Women Writers To Put Back On The Bookshelf

Episodes

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01Charlotte Turner Smith20200302New Generation Thinker Sophie Coulombeau argues that we should salute this woman who supported her family through her writing, who perfected sonnets about solitude before Wordsworth began writing his, and who explored the struggles of women and refugees in her fiction. Mother to 12 children, Charlotte Turner Smith wrote ten novels, three poetry collections and four children's books and translated French fiction. In 1788 her first novel, Emmeline, sold 1500 copies within months but by the time of her death in 1803 her popularity had declined and she had become destitute.

New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to work with academics to turn their research into radio.

Producer: Robyn Read

The Romantic poet who inspired Wordsworth is profiled by Sophie Coulombeau.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

02Lady Mary Wroth20200303Author of the first prose romance published in England in 1621, her reputation at court was ruined by her thinly veiled autobiographical writing. Visit the family home, Penshurst Place in Kent, and you can see Lady Mary Wroth's portrait, but New Generation Thinker Nandini Das says you can also find her in the pages of her book The Countess of Montgomery's Urania which places centre stage women who "love and are not afraid to love." Scandal led to her withdrawing it from sale and herself from public life.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod

The English Renaissance poet whose reputation at court was ruined by her writing.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

03Margaret Oliphant20200304The novel Miss Marjoribanks (1866) brought to life a large comic heroine who bucked C19 conventions. New Generation Clare Walker Gore outlines the prolific writing career of Margaret Oliphant and laments the way she was used by fellow novelist Virginia Woolf as a symbol of the dangers of needing to write for money to keep yourself and your family afloat.

Producer: Paula McGinley

The Scottish creator of comic heroine Miss Marjoribanks, who bucked C19 conventions.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

The novel Miss Marjoribanks (1866) brought to life a large comic heroine who bucked 19th-century conventions. New Generation Thinker Clare Walker Gore outlines the prolific writing career of Margaret Oliphant and laments the way she was used by fellow novelist Virginia Woolf as a symbol of the dangers of needing to write for money to keep yourself and your family afloat.

The Scottish writer whose comic heroine Miss Marjoribanks bucks 19th-century conventions.

04Storm Jameson20200305What is a writer's duty? Katie Cooper considers Storm Jameson's campaigning for refugees, her 1940 appeal, To the Conscience of the World, and why her fiction fell out of favour but is now seeing a revival of interest.

Born in Yorkshire in 1891, she wrote science fiction books, collections of criticism including an analysis of modern Drama in Europe, the introduction to the 1952 British edition of The Diary of Anne Frank and a host of novels set in European countries. During the Second World War years, she was head PEN, the association of writers, founded in London in 1921 to promote literature and intellectual co-operation.

Katie Cooper teaches at the University of East Anglia and is a New Generation Thinker on the scheme run by the BBC with the Arts and Humanities Research Council to turn research into radio.

Producer: Alex Mansfield

A Yorkshire-born writer with a European outlook who campaigned for World War II refugees.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

What is a writer's duty? Katie Cooper considers Storm Jameson's campaigning for refugees, her 1940 appeal To the Conscience of the World and why her fiction fell out of favour but is now seeing a revival of interest.

Born in Yorkshire in 1891, she wrote war novels and speculative fiction, collections of criticism - including an analysis of modern drama in Europe, the introduction to the 1952 British edition of The Diary of Anne Frank and a host of novels set in European countries. During the Second World War years she was head of PEN, the association of writers, founded in London in 1921 to promote literature and intellectual co-operation.

Katie Cooper teaches at the University of East Anglia and is a New Generation Thinker on the scheme run by the BBC with the Arts and Humanities Research Council to turn research into radio. Her book, War, Nation and Europe in the Novels of Storm Jameson, is published April 2020.

A Yorkshire-born writer with a European outlook who campaigned for World War Two refugees.

05Yolande Mukagasana20200306New Generation Thinker Zoe Norridge describes translating the testimony of a Rwandan nurse and her belief in reconciliation and rebuilding after the 1994 conflict. Not My Time to Die is the English title for the first survivor testimony to be published about the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. Yolande Mukagasana fled to Belgium during the war and has since created exhibitions and a play in addition to writing her memoir.

Producer: Luke Mulhall

Zoe Norridge describes translating the testimony of a Rwandan nurse.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

New Generation Thinker Zoe Norridge describes translating the testimony of a nurse who survived the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda.

In Rwanda, Yolande Mukagasana is a well-known writer, public figure and campaigner for remembrance of the genocide. She has authored three testimonies, a collection of interviews with survivors and perpetrators and two volumes of Rwandan stories. Her work has received numerous international prizes, including an Honourable Mention for the UNESCO Education for Peace Prize.

Zoe Norridge, from King’s College London, argues there should be a place for Mukagasana on our shelves in UK, alongside works from the Holocaust and other genocides. Why? Because listening to survivor voices helps us to understand the human cost of mass violence.

Zoe Norridge describes translating the testimony of a Rwandan survivor.