Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0120160822

012016082220160823 (R4)

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0120160822

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

Dahai is a military child and a rebel, Fred is a daughter of the Party and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West. We know the headlines of their lives, but what of the details?

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

012016082220160823 (R4)

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

Dahai is a military child and a rebel, Fred is a daughter of the Party and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West. We know the headlines of their lives, but what of the details?

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0220160823

0220160823

Dahai is a military child and a netizen, Fred is a daughter of the Party, Snail the son of struggling farmers, and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. In today's episode they endure the rigours of the Chinese education system and the pressure to get the exam grades which lead to college.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA - and they are destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

022016082320160824 (R4)

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

Dahai is a military child and a netizen, Fred is a daughter of the Party, Snail the son of struggling farmers, and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. In today's episode they endure the rigours of the Chinese education system and the pressure to get the exam grades which lead to college.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA - and they are destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

022016082320160824 (R4)

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0320160824

0320160824

Alec Ash charts the stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

Dahai is a child of the military who grew up in a compound, Fred is a pampered daughter of the Party, Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north where her parents ran a fruit wholesalers, and Snail comes from a farming family and is the son of a rural migrant worker. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

In today's episode, the search for more to life than the treadmill of exams and finding a job. These young Chinese seek meaning in other realms - hipster fads, star signs, online gaming and religion.

Alec Ash moved to Beijing in 2008 and speaks Mandarin, he too is of the 80s generation.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

032016082420160825 (R4)

China's 'one-child' generation of the 1980s are turning 30. Four of them tell their story.

Alec Ash charts the stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

Dahai is a child of the military who grew up in a compound, Fred is a pampered daughter of the Party, Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north where her parents ran a fruit wholesalers, and Snail comes from a farming family and is the son of a rural migrant worker. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

In today's episode, the search for more to life than the treadmill of exams and finding a job. These young Chinese seek meaning in other realms - hipster fads, star signs, online gaming and religion.

Alec Ash moved to Beijing in 2008 and speaks Mandarin, he too is of the 80s generation.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

032016082420160825 (R4)

China's 'one-child' generation of the 1980s are turning 30. Four of them tell their story.

0420160825

042016082520160826 (R4)

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0420160825

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West.

In episode 4, Dahai, Fred, Snail and Xiaoxiao have graduated, now they have to find their own way - a place to live, a job and ultimately a life-partner. The pressure to marry is considerable - on both young men and women.

Alec Ash studied English literature at Oxford University. After graduating he taught in a Tibetan village in western China for a summer, before moving to Beijing in 2008. He speaks Mandarin and has spent a lot of time with the people he writes about, who are like him, children of the 1980s.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

042016082520160826 (R4)

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West.

In episode 4, Dahai, Fred, Snail and Xiaoxiao have graduated, now they have to find their own way - a place to live, a job and ultimately a life-partner. The pressure to marry is considerable - on both young men and women.

Alec Ash studied English literature at Oxford University. After graduating he taught in a Tibetan village in western China for a summer, before moving to Beijing in 2008. He speaks Mandarin and has spent a lot of time with the people he writes about, who are like him, children of the 1980s.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0520160826

052016082620160827 (R4)

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.

0520160826

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West.

Dahai is a military child and a would be rebel, Fred is a daughter of the Party, Snail the son of a farming family and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

In today's episode we rejoin the cohort in 2014 as they approach or turn 30 years old. Stable employment continues to preoccupy them , as does the question of when and how to start a family.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

052016082620160827 (R4)

The stories of young Chinese lives, particularly those young people born under the one-child policy of the 1980s, as they seek to negotiate the expectations of those around them and their own inner desires for self-fulfilment.

There are approximately 322 million Chinese aged between 16 and 30 - a group larger than the population of the USA and destined to have an unprecedented influence on global affairs in the coming years. The one-child policy has led to a generation of only children. There is intense competition for education and jobs, and a tug-of-war between cultural change and tradition, nationalism and the lures of the West.

Dahai is a military child and a would be rebel, Fred is a daughter of the Party, Snail the son of a farming family and Xiaoxiao grew up in the far north and longed to travel south. All were infants when the tanks rolled through Beijing in 1989 and none really know much about their country's recent past. But the way China develops in the future is very much something that will affect their lives - and their behaviour and decisions will affect ours.

In today's episode we rejoin the cohort in 2014 as they approach or turn 30 years old. Stable employment continues to preoccupy them , as does the question of when and how to start a family.

Written by Alec Ash

Read by David Seddon

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

Exploring the lives of young Chinese, the 'one-child' offspring of the 1980s.