When Katty Met Carlos [World Service]

Episodes

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2021021320210215 (WS)A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

2021022020210222 (WS)A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

20210320A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

20210327
2021040320210404 (WS)A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

20210410
2021041020210411 (WS)A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

20210417
2021041720210418 (WS)A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

#MeToo today with Rose McGowan20210327It was in 2017, with numerous allegations against Harvey Weinstein, that #MeToo went viral around the world.

One of the most outspoken people was the actress Rose McGowan, who accused Weinstein of raping her. A number of other women also accused the disgraced movie producer. He was found guilty of rape and sentenced to 23 years in prison in February 2020.

Katty Kay and Carlos Watson speak to Rose McGowan about her personal story, and what drove her to speak out and “fight the system.” They also discuss what more needs to be done to prevent sexual abuse – of girls and women, and of boys and men.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A New Presidency2021012320210124 (WS)
20210125 (WS)
It’s all change at the White House, with the new president promising a fresh start on a host of key issues: from vaccines and the economy, to race and climate change. But is President Biden offering too much, too soon, and can he live up to his pledge to unite a divided America? At the end of inauguration week, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson are joined by Valerie Jarrett, long-term adviser to Barack Obama, and by John McLaughlin, a former deputy director of the CIA. Together they discuss some of the major challenges facing the incoming Biden administration, from relations with the Republican party, to dealing with Iran and China.

It's all change at the White House, but is President Biden offering too much, too soon?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

America's Loneliness Epidemic2021013020210131 (WS)Even before Covid, four out of every 10 American adults admitted to feeling anxiety and depression, and up to 70% of young Americans said they were lonely. Now amid growing concerns of an emerging mental health crisis because of the coronavirus pandemic, Carlos Watson and Ritula Shah (standing in for Katty Kay) tackle the subject with the help of two leading health experts - Dr Altha Stewart, former head of the American Psychiatric Association and Dr Deepak Chopra, a prominent alternative medicine advocate. Together they explore how loneliness affects people of a different age, race and gender, and offer some solutions and advice as to how Americans can learn to cope, even after the pandemic has passed.

Loneliness affects up to 70% of young Americans. What solutions are there?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

Black Lives Matter Co-founder Opal Tometi2021010220210103 (WS)
20210104 (WS)
Over the past year the Black Lives Matter movement went global, with protests against racial injustice taking place in over 60 countries.

Katty and Carlos speak to co-founder of the movement, Opal Tometi, about the roots of the organisation, its goals, and what its priorities are for 2021.

We hear some of the criticisms levelled at the movement, asking what has been achieved by the high-profile protests which have taken place across America, and reflect on its influence on civil rights activism around the world, exploring the movement's role in tackling issues beyond police brutality.

Katty and Carlos speak to Opal Tometi about the year when Black Lives Matter went global.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Bridging Divided America2020111420201115 (WS)America’s turbulent 2020 election has highlighted how divided the United States is. President-elect Joe Biden has promised to bring the country together, and this may become one of the biggest challenges of his presidency. Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss what politicians, leaders and communities can do to bridge divides in this polarised nation. They’re joined by veteran civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton and former Governor of Ohio John Kasich.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Viv Jones, John Murphy, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi and Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Andy Garratt

After a turbulent election, how can America be brought together?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Conspiracy Theories In The Time Of Covid-192020121220201213 (WS)Multiple conspiracy theories are circulating about Covid-19 - but how widely are they believed and what influence do they have?

From QAnon to the death of Jeffrey Epstein, conspiratorial thinking seems to be everywhere right now - is this the era when fringe ideas have gone mainstream?

Katty Kay and Carlos Watson speak to political scientist and conspiracy theory expert Prof Joseph Uscinski to explore why people believe in them, and what the potential consequences for wider society might be.

They hear directly from those who believe in them, as well as people who have been subjected to personal attacks from conspiracy theory extremists.

Conspiracy theories are circulating about Covid-19 - but how widely are they believed?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Feeling good?20210320How can we feel good again? It goes without saying that it’s been a tough year, but as things start to open up again, can Americans regain some sense of positivity, or has the traditional idea of American optimism been changed forever?

Dr Cicely Horsham Brathwaite is a therapist and career coach. Many of her clients are African American, and she says the constant discussions around racism add an extra layer of stress and anxiety to an already impossible year. She says getting involved in activism, volunteering and reading positive stories about your community can help.

Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist and author of the new book Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know. He argues this may be time for us to change our attitudes.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and Ozy Media.

How have American attitudes changed during the pandemic, and how can we feel good again?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Feeling Good?2021032020210322 (WS)How can we feel good again? It goes without saying that it’s been a tough year, but as things start to open up again, can Americans regain some sense of positivity, or has the traditional idea of American optimism been changed forever?

Dr Cicely Horsham Brathwaite is a therapist and career coach. Many of her clients are African American, and she says the constant discussions around racism add an extra layer of stress and anxiety to an already impossible year. She says getting involved in activism, volunteering and reading positive stories about your community can help.

Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist and author of the new book Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know. He argues this may be time for us to change our attitudes.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and Ozy Media.

How have American attitudes changed during the pandemic, and how can we feel good again?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

From Cities To States, The Us Battles Climate Change2020112120201122 (WS)Joe Biden says he will immediately re-join the Paris agreement on climate change, which Donald Trump withdrew from. Donald Trump has also repealed many of President Obama’s environmental laws. In the meantime, cities and States across the US have been taking their own action on the environment and climate change, irrespective of what’s been happening in Washington. President-elect Biden has said that climate change is the number one issue for humanity and for him. But will he be able to change much?

Carlos Watson and Ritula Shah (standing in for Katty Kay this week) speak to Wisconsin’s Lieutenant Governor, Mandela Barnes, about what his state has been doing and what obstacles it faces. They’ll also be speaking to Jody Freeman, professor of environmental law at Harvard, who was an advisor to the Obama administration, about the difficulties Biden could have getting his climate agenda passed. Also taking part will be the mayor of Carmel, Indiana, Jim Brainard, who describes how being a Republican does not conflict with taking action on climate change.

Production team: Editor, Penny Murphy. Producers: John Murphy, Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi

What will a Joe Biden presidency do about climate change?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From Cities To States, The Us Battles Climate Change20201122Joe Biden says he will immediately re-join the Paris agreement on climate change, which Donald Trump withdrew from. Donald Trump has also repealed many of President Obama’s environmental laws. In the meantime, cities and States across the US have been taking their own action on the environment and climate change, irrespective of what’s been happening in Washington. President-elect Biden has said that climate change is the number one issue for humanity and for him. But will he be able to change much?

Carlos Watson and Ritula Shah (standing in for Katty Kay this week) speak to Wisconsin’s Lieutenant Governor, Mandela Barnes, about what his state has been doing and what obstacles it faces. They’ll also be speaking to Jody Freeman, professor of environmental law at Harvard, who was an advisor to the Obama administration, about the difficulties Biden could have getting his climate agenda passed. Also taking part will be the mayor of Carmel, Indiana, Jim Brainard, who describes how being a Republican does not conflict with taking action on climate change.

Production team: Editor, Penny Murphy. Producers: John Murphy, Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi

What will a Joe Biden presidency do about climate change?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Good Cops, Bad Cops2020120520201206 (WS)One of the major stories of the past year was the death of George Floyd in May, following his arrest outside a store in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The whole world saw the video of police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck, pinning him to the ground for more than 8 minutes. Chauvin has now been charged with murder - one of only a few American police officers to be charged with murdering a civilian.

George Floyd’s death was the result of a standard encounter between police officers and a member of the public, which unnecessarily spiralled out of control - a tragically familiar tale when it to comes to the police and minority communities.

What can America do to better tackle the problem of police brutality, and why does it seem so hard to bring bad cops to account?

Guests:

Leon Ford, a social justice campaigner from Pittsburgh who was paralysed after being shot by police during a traffic stop in 2012

Chief Art Acevedo, City of Houston Police Department

Redditt Hudson, former St Louis police officer, and co-founder of the National Coalition of Law Enforcement Officers for Justice Reform and Accountability

Editor: Hugh Levinson
Production team: Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi, Pamela Lorence

What can America do to tackle police brutality?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

Have Native Americans Been Let Down?2021022720210301 (WS)At the height of the pandemic, Native Americans were dying of Covid at twice the rate of white Americans. Huge inequalities have been highlighted, not just in terms of health, but also housing, education and wealth. Twenty-three percent of Native Americans live below the poverty line, compared to 10 percent of white Americans, and Native Americans are 19 times more likely to live without running water in their home. But there’s some good news too. If confirmed, Deb Haaland will make history as the first Native American in a cabinet secretary role. She’ll be the Secretary of the Interior, which oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Could this historic appointment change the fate of Native Americans today?

There’s a lot of history to undo. Jonodev Chaudhuri, ambassador for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, explains how his mother was forced to go to a boarding school where she was forbidden from speaking her native language, and her arm was broken by her teachers. The poor education she received didn’t set her up well in life. He says the federal government has broken promises made in treaties to safeguard the health, education and safety of his people in return for their land.

Amber Crotty, a tribal council delegate in the Navajo Nation in Arizona, tells how her tribe were left out of agreements over who had the right to the water that ran through their land, so today they can’t lawfully use it. One-third of her nation live without running water in their homes, and there are just 13 grocery stores on the 71,000 sq km reservation, meaning they have to drive for hours to buy food. She’s working hard to get her citizens vaccinated against Covid, and says the tide is now starting to turn. She hopes having a Native American head up the Department of the Interior, which oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs, will help address many inequalities they face.

Native Americans have been dying of covid at twice the rate of white Americans.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

How Has Covid Changed America?2020112820201129 (WS)Covid-19 has dramatically changed the way we live our lives, exposing fractures in our communities - but what's America's exit plan from the pandemic?

Carlos Watson and Philippa Thomas (standing in for Katty Kay) speak to journalist and author Fareed Zakaria about the dramatic and sudden shift in society this year. What are the lessons we need to learn to cope better in the future?

Carlos and Philippa also explore how President-elect Biden may tackle the pandemic, speaking to Dr Nicole Lurie, a public health expert who was an advisor to Joe Biden during his election campaign. Working under President Obama as assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the United States Department of Health, Dr Lurie planned for public health emergencies like the one we are living through right now. What does she think needs to be done to bring the pandemic under control?

Editor: Penny Murphy
Production team: Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi, Pamela Lorence

Covid-19 has dramatically changed the way we live our lives. What's America's exit plan?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

How Has Covid Changed America?20201129Covid-19 has dramatically changed the way we live our lives, exposing fractures in our communities - but what's America's exit plan from the pandemic?

Carlos Watson and Philippa Thomas (standing in for Katty Kay) speak to journalist and author Fareed Zakaria about the dramatic and sudden shift in society this year. What are the lessons we need to learn to cope better in the future?

Carlos and Philippa also explore how President-elect Biden may tackle the pandemic, speaking to Dr Nicole Lurie, a public health expert who was an advisor to Joe Biden during his election campaign. Working under President Obama as assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the United States Department of Health, Dr Lurie planned for public health emergencies like the one we are living through right now. What does she think needs to be done to bring the pandemic under control?

Editor: Penny Murphy
Production team: Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi, Pamela Lorence

Covid-19 has dramatically changed the way we live our lives. What's America's exit plan?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Immigration In America2021020620210208 (WS)America was built on immigration, but is it still a good place for immigrants? Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss immigration, acceptance and assimilation with a top chef and a hip hop music manager.

Marcus Samuelsson was born in Ethiopia but brought up in Sweden by his Swedish adoptive parents, before moving to America in the 1990s. He now has a chain of restaurants across the US, including the famous Red Rooster in Harlem.

Sophia Chang was born in Canada to Korean immigrant parents. She moved to the US in her twenties and has been living in New York for more than three decades. She is known as “the first Asian woman in hip hop.” Amongst others, she has managed three members of Wu Tang Clan.

Both discuss their journeys and reasons for coming to America, their experiences of trying to fit into American society, and what they feel about America’s attitudes to immigrants. They also talk about America’s cultural mosaic, opportunities, what immigrants bring to the US, and racism.

This is a co-production between BBC World Service and Ozy Media.

Is America still friendly to immigrants?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

Is American Democracy In Danger?2021010920210110 (WS)
20210111 (WS)
Katty Kay and Carlos Watson look back on a tumultuous week in US politics, and ask: where now for American democracy and America’s democratic institutions? Republicans are divided over support for Donald Trump, so what does that mean for the GOP? What should President-elect Biden do to heal the divisions of the past four years in the political establishment and the country? Katty and Carlos are joined by veteran political strategists Ron Christie and Doug Sosnik, a Republican and Democrat respectively, to seek answers from the week’s events, and to look at America beyond the Trump presidency.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

Is Bitcoin Here To Stay?20210313Once again, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin is making headlines for rocketing in value. As more companies back it, could it be here to stay? And if so, how is it changing our world? Katty Kay and Carlos Watson look at Bitcoin’s latest price surge and discuss how it and other digital currencies are being adopted around the globe - from the U.S., to Venezuela, to China.

Nathaniel Popper is a New York Times technology reporter and author of Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money. He’s been following the Bitcoin story for nearly a decade, and explains how it is changing our relationship with money.

Lily Liu is an entrepreneur who has worked with cryptocurrencies for more than five years. In 2018 a company she co-founded was sold to one of the largest cryptocurrency trading platforms for more than $100m. She says companies are backing Bitcoin as an alternative to gold.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.

How are digital currencies changing our relationship with money?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Is Bitcoin Here To Stay?2021031320210315 (WS)Once again, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin is making headlines for rocketing in value. As more companies back it, could it be here to stay? And if so, how is it changing our world? Katty Kay and Carlos Watson look at Bitcoin’s latest price surge and discuss how it and other digital currencies are being adopted around the globe - from the U.S., to Venezuela, to China.

Nathaniel Popper is a New York Times technology reporter and author of Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money. He’s been following the Bitcoin story for nearly a decade, and explains how it is changing our relationship with money.

Lily Liu is an entrepreneur who has worked with cryptocurrencies for more than five years. In 2018 a company she co-founded was sold to one of the largest cryptocurrency trading platforms for more than $100m. She says companies are backing Bitcoin as an alternative to gold.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.

How are digital currencies changing our relationship with money?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

Talking Across Divides2021011620210117 (WS)
20210118 (WS)
Katty Kay and Carlos Watson ask how Americans of differing views can restart their conversations. Partisan politics has broken up friendships, love affairs and even families. But is it up to the politicians to take the lead on restoring trust and respect, or should everyone play a part in reaching out across the aisle? Katty and Carlos are joined in the discussion by community organiser Maureen Hetherington, who led a unique project to heal the wounds left by decades of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland, and by Francesca Polletta, professor of sociology at University of California, Irvine, who argues that making people like each other isn’t fundamental to bringing Americans together.

How can Americans of differing views restart their conversations?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

The wonderful world of Gen Z20210213How are Generation Z shaping your world? They are the generation born from 1996 to the present day. As the oldest members are turning 24, they’re already shaking things up in the workplace and at the ballot box. Social justice is the most important issue for them and their demands that companies take a stand on political issues is causing a debate in the workplace.

Deja Foxx was the youngest staffer working on Vice President Kamala Harris’ election campaign, working on social media strategy. She is the founder of Gen Z Girl Gang, which promotes inclusivity and diversity. At 17, she founded a sex education organisation helping teens at risk of homelessness and those formerly in prison with access to birth control.

Maya Penn started her own sustainable fashion brand Maya’s Ideas at only 8 years old. She is also the author of ‘You Got This’, a handbook for other would be teenage CEOs and is an award winning environmental activist and artist.

As the most diverse generation America has seen, it’s no wonder that inclusivity is important to them. Deja and Maya discuss how they feel empowered to build a more just and vibrant world…with a little help from their smartphones.

This is a co-production between BBC World Service and Ozy Media.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

The wonderful world of Gen Z2021021320210215 (WS)How are Generation Z shaping your world? They are the generation born from 1996 to the present day. As the oldest members are turning 24, they’re already shaking things up in the workplace and at the ballot box. Social justice is the most important issue for them and their demands that companies take a stand on political issues is causing a debate in the workplace.

Deja Foxx was the youngest staffer working on Vice President Kamala Harris’ election campaign, working on social media strategy. She is the founder of Gen Z Girl Gang, which promotes inclusivity and diversity. At 17, she founded a sex education organisation helping teens at risk of homelessness and those formerly in prison with access to birth control.

Maya Penn started her own sustainable fashion brand Maya’s Ideas at only 8 years old. She is also the author of ‘You Got This’, a handbook for other would be teenage CEOs and is an award winning environmental activist and artist.

As the most diverse generation America has seen, it’s no wonder that inclusivity is important to them. Deja and Maya discuss how they feel empowered to build a more just and vibrant world…with a little help from their smartphones.

This is a co-production between BBC World Service and Ozy Media.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Veterans20210220Are America's military veterans getting the support they need?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Veterans2021022020210222 (WS)Are America's military veterans getting the support they need?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

What Next For The Gop?2020121920201220 (WS)In the week that the Electoral College confirmed Joe Biden as the next US President, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson take a look at the future of the Republican party. The Trump presidency might be over, but there is no sign that Republican leaders are ready to jettison Trumpism, especially after securing more than 72 million votes in November’s elections. Katty and Carlos are joined by Brian Lanza, who was part of President Trump’s 2016 transitional team, and by Michael Steele, the first African-American to hold the post of chairperson of the Republican National Committee, to discuss what role Donald Trump will play in the party’s path ahead; and, if not a Trump, then who else will seek to steer the GOP into the 2024 presidential run-off?

The Trump presidency might be over, but will Republican leaders jettison Trumpism?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

In the week that the Electoral College confirmed Joe Biden as the next US President, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson take a look at the future of the Republican party. The Trump presidency might be over, but there is no sign that Republican leaders are ready to jettison Trumpism, especially after securing more than 72 million votes in November’s elections. Katty and Carlos are joined by Brian Lanza, who was part of President Trump’s 2016 transitional team, and by Michael Steele, the first African-American to hold the post of chairperson of the Republican National Committee, to discuss what role Donald Trump will play in the party’s path ahead; and, if not a Trump, then who else will seek to steer the GOP into the 2024 presidential run-off?

Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

When Katty Met Carlos20201212
When Katty Met Carlos20201213
Why Local Newspapers Matter20210306In the last 15 years, America has lost around 25% of its local and regional newspapers. Many others have shrunk dramatically in size. This has led to an increasing number of so-called “news deserts” across the US. There is growing evidence that this has a detrimental impact on local democracy, as well as the local economy.

Emily Brindley is a 25-year-old reporter on the country’s longest continuously published newspaper, the Hartford Courant, in Connecticut. The paper has recently lost dozens of newsroom staff, as well as its physical newsroom, and is set to be taken over by a hedge fund that is notorious for making swingeing cuts.

Penelope Abernathy started her career in local journalism, before moving to the business side of newspapers, including working for the New York Times and helping it expand nationally and internationally. She has written a number of reports on the state of local media in the US.

Katty and Carlos explore the consequences of the disappearance of local media

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Why Local Newspapers Matter2021030620210308 (WS)In the last 15 years, America has lost around 25% of its local and regional newspapers. Many others have shrunk dramatically in size. This has led to an increasing number of so-called “news deserts” across the US. There is growing evidence that this has a detrimental impact on local democracy, as well as the local economy.

Emily Brindley is a 25-year-old reporter on the country’s longest continuously published newspaper, the Hartford Courant, in Connecticut. The paper has recently lost dozens of newsroom staff, as well as its physical newsroom, and is set to be taken over by a hedge fund that is notorious for making swingeing cuts.

Penelope Abernathy started her career in local journalism, before moving to the business side of newspapers, including working for the New York Times and helping it expand nationally and internationally. She has written a number of reports on the state of local media in the US.

Katty and Carlos explore the consequences of the disappearance of local media

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production, presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News
America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson. When Katty Met Carlos looks at the issues and themes reshaping America’s future and the deep undercurrents that lie beneath American society – from Covid-19 to race, the economy, and more. These are
issues that will change America and the world, from how we are governed to how we live together. Katty and Carlos are looking for answers to their questions; discovering solutions to the problems, and reflecting the widest possible range of opinion and thought.

01America Humbled?2020092720200928 (WS)Katty and Carlos open the series with a bold and difficult question: has America been humbled by the Covid-19 pandemic? The US has reached the grim milestone of 200,000 coronavirus deaths and more than 6.8 million people are known to have been infected, more than in any other country. Many Americans were blindsided by how badly the country has been hit. Has this created a dent in the idea of American exceptionalism? And if so, how can the nation recover its self-confidence?

Katty and Carlos are joined by former Republican Senator Jeff Flake and New York Times Pentagon correspondent Helene Cooper.

Produced by Sandie Kanthal, Viv Jones and Maeve McGoran, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour.

Katty and Carlos kick off the series by asking whether the pandemic has humbled America

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

02Talking About Race2020100420201005 (WS)"Where were you when you heard the news?" Katty and Carlos kick off this week's episode examining the impact of President Trump's Covid-19 diagnosis and what it means for the presidential election in November. They move onto the death of George Floyd and the recent grand jury decision not to charge police officers with the killing of Breonna Taylor. With race relations in America back at boiling point, the country is being forced to confront a painful history which includes slavery and oppression. Joining Katty and Carlos are Christina Greer, professor of political science at Fordham University, and the award winning South African journalist Justice Malala.

Editor: Penny Murphy

Produced by Sandra Kanthal, Viv Jones and Maeve McGoran, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour

Mixed by Nigel Appleton

How should we have difficult conversations about race?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

03Is America's Democracy Under Threat?2020101120201012 (WS)President Trump’s hospitalisation for Covid-19 prompted many Americans to also worry about the health of the election process, and democracy itself. Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss whether American democracy is in crisis, and what its future may hold. They are joined by Julius Krein, of the journal American Affairs, and award-winning Venezuelan-American journalist Mariana Atencio. Mariana argues that America risks descending into a crisis similar to that of her native Venezuela if its democracy is not shored up and valued by its citizens. Julius outlines how the nation’s widening polarisation is damaging for its democracy.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Sandra Kanthal, Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa and Maeve McGoran, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton

How confident can Americans be in their democratic systems?

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

04America's Economic Divide2020101820201019 (WS)Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Katty and Carlos discuss America’s economy and why one of the world’s wealthiest countries is home to such extremes of inequality and poverty.

They are joined by Stephanie Kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders, and Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Stony Brook University in New York. Stephanie is a proponent of modern monetary theory (MMT), an economic school of thought that’s gaining popularity with some American thinkers and politicians. She argues that MMT could help America to build a bigger social safety net. Also joining the discussion is Teva Sienicki, CEO of Metro Caring, a non-profit organisation in Denver that serves 75,000 people per year. Teva shares the difficult stories of some of the people her charity helps, and reflects upon whether the ideal of the American Dream has contributed to the widespread belief that poverty is solely the fault of the poor.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Sandra Kanthal, Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa, Maeve McGoran and Jonelle Awomoyi, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton

Why is one of the world's wealthiest countries home to such extremes of inequality?

05America In The World2020102520201026 (WS)This week, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson turn their attention to American foreign policy. The Trump administration made radical changes to the United States’ role on the world stage with its America First doctrine. Some say he spoke truth to power; others lament the upending of norms which guided international relations for decades. Katty and Carlos are joined by former UN Ambassador and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power, and American Enterprise Institute senior fellow Danielle Pletka, to ask if historians will look on the Trump administration more favourably in the future than in the present, and what a possible Biden presidency might mean for America’s relationships around the world.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa, Maeve McGoran and Jonelle Awomoyi, and Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton

Katty and Carlos examine America's foreign policy

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

06What Do Women Voters Want?2020110120201102 (WS)Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America

Women will play a critical role in who wins the U.S. presidential election. Pollsters are keeping a close eye on this important voting bloc, and there is data to suggest that no nominee for either party has ever garnered as much female support as the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden. So what do women voters want? Katty and Carlos are joined by Carrie Lukas, president of the conservative-leaning Independent Women’s Forum, and Christian Nunes, president of the National Organisation for Women, a feminist activist group founded in the 1960s.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Sandie Kanthal, Iyore Odighizuwa, Maeve McGoran, Jonelle Awomoyi, and Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton

Women voters could decide the 2020 presidential election. So what do they want?

072020110820201109 (WS)Presented by the BBC’s Katty Kay from World News America, and journalist and OZY co-founder Carlos Watson, the series will discuss the themes reshaping America’s future, the deep under-currents deep below the daily electioneering. These are issues that may change America and the world: Topics like identity; racial bias; restarting your career after sweeping job losses; self-care, and falling in love while managing the fear of a simple handshake. Together Katty and Carlos are inviting each other and their guests to think again about how much we understand America and America’s position in the world.

November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new House of Representatives, and thirteen governors. More than one hundred and fifty thousand Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of Americans have taken to the streets demanding social justice. This race will determine the future of the country — and possibly the world — for much longer than four years of the next presidency. And what happens in America politically, economically, socially and culturally has deep resonances around the world.

Katty Kay is one of the BBC’s most distinguished presenters, and an expert on US politics. Carlos Watson is himself a successful journalist and entrepreneur. Both have a reputation for hosting great interviews, each with their own style. Together they bring a new outlook on the debate about America’s future during the 2020 election.
Each offers a different perspective on America – together with their guests they offer a chance for a new kind of debate about America and the way we live.

A fresh perspective on the debate about America's future during the 2020 US election.

From the BBC and Ozy, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson share fresh perspectives on America