Episodes

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02The Robin20110201

In the second of her series of Essays considering our responses to the creatures which make up the British landscape, the writer and poet Ruth Padel turns her attention to the robin. She explores why our feelings on seeing their red breasts in winter have grown so strong and finds out that religious symbolism has played a large part. She charts the history of the bird in Britain and traces the ways it has been represented in literature from Shakespeare's ""Twelfth Night"" to Frances Hodgson Burnett's ""The Secret Garden"". How has this affected the way we perceive it?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the second of her series of Essays considering our responses to the creatures which make up the British landscape, the writer and poet Ruth Padel turns her attention to the robin. She explores why our feelings on seeing their red breasts in winter have grown so strong and finds out that religious symbolism has played a large part. She charts the history of the bird in Britain and traces the ways it has been represented in literature from Shakespeare's ""Twelfth Night"" to Frances Hodgson Burnett's ""The Secret Garden"". How has this affected the way we perceive it?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the second of her series of Essays considering our responses to the creatures which make up the British landscape, the writer and poet Ruth Padel turns her attention to the robin. She explores why our feelings on seeing their red breasts in winter have grown so strong and finds out that religious symbolism has played a large part. She charts the history of the bird in Britain and traces the ways it has been represented in literature from Shakespeare's ""Twelfth Night"" to Frances Hodgson Burnett's ""The Secret Garden"". How has this affected the way we perceive it?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

03The Badger20110202

In the third of her Essays which explore our responses to creatures in our landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the badger. In children's stories the badger is usually a source of wisdom and has connections with morality- think of ""The Wind in the Willows"" and Narnia. Badgers have also acquired an extra mystery by emerging at night. But in reality they provoke mixed reactions, with some people wanting to hunt them for sport and some farmers demanding the right to cull them to stop TB transmission to cattle. Drawing on history, literature and science, Ruth explores how our attitudes to badgers have been shaped through the centuries.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the third of her Essays which explore our responses to creatures in our landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the badger. In children's stories the badger is usually a source of wisdom and has connections with morality- think of ""The Wind in the Willows"" and Narnia. Badgers have also acquired an extra mystery by emerging at night. But in reality they provoke mixed reactions, with some people wanting to hunt them for sport and some farmers demanding the right to cull them to stop TB transmission to cattle. Drawing on history, literature and science, Ruth explores how our attitudes to badgers have been shaped through the centuries.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the third of her Essays which explore our responses to creatures in our landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the badger. In children's stories the badger is usually a source of wisdom and has connections with morality- think of ""The Wind in the Willows"" and Narnia. Badgers have also acquired an extra mystery by emerging at night. But in reality they provoke mixed reactions, with some people wanting to hunt them for sport and some farmers demanding the right to cull them to stop TB transmission to cattle. Drawing on history, literature and science, Ruth explores how our attitudes to badgers have been shaped through the centuries.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

04The Butterfly20110203

From Meadowbrown to Painted Ladies, the allure of butterflies has traditionally been strong. We love their colours and exotic names and use them as images of freedom and fragility coupled with inner strength. But why do we respond to them in this way? In the fourth of her series of Essays looking at creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel explores how our attitudes to the butterfly have been shaped and uncovers a host of associations that it has taken on in literature and science.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

From Meadowbrown to Painted Ladies, the allure of butterflies has traditionally been strong. We love their colours and exotic names and use them as images of freedom and fragility coupled with inner strength. But why do we respond to them in this way? In the fourth of her series of Essays looking at creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel explores how our attitudes to the butterfly have been shaped and uncovers a host of associations that it has taken on in literature and science.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

From Meadowbrown to Painted Ladies, the allure of butterflies has traditionally been strong. We love their colours and exotic names and use them as images of freedom and fragility coupled with inner strength. But why do we respond to them in this way? In the fourth of her series of Essays looking at creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel explores how our attitudes to the butterfly have been shaped and uncovers a host of associations that it has taken on in literature and science.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

05 LASTThe Fox20110204

In the last of her series of Essays considering our responses to creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the fox. Drawing on a range of literary and historical examples, she charts the way in which our attitudes to it have changed and developed through the centuries and she asks what it means to us now.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the last of her series of Essays considering our responses to creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the fox. Drawing on a range of literary and historical examples, she charts the way in which our attitudes to it have changed and developed through the centuries and she asks what it means to us now.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

In the last of her series of Essays considering our responses to creatures in the British landscape, the poet and writer Ruth Padel turns her attention to the fox. Drawing on a range of literary and historical examples, she charts the way in which our attitudes to it have changed and developed through the centuries and she asks what it means to us now.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.