traces the iconic neighbourhood's story by telling the history of a single street in Harlem - 120th Street between 5th and 6th Avenues - from 1910 to the present day.
Although Harlem is the best-known African-American neighbourhood in the world, a hundred years ago 120th Street was, like most of the area, a Jewish neighbourhood.
Michael describes life as it was and life as it is today and asks - what price has been paid by long-term black residents for the area's gentrification? How important is it for African-American culture that Harlem remain what it has been since the 1920's, the undisputed capital of Black America.
Along the way Michael meets the people of 120th Street in Harlem, Professor of History at Columbia University, Manning Marable; architectural historian Michael Henry Adams; and Jeffrey Gurock, Professor of History at Yeshiva University and author of When Harlem was Jewish.
Who will 'own' Harlem if African Americans become a minority?
Michael Goldfarb explores Harlem in New York City, the most dynamic African-American ne.
02 LASTOpen Eye20110126 Why racial tensions are increasing in Sweden
What sort of relationships do photographers form with the people that are the subject of their pictures?
The bond can be an emotional one because the theme is often highly charged.
In this BBC World Service documentary series, two photographers reveal their stories - one of hope and grief, and the other a tale of racial tension.
02 LASTOpen Eye20110127 Why racial tensions are increasing in Sweden
02 LASTOpen Eye20110130 Why racial tensions are increasing in Sweden
What sort of relationships do photographers form with the people that are the subject of their pictures?
The bond can be an emotional one because the theme is often highly charged.
In this BBC World Service documentary series, two photographers reveal their stories - one of hope and grief, and the other a tale of racial tension.
02 LASTPain20090408 Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, takes a personal journey through pain.
Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, take.
02 LASTPain20090409 Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, takes a personal journey through pain.
Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, take.
02 LASTPain20090411 Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, takes a personal journey through pain.
Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, take.
02 LASTPain20090412 Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, takes a personal journey through pain.
Another chance to hear this series, in which BBC Iraq correspondent, Andrew North, take.
02 LASTPlaying Castro's Tune20090109 Stephen Evans visits Cuba to look at the way the revolution impacted on Cuban music.
02 LASTQueenan's Crime Scenes20100331 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how...
Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how crime is reflected in their literature.
02 LASTQueenan's Crime Scenes20100401 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
02 LASTQueenan's Crime Scenes20100403 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how crime is reflected in their literature.
02 LASTQueenan's Crime Scenes20100404 Joe Queenan's passion for crime fiction leads him to Sweden and the USA to find out how.
02 LASTRebranding Nigeria20091028 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and highlight the country's cultural values.
02 LASTRebranding Nigeria20091029 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
02 LASTRebranding Nigeria20091031 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and highlight the country's cultural values.
02 LASTRebranding Nigeria20091101 Henry Bonsu follows the steps of Alder Consulting's campaign to rebrand Nigeria and hig.
02 LASTSouth Africa's Path To Freedom20100616 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's greatest living writers: Wole Soyinka.
02 LASTSouth Africa's Path To Freedom20100617 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
02 LASTSouth Africa's Path To Freedom20100619 A landmark journey through South Africa's past and present by one of the continent's gr.
02 LASTSouth Africa's Path To Freedom, South Africa's Path To Freedom20100619 Wole Soyinka fought apartheid from outside South Africa during the years of oppression and conflict, and now he makes a special journey to the country to meet some of the key writers who lived through the turbulent years.
In Johannesburg he joins fellow Nobel Prize winner Nadine Gordimer.
At the Constitutional Court he speaks with Albie Sachs, a former judge who was almost killed in a car bomb attack in 1988 in which he lost an arm and the sight of his right eye.
Instrumental in setting up the legal framework for the new nation, Albie Sachs proves an inspiration to Professor Soyinka.
Also in Johannesburg he speaks to South Africa’s Poet Laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile and in Cape Town to Antjie Krog, author of the seminal work Country of My Skull, about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Wole Soyinka also meets the new young black writers who are interpreting their world through fiction.
In Johannesburg he visits the local FM radio station to speak to Karabo Kgoleng, who gives her take on modern South Africa, and visits the township of Alexandra to see if living conditions have actually improved.
Economics, social issues, and the desperate need to improve the lot of the poor are all brought to Wole Soyinka on his journey through the land.
Finally calling in at both the Market Theatre and the new theatre in Cape Town, Wole Soyinka catches Athol Fugard after whom the new theatre is named.
In a dramatic twist, the two end up on stage together as they consider their shared histories.
This is a journey through old and new South Africa by a writer who truly understands the work of the African writer.
It sheds fresh light on the problems of the past and the challenges of the future for the society that now makes up the rainbow nation.
Wole Soyinka explores South Africa through the eyes of its finest writers.
02 LASTSouth Africa's Path To Freedom, South Africa's Path To Freedom20100620 Wole Soyinka explores South Africa through the eyes of its finest writers.
02 LASTTextbook Diplomacy20100203 Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of Eur.
Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of European integration.
02 LASTTextbook Diplomacy20100204 Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of Eur.
02 LASTTextbook Diplomacy20100206 Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of Eur.
Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of European integration.
02 LASTTextbook Diplomacy20100207 Mark Whitaker investigates the disputed role of history textbooks in the process of Eur.
02 LASTThe Cricket Revolution20090610 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and asks what this could mean for its future.
David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
02 LASTThe Cricket Revolution20090611 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
02 LASTThe Cricket Revolution20090613 David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years and asks what this means for its future.
David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years and as.
David Goldblatt examines how cricket has been turned on its head in just 5 years, and a.
02 LASTThe Listening Post20100728 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the histories they carry.
02 LASTThe Listening Post20100729 A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
02 LASTThe Listening Post20100731 Story of Belfast-born Philip McTaggart, a man who lives in the shadow of his son's death.
Listening Post is a new series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the histories they carry with them.
Philip McTaggart lives in the shadow of his son's suicide.
Also called Philip – and nicknamed Pip – he was just 17 when he died.
His father's response, in 2003, was to set up the Public Initiative for the Prevention of Suicide and Self-Harm, or PIPS.
We hear how the trauma of Pip's suicide led Philip to an awareness of the alarming rates of suicide and self-harm among young people in Northern Ireland.
A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals and the.
02 LASTThe Listening Post20100801 Story of Belfast-born Philip McTaggart, a man who lives in the shadow of his son's death.
02 LASTThe Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090527 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a million protesters in Tiananmen Square.
James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
02 LASTThe Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090528 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
02 LASTThe Lost Voices Of Tiananmen Square20090530 James Miles looks at the Beijing Spring - the pro-democracy movement that led to over a.
02 LASTTiger V Dragon, China's String Of Pearls20100630 India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
This is the Asian century.
It will be increasingly dominated by two countries that share nearly half of the world's population: India and China.
But the hype around the economic growth of these two Asian giants, lumped hopefully together as "Chindia," has obscured some much darker truths.
In this provocative series of programmes, Mukul Devichand travels across frontiers, from the controversial new ports China is building in the Indian Ocean to the poor interior villages of these continent-sized countries.
He examines whether China's authoritarianism may in fact be doing much more for the poor than India's sometimes bloody democracy.
He also looks at how the old nationalist rivalries mingle with the intense hunger for oil and other natural resources.
Far from the dream of a co-operative "Chindia," there's a risk India and China may well end up at odds with each other in what some have called an Asian cold war.
Part 2: China's String of Pearls
India and China are newly rising powers but also old military rivals, ancient civilisations which have stared at each other across the bitterly disputed Tibetan plateau for millenia.
As the world's most populous nations now enter an era of rapid growth, they have renewed their diplomatic and trade ties.
But how will the old acrimony shape the new faultlines of power in Asia and the wider world?
In the second programme of the series, Mukul Devichand travels from India to China via the network of new ports China is building in countries around India.
In the chaotic port city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, he speaks to Naval officers and Chinese workers about the "String of Pearls" -- deep sea ports that China is now helping to build and which some accuse of having a dual military use.
On the other side, frustrated Chinese voices claim their generosity and their country's rise to world power status is being deliberately misunderstood.
The concluding episode of Tiger v.
Dragon questions key Chinese, Indian and American figures about the way in which the new world order is being shaped in Asia, and asks what it means for us all.
02 LASTTiger V Dragon, China's String Of Pearls20100701 India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
02 LASTTiger V Dragon, China's String Of Pearls20100703 This is the Asian century.
It will be increasingly dominated by two countries that share nearly half of the world's population: India and China.
But the hype around the economic growth of these two Asian giants, lumped hopefully together as "Chindia," has obscured some much darker truths.
In this provocative series of programmes, Mukul Devichand travels across frontiers, from the controversial new ports China is building in the Indian Ocean to the poor interior villages of these continent-sized countries.
He examines whether China's authoritarianism may in fact be doing much more for the poor than India's sometimes bloody democracy.
He also looks at how the old nationalist rivalries mingle with the intense hunger for oil and other natural resources.
Far from the dream of a co-operative "Chindia," there's a risk India and China may well end up at odds with each other in what some have called an Asian cold war.
Part 2: China's String of Pearls
India and China are newly rising powers but also old military rivals, ancient civilisations which have stared at each other across the bitterly disputed Tibetan plateau for millenia.
As the world's most populous nations now enter an era of rapid growth, they have renewed their diplomatic and trade ties.
But how will the old acrimony shape the new faultlines of power in Asia and the wider world?
In the second programme of the series, Mukul Devichand travels from India to China via the network of new ports China is building in countries around India.
In the chaotic port city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, he speaks to Naval officers and Chinese workers about the "String of Pearls" -- deep sea ports that China is now helping to build and which some accuse of having a dual military use.
On the other side, frustrated Chinese voices claim their generosity and their country's rise to world power status is being deliberately misunderstood.
The concluding episode of Tiger v.
Dragon questions key Chinese, Indian and American figures about the way in which the new world order is being shaped in Asia, and asks what it means for us all.
India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
02 LASTTiger V Dragon, China's String Of Pearls20100704 India and China will dominate the 21st century.
Will the Asian giants co-operate or clash?
02 LASTUseful Idiots20100811 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave their blessing to tyrannies and tyrants.
02 LASTUseful Idiots20100812 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
02 LASTUseful Idiots20100814 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
02 LASTUseful Idiots20100815 John Sweeney looks at Useful Idiots, Lenin's description of intellectuals who gave thei.
02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20100519 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral creatures humans are.
Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20100520 Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20100522 Moral dilemmas facing people in situations of war and crisis.
A train is hurtling down a railway line.
It's out of control and the brakes have failed.
Ahead, five people are tied to the track and apparently face certain death.
You, however, are standing by the rails and have a chance to save them.
This is the story of an obese gentleman, runaway trains, killing and saving lives.
The programme examines moral philosophy and our deepest moral intuitions through a single famous thought-experiment: would you kill the big guy?
In the first programme we saw how most people believe its acceptable to divert a runaway train away from killing five people who are tied to a track, even if by so doing, the train would crash into and kill one other person.
But the majority of people do not think it's acceptable to stop a train by throwing a large man in front of it - even if this would save five lives.
Why does this apparently arcane philosophical puzzle matter in the real world?
Well, the politician, the lawyer, the doctor and the soldier all have to make decisions about life and death - about who should live and who should die.
The Trolley Problem casts light on when their actions are moral, and when they're not.
There have also been dozens of studies on popular intuitions in these cases.
The BBC recently conducted an online poll in which 65,000 people took part.
Neuroscientists and psychologists have also jumped on the tramwagon.
In Harvard and Princeton, brain scans are showing which bit of the brain is being used in the different scenarios.
This two-part series, presented by Steve Evans will explore the tram puzzles - to see what it tells us about what kinds of moral creatures humans are.
Steve Evans explores moral dilemmas, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral c.
02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20100523 Moral dilemmas facing people in situations of war and crisis.
02 LASTYiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091014 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of.
Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of the language survives.
02 LASTYiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091015 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of.
02 LASTYiddish - A Struggle For Survival20091017 Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of.
Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of the language Yiddish.
Dennis Marks travels to New York to discover what has become of Yiddish and how much of the language survives.
Yiddish - a mixture of Hebrew and Middle German, spiced with Aramaic, Greek, Latin, Old French and Old Italian, was once spoken by more than ten million people - that is nearly two thirds of the world's entire Jewish population.
However, it has suffered a dramatic decline over the last century.
In the second part of this series, Dennis Marks continues his investigation in New York.
He meets Aaron Lansky, founder of the National Yiddish Book Centre, a library dedicated to rescuing and saving Yiddish books - as he describes - from the dustbin of history.
The Centre has saved and preserved thousands of books, many of which now reside in libraries in Oxford, in an attempt to keep this joyful, exuberant language alive.
03Age Of Terror20090211 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important terrorist attacks of the last 30 years.
03Age Of Terror20090212 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important terrorist attacks of the last 30 years.
03Age Of Terror20090214 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
03Indonesian Journeys20090311 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April general election.
03Indonesian Journeys20090312 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
03Indonesian Journeys20090314 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
03What Can I Say?, - Thailand20110302 
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
03What Can I Say?, - Thailand20110303 
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
03What Can I Say?, - Thailand20110305 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
03What Can I Say?, - Thailand20110306 
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
03World Stories, World Stories - Afghanistan's Beardless Boys20100908 The "bacha bereesh" or beardless boys: teenage boys who dress up as girls and dance for.
The "bacha bereesh" or beardless boys: teenage boys who dress up as girls and dance for male patrons at parties in Afghanistan.
03World Stories, World Stories - Afghanistan's Beardless Boys20100909 The "bacha bereesh" or beardless boys: teenage boys who dress up as girls and dance for.
03World Stories, World Stories - Afghanistan's Beardless Boys20100911 The "bacha bereesh" or beardless boys: teenage boys who dress up as girls and dance for.
03World Stories, World Stories - Afghanistan's Beardless Boys20100912 The "bacha bereesh" or beardless boys: teenage boys who dress up as girls and dance for.
03World Stories, World Stories - Afghanistan's Dancing Boys   
03 LASTA Dollar A Day20091118 Mike Wooldridge meets two women in Western Nepal, where severe drought and unreliable r.
Mike Wooldridge meets two women in Western Nepal, where severe drought and unreliable rains have led to acute food shortages.
03 LASTA Dollar A Day20091119 Mike Wooldridge meets two women in Western Nepal, where severe drought and unreliable r.
03 LASTA Dollar A Day20091121 Mike Wooldridge meets two women in Western Nepal, where severe drought and unreliable rains have led to acute food shortages.
03 LASTA Dollar A Day20091122 Mike Wooldridge meets two women in Western Nepal, where severe drought and unreliable r.
03 LASTGold20090826  
03 LASTGold20090827 Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.
03 LASTGold, Gold20090829 Nick Rankin investigates the value of gold - and its true cost.
Nick Rankin explores how we assess the value of gold.
From Olympic winners' medals to bling", gold is everywhere.
There is a dollar's worth of gold in every mobile phone.
With the price of the metal going up in recent years, the documentary examines why more and more people have got gold on their minds.
Also under consideration is the cost of gold - to the people who battle to get it, and to the planet."
03 LASTGold, Gold20090830 Nick Rankin investigates the value of gold - and its true cost.
03 LASTReturn To White Horse Village20081224 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is turned into a city.
03 LASTReturn To White Horse Village20081225 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
03 LASTReturn To White Horse Village20081227 Carrie Gracie witnesses the upheaval as a rural community in the mountains of China is.
03 LASTThe Foods That Make Billions20101229 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bottled water and yoghurt into necessities.
03 LASTThe Foods That Make Billions20101230 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
03 LASTThe Foods That Make Billions20110102 How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bott.
How big business branding has transformed novelty foods such as breakfast cereals, bottled water and yoghurt into necessities.
03 LASTThe Greening Of The Deserts20090715 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.
03 LASTThe Greening Of The Deserts20090716 Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
03 LASTThe Greening Of The Deserts20090718 In Egypt scientists are experimenting with high-tech techniques to make the desert bloom.
Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.
Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.
In the final part of this series, Ayisha meets scientists in Egypt experimenting with high-tech techniques to make the desert bloom.
The Egyptian government is keen to encourage people to move to the desert.
They want to press ahead with a controversial plan to reclaim a further 3.4 million acres of desert over the next 10 years.
Ayisha Yahaya asks, is this plan practical or sustainable or might it ultimately backfire?
Ayisha Yahya explores the a.
03 LASTThe Secret Scientists20090429 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
03 LASTThe Secret Scientists20090430 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
03 LASTThe Secret Scientists20090502 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb...
Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.
03 LASTThe Secret Scientists20090503 Professor Jim Al-Khalili looks at the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundb.
04World Stories, World Stories - The Children Of Pedro Pan20100915 In the 1960's 14,000 Cuban children were sent to live in the USA, to seek a better life.
Now, we hear some of their stories.
04World Stories, World Stories - The Children Of Pedro Pan20100916 In the 1960's 14,000 Cuban children were sent to live in the USA, to seek a better life.
04World Stories, World Stories - The Children Of Pedro Pan20100918 In the 1960's 14,000 Cuban children were sent to live in the USA, to seek a better life.
In the 1960's 14,000 Cuban children were sent to live in the USA, to seek a better life. Now, we hear some of their stories.
Now, we hear some of their stories.
04World Stories, World Stories - The Children Of Pedro Pan20100919 In the 1960's 14,000 Cuban children were sent to live in the USA, to seek a better life.
04 LASTAge Of Terror20090218 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important terrorist attacks of the last 30 years.
Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
04 LASTAge Of Terror20090219 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
04 LASTAge Of Terror20090221 Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important.
Peter Taylor takes us into the Age of Terror with a series that explores four important terrorist attacks of the last 30 years.
04 LASTIndonesian Journeys20090318 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April general election.
04 LASTIndonesian Journeys20090319 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
04 LASTIndonesian Journeys20090321 Anita Barraud travels to Indonesia where 240 million people are preparing for the April.
04 LASTWhat Can I Say?, - Singapore20110309 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
04 LASTWhat Can I Say?, - Singapore20110310 What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
04 LASTWhat Can I Say?, - Singapore20110313 Exploring freedom of speech and democracy in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore
What can be said publicly in countries where politics, tradition and memories of past trauma combine to put limits on free expression?
In partnership with the Australian radio station ABC, the four-part series What Can I Say? explores freedom of speech and democracy in South East Asia.
Presenter Gary Bryson travels to Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Singapore to meet people who are trying to find a voice for their village, their culture or their nation.
04 LASTWhat Can I Say?, - Singapore   
05 LASTWorld Stories, World Stories - Revolutions In Iran20100926 Iran is facing a media revolution through blogs, social networking sites and mobile phone technology.
Ideas and pictures are reaching people across the globe every day in a matter of seconds.
But Iran has faced a media revolution before.
Across the country in the late 1970s, families and friends would sit together to listen to, read and share subversive material.
Then, it was in the form of cassettes, pamphlets and whispers behind closed doors that spread the message of the Islamic Revolution quickly and effectively across the country and beyond.
Old and new revolutionaries explore how the two movements compare.
In Iran, how does the spread of ideas shape world opinion?
05 LASTWorld Stories, World Stories - Revolutions In Iran20100922 Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and Bluetooth... and a past media revolution.
Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and.
Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and Bluetooth...
and a past media revolution.
05 LASTWorld Stories, World Stories - Revolutions In Iran20100922 Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and.
05 LASTWorld Stories, World Stories - Revolutions In Iran20100923 Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and.
05 LASTWorld Stories, World Stories - Revolutions In Iran20100925 Exploring Iran's media revolution of blogs, social networking sites, mobile phones and.
In Iran, how does the spread of ideas shape world opinion?
Iran is facing a media revolution through blogs, social networking sites and mobile phone technology.
Ideas and pictures are reaching people across the globe every day in a matter of seconds.
But Iran has faced a media revolution before.
Across the country in the late 1970s, families and friends would sit together to listen to, read and share subversive material.
Then, it was in the form of cassettes, pamphlets and whispers behind closed doors that spread the message of the Islamic Revolution quickly and effectively across the country and beyond.
Old and new revolutionaries explore how the two movements compare.
 
 Tired Of Terror - 12008112220081123Rupa Jha in Kashmir talks to former militants who fought against India.
Why did they fi.
 Tired Of Terror - 22008112620081127
20081129 (WS)
20081130 (WS)
Rupa Jha in Kashmir talks to former militants who fought against India.
Why did they fi...
Why did they fight, and what led them to stop fighting?
 20/06/200920090617 Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.
 20/06/200920090618 Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.
  20090627 Farming is fundamental to our way of life.
But do all farmers have similar objectives? We meet two very different farmers.
But do all farmers have similar objectives?
 08/08/200920090805 Julian O'halloran investigates claims that the spreading Swine Flu virus is linked to f.
Julian O'halloran investigates claims that the spreading Swine Flu virus is linked to factory style pig farming.
 Tracing The Strain20090808 Julian O'halloran finds out if swine flu is linked to intensive pig farming in the US.
Swine flu has spread across the world since emerging in Mexico and is now officially the first flu pandemic for 40 years.
It is a respiratory disease, caused by a strain of the influenza type A virus known as H1N1 and can be spread from person to person by coughing and sneezing.
As cases continue to multiply, Julian O'halloran investigates the origins of the H1N1 virus and examines claims that it is linked to factory style pig farming in the United States.
Over the past 30 years, pig farming in America has been swamped by industrial scale methods.
Many environmental and animal welfare lobby groups have alleged that this has caused massive damage to the environment, intolerable smells, and health risks to farm workers and their families.
They are now asking if it has played a role in the current world flu pandemic.
For years, American virologists have been studying the links between new and potentially risky flu viruses and farm animals.
Experts say that parts of the current flu virus can be traced back to outbreaks of swine flu, then affecting only pigs, in several US states in 1998.
Local people near the first known case in Mexico questioned the role of an American owned pig farm nearby, however this link was strenuously denied and the US pork industry soon helped persuade medical authorities to drop the term 'swine flu' - blaming the use of the term for a sharp drop in sales of pig meat.
With growing alarm and rising death tolls, Julian goes on the trail of the virus's origins, back to an outbreak in pigs in North Carolina, more than ten years ago.
 08/08/200920090809 Julian O'halloran investigates claims that the spreading Swine Flu virus is linked to f.
 Tracing The Strain20090809 Julian O'halloran finds out if swine flu is linked to intensive pig farming in the US.
  2009091620090919Judith Kampfner discovers more about Ann Dunham, Barack Obama's mother - a social reformer, activist and economist.
 19/09/200920090917 Judith Kampfner discovers more about Ann Dunham, Barack Obama's mother - a social refor.
 Dreams From My Mother20090919 Judith Kampfner unveils the story of Ann Dunham, the mother of President Barack Obama.
Barack Obama made history on 4 November 2008 when he defeated Republican rival John McCain to become the first black president of the United States.
The son of a Kenyan man and a white woman from Kansas, he was named after his father who grew up herding goats but gained a scholarship to study in Hawaii.
There the Kenyan met and married Barack's mother, Ann Dunham, who was living in Honolulu with her parents.
The president has famously written of the influence exerted on him by his charismatic but absent father in his memoir, Dreams of My Father, but what of his mother, Ann Dunham?
The world knows very little about her, but how did she affect his formative years and help to shape him in his political rise?
She was christened Stanley Ann Dunham because her parents yearned for a boy.
Born in Kansas, she was the only child of hard working middle class parents who kept moving to improve their lives.
She married Barack Obama Snr whom she met in a class at the University of Hawaii at the age of 18.
It was a time of racial tension in America in the early 1960s and mixed marriages were not very common.
When Barack Jnr was still a toddler, his father decided to take up a scholarship at Harvard, turning down a more financially generous offer from New York University which would have supported the whole family.
So Ann and young Barry, as he was then known, remained in Hawaii.
He later returned to Kenya alone, where he worked as a government economist, and the couple divorced.
When President Obama was six, his mother married an Indonesian man, Lolo Soetoro and the family moved to Jakarta.
But life proved too conventional for Ann and as she and Lolo became estranged, she moved to Yogyakarta the ancient capital of Java and began a study of indigenous craft industries and their community structures - which she pursued to the end of her life.
As a mature student, she was accepted into a PhD programme at the University of Hawaii and she chose to research the archaeology and anthropology of agricultural blacksmiths.
She was the first woman admitted into the inner sanctum of this ancient all-male trade.
As she learnt about the ceremonial dagger making and the ritual power the smiths imbued into each instrument they forged, she also gained an appreciation of all Javanese crafts and culture.
In an effort to alleviate the hardship associated with these peasant industries, she constructed a model of micro-financing which is now the standard in Indonesia, a country that is a world leader in micro-credit systems.
With grants from the Ford Foundation and loans from the World Bank, she worked with many NGO's to help rural people get loans to launch small enterprises.
In this programme Judith Kampfner talks to Ann's 80 year old feisty professor and mentor, Alice Dewey.
She also speaks to field workers and executives at the People's Bank of Indonesia, the Ford Foundation, and the USIA and to anthropologists and crafts workers who knew Ann Dunham.
Listen as the life of this unconventional and idealistic woman is revealed and whether her importance has been deliberately downplayed in the story of Barack Obama.
Judith Kampfner discovers more about Ann Dunham, Barack Obama's mother - a social refor.
 19/09/200920090920 Judith Kampfner discovers more about Ann Dunham, Barack Obama's mother - a social refor.
 Dreams From My Mother20090920 Judith Kampfner unveils the story of Ann Dunham, the mother of President Barack Obama 
  20090923 Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people.
Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people take to escape their homelands.
 23/09/200920090924 Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people.
  20090930 Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people.
Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people take to escape their homelands.
 30/09/200920091001 Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people.
 30/09/200920091003 Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people.
Jenny Cuffe explores migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes which people take to escape their homelands.
 28/11/200920091125 In 2001 the UN set up funds to tackle climate change, funded by industrialised countrie.
In 2001 the UN set up funds to tackle climate change, funded by industrialised countries.
Did poor countries ever see the money?
 Shortchanging The Planet20091125 Will mistrust over financial pledges prevent a climate change deal at Copenhagen?
Finance will be the key to any new global deal on climate change at Copenhagen.
Hundreds of billions of dollars are needed to help countries adapt to the effects of climate change.
But over the past few years, a deep level of mistrust has built up among developing nations about financial pledges made by rich countries.
For the Wednesday Documentary, Rob Young goes to Liberia to assess what has gone wrong, and talks to some of the key players ahead of the Copenhagen meeting on climate change.
 28/11/200920091126 In 2001 the UN set up funds to tackle climate change, funded by industrialised countrie.
 Shortchanging The Planet20091126 Will mistrust over financial pledges prevent a climate change deal at Copenhagen?
 Shortchanging The Planet20091128 Will mistrust over financial pledges prevent a climate change deal at Copenhagen?
Finance will be the key to any new global deal on climate change at Copenhagen.
Hundreds of billions of dollars are needed to help countries adapt to the effects of climate change.
But over the past few years, a deep level of mistrust has built up among developing nations about financial pledges made by rich countries.
For the Wednesday Documentary, Rob Young goes to Liberia to assess what has gone wrong, and talks to some of the key players ahead of the Copenhagen meeting on climate change.
In 2001 the UN set up funds to tackle climate change, funded by industrialised countrie.
 Shortchanging The Planet20091129 Will mistrust over financial pledges prevent a climate change deal at Copenhagen?
  20091216 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the world, using Internet Cafes to guide him.
 16/12/200920091217 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
 16/12/200920091219 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
 16/12/200920091220 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
  20091223 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the world, using Internet Cafes to guide him.
 23/12/200920091224 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
 23/12/200920091226 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the world, using Internet Cafes to guide him.
 23/12/200920091227 Nick Baker embarks on a global journey - an ambitious project to draw a map round the w.
  20091230 We delve into Tulsa's tough underworld in the company of two police officers who have d.
We delve into Tulsa's tough underworld in the company of two police officers who have developed dazzling talents as storytellers
 30/12/200920091231 We delve into Tulsa's tough underworld in the company of two police officers who have d.
 30/12/200920100102 We delve into Tulsa's tough underworld in the company of two police officers who have d.
 30/12/200920100103 We delve into Tulsa's tough underworld in the company of two police officers who have d.
  20100106 Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals o.
Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals of modern times, unfolded.
 06/01/201020100107 Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals o.
 06/01/201020100109 Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals o.
Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals of modern times, unfolded.
 06/01/201020100110 Rob Walker tells the story of how 'Angolagate', one of the biggest arms deal scandals o.
  20100310 Rajini Vaidy takes a behind the scenes look at Shaadi.com, Indias biggest dating website.
 10/03/201020100311 Rajini Vaidy takes a behind the scenes look at Shaadi.com, Indias biggest dating website.
 10/03/201020100313 Is the internet changing the way Indians make matches and find life partners?
Marriage websites are springing up all over the world, but nowhere more so than in India.
Shaadi.com is the biggest such site in the world and more and more urban Indians are meeting their life partners online.
But is online dating and marriage making changing the way Indians meet their life partners? Rajini Vaidyanathan investigates.
Rajini Vaidy takes a behind the scenes look at Shaadi.com, Indias biggest dating website.
 10/03/201020100314 Is the internet changing the way Indians make matches and find life partners?
 Afghan Bloggers20100317 Discover the world online in Afghanistan and meet the country's community of bloggers.
Afghan journalist Najieh Ghulami returns to her country to discover the country's growing community of internet users.
The internet was banned in the country under the Taliban, but in the six years since their overthrow, an online world has been putting down roots in the country's cybercafes and universities, allowing many Afghans the chance to build bridges with the wider world.
These pioneers want to use the internet to describe a world beyond the headlines of war and poverty and use it to aid their country's development.
 Afghan Bloggers20100318 Discover the world online in Afghanistan and meet the country's community of bloggers.
 Afghan Bloggers20100320 Discover the world online in Afghanistan and meet the country's community of bloggers.
Afghan journalist Najieh Ghulami returns to her country to discover the country's growing community of internet users.
The internet was banned in the country under the Taliban, but in the six years since their overthrow, an online world has been putting down roots in the country's cybercafes and universities, allowing many Afghans the chance to build bridges with the wider world.
These pioneers want to use the internet to describe a world beyond the headlines of war and poverty and use it to aid their country's development.
 Afghan Bloggers20100321 Discover the world online in Afghanistan and meet the country's community of bloggers.
  20100407 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Bahamas, Trinidad and his native Cornwall.
 07/04/201020100408 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
 07/04/201020100410 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Bahamas, Trinidad and his native Cornwall.
 07/04/201020100411 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
  20100414 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Bahamas, Trinidad and his native Cornwall.
 14/04/201020100415 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
 14/04/201020100417 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Bahamas, Trinidad and his native Cornwall.
 14/04/201020100418 Ros Atkins observes attitudes to tourism in three countries where he grew-up - the Baha.
  20100421 Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investi.
Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investigating his fate.
Razia Iqbal reports.
 21/04/201020100422 Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investi.
 21/04/201020100424 Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investi.
Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investigating his fate.
Razia Iqbal reports.
 21/04/201020100425 Libyan dissident Jaballah Matar disappeared 20 years ago, and his son Hisham is investi.
  20100428 Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can learn trades.
Is it really sustainable?
Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can l.
 28/04/201020100429 Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can l.
 28/04/201020100501 Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can l.
Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can learn trades.
Is it really sustainable?
 28/04/201020100502 Apostle Asafo guides us around his remarkable workshops in Accra, where teenagers can l.
  20100505 Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from.
Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from a perspective seldom considered.
 05/05/201020100506 Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from.
 05/05/201020100508 Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from.
Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from a perspective seldom considered.
 05/05/201020100509 Polly Evans examines the personal, political and cultural stories of Guantanamo - from.
  20100526 The Art of War by Sun Tzu was written about 2,500 years ago and relevant in just about.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu was written about 2,500 years ago and relevant in just about all wars now.
 26/05/201020100527 The Art of War by Sun Tzu was written about 2,500 years ago and relevant in just about.
 26/05/201020100529 The Art of War by Sun Tzu was written about 2,500 years ago and relevant in just about.
 The Art Of War20100529 Why Sun Tzu's words of wisdom - written over 2,500 years ago - are still relevant today
is an ancient Chinese treatise on military and intelligence strategy.
It was written by the military scholar Sun Tzu about 2,500 years ago and still has tremendous relevance to war now.
Over the centuries it has been influential to both traditional armies and guerrilla fighters - the IRA, for instance, read it with interest and commanders in the first Gulf war and the recent war in Iraq have spoken of the influence of Sun Tzu on direct military operations and the intelligence cycle during extended wars.
But ultimately the moral of Sun Tzu's book is that the greatest leaders avoid war:
'A government should not mobilize an army out of anger, military leaders should not provoke war out of wrath.
Act when it is beneficial, desist if it is not.
Anger can revert to joy, wrath can revert to delight, but a nation destroyed cannot be restored to existence, and the dead cannot be restored to life.'
How have Sun Tzu's ideas stood the test of time?
 The Art Of War20100530 Why Sun Tzu's words of wisdom - written over 2,500 years ago - are still relevant today
  20100602 Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee in.
Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee in Mississippi's travelling electric chair.
 02/06/201020100603 Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee in.
 02/06/201020100605 In 1945, an all-white jury in America took two and a half minutes to find a black man named Willie McGee guilty of raping a white woman.
Over the next six years, the case wound through three trials, and sparked international protests and appeals from William Faulkner, Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, and even Albert Einstein.
Willie McGee was defended by a young Bella Abzug: attorney, activist, and eventually the first Jewish woman in the United States Congress.
But on the night of 7 May 1951, he was put to death in Mississippi’s travelling electric chair – the only one of its kind in the US.
A local radio station broadcast his execution live from the steps of the courthouse.
A newly discovered recording of that newscast provides a chilling glimpse into a lost episode of history.
Before his trial, his wife fled to Las Vegas with their four children.
A generation on, Bridgette McGee-Robinson, Willie’s granddaughter, grew up not knowing why her family left the south.
It was only by accident, while sorting through some papers under her mother's bed, that Bridgette found old news clippings of the Willie McGee case.
In this documentary, Bridgette retraces the history of her grandfather's trial and execution, uncovering the truth behind an episode shrouded in mystery.
She also explores how the incident continues to shape the memories of local residents and the families of those involved in the case; the stories they tell – and don't tell.
First broadcast on click NPR and aired on BBC World Service on 2 June 2010.
Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee.
Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee in.
 02/06/201020100606 Bridgette Robinson tells the story of the execution of her grandfather Willie McGee.
  20100818 Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.
Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are taking over from Irish Americans.
 18/08/201020100819 Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.
 18/08/201020100821 Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.
 18/08/201020100822 Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.
  20100929 Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein
Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein hears from the voices of experience.
 29/09/201020100930 Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein.
 Memory Wars2010100220101003Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past?
History, it is often said, is written by the victors.
But oral history has - in its brief 60 year span - been firmly associated with the voices of the 'ordinary' citizen - a view of turbulent times from the bottom up.
It offers different versions of the unfinished business of the past, be it war, revolution or dictatorship.
In this two-part documentary Alan Dein explores how sometimes this oral history collides with the official version committed to the history books - particularly in nations where the outcome is still bitterly contested.
In Argentina, Memoria Abierta (Open Memory) has worked alongside human rights organisations since 1999 to recover the stories of those who survived the so-called ‘Dirty War’ of the 1970s and 80s.
The Italian historian Alessandro Portelli has been a vital figure in using oral history to challenge and amend the past both in his native country.
His account of a single Nazi massacre in Rome in 1943 showed how the discipline could be crucial in reconstructing the meaning of historical events.
In Russia, the Memorial organisation has come into direct conflict with the authorities over its attempts to gather the voices of those who survived the Gulag and the repressive world of Stalin's Russia.
In a nation where even now the history books still hover uneasily over both Stalin's legacy and the 'achievements' of Soviet times, the work of Memorial has proved troubling and unwelcome in official circles.
Both South Africa and Rwanda have seen multiple oral history projects aimed at helping victims give voice to recent trauma and restore them to the mainstream of recorded history.
Often crucial in all these projects has been the training and empowerment of local voices, not just professional oral historians, to gather intimate and sometimes disturbing stories within their own communities.
Alan Dein hears voices of experience from across the globe and from those using oral history to challenge the past.
  20101006 Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein.
Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein hears from the voices of experience.
 06/10/201020101007 Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past? Alan Dein.
 Memory Wars - Part Two - Silent No Longer2010100920101010Can oral history challenge the official records of a nation's turbulent past?
History, it is often said, is written by the victors.
But oral history has - in its brief 60 year span - been firmly associated with the voices of the 'ordinary' citizen - a view of turbulent times from the bottom up.
It offers different versions of the unfinished business of the past, be it war, revolution or dictatorship.
In this two-part documentary Alan Dein explores how sometimes this oral history collides with the official version committed to the history books - particularly in nations where the outcome is still bitterly contested.
In Argentina, Memoria Abierta (Open Memory) has worked alongside human rights organisations since 1999 to recover the stories of those who survived the so-called ‘Dirty War’ of the 1970s and 80s.
The Italian historian Alessandro Portelli has been a vital figure in using oral history to challenge and amend the past both in his native country.
His account of a single Nazi massacre in Rome in 1943 showed how the discipline could be crucial in reconstructing the meaning of historical events.
In Russia, the Memorial organisation has come into direct conflict with the authorities over its attempts to gather the voices of those who survived the Gulag and the repressive world of Stalin's Russia.
In a nation where even now the history books still hover uneasily over both Stalin's legacy and the 'achievements' of Soviet times, the work of Memorial has proved troubling and unwelcome in official circles.
Both South Africa and Ireland have seen multiple oral history projects aimed at helping victims give voice to recent trauma and restore them to the mainstream of recorded history.
Often crucial in all these projects has been the training and empowerment of local voices, not just professional oral historians, to gather intimate and sometimes disturbing stories within their own communities.
Alan Dein hears voices of experience from across the globe and from those using oral history to challenge the past.
  20101013 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlooking the 2012 Olympic site in East London.
 13/10/201020101014 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
 13/10/201020101016 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlooking the 2012 Olympic site in East London.
 13/10/201020101017 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
  2010102020101023The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlooking the 2012 Olympic site in East London.
 20/10/201020101021 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
 20/10/201020101024 The series which tracks the lives of residents on an inner city housing estate overlook.
  20101027 Polly Evans examines Guantanamo through the eyes of the locals, who see it from a diffe.
Polly Evans examines Guantanamo through the eyes of the locals, who see it from a different, and seldom-considered perspective.
 27/10/201020101028 Polly Evans examines Guantanamo through the eyes of the locals, who see it from a diffe.
 The Other Guantanamo20101030 Polly Evans travels to Guantanamo to talk to Cubans about living next to the prison
To many people the name Guantanamo conjures up images of detainees in orange, allegations of torture, controversy and trauma.
But to those who live there, Guantanamo means green hills and tumbling waterfalls, distinctive son and guajira music and mouth-watering Jamaican and French-influenced cuisine.
In this programme, award-winning travel writer Polly Evans goes in search of the other Guantanamo, talking to local people about their area, and how they feel about it becoming synonymous with what Amnesty International called "the gulag of our times".
She delves into the history of the open-ended American lease of this corner of the island - and asks whether the nearly 10,000 Cubans who held construction jobs on the site (and still draw a favourable US pension) have different feelings about it.
Polly examines the personal, political and cultural stories of a controversial place - from a perspective that is seldom considered.
 27/10/201020101103 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad to face adulthood.
 27/10/201020101104 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
 27/10/201020101106 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas returns to Baghdad to face adulthood.
Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
 27/10/201020101107 Seven years after a rocket attack caused him devastating traumas, 19 year old Ali Abbas.
  20101201 Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release from capti.
Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release from captivity.
 01/12/201020101202 Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release from capti.
 01/12/201020101205 Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release
Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy has never thanked Giandomenico Picco, the United Nations negotiator who arranged his release.
In this documentary John at last travels to meet him and explores the development of the role of the crisis negotiator.
The journey John makes is a deeply personal one.
He is intensely grateful for the role Giandomenico took in arranging his release - at no small risk to himself - and John's journey to New York provides a compelling holding form for his wider purpose.
John is fascinated by the skills and dedication of men such as Giandomenico, and he explores how the techniques used in negotiation have changed and developed.
With the help of archive and interviews, John contemplates the development of the role of the negotiator.
Beginning with the emergence of negotiation as a psychological study in early 1970s America - he considers negotiation tactics being used in international crises and domestic incidents - can the same tactics be employed in both arenas?
The programme culminates in John's meeting with Giandomenico.
He will endeavour, in the light of his investigations into the role of the negotiator, to answer some of his closer unanswered questions regarding the back room story that led to his own personal freedom.
  20101208 As Chicago prepares for its first new mayor since 1989, Steve Edwards asks why the Wind.
As Chicago prepares for its first new mayor since 1989, Steve Edwards asks why the Windy City is such a hotbed of corruption.
 08/12/201020101209 As Chicago prepares for its first new mayor since 1989, Steve Edwards asks why the Wind.
 Extremes Of Corruption: Somalia20101210 Does Somalia deserve its reputation as a failed, corrupt state?
Extreme World is a new season of coverage on the BBC examining the global differences that divide us.
Over the next few months we will explore eight key themes that illustrate the contrasts in our extreme world.
They include click Hot and Cold, Corruption, Dying, Crime, Education, Business, Pollution and God.
 Extremes Of Corruption: Somalia20101211 Does Somalia deserve its reputation as a failed, corrupt state?
 Oiling The Machine - Uncovering Corruption In Chicago20101212 Steve Edwards investigates why Chicago such a hotbed of corruption
Extreme World is a new season of coverage on the BBC examining the global differences that divide us.
Over the next few months we will explore eight key themes that illustrate the contrasts in our extreme world.
They include click Hot and Cold, Corruption, Dying, Crime, Education, Business, Pollution and God.
  20110316 
Animals, insects & corpses were once put on trial - why and how? What do these odd tria.
Animals, insects & corpses were once put on trial - why and how? What do these odd trials tell us about individual rights now?
 16/03/201120110317 
Animals, insects & corpses were once put on trial - why and how? What do these odd tria.
 16/03/201120110319 Animals, insects & corpses were once put on trial - why and how? What do these odd tria.
 16/03/201120110320 
Animals, insects & corpses were once put on trial - why and how? What do these odd tria.
 Animals On Trial20110320 
Animals, insects and corpses were once put on trial - but why and how?
In 1750, Jacques Ferron was convicted of coupling with a female donkey in France.
Both he and the donkey would face certain execution.
However the parish priest petitioned for the court to show mercy, unfortunately for Ferron the priest would only vouch for the good character of the animal.
The donkey was spared and Ferron was burned alive.
Throughout history donkeys, pigs, dogs, rats, even insects have been put on trial and some convicted and sentenced.
Crime thriller writer and former solicitor Frances Fyfield looks at these extraordinary cases of animals in court.

Genre

  • Factual

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