Episodes

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Wales at the Rugby World Cup 1987 - 199920190912

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup, Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part one covers Wales' journey through the first four tournaments - 1987, 1991, 1995 and 1999. We hear how Wales fared in that inaugural tournament, beating England in the quarter final, losing to a rampant All Blacks side in the semi and seeing off Australia in a dramatic play-off to finish third in the world. In the words of Paul Thorburn, who kicked a memorable conversion to seal the victory, "It went right to the death and there was a lot of emotion. We were overjoyed at winning."

The next two tournaments brought drama of a darker kind as Wales crashed out in 1991 in the pool stages after being beaten by Western Samoa. As the joke of the time quipped: "Thank God they weren't playing the whole of Samoa!" And in 1995 Wales' torrid campaign ended when they lost to Ireland by a single point. But the bigger story of that tournament transcended sport as post-apartheid South Africa played host. We hear Welsh journalist Stephen Jones describe the emotion of seeing rugby unite a nation for the first time, as Springbok captain Francois Pienaar received the Webb Ellis Trophy from his president Nelson Mandela, who was dressed in Piennar's No.6 jersey.

In 1999 it was Wales' turn to be hosts and hopes were high for a home team galvanised by Great Redeemer Graham Henry. But controversy raged as dubious refereeing saw Wales ejected in their quarter final against Australia.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales at the Rugby World Cup 1987 - 19992019091220190913 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup, Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part one covers Wales' journey through the first four tournaments - 1987, 1991, 1995 and 1999. We hear how Wales fared in that inaugural tournament, beating England in the quarter final, losing to a rampant All Blacks side in the semi and seeing off Australia in a dramatic play-off to finish third in the world. In the words of Paul Thorburn, who kicked a memorable conversion to seal the victory, "It went right to the death and there was a lot of emotion. We were overjoyed at winning."

The next two tournaments brought drama of a darker kind as Wales crashed out in 1991 in the pool stages after being beaten by Western Samoa. As the joke of the time quipped: "Thank God they weren't playing the whole of Samoa!" And in 1995 Wales' torrid campaign ended when they lost to Ireland by a single point. But the bigger story of that tournament transcended sport as post-apartheid South Africa played host. We hear Welsh journalist Stephen Jones describe the emotion of seeing rugby unite a nation for the first time, as Springbok captain Francois Pienaar received the Webb Ellis Trophy from his president Nelson Mandela, who was dressed in Piennar's No.6 jersey.

In 1999 it was Wales' turn to be hosts and hopes were high for a home team galvanised by Great Redeemer Graham Henry. But controversy raged as dubious refereeing saw Wales ejected in their quarter final against Australia.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales at the Rugby World Cup 1987 - 19992019091220190915 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup, Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part one covers Wales' journey through the first four tournaments - 1987, 1991, 1995 and 1999. We hear how Wales fared in that inaugural tournament, beating England in the quarter final, losing to a rampant All Blacks side in the semi and seeing off Australia in a dramatic play-off to finish third in the world. In the words of Paul Thorburn, who kicked a memorable conversion to seal the victory, "It went right to the death and there was a lot of emotion. We were overjoyed at winning."

The next two tournaments brought drama of a darker kind as Wales crashed out in 1991 in the pool stages after being beaten by Western Samoa. As the joke of the time quipped: "Thank God they weren't playing the whole of Samoa!" And in 1995 Wales' torrid campaign ended when they lost to Ireland by a single point. But the bigger story of that tournament transcended sport as post-apartheid South Africa played host. We hear Welsh journalist Stephen Jones describe the emotion of seeing rugby unite a nation for the first time, as Springbok captain Francois Pienaar received the Webb Ellis Trophy from his president Nelson Mandela, who was dressed in Piennar's No.6 jersey.

In 1999 it was Wales' turn to be hosts and hopes were high for a home team galvanised by Great Redeemer Graham Henry. But controversy raged as dubious refereeing saw Wales ejected in their quarter final against Australia.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales At The Rugby World Cup 1987 - 19992019091220190913 (RW)
20190915 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup, Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part one covers Wales' journey through the first four tournaments - 1987, 1991, 1995 and 1999. We hear how Wales fared in that inaugural tournament, beating England in the quarter final, losing to a rampant All Blacks side in the semi and seeing off Australia in a dramatic play-off to finish third in the world. In the words of Paul Thorburn, who kicked a memorable conversion to seal the victory, "It went right to the death and there was a lot of emotion. We were overjoyed at winning."

The next two tournaments brought drama of a darker kind as Wales crashed out in 1991 in the pool stages after being beaten by Western Samoa. As the joke of the time quipped: "Thank God they weren't playing the whole of Samoa!" And in 1995 Wales' torrid campaign ended when they lost to Ireland by a single point. But the bigger story of that tournament transcended sport as post-apartheid South Africa played host. We hear Welsh journalist Stephen Jones describe the emotion of seeing rugby unite a nation for the first time, as Springbok captain Francois Pienaar received the Webb Ellis Trophy from his president Nelson Mandela, who was dressed in Piennar's No.6 jersey.

In 1999 it was Wales' turn to be hosts and hopes were high for a home team galvanised by Great Redeemer Graham Henry. But controversy raged as dubious refereeing saw Wales ejected in their quarter final against Australia.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales at the Rugby World Cup 2003-201520190919

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup. Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part two covers Wales' journey through the last four tournaments - 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015. In Australia 2003 Shane Williams was taken as the third-choice scrum-half but lit up the tournament. We hear how Wales surprised everybody - did they rip up the Hansen rule-book to give New Zealand and England such a scintillating scare or was it part of the Kiwi’s masterplan all along. Max Boyce reveals what the fans got up to – including his own adventures selling out the Sydney Opera House.

Wales’s 2007 World Cup campaign was a rollercoaster from start to finish - from the troubled build up to the shock exit which saw coach Gareth Jenkins sacked in the car-park. But it wasn’t all doom and drama – we discover why Mark Jones carried a live sheep into Dwayne Peel’s room.

Next, the uplifting but ultimately heartbreaking tale of 2011, the tournament that made the world want to be Welsh. Sam Warburton recalls the red card that left a nation blue and robbed them of a final against the All Blacks – a match many pundits believe they could have won.

In 2015, injury-blighted Wales defeated host nation England in the most dramatic game of the tournament but come up short against Australia even when the Wallabies were down to 13 men. And while Twickenham was the official hub Cardiff proved once again why it’s the best rugby host city on earth.

World Cup Dragons ends with a look ahead to Japan 2019 – can the coach who took Wales to a semi-final in 2011 go one better on his swansong?

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales at the Rugby World Cup 2003-20152019091920190920 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup. Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part two covers Wales' journey through the last four tournaments - 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015. In Australia 2003 Shane Williams was taken as the third-choice scrum-half but lit up the tournament. We hear how Wales surprised everybody - did they rip up the Hansen rule-book to give New Zealand and England such a scintillating scare or was it part of the Kiwi’s masterplan all along. Max Boyce reveals what the fans got up to – including his own adventures selling out the Sydney Opera House.

Wales’s 2007 World Cup campaign was a rollercoaster from start to finish - from the troubled build up to the shock exit which saw coach Gareth Jenkins sacked in the car-park. But it wasn’t all doom and drama – we discover why Mark Jones carried a live sheep into Dwayne Peel’s room.

Next, the uplifting but ultimately heartbreaking tale of 2011, the tournament that made the world want to be Welsh. Sam Warburton recalls the red card that left a nation blue and robbed them of a final against the All Blacks – a match many pundits believe they could have won.

In 2015, injury-blighted Wales defeated host nation England in the most dramatic game of the tournament but come up short against Australia even when the Wallabies were down to 13 men. And while Twickenham was the official hub Cardiff proved once again why it’s the best rugby host city on earth.

World Cup Dragons ends with a look ahead to Japan 2019 – can the coach who took Wales to a semi-final in 2011 go one better on his swansong?

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales at the Rugby World Cup 2003-20152019091920190922 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup. Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part two covers Wales' journey through the last four tournaments - 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015. In Australia 2003 Shane Williams was taken as the third-choice scrum-half but lit up the tournament. We hear how Wales surprised everybody - did they rip up the Hansen rule-book to give New Zealand and England such a scintillating scare or was it part of the Kiwi’s masterplan all along. Max Boyce reveals what the fans got up to – including his own adventures selling out the Sydney Opera House.

Wales’s 2007 World Cup campaign was a rollercoaster from start to finish - from the troubled build up to the shock exit which saw coach Gareth Jenkins sacked in the car-park. But it wasn’t all doom and drama – we discover why Mark Jones carried a live sheep into Dwayne Peel’s room.

Next, the uplifting but ultimately heartbreaking tale of 2011, the tournament that made the world want to be Welsh. Sam Warburton recalls the red card that left a nation blue and robbed them of a final against the All Blacks – a match many pundits believe they could have won.

In 2015, injury-blighted Wales defeated host nation England in the most dramatic game of the tournament but come up short against Australia even when the Wallabies were down to 13 men. And while Twickenham was the official hub Cardiff proved once again why it’s the best rugby host city on earth.

World Cup Dragons ends with a look ahead to Japan 2019 – can the coach who took Wales to a semi-final in 2011 go one better on his swansong?

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup.

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.

Wales At The Rugby World Cup 2003-20152019091920190920 (RW)
20190922 (RW)

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecodotal history of Wales in the Rugby World Cup. Featuring archive and interviews from more than 30 years of rugby's global showpiece, World Cup Dragons traces the Welsh experience in the tournament. Carolyn, who has covered five Rugby World Cups, reflects on the surprise wins, the shock defeats and collects colourful memories from players, pundits and fans alike.

Part two covers Wales' journey through the last four tournaments - 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015. In Australia 2003 Shane Williams was taken as the third-choice scrum-half but lit up the tournament. We hear how Wales surprised everybody - did they rip up the Hansen rule-book to give New Zealand and England such a scintillating scare or was it part of the Kiwi’s masterplan all along. Max Boyce reveals what the fans got up to – including his own adventures selling out the Sydney Opera House.

Wales’s 2007 World Cup campaign was a rollercoaster from start to finish - from the troubled build up to the shock exit which saw coach Gareth Jenkins sacked in the car-park. But it wasn’t all doom and drama – we discover why Mark Jones carried a live sheep into Dwayne Peel’s room.

Next, the uplifting but ultimately heartbreaking tale of 2011, the tournament that made the world want to be Welsh. Sam Warburton recalls the red card that left a nation blue and robbed them of a final against the All Blacks – a match many pundits believe they could have won.

In 2015, injury-blighted Wales defeated host nation England in the most dramatic game of the tournament but come up short against Australia even when the Wallabies were down to 13 men. And while Twickenham was the official hub Cardiff proved once again why it’s the best rugby host city on earth.

World Cup Dragons ends with a look ahead to Japan 2019 – can the coach who took Wales to a semi-final in 2011 go one better on his swansong?

Carolyn Hitt presents a lively, anecdotal history of the Rugby World Cup.