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The Theremin2012031220120313 (WS)
20120318 (WS)
In 1929 a Russian inventor brought an electronic musical instrument to the USA.
His name was Leon Theremin, and at the time many people thought it would revolutionise music making.
He taught Lydia Kavina to play it when she was a child.
 20120701 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
In Prison With Nelson Mandela20120708 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
Bay Of Pigs Invasion20120715 In 1961 Alfredo Duran was part of a group of CIA-trained Cuban exiles who invaded the island to try to overthrow Fidel Castro's revolutionary government.
He tells Witness how the scheme went badly wrong, and how the promise of help from the Americans never came.
Life In The Warsaw Ghetto20120722 The memories of Janina Dawidowicz who as a child lived in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII.
Janina Dawidowicz was a nine-year old girl when World War Two engulfed Poland. As Jews, she and her family were soon driven into the Warsaw Ghetto. Seventy years ago, during the summer of 1942, the Nazis began to send the inhabitants of the Ghetto to their deaths in gas chambers. Janina escaped but her family and friends were killed. Hear her memories of the Ghetto - the sights, the characters, the coping mechanisms that people used to survive.
Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
The Gi Who Chose China2012072720120729At the end of the Korean War, 21 American prisoners chose not to go home to the USA.
At the end of the Korean War, POWs on both sides could choose where they wanted to go next. Thousands of North Korean and Chinese prisoners headed for a new life in the USA. David Hawkins was one of the 21 Americans who had been held prisoner in North Korea, who chose to go to communist China. He explains his decision, made at the height of the Cold War, and recalls the treatment he recieved as a prisoner, and then as a celebrated guest in Beijing.
Water Polo And The Hungarian Uprising In 195620120805 In November 1956 the Hungarian uprising against Soviet rule was quickly quashed. Tanks were sent into the capital Budapest and rebels were rounded up. But the Olympics in Melbourne later that month, gave the country's water polo team one last chance to stand up to the USSR. Before his death in April this year, Hungarian water polo player Ervin Zador, spoke to Witness about the clash which became known as the 'blood in the water match'.
How a water polo match came to symbolise Hungary's fight for freedom against Soviet rule.
The Battle For Mount Longdon20120812 It is 30 years since the end of the Falklands War. Hear two very different views of the conflict from an Argentine veteran and a British veteran. Miguel Savage was a 19 year-old student conscript. He had never wanted to join the army but ended up a reluctant member of Argentina's Falklands invasion force nonetheless. Quintin Wright was a well-trained member of the 3rd Battalion of the Parachute Regiment. He had joined-up voluntarily, and was excited at the thought of action. They both fought in one of the decisive encounters at the end of the war - the battle for Mount Longdon.
An Argentine soldier and a British soldier tell their stories of the Falklands War.
Woodstock20120819 The Woodstock music festival, held 43 years ago this weekend, has come to symbolise much of the idealism of the 1960s.
Hear from one man whose life was changed by those 3 days of peace, love and chaos in August 1969.
Patrick Colucci was training to become a Roman Catholic priest when he decided on the spur of the moment to join the stream of young people heading for a dairy farm in the Catskills in New York state.
The Woodstock music festival has come to symbolise much of the idealism of the 1960s.
The Suicide Of Yukio Mishima20120826 Yukio Mishima, the celebrated Japanese author, killed himself in very public circumstances in Tokyo in 1970.
Henry Scott Stokes was working as a foreign correspondent in Japan at the time and knew the great writer well. He remembers the day of Mishima's death, and his long-standing interest in ritual suicide.
A friend remembers the dramatic death of one of Japan's greatest 20th century writers.
Farzad Bazoft - Observer Journalist In Baghdad20120902 In September 1989 the Observer journalist Farzad Bazoft was arrested in Baghdad and accused of spying for Britain. Six months later he was executed by the Iraqi authorities.
A British nurse called Daphne Parish was also arrested. She was eventually released and returned to the UK. She, and British diplomat Robin Kealy, spoke to Witness about their memories of Farzad Bazoft.
In 1989, journalist Farzad Bazoft was arrested in Iraq and accused of spying for Britain.
Nehru And Edwina20120909 Lady Pamela Hicks talks about her mother's love for India's first post-independence leader
As India gained its independence from Britain, the last Viceroy's wife was falling in love. Edwina Mountbatten's younger daughter, Lady Pamela Hicks remembers her mother's deep love for India's first post-independence leader. She talks to Witness about Pandit Nehru's charm and sense of fun, and the correspondence that continued until Edwina Mountbatten died.
 20120916 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
 20120923 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
 20120930  
Fighting In The Iran-iraq War20130106 When Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion of Iran in 1980, he said his war would be over in days or weeks. But the Iran-Iraq War lasted for almost 8 years and claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. Ahmad al-Mushatat was a young medic who served in front line trenches during the last months of that war. Hear his story.
Photo: Ahmad al-Mushatat during the Iran-Iraq war, second from the right.
Baby Fae And The Baboon's Heart20130113 In 1984 doctors in California tried to save a baby girl's life by giving her a heart transplant. Unable to find an infant human donor, they used the heart of a baboon. Dr Leonard Bailey, who led the transplant team, and nurse Marie Hodgkins, talk about their attempts to save Baby Fae.
Photo: Baby Fae in the isolation unit listening to her mother's voice a few days after her operation. Courtesy of Loma Linda University Medical Center.
The Biafran War20130120 ended in January 1970. It had lasted for almost 3 years and split Nigeria. The word Biafra had become synonymous with famine and suffering. Ben Okafor was 12 years old when the fighting started. He fled his hometown with his family, worked in a refugee camp and even volunteered as a child soldier. Hear his memories of the failed bid for Biafran independence.
Vietnam - The 'christmas Bombings'20130127 On January 27th 1973 a ceasefire took effect in Vietnam, allowing the USA to pull its troops out of the country. It followed an intense aerial bombardment of North Vietnam by American B-52s - the 'Christmas Bombing Campaign'. 40 years on, it is still not clear what the bombardment was meant to achieve, as the January deal was much the same as one that had been drawn up before the bombing started. Ha Mi was just ten years old and living in Hanoi with her family when the bombs began to fall.
Photo: Ha Mi in the summer of 1972.
 20130203 History as told by the people who were there.
 20130210  
 20130224  
The Cultural Revolution In China20130303 In the mid 1960s the young people of China were encouraged to turn on their parents and teachers and 'criticise' them. It was part of Chairman Mao's plan to rejuvenate his communist state. Violence and upheaval followed as young Red Guards took his message to extremes. Paul Crook was a foreign teenager living with his family in Beijing. His whole world was turned upside down by the Cultural Revolution.
History as told by the people who were there.
 20130310 History as told by the people who were there.
 20130317 In March 1966 Mexican-American farm workers staged a protest that inspired the Latino civil rights movement in the USA. It was led by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta. Chavez died in 1993 but Dolores Huerta has been speaking about their long struggle against California's grape growers, and about the phrase that came to signify their movement "si se puede - yes we can".
Photo: Cesar Chavez in 1979. AP.
 20130324 History as told by the people who were there.
 20130707 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
The Soviet Gulag20130714 Millions of people were sent to brutal labour camps in the Soviet Union during Stalin's rule. Political prisoners and criminals worked alongside each other as slave labourers. Many died of disease, starvation, or exhaustion. Leonid Finkelstein spent more than 5 years in the Gulag. Hear his story.
Haile Selassie Visits Jamaica20130721 In 1966, Haile Selassie the Emperor of Ethiopia made his first and only visit to Jamaica - home of the Rastafari movement which revered him. Alex Last has been speaking to two Jamaicans who witnessed his historic arrival.
 20130728 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
Vietnam - Us Prisoner Of War20130804 In August 1964, US Air Force pilot, Everett Alvarez, was shot down over the Gulf of Tonkin by communist North Vietnamese forces. He spent more than 8 years in captivity, suffering physical and psychological torture. He is one of the longest-held American POWs ever.
Photo: Everett Alvarez (left) and other POWs on their release in 1973. Credit: Getty Images.
The Opening Of Euro Disney20130811 21 years ago the Walt Disney Company opened a theme park near Paris. But it had taken years of delicate negotiations and diplomacy to bring Mickey Mouse to France.
The Nepali Royal Massacre20130818 In 2001, the Crown Prince of Nepal killed nine people and then turned the gun on himself in a shooting at the royal palace. His cousin, Ketaki Chester, was injured in the massacre. She tells Witness about the events of that day and why she thinks the Prince murdered his own relatives.
The Ballerina And The Coup20130825 In 1959, Dame Margot Fonteyn became involved in a bizarre plot to overthrow the government of Panama. The Royal Ballet's prima ballerina was briefly arrested and then deported from the Central American country, after the intervention of British officials. Mike Lanchin speaks to Judy Tatham, a former friend of Dame Margot's, who took part in the failed conspiracy.
The Chile Coup20130908 In September 1973 General Pinochet launched a military coup against the socialist government of Salvador Allende in Chile. The playwright Ariel Dorfman was a young assistant to President Allende. Hear his story of regret and exile.
Us Airman Shot Down By Syrian Forces20130915 In 1983, a US airman was captured while attacking Syrian positions in Lebanon. Lt Robert Goodman was taken to Damascus and held for a month. He was only released after Reverend Jesse Jackson went to Syria to plead his case with President Hafez al-Assad.
Duke Ellington Plays Kabul20130922 In September 1963 the jazz legend gave a concert in the Afghan capital. In those days the city was open to all sorts of cultural experiments. Hear from Faiz Khairzada, the man who organised Duke Ellington's appearance.
Re-education In China20130929 In China 're-education' is still used as a form of punishment. It was introduced by the Communist Party and the police still send people for re-education without trial. Listen to the story of Robert Ford, an Englishman who spent 5 years being taught the error of his ways in Chinese jails in the 1950s. He had been captured by the Red Army during the invasion of Tibet.
The Death Of Grenada's Revolution20131019 In October 1983 Grenada's leftist prime minister was killed. Six days later the US invaded
The Death Of Grenada's Revolution20131019 On October 19th 1983, Grenada's leftist Prime Minister, Maurice Bishop, was killed following a coup. Six days later the US invaded the tiny Caribbean island. We hear from Ann Peters, who was with Maurice Bishop in his final hours.
Death In The Boxing Ring20131123 In November 1982, the boxer Deuk-Koo Kim died of brain damage after a world title fight against the American Ray Mancini. Kim fell into a coma after being repeatedly knocked down in the 14th round. His death led to a series of reforms in boxing. Ray Mancini shares his memories of the fight and its aftermath.
Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
The Kidnapping Of Frank Sinatra Jr20140105 In December 1963 the 19-year-old son of Frank Sinatra - Frank Jr - was kidnapped for a ransom. He was released unharmed after two days. Barry Keenan, the man behind the crime, speaks to Mike Lanchin and describes the events of his doomed 'get rich quick' plot.
The First Panda In The West20140112 In 1936 American socialite Ruth Harkness and her Chinese-American guide, Quentin Young, captured a giant panda cub in the forests of China. Ruth Harkness took the panda to the USA and kept it in her New York flat, before selling it to a Chicago zoo. It was the first time the animal had been seen outside China and panda-mania ensued. It was named 'Su-Lin' and celebrities such as Shirley Temple and Al Capone flocked to see it. Hear from Quentin Young's niece, Jolly Young, about the expedition in search of the panda.
 20140119 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
Tunnelling Under The Berlin Wall20140126 In 1964 a group of West German students helped more than 50 people escape from East Berlin through a tunnel that they had dug under the Berlin Wall. Joachim Neumann and Ralph Kabisch were two of the students who did the digging - Joachim's wife Christa was one of the people they helped to flee.
Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
Tunnelling Under The Berlin Wall20140126 In 1964 a group of West German students helped more than 50 people escape from East Berlin through a tunnel that they had dug under the Berlin Wall. Joachim Neumann and Ralph Kabisch were two of the students who did the digging - Joachim's wife Christa was one of the people they helped to flee.
Tunnelling Under The Berlin Wall20140126  
The Killing Of Dian Fossey20140202 In 1985 the celebrated American gorilla expert was murdered in her cabin at the research station she had set up in the mountains of Rwanda. Hear from Kelly Stewart who worked alongisde Fossey for 10 years in the Volcanoes National Park.
Photo of Dian Fossey courtesy of Kelly Stewart.
The Battle Of The Carmens20140209 At the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, an East German, Katarina Witt, and an American, Debi Thomas, were vying for Gold in the ice dance competition. It was portrayed as a clash between East and West. Completely by chance they were both dancing to the same music, Bizet's opera, Carmen.
Women And The Iranian Revolution20140216 In February 1979 Iran was undergoing a popular revolution. Liberals had joined forces with Islamic believers and taken to the streets. But what happened next would disappoint many of the people who had welcomed the end of the Shah's rule - particularly the women.
The Exile Of Solzhenitsyn20140223 In February 1974, Russia's most famous dissident writer, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, was sent into exile in the West.
His widow, Natalia, remembers the day the Soviet policemen came to their house and took him away. The couple would spend the next 20 years living in Europe and the US.
The Assassination Of Benigno Aquino20140302 In 1983 the Philippines opposition leader, Benigno Aquino, was shot dead at Manila airport as he returned from exile in the USA. Hear from his brother-in-law, the journalist Ken Kashiwahara, who was with him that day.
Fighting The Contras In Nicaragua20140309 A former left-wing Sandinista soldier talks about the war against US-backed Contra rebels in the early 1980s.
"Daniel Alegria" was an idealistic follower of the Sandinistas when he joined the brutal struggle against the rebels as a member of the Sandinista special forces.
(Warning: This programme contains descriptions some listeners might find distressing).
Taiwan - The 228 Incident20140316 In early 1947, Chinese nationalist forces, led by Chiang Kai-Shek, killed an estimated twenty thousand Taiwanese islanders after protests in Taipei. The Chinese had taken control of the island at the end of WW2 after more than 50 years of Japanese rule. Dr Chau Wu was a young boy at the time of the killings.
 20140323 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.
 20140330 Series looking at key events in history, featuring archive accounts from the people who were there.

Duration

  • 15 Minutes

Genre

  • Genre: Factual, History, Factual
  • Genre: Documentaries, Factual
  • Genre: Factual, History, Factual

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