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0120120130With policing top of the political agenda, and major change on the way, Mark Easton asks what we want from our police.
Mark spends time with police officers doing jobs as diverse as roads policing, neighbourhood policing and monitoring sex offenders to paint a picture of how we are policed in 2012 and examine whether the daily reality matches the political rhetoric. And he speaks to politicians, academics and the public to assess whether what we are getting is what we want.
In this first programme, he digs into the origins of the current political debate over policing, and asks what the huge political changes lined up for policing in 2012 - including budget cuts and major changes to working practices - will mean for the service.
Producer: Giles Edwards.
Mark Easton digs into the origins of the current political debate over policing.
0220120206With policing top of the political agenda, and major change on the way, Mark Easton asks what we want from our police.
Mark spends time with police officers doing jobs as diverse as roads policing, neighbourhood policing and monitoring sex offenders to paint a picture of how we are policed in 2012 and examine whether the daily reality matches the political rhetoric. And he speaks to politicians, academics and the public to assess whether what we are getting is what we want.
In this second programme, he explores the relationship between the public and the police. How far do the police respond to public concerns? What is the role of the public in policing? How far have we come from Sir Robert Peel's principle that "the police are the public and the public are the police"?
Mark also considers how attitudes to the police are affected by media coverage and police drama, and asks what impact that has on how we think about crime, and about the police.
Producer: Giles Edwards.
Mark explores the relationship between the public and the police.
03 LAST20120213With policing top of the political agenda, and major change on the way, Mark Easton asks what we want from our police.
Mark spends time with police officers doing jobs as diverse as roads policing, neighbourhood policing and monitoring sex offenders to paint a picture of how we are policed in 2012 and examine whether the daily reality matches the political rhetoric. And he speaks to politicians, academics and the public to assess whether what we are getting is what we want.
In this final programme, he explores the relationship between the police and other agencies. Could other agencies take over some responsibilities from an overburdened police service? Do the police spend too much time, in the words of one critic, acting as social workers rather than rat-catchers? How well is the criminal justice system joined up?
Producer: Giles Edwards.
Mark explores the relationship between the police and other agencies.

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