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Broadcast
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01Tessa Hadley On Rooms And Reality2011121920130617Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing.
Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it.
They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focussed critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
Beginning the series is Tessa Hadley, writing on Rooms and Reality.
Taking as her starting point the description of the Clenham's house in Little Dorritt, she explores how Dickens paints the reality of his world through his characters' houses, and reflects on how significant houses are her own writing.
Other writers in the series are A L Kennedy, Alexander McCall Smith, Romesh Gunesekera and Justin Cartwright.
Tessa Hadley on how Dickens paints the reality of his world through characters' houses.
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens's prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth-century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens's novels, each writer discuss Dickens's themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens's skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
Beginning the series is Tessa Hadley, writing on Rooms and Reality. Taking as her starting point the description of the Clenham's house in Little Dorritt, she explores how Dickens paints the reality of his world through his characters' houses, and reflects on how significant houses are her own writing.
Other writers in the series are A L Kennedy, Alexander McAll Smith, Romesh Gunesekera and Justin Cartwright.
First broadcast in December 2011.
02Romesh Gunesekera - The Orphan Eye2011122020130618Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing.
Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it.
They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the second essay in the series, Booker-shortlisted novelist Romesh Gunesekera takes an extract from David Copperfield as a starting point for an exploration of Dickens' writing about childhood and the move from childhood into adulthood, a theme which has been significant in his own writing.
Romesh Gunesekera on how Dickens addresses the move from childhood into the world beyond.
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens's prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth-century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens's novels, each writer discuss Dickens's themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens's skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the second essay in the series, Booker-shortlisted novelist Romesh Gunesekera takes an extract from David Copperfield as a starting point for an exploration of Dickens's writing about childhood and the move from childhood into adulthood, a theme which has been significant in his own writing.
First broadcast in December 2011.
03A L Kennedy - No Hope Of Return2011122120130619Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing.
Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it.
They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the third programme in the series, novelist, essayist and performer A L Kennedy takes an extract from Nicholas Nickleby as her starting point for a provocative exploration of poverty and misery - themes which loom large in Dickens' work, and which are never far from her own fiction.
AL Kennedy explores Dickens' literary response to the themes of poverty, misery and death.
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens's prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth-century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens's novels, each writer discuss Dickens's themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens's skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the third programme in the series, novelist, essayist and performer A L Kennedy takes an extract from Nicholas Nickleby as her starting point for a provocative exploration of poverty and misery - themes which loom large in Dickens's work, and which are never far from her own fiction.
First broadcast in December 2011.
04Alexander Mccall Smith - Episodic Writing2011122220130620Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing.
Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it.
They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the fourth programme in the series novelist Alexander McCall Smith salutes Dickens' mastery of the episodic form, something he himself used with great success in his novels 44 Scotland Street, published over several years in a daily newspaper, and Corduroy Mansions, published in daily episodes online.
Writer Alexander McCall Smith salutes Charles Dickens's mastery of the episodic form.
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens's prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth-century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens's novels, each writer discuss Dickens's themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens's skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the fourth programme in the series novelist Alexander McCall Smith salutes Dickens's mastery of the episodic form, something he himself used with great success in his novels 44 Scotland Street, published over several years in a daily newspaper, and Corduroy Mansions, published in daily episodes online.
First broadcast in December 2011.
05 LASTJustin Cartwright - Christmas2011122320130621Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens's prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth-century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens's novels, each writer discuss Dickens's themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focused critical appreciation of Dickens's skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the final programme in the series, novelist Justin Cartwright reflects on the significant place Christmas occupies in Dickens's work, and argues that this is a direct result of his experiences as a child and not simply an expression of sentiment.
First broadcast in December 2011.
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing.
Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it.
They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focussed critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.
In the final programme in the series, novelist Justin Cartwright reflects on the significant place Christmas occupies in Dickens' work, and argues that this is a direct result of his experiences as a child and not simply an expression of sentiment.
Justin Cartwright reflects on the place that Christmas occupies in Charles Dickens's work.

Duration

  • 15 Minutes

Genre

  • Discussion & Talk
  • Arts
  • Culture & the Media
  • Factual

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