Your World [world Service]

Episodes

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20110416

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

20110416

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year...

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

20110423

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

20110423

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year...

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year on.

20110430

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qatar, and asks: Is it all built on sand?

20110430

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qatar, and asks: Is it all built on sand?

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa...

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qatar, and asks: Is it all built on sand?

20110507
20110507

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qatar, and asks: Is it all built on sand?

20110514

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide legacy.

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide l.

20110514

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide legacy.

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide l.

20110521

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and.

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and political impact of this classic album.

20110521

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and.

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and political impact of this classic album.

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and...

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and political impact of this classic album.

20110618

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

20110618

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

20110625

Steve Rosenberg takes a walk down his favourite Moscow street, and hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

Steve Rosenberg takes a walk down his favourite Moscow street, and hears how Russians v.

20110625

Steve Rosenberg takes a walk down his favourite Moscow street, and hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

Steve Rosenberg takes a walk down his favourite Moscow street, and hears how Russians v.

20110716

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the lives of two women involved for 9 months.

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the li.

20110716

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the lives of two women involved for 9 months.

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the li.

20110723

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland.

She is a medium and communicating wit.

She is a medium and communicating with spirits is part of her daily life.

20110723

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland.

She is a medium and communicating wit.

She is a medium and communicating with spirits is part of her daily life.

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland. She is a medium and communicating wit...

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland. She is a medium and communicating with spirits is part of her daily life.

20111008

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki.

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Kirby sees what's changed today.

20111008

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki.

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Kirby sees what's changed today.

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki...

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Kirby sees what's changed today.

20111015

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in.

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in the immediate aftermath of the rioting.

20111015

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in.

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in the immediate aftermath of the rioting.

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in...

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in the immediate aftermath of the rioting.

20111119

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shield by the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka.

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shie.

20111119

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shield by the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka.

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shie.

2012010720120109

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how thing.

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how things have changed for women in Egypt.

2012010720120109

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how thing.

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how things have changed for women in Egypt.

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how things have changed for women in Egypt.

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how thing.

20120114

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shackleton's second-in-command.

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shacklet.

20120114

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shackleton's second-in-command.

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shacklet.

20120204

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London night. With Sandy Grierson.

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

20120204

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London night. With Sandy Grierson.

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

20120211

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the great Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking Festival.

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the.

20120211

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the great Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking Festival.

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the.

20120310

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock horror.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

20120310

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock horror.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock horror.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

20120331

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy at the Round Up Drive In, in Phoenix, Arizona.

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy at the Round Up Dr.

20120331

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy at the Round Up Drive In, in Phoenix, Arizona.

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy at the Round Up Dr.

20120407

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting? Owen Bennett-Jones investigates.

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

20120407

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting? Owen Bennett-Jones investigates.

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

2012051920120520

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Z.

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars'

2012051920120520

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Z.

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars'

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Z...

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars'

2012051920120521

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars'

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Z.

2012051920120521

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars'

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of David Bowie's seminal album 'The Rise and Fall of Z.

2012061620120617

Award-winning South African author Lauren Beukes asks: Is Science Fiction coming to Afr...

Award-winning South African author Lauren Beukes asks: Is Science Fiction coming to Africa, or is it already here?

2012061620120618

Award-winning South African author Lauren Beukes asks: Is Science Fiction coming to Afr.

2012061620120618

Award-winning South African author Lauren Beukes asks: Is Science Fiction coming to Afr.

2012062320120624

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

2012062320120624

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

20121110

Phil Maguire attends the launch of Trinidads first prison radio station.

20121110

Phil Maguire attends the launch of Trinidads first prison radio station.

2013020920130210 (WS)
20130211 (WS)

Dominic Sandbrook tells the story of how radio broadcasting began in Britain, and why i...

Dominic Sandbrook tells the story of how radio broadcasting began in Britain, and why it took so long to get started.

2013020920130210 (WS)
20130211 (WS)

Dominic Sandbrook tells the story of how radio broadcasting began in Britain, and why it took so long to get started.

Dominic Sandbrook tells the story of how radio broadcasting began in Britain, and why i...

04/02/201220120205

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

04/02/201220120205

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

04/02/201220120206

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

04/02/201220120206

Cathy Fitzgerald presents a dream-walk with author Charles Dickens through the London n.

07/01/201220120108

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how thing.

07/01/201220120108

Women were at the forefront of the revolution in Egypt. Hanan Razek discovers how thing.

07/01/201220120109
07/04/201220120408

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

07/04/201220120408

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

07/04/201220120409
07/04/201220120409

The People's Mujahedin of Iran: terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

07/05/201120110508

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

07/05/201120110508

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

07/05/201120110509
07/05/201120110509

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

08/10/201120111009

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki.

08/10/201120111009

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki.

08/10/201120111010
08/10/201120111010

Eighty years after George Orwell's account of poverty in Paris and London, Emma Jane Ki.

10/03/201220120311

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

10/03/201220120311

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

10/03/201220120312
10/03/201220120312

A profile of musician Alice Cooper, who welcomes us to his theatrical world of rock hor.

11/02/201220120212

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the.

11/02/201220120212

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the.

11/02/201220120213
11/02/201220120213

Alison Finch meets one of Ireland's last traditional matchmakers as he reigns over the.

14/01/201220120115

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shacklet.

14/01/201220120115

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Sir Ernest Shacklet.

14/01/201220120116
14/01/201220120116
14/05/201120110515

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide l.

14/05/201120110515

On the 30th anniversary of Bob Marleys death, poet Lemn Sissay looks at his worldwide l.

14/05/201120110516
14/05/201120110516
15/10/201120111016

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in.

15/10/201120111016

Alan Dein explores the impact of last summer's riots on a London man and his friends in.

15/10/201120111017
15/10/201120111017
16/04/201120110417

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

16/04/201120110417

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

16/04/201120110418
16/04/201120110418

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

16/07/201120110717

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the li.

16/07/201120110717

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the li.

16/07/201120110718
16/07/201120110718

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial? We follow the li.

18/06/201120110619

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

18/06/201120110619

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

18/06/201120110620
18/06/201120110620

Ruth Evans reports on a unique dot.com venture providing jobs for the poor.

19/11/201120111120

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shie.

19/11/201120111120

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shie.

19/11/201120111121
19/11/201120111121

Priyath Liyanage searches for a boy carrying a violin case who was used as a human shie.

21/05/201120110522

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and.

21/05/201120110522

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and.

21/05/201120110523
21/05/201120110523

To mark the 40th anniversary of Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, a look at the social and.

23/04/201120110424

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

23/04/201120110424

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

23/04/201120110425
23/04/201120110425

Adam Zamoyski examines the impact on Polish society of the Smolensk air crash, one year.

23/07/201120110724

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland.

She is a medium and communicating wit.

23/07/201120110724

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland.

She is a medium and communicating wit.

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland. She is a medium and communicating wit.

23/07/201120110725
23/07/201120110725

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two from Ireland.

She is a medium and communicating wit.

30/04/201120110501
30/04/201120110501

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

30/04/201120110502
30/04/201120110502

Jonathan Glancey looks at architecture in Middle Eastern countries such as Dubai and Qa.

A Family Business20120218

Worldwide, running a business as a family is the most common and enduring kind.

But it's a model that is being tested by the speed of technological change, which leads to all sorts of tensions between the generations.

How can the younger generation convince their elders of the benefits of technology and that it's time to change their working practices when they seem to be just about getting by as they always have done?

And how do the older generation know when it's time to call it a day and hand over the reins?

The Bernardes family business is a hardware store in the East End of London, which has been in the family for over a hundred years and is now in its fourth generation.

For Your World, Mair Bosworth spends time in its narrow aisles. which are packed from floor to ceiling with household goods.

Their location and price are only in the heads of parents Ian and Jan, who are approaching their 60s, and son John who is in his 30s.

As John says "it's a BC business - before computers".

John's own way of shopping is to use his smartphone, and he wants to convince Ian and Jan to computerise the stock control and have a website for online sales.

But Ian and Jan are more comfortable with the physical reality of counting out screws by hand.

Will John manage to convince his parents that it's time to change?

Will the Bernardes family business be there for a fifth generation?

A Family Business was presented and produced by Mair Bosworth, with studio production by Kate Howells.

Mair Bosworth looks at conflict between generations in a small family business in London.

A Family Business20120218

Worldwide, running a business as a family is the most common and enduring kind.

But it's a model that is being tested by the speed of technological change, which leads to all sorts of tensions between the generations.

How can the younger generation convince their elders of the benefits of technology and that it's time to change their working practices when they seem to be just about getting by as they always have done?

And how do the older generation know when it's time to call it a day and hand over the reins?

The Bernardes family business is a hardware store in the East End of London, which has been in the family for over a hundred years and is now in its fourth generation.

For Your World, Mair Bosworth spends time in its narrow aisles. which are packed from floor to ceiling with household goods.

Their location and price are only in the heads of parents Ian and Jan, who are approaching their 60s, and son John who is in his 30s.

As John says "it's a BC business - before computers".

John's own way of shopping is to use his smartphone, and he wants to convince Ian and Jan to computerise the stock control and have a website for online sales.

But Ian and Jan are more comfortable with the physical reality of counting out screws by hand.

Will John manage to convince his parents that it's time to change?

Will the Bernardes family business be there for a fifth generation?

A Family Business was presented and produced by Mair Bosworth, with studio production by Kate Howells.

Mair Bosworth looks at conflict between generations in a small family business in London.

A Family Business20120219

Mair Bosworth looks at conflict between generations in a small family business in London.

A Family Business20120219

Mair Bosworth looks at conflict between generations in a small family business in London.

A Family Business20120220
A Family Business20120220

Mair Bosworth looks at conflict between generations in a small family business in London.

A Long Walk Into History2012120820121209 (WS)
20121210 (WS)

The story of James Meredith, the first black student at the University of Mississippi.

The story of James Meredith, the first black student at the University of Mississippi.

Fifty years have passed since James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi - an event that brought the segregated state of Mississippi into virtual insurrection against the newly elected administration of President Kennedy.

On Kennedy's orders 16,000 US troops helped ensure that James Meredith was enrolled at 'Ole Miss', the symbolic heart of southern white pride and power. Meredith changed history in the face of violent and often terrifying opposition. He saw himself on 'a mission from god', a warrior not for the cause of civil rights but for his own birth rights and citizenship.

In 1966, Meredith embarked on his 'Walk Against Fear', a 225 mile journey from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi in part to encourage black Mississippians to register to vote. He was shot and wounded two days into his walk. Twenty-five thousand people, led by Martin Luther King, would complete the march as the civil rights movement began to fragment along different paths.

James Meredith changed history. There is a statue to him on the campus of 'Ole Miss' near to that of a confederate soldier. But Meredith sees nothing to celebrate as the rest of America marks his moment. He is a controversial figure who finds himself uneasy with the definition of victory and achievement in the cause of civil rights. Consequently he rarely speaks in public.

Writer Sol B River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and here he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

(Image: Civil rights activist James Meredith, center, is escorted by US marshals and troops en route to classes at the University of Mississippi. Credit: AP Photo)

In 1962 James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi. In doing so he exposed the fault lines of race and power in the USA.

Fifty years on, his message and meaning are still troubling. Writer Sol B. River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

In 1962 James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi. In doing so he exposed the fault lines of race and power in the USA.

Fifty years on, his message and meaning are still troubling. Writer Sol B. River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

Fifty years have passed since James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi - an event that brought the segregated state of Mississippi into virtual insurrection against the newly elected administration of President Kennedy.

On Kennedy's orders 16,000 US troops helped ensure that James Meredith was enrolled at 'Ole Miss', the symbolic heart of southern white pride and power. Meredith changed history in the face of violent and often terrifying opposition. He saw himself on 'a mission from god', a warrior not for the cause of civil rights but for his own birth rights and citizenship.

In 1966, Meredith embarked on his 'Walk Against Fear', a 225 mile journey from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi in part to encourage black Mississippians to register to vote. He was shot and wounded two days into his walk. Twenty-five thousand people, led by Martin Luther King, would complete the march as the civil rights movement began to fragment along different paths.

James Meredith changed history. There is a statue to him on the campus of 'Ole Miss' near to that of a confederate soldier. But Meredith sees nothing to celebrate as the rest of America marks his moment. He is a controversial figure who finds himself uneasy with the definition of victory and achievement in the cause of civil rights. Consequently he rarely speaks in public.

Writer Sol B River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and here he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

(Image: Civil rights activist James Meredith, center, is escorted by US marshals and troops en route to classes at the University of Mississippi. Credit: AP Photo)

A Long Walk Into History2012120820121209 (WS)
20121210 (WS)

The story of James Meredith, the first black student at the University of Mississippi.

Fifty years have passed since James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi - an event that brought the segregated state of Mississippi into virtual insurrection against the newly elected administration of President Kennedy.

On Kennedy's orders 16,000 US troops helped ensure that James Meredith was enrolled at 'Ole Miss', the symbolic heart of southern white pride and power. Meredith changed history in the face of violent and often terrifying opposition. He saw himself on 'a mission from god', a warrior not for the cause of civil rights but for his own birth rights and citizenship.

In 1966, Meredith embarked on his 'Walk Against Fear', a 225 mile journey from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi in part to encourage black Mississippians to register to vote. He was shot and wounded two days into his walk. Twenty-five thousand people, led by Martin Luther King, would complete the march as the civil rights movement began to fragment along different paths.

James Meredith changed history. There is a statue to him on the campus of 'Ole Miss' near to that of a confederate soldier. But Meredith sees nothing to celebrate as the rest of America marks his moment. He is a controversial figure who finds himself uneasy with the definition of victory and achievement in the cause of civil rights. Consequently he rarely speaks in public.

Writer Sol B River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and here he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

(Image: Civil rights activist James Meredith, center, is escorted by US marshals and troops en route to classes at the University of Mississippi. Credit: AP Photo)

In 1962 James Meredith became the first black student to be admitted to the University of Mississippi. In doing so he exposed the fault lines of race and power in the USA.

Fifty years on, his message and meaning are still troubling. Writer Sol B. River has long been fascinated by the complexities of Meredith's story and character, and he talks with Meredith at length as he seeks to understand one man's war and his place in history.

African Perspective: Lipstick Evangelists2012100620121008 (WS)

The cosmetics giant Avon now sells far more products outside the US, the place where it was founded 126 years.

The company's sales were up a mere 1% globally last year but in South Africa, business is booming and sales were up for a third year.

Thousands of black women - in the townships, cities and countryside - are rushing to be the ones who sell the body lotions, bubble baths and lipsticks.

Eunice Maseko's tale is extraordinary. Her ambition to first of all be a doctor and then a teacher was thwarted by apartheid, and we hear how her time at university came to a dramatic end.

In a country where unemployment stands at 25%, Avon is bound to appeal – but there is more to the job than the chance to earn some money, say many Avon Ladies.

"Without Avon," Maggy More in Soweto says, "I think I would be old by now."

High crime rates mean there is very little of the door-to-door selling that gave rise to the company's famous mantra, 'Ding dong, Avon calling'.

Maggy shows us how inventive South African Avon Ladies have to be because of this and we travel with her as she takes advantage of a captive audience in a crammed commuter bus.

We ask whether our Lipstick Evangelists sell just within their ethnic group or beyond South Africa's racial and economic groups and explore how sustainable the job is for future generations.

(Image: Avon lipsticks. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

African Perspective: Lipstick Evangelists2012100620121008 (WS)
20121007 (WS)

The cosmetics giant Avon now sells far more products outside the US, the place where it was founded 126 years.

The company's sales were up a mere 1% globally last year but in South Africa, business is booming and sales were up for a third year.

Thousands of black women - in the townships, cities and countryside - are rushing to be the ones who sell the body lotions, bubble baths and lipsticks.

Eunice Maseko's tale is extraordinary. Her ambition to first of all be a doctor and then a teacher was thwarted by apartheid, and we hear how her time at university came to a dramatic end.

In a country where unemployment stands at 25%, Avon is bound to appeal – but there is more to the job than the chance to earn some money, say many Avon Ladies.

"Without Avon," Maggy More in Soweto says, "I think I would be old by now."

High crime rates mean there is very little of the door-to-door selling that gave rise to the company's famous mantra, 'Ding dong, Avon calling'.

Maggy shows us how inventive South African Avon Ladies have to be because of this and we travel with her as she takes advantage of a captive audience in a crammed commuter bus.

We ask whether our Lipstick Evangelists sell just within their ethnic group or beyond South Africa's racial and economic groups and explore how sustainable the job is for future generations.

(Image: Avon lipsticks. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The cosmetics giant Avon now sells far more products outside the US, the place where it was founded 126 years.

The company's sales were up a mere 1% globally last year but in South Africa, business is booming and sales were up for a third year.

Thousands of black women - in the townships, cities and countryside - are rushing to be the ones who sell the body lotions, bubble baths and lipsticks.

Eunice Maseko's tale is extraordinary. Her ambition to first of all be a doctor and then a teacher was thwarted by apartheid, and we hear how her time at university came to a dramatic end.

In a country where unemployment stands at 25%, Avon is bound to appeal – but there is more to the job than the chance to earn some money, say many Avon Ladies.

"Without Avon," Maggy More in Soweto says, "I think I would be old by now."

High crime rates mean there is very little of the door-to-door selling that gave rise to the company's famous mantra, 'Ding dong, Avon calling'.

Maggy shows us how inventive South African Avon Ladies have to be because of this and we travel with her as she takes advantage of a captive audience in a crammed commuter bus.

We ask whether our Lipstick Evangelists sell just within their ethnic group or beyond South Africa's racial and economic groups and explore how sustainable the job is for future generations.

(Image: Avon lipsticks. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

We travel with two Avon cosmetics reps to find out what it is like to be a door-to-door...

We travel with two Avon cosmetics reps to find out what it is like to be a door-to-door salesperson in South Africa.

After The Crash20110417

Has Poland recovered from the 2010 plane creash that wiped out the nation's ruling class?

One year on from the Smolensk air crash, writer and historian Adam Zamoyski examines how Polish politics and society have been affected by the events of April 10 2010 - the day which saw the country lose its President and 95 other public servants and dignitaries.

In the first programme, Adam visits Krakow and speaks to those who suffered personal loss, as well as citizens who were united in the spontaneous national grief that followed the crash.

Adam also questions, how does a country recover politically, bureaucratically and mentally from such a debilitating blow and what did the citizen's reactions reveal about the Polish attitude towards its own history?

After The Crash20110417

Has Poland recovered from the 2010 plane creash that wiped out the nation's ruling class?

One year on from the Smolensk air crash, writer and historian Adam Zamoyski examines how Polish politics and society have been affected by the events of April 10 2010 - the day which saw the country lose its President and 95 other public servants and dignitaries.

In the first programme, Adam visits Krakow and speaks to those who suffered personal loss, as well as citizens who were united in the spontaneous national grief that followed the crash.

Adam also questions, how does a country recover politically, bureaucratically and mentally from such a debilitating blow and what did the citizen's reactions reveal about the Polish attitude towards its own history?

Has Poland recovered from the 2010 plane creash that wiped out the nation's ruling class?

One year on from the Smolensk air crash, writer and historian Adam Zamoyski examines how Polish politics and society have been affected by the events of April 10 2010 - the day which saw the country lose its President and 95 other public servants and dignitaries.

In the first programme, Adam visits Krakow and speaks to those who suffered personal loss, as well as citizens who were united in the spontaneous national grief that followed the crash.

Adam also questions, how does a country recover politically, bureaucratically and mentally from such a debilitating blow and what did the citizen's reactions reveal about the Polish attitude towards its own history?

After The Crash20110418

Has Poland recovered from the 2010 plane creash that wiped out the nation's ruling class?

After The Crash20110418

Has Poland recovered from the 2010 plane creash that wiped out the nation's ruling class?

After The Crash - Part Two20110425

On the anniversary of the Smolensk air crash, writer and historian Adam Zamoyski examines how Polish politics and society have been affected by the events of 10 April 2010, a day on which Poland lost its President and 95 others, which included many talented public servants and dignitaries.

In the second programme, Zamoyski travels to Warsaw to examine how the legacy of the crash has impacted on a year of Polish politics.

The disaster forced Poland to embrace the shortest presidential campaign in its history – with the late president’s identical twin Jarosław Kaczyński of the Law and Order Party running against Bronisław Maria Komorowski of Civic Platform.

In the months that followed, deep ideological divisions have developed in the country, and Zamoyski hears the opinions of politicians, students and members of the influential Catholic church.

Is Poland rebuilding now or pulling itself apart?

How Polish society coped a year after losing its political elite in the Smolensk air crash

After The Crash - Part Two20110425

On the anniversary of the Smolensk air crash, writer and historian Adam Zamoyski examines how Polish politics and society have been affected by the events of 10 April 2010, a day on which Poland lost its President and 95 others, which included many talented public servants and dignitaries.

In the second programme, Zamoyski travels to Warsaw to examine how the legacy of the crash has impacted on a year of Polish politics.

The disaster forced Poland to embrace the shortest presidential campaign in its history – with the late president’s identical twin Jarosław Kaczyński of the Law and Order Party running against Bronisław Maria Komorowski of Civic Platform.

In the months that followed, deep ideological divisions have developed in the country, and Zamoyski hears the opinions of politicians, students and members of the influential Catholic church.

Is Poland rebuilding now or pulling itself apart?

How Polish society coped a year after losing its political elite in the Smolensk air crash

Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110917

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110917

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110918
Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110918

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110919

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

Always Hope: Cambodia's New Music20110919

In Cambodia, in June this year, an Australian musician and entrepreneur organized the country's first live music festival.

Held in the small riverside town of Kampot in Cambodia's south-east, the Kampot River Music Festival showcased several bands in which Khmer and foreign musicians are blending styles and languages to make fresh sounds.

This cross-pollination of Khmer and Western music began with Cambodia's Golden Era of rock 'n' roll in the late 60s but was brutally halted by the Khmer Rouge genocide.

During those dark years between 1975 and 1979 - in which artists and musicians were targeted - nearly 90% perished.

Those who didn't survive included the big stars of the era - Sinn Sisamouth, Ros Sureysothea and Pan Ron - singers who are still famous today and whose work is being reinterpreted by some contemporary bands.

In the past five years, new bands and music venues have been established and young hip hop artists have been supported to create their own material rather than copying American artists.

Bands like The Cambodian Space Project, Dub Addiction, The Kampot Playboys and CycloSonic, are all contributing to a fledgling but creative music scene.

As Cambodia's contemporary music scene grows, the country is slowly recovering from the dark years of Pol Pot's rule.

This may even be the beginning of a new Golden Era.

How Cambodia's new bands are promising signs of a culture in recovery.

Building On Sand20110502

Dubai is a phenomenon.

It's like no other city on earth.

In terms of architecture, it has been reaching for the stars with the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa.

It stands as a symbol for the way power, money and influence appear to have moved away from the west to newly-confident countries in the east.

But what is it all built upon?

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building in one of the harshest environments on earth.

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building on sand

Building On Sand20110502

Dubai is a phenomenon.

It's like no other city on earth.

In terms of architecture, it has been reaching for the stars with the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa.

It stands as a symbol for the way power, money and influence appear to have moved away from the west to newly-confident countries in the east.

But what is it all built upon?

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building in one of the harshest environments on earth.

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building on sand

Dubai is a phenomenon.

It's like no other city on earth. In terms of architecture, it has been reaching for the stars with the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa.

It stands as a symbol for the way power, money and influence appear to have moved away from the west to newly-confident countries in the east. But what is it all built upon?

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building in one of the harshest environments on earth.

Jonathan Glancey looks at whether Dubai has a sustainable policy towards building on sand

Don’t Log Off2012101320121014 (WS)
20121015 (WS)

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype.

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype.

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype - discovering the real-life dramas behind the online profiles.

It's a hesitant beginning as Alan starts from a "Friend" count of zero, struggling to lure users away from the anonymity of the keyboard to the glare of the webcam - and engage in real verbal communication. Yet over five long late nights, he gradually builds up a circle of friends, crossing the time zones and discovering some startling stories.

Alan's conversations lead him into the realm of love and loss - online and offline. He connects with a single parent snowbound in Nova Scotia, an Egyptian whose online romance turned sour, and a Pakistani yearning for a girl from the 'wrong' caste.

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype - discovering the real-life dramas behind the online profiles.

It's a hesitant beginning as Alan starts from a "Friend" count of zero, struggling to lure users away from the anonymity of the keyboard to the glare of the webcam - and engage in real verbal communication. Yet over five long late nights, he gradually builds up a circle of friends, crossing the time zones and discovering some startling stories.

Alan's conversations lead him into the realm of love and loss - online and offline. He connects with a single parent snowbound in Nova Scotia, an Egyptian whose online romance turned sour, and a Pakistani yearning for a girl from the 'wrong' caste.

Don’t Log Off2012101320121014 (WS)
20121015 (WS)

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype.

Alan Dein attempts to cross the world on a late-night excursion via Facebook and Skype - discovering the real-life dramas behind the online profiles.

It's a hesitant beginning as Alan starts from a "Friend" count of zero, struggling to lure users away from the anonymity of the keyboard to the glare of the webcam - and engage in real verbal communication. Yet over five long late nights, he gradually builds up a circle of friends, crossing the time zones and discovering some startling stories.

Alan's conversations lead him into the realm of love and loss - online and offline. He connects with a single parent snowbound in Nova Scotia, an Egyptian whose online romance turned sour, and a Pakistani yearning for a girl from the 'wrong' caste.

Dreaming Dickens20120206

A dream-walk with Charles Dickens through the London night.

In the 200 years since his birth, Charles Dickens has become an institution - the archetypal Victorian novelist, whose works have spawned countless costume dramas on television.

But he also left another, very different legacy: some of the strangest and most surreal writing in the English language.

At times so cosy and sentimental, Dickens’ novels are full of transgressive desires and fears - murderous rage, anarchic glee, cannibalistic threats, and sexual obsession.

In this documentary-fantasy we bring the danger back to Dickens.

Slipping in and out of his weird and brilliant imagination, we see modern London as he might have done, travelling through the city's streets at night to crack dens and strip-joints as the police sirens wail.

We meet characters from his novels and characters who would be in his novels if he were still alive today.

Starring Sandy Grierson and Madeline Brolly.

(Image: Charles Dickens. Credit: Getty Images)

Dreaming Dickens20120206

A dream-walk with Charles Dickens through the London night.

In the 200 years since his birth, Charles Dickens has become an institution - the archetypal Victorian novelist, whose works have spawned countless costume dramas on television.

But he also left another, very different legacy: some of the strangest and most surreal writing in the English language.

At times so cosy and sentimental, Dickens’ novels are full of transgressive desires and fears - murderous rage, anarchic glee, cannibalistic threats, and sexual obsession.

In this documentary-fantasy we bring the danger back to Dickens.

Slipping in and out of his weird and brilliant imagination, we see modern London as he might have done, travelling through the city's streets at night to crack dens and strip-joints as the police sirens wail.

We meet characters from his novels and characters who would be in his novels if he were still alive today.

Starring Sandy Grierson and Madeline Brolly.

(Image: Charles Dickens. Credit: Getty Images)

A dream-walk with Charles Dickens through the London night.

In the 200 years since his birth, Charles Dickens has become an institution - the archetypal Victorian novelist, whose works have spawned countless costume dramas on television.

But he also left another, very different legacy: some of the strangest and most surreal writing in the English language.

At times so cosy and sentimental, Dickens’ novels are full of transgressive desires and fears - murderous rage, anarchic glee, cannibalistic threats, and sexual obsession.

In this documentary-fantasy we bring the danger back to Dickens.

Slipping in and out of his weird and brilliant imagination, we see modern London as he might have done, travelling through the city's streets at night to crack dens and strip-joints as the police sirens wail.

We meet characters from his novels and characters who would be in his novels if he were still alive today.

Starring Sandy Grierson and Madeline Brolly.

(Image: Charles Dickens. Credit: Getty Images)

Dreaming Dickens20120207

A dream-walk with Charles Dickens through the London night.

Dreaming Dickens20120207

A dream-walk with Charles Dickens through the London night.

Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120414

Set up during apartheid in the 1960s, Chatsworth is an Indian township near Durban which has been devastated in recent years by 'sugars' - a highly addictive cut of heroin, mixed with rat poison to prevent blood clots and any other powdered household goods - available to bulk it up and make it cheap.

The withdrawals are agonising.

Sugars came to Chatsworth with addicted minibus taxi drivers from Durban and cut through the youth like wildfire.

Those addicts whose families have any possessions of value steal from their families, those who don't con and beg in car parks and steal from shops.

Heroin addictions are notoriously difficult to treat, and the figure quoted for long-term recovery is below 10%.

But in Chatsworth Sam Pillay, founder of the Anti-Drug Forum, thinks he has come up with a combination of detox drugs and family therapy rehabilitation which he wants the world to know about.

It's early days but he estimates that so far their success rate is in the region of 60 - 80%.

Chervon Chetty, who is from a South African family of Indian origin with roots in Durban, visits Chatsworth to see the impact of 'sugars', and hear about the chance for change in addicts' lives.

Produced in partnership with SAfm

Presenter: Chervon Chetty from SAfm

Producers: Chervon Chetty and Kate Howells

(Image: Presenter Chervon Chetty. Credit: Kate Howells)

The bitter taste of 'sugars' and the addicts' chance for change.

Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120414

Set up during apartheid in the 1960s, Chatsworth is an Indian township near Durban which has been devastated in recent years by 'sugars' - a highly addictive cut of heroin, mixed with rat poison to prevent blood clots and any other powdered household goods - available to bulk it up and make it cheap.

The withdrawals are agonising.

Sugars came to Chatsworth with addicted minibus taxi drivers from Durban and cut through the youth like wildfire.

Those addicts whose families have any possessions of value steal from their families, those who don't con and beg in car parks and steal from shops.

Heroin addictions are notoriously difficult to treat, and the figure quoted for long-term recovery is below 10%.

But in Chatsworth Sam Pillay, founder of the Anti-Drug Forum, thinks he has come up with a combination of detox drugs and family therapy rehabilitation which he wants the world to know about.

It's early days but he estimates that so far their success rate is in the region of 60 - 80%.

Chervon Chetty, who is from a South African family of Indian origin with roots in Durban, visits Chatsworth to see the impact of 'sugars', and hear about the chance for change in addicts' lives.

Produced in partnership with SAfm

Presenter: Chervon Chetty from SAfm

Producers: Chervon Chetty and Kate Howells

(Image: Presenter Chervon Chetty. Credit: Kate Howells)

The bitter taste of 'sugars' and the addicts' chance for change.

Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120415

The bitter taste of 'sugars' and the addicts' chance for change.

Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120415

The bitter taste of 'sugars' and the addicts' chance for change.

Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120416
Global Perspectives: Chatsworth - A Chance For Change20120416

The bitter taste of 'sugars' and the addicts' chance for change.

In My Mother's Image2013030320130304 (WS)

A photograph, a mother who died young and the desire to honour those we've loved and lost.

Letitia Boateng has retired from a bank job and is now back in the village of her birth, high in the hills of Ghana's eastern region.

Letitia, 72, has reached a point in her life where she is reflecting long and hard about her own childhood - the intense struggles her subsistence farmer parents encountered in trying to give their eight children an education and the devastating effect the early death of her mother had on them all.

When she looks at a cherished photo of her dad, taken a short while before he died, aged 104, she wishes she had also been able to look after her mum in her old age.

And this has now crystallised into a desperate need to find a photograph of her mother so that she can show her own children and grandchildren.

She has never seen it but Letitia knows that one existed.

The missing photograph is of a group taken outside a Pentecostal church in the mid-1950s – a group that included Letitia's parents as well as her older cousin, and her husband.

In this programme, Letitia's search for this picture brings her back into close contact with this older cousin, Maa Nyane Ofei - who has intensely tragic associations with the photograph.

The photo was removed by police for their enquiries when Maa Nyane Ofei's husband mysteriously disappeared on his way to visit his wife and their brand new baby.

He was never to be seen again, and the photograph was also never retrieved.

The story of the search for this photograph becomes the story of these elderly women, their united search and their longing for those dead and lost.

The journey in itself proves to be an extraordinary revelation.

(Image: Letitia Boateng)

A photograph, a mother who died young and the desire to honour those who've loved and lost

In My Mother's Image2013030320130304 (WS)

Letitia Boateng has retired from a bank job and is now back in the village of her birth, high in the hills of Ghana's eastern region.

Letitia, 72, has reached a point in her life where she is reflecting long and hard about her own childhood - the intense struggles her subsistence farmer parents encountered in trying to give their eight children an education and the devastating effect the early death of her mother had on them all.

When she looks at a cherished photo of her dad, taken a short while before he died, aged 104, she wishes she had also been able to look after her mum in her old age.

And this has now crystallised into a desperate need to find a photograph of her mother so that she can show her own children and grandchildren.

She has never seen it but Letitia knows that one existed.

The missing photograph is of a group taken outside a Pentecostal church in the mid-1950s – a group that included Letitia's parents as well as her older cousin, and her husband.

In this programme, Letitia's search for this picture brings her back into close contact with this older cousin, Maa Nyane Ofei - who has intensely tragic associations with the photograph.

The photo was removed by police for their enquiries when Maa Nyane Ofei's husband mysteriously disappeared on his way to visit his wife and their brand new baby.

He was never to be seen again, and the photograph was also never retrieved.

The story of the search for this photograph becomes the story of these elderly women, their united search, and their longing for those dead and lost.

The journey in itself proves to be an extraordinary revelation.

(Image: Letitia Boateng)

A photograph, a mother who died young and the desire to honour those who've loved and lost

A photograph, a mother who died young and the desire to honour those we've loved and lost.

Is Science Fiction Coming To Africa?2012061620120617
20120618 (WS)

Or is it already here? Lauren Beukes, South African author and winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for Science Fiction in 2011, investigates.

Beukes hears from film-makers Neill Blomkamp (South Africa - director of the international hit District 9), Wanuri Kahiu (Kenya), blogger Jonathan Dotse (Ghana), writer Nnedi Okorafor (Nigeria/USA) and others on how their particular experiences have influenced their work.

Science fiction often explores the interaction between people and technology. In Africa that theme plays out in surprising ways, from making an appointment with a traditional healer over email, to women in remote villages collecting water while chatting on their mobiles.

It’s this mix of magic and technology, challenge and innovation that shapes the science fiction coming out of the continent.

Leaving behind the traditional visions of a high-tech Tokyo, futuristic LA or dystopian New York, and challenging clichéd views of the entire African continent, this is a science fiction being told by the people who live there.

Producer: Deborah Basckin.

(Image: A young girl wearing 3D glasses in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: AP Photo / Darko Bandic)

Is Science Fiction Coming To Africa?2012061620120617
20120618 (WS)

Or is it already here? Lauren Beukes, South African author and winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for Science Fiction in 2011, investigates.

Beukes hears from film-makers Neill Blomkamp (South Africa - director of the international hit District 9), Wanuri Kahiu (Kenya), blogger Jonathan Dotse (Ghana), writer Nnedi Okorafor (Nigeria/USA) and others on how their particular experiences have influenced their work.

Science fiction often explores the interaction between people and technology. In Africa that theme plays out in surprising ways, from making an appointment with a traditional healer over email, to women in remote villages collecting water while chatting on their mobiles.

It’s this mix of magic and technology, challenge and innovation that shapes the science fiction coming out of the continent.

Leaving behind the traditional visions of a high-tech Tokyo, futuristic LA or dystopian New York, and challenging clichéd views of the entire African continent, this is a science fiction being told by the people who live there.

Producer: Deborah Basckin.

(Image: A young girl wearing 3D glasses in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: AP Photo / Darko Bandic)

Is Science Fiction Coming To Africa?2012061720120618

Or is it already here? Lauren Beukes, South African author and winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for Science Fiction in 2011, investigates.

Beukes hears from film-makers Neill Blomkamp (South Africa - director of the international hit District 9), Wanuri Kahiu (Kenya), blogger Jonathan Dotse (Ghana), writer Nnedi Okorafor (Nigeria/USA) and others on how their particular experiences have influenced their work.

Science fiction often explores the interaction between people and technology. In Africa that theme plays out in surprising ways, from making an appointment with a traditional healer over email, to women in remote villages collecting water while chatting on their mobiles.

It’s this mix of magic and technology, challenge and innovation that shapes the science fiction coming out of the continent.

Leaving behind the traditional visions of a high-tech Tokyo, futuristic LA or dystopian New York, and challenging clichéd views of the entire African continent, this is a science fiction being told by the people who live there.

Producer: Deborah Basckin.

(Image: A young girl wearing 3D glasses in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: AP Photo / Darko Bandic)

It's A Dog's Life2012060920120610
20120609 (WS)
20120610 (WS)
20120611 (WS)

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Startlingly, in a country having kittens over its plummeting birth-rate, there are now twice as many pets in Japan as there are children.

While the average age of Japan's population has been steadily climbing and birth rates falling rapidly, Japan has become a pet superpower.

As the number of dogs has increased, so too has the number of childless women and couples, many of whom dote on their dogs in place of children, lavishing luxuries and all kinds of anthropomorphic privileges on them. Small pedigree breeds such as chihuahuas or tiny purse-sized poodles are preferred and highly prized.

Some of the luxuries on offer include dog kimonos, fake fur coats and $1,500 Hermes leather tote bags and collars. Dog buggies, nappies, sunglasses and hats are “must have? items for any self-respecting dog owner.

Roland Buerk seeks an explanation for this explosion in interest in all things canine, and explores the demographic time-bomb behind it. If Japanese women continue to reject marriage and children in favour of doggy love, what will be the impact on Japan's population?

(Image shows young Japanese women carrying poodles in the Tokyo International Dog Show 2010. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

It's A Dog's Life2012060920120610
20120610 (WS)

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Startlingly, in a country having kittens over its plummeting birth-rate, there are now twice as many pets in Japan as there are children.

While the average age of Japan's population has been steadily climbing and birth rates falling rapidly, Japan has become a pet superpower.

As the number of dogs has increased, so too has the number of childless women and couples, many of whom dote on their dogs in place of children, lavishing luxuries and all kinds of anthropomorphic privileges on them. Small pedigree breeds such as chihuahuas or tiny purse-sized poodles are preferred and highly prized.

Some of the luxuries on offer include dog kimonos, fake fur coats and $1,500 Hermes leather tote bags and collars. Dog buggies, nappies, sunglasses and hats are “must have? items for any self-respecting dog owner.

Roland Buerk seeks an explanation for this explosion in interest in all things canine, and explores the demographic time-bomb behind it. If Japanese women continue to reject marriage and children in favour of doggy love, what will be the impact on Japan's population?

(Image shows young Japanese women carrying poodles in the Tokyo International Dog Show 2010. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Startlingly, in a country having kittens over its plummeting birth-rate, there are now twice as many pets in Japan as there are children.

While the average age of Japan's population has been steadily climbing and birth rates falling rapidly, Japan has become a pet superpower.

As the number of dogs has increased, so too has the number of childless women and couples, many of whom dote on their dogs in place of children, lavishing luxuries and all kinds of anthropomorphic privileges on them. Small pedigree breeds such as chihuahuas or tiny purse-sized poodles are preferred and highly prized.

Some of the luxuries on offer include dog kimonos, fake fur coats and $1,500 Hermes leather tote bags and collars. Dog buggies, nappies, sunglasses and hats are “must have? items for any self-respecting dog owner.

Roland Buerk seeks an explanation for this explosion in interest in all things canine, and explores the demographic time-bomb behind it. If Japanese women continue to reject marriage and children in favour of doggy love, what will be the impact on Japan's population?

(Image shows young Japanese women carrying poodles in the Tokyo International Dog Show 2010. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

It's A Dog's Life2012060920120611
20120611 (WS)

Startlingly, in a country having kittens over its plummeting birth-rate, there are now twice as many pets in Japan as there are children.

While the average age of Japan's population has been steadily climbing and birth rates falling rapidly, Japan has become a pet superpower.

As the number of dogs has increased, so too has the number of childless women and couples, many of whom dote on their dogs in place of children, lavishing luxuries and all kinds of anthropomorphic privileges on them. Small pedigree breeds such as chihuahuas or tiny purse-sized poodles are preferred and highly prized.

Some of the luxuries on offer include dog kimonos, fake fur coats and $1,500 Hermes leather tote bags and collars. Dog buggies, nappies, sunglasses and hats are “must have? items for any self-respecting dog owner.

Roland Buerk seeks an explanation for this explosion in interest in all things canine, and explores the demographic time-bomb behind it. If Japanese women continue to reject marriage and children in favour of doggy love, what will be the impact on Japan's population?

(Image shows young Japanese women carrying poodles in the Tokyo International Dog Show 2010. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Roland Buerk reports on Japan's doggy obsession and the demographic time-bomb behind it.

Johnny Cash And The Forgotten Prison Blues2013010520130106 (WS)
20130107 (WS)

Johnny Cash became a passionate prison reformer. Why?

Cash’s classic albums recorded at Folsom Prison and San Quentin are well known, but few are aware that these were just two of many prison concerts he played over three decades.

Cash's experiences in these jails turned him into a passionate prison reformer who donated his own money to the cause, took a released prisoner into his own home and even met President Richard Nixon to force the issue. It was a myth that Cash served hard time, he was only ever in a police cell overnight but he did see the insides of some of the toughest prisons in the world.

Presenter Danny Robins uncovers two lesser known but intriguing prison concerts – Cash’s 1969 appearance at Cummins Prison in Arkansas, and his 1972 concert at Österåker Prison just outside Stockholm in Sweden, the only prison gig Cash ever performed outside America.

In Part One, Robins travels to Arkansas, Cash’s home state.

A concert at Cummins Penitentiary, one of the worst prisons in the country at the time, meant so much to Cash that the singer donated his own money to have a chapel built there.

Only a year after Cash’s visit to Cummins, a judge would declare the whole of Arkansas’s prison system to be ‘unconstitutional’ on the grounds it constituted cruel and inhuman punishment.

(Image: Jonny Cash, Credit: Hulton/Getty)

Johnny Cash And The Forgotten Prison Blues2013010520130106 (WS)
20130107 (WS)

Johnny Cash became a passionate prison reformer. Why?

Cash’s classic albums recorded at Folsom Prison and San Quentin are well known, but few are aware that these were just two of many prison concerts he played over three decades.

Cash's experiences in these jails turned him into a passionate prison reformer who donated his own money to the cause, took a released prisoner into his own home and even met President Richard Nixon to force the issue. It was a myth that Cash served hard time, he was only ever in a police cell overnight but he did see the insides of some of the toughest prisons in the world.

Presenter Danny Robins uncovers two lesser known but intriguing prison concerts – Cash’s 1969 appearance at Cummins Prison in Arkansas, and his 1972 concert at Österåker Prison just outside Stockholm in Sweden, the only prison gig Cash ever performed outside America.

In Part One, Robins travels to Arkansas, Cash’s home state.

A concert at Cummins Penitentiary, one of the worst prisons in the country at the time, meant so much to Cash that the singer donated his own money to have a chapel built there.

Only a year after Cash’s visit to Cummins, a judge would declare the whole of Arkansas’s prison system to be ‘unconstitutional’ on the grounds it constituted cruel and inhuman punishment.

(Image: Jonny Cash, Credit: Hulton/Getty)

Johnny Cash became a passionate prison reformer. Why?

Cash’s classic albums recorded at Folsom Prison and San Quentin are well known, but few are aware that these were just two of many prison concerts he played over three decades.

Cash's experiences in these jails turned him into a passionate prison reformer who donated his own money to the cause, took a released prisoner into his own home and even met President Richard Nixon to force the issue. It was a myth that Cash served hard time, he was only ever in a police cell overnight but he did see the insides of some of the toughest prisons in the world.

Presenter Danny Robins uncovers two lesser known but intriguing prison concerts – Cash’s 1969 appearance at Cummins Prison in Arkansas, and his 1972 concert at Österåker Prison just outside Stockholm in Sweden, the only prison gig Cash ever performed outside America.

In Part One, Robins travels to Arkansas, Cash’s home state.

A concert at Cummins Penitentiary, one of the worst prisons in the country at the time, meant so much to Cash that the singer donated his own money to have a chapel built there.

Only a year after Cash’s visit to Cummins, a judge would declare the whole of Arkansas’s prison system to be ‘unconstitutional’ on the grounds it constituted cruel and inhuman punishment.

(Image: Jonny Cash, Credit: Hulton/Getty)

Johnny Cash And The Forgotten Prison Blues2013011220130113 (WS)
20130114 (WS)

Did Johnny Cash have any real impact on prison reform in America?

Johnny Cash spotted Glen Sherley at Folsom Prison, as a talented musician and songwriter. Cash performed a song by Sherley on the Folsom live album and subsequently fought to have him released.

What became of Sherley? Was it realistic for Cash to attempt to rehabilitate an inmate in this way

A Johnny Cash concert at Österåker in Sweden was the only prison concert Cash ever performed outside America.

Whereas Cummins represented everything Cash wanted to change about American prisons, Stockholm’s Österåker prison represented everything he hoped they might become.

Life at Österåker in the late 1960s and 70s was as liberal as Cummins was harsh. Inmates could wear their own clothes, were on first name terms with wardens, could go out ‘on leave’ and have partners to stay for conjugal visits.

Was the Swedish liberal way any more successful than the American when it came to rehabilitating criminals?

(Image: Johnny Cash and his wife June Carter Cash leave the front gate of Kansas State Prison, circa 1968, Credit: Hulton/Getty)

Johnny Cash And The Forgotten Prison Blues2013011220130113 (WS)
20130114 (WS)

Did Johnny Cash have any real impact on prison reform in America?

Johnny Cash spotted Glen Sherley at Folsom Prison, as a talented musician and songwriter. Cash performed a song by Sherley on the Folsom live album and subsequently fought to have him released.

What became of Sherley? Was it realistic for Cash to attempt to rehabilitate an inmate in this way

A Johnny Cash concert at Österåker in Sweden was the only prison concert Cash ever performed outside America.

Whereas Cummins represented everything Cash wanted to change about American prisons, Stockholm’s Österåker prison represented everything he hoped they might become.

Life at Österåker in the late 1960s and 70s was as liberal as Cummins was harsh. Inmates could wear their own clothes, were on first name terms with wardens, could go out ‘on leave’ and have partners to stay for conjugal visits.

Was the Swedish liberal way any more successful than the American when it came to rehabilitating criminals?

(Image: Johnny Cash and his wife June Carter Cash leave the front gate of Kansas State Prison, circa 1968, Credit: Hulton/Getty)

Kenya Orphans20120303

We meet an ordinary Kenyan woman who has done an extraordinary thing and opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

She is one of an increasing number of Kenyans who are stepping forward to adopt or care for children in need.

The programme explores her motives and finds out how she copes, but also discovers that the situation is more complicated than it first appears.

Meet the Kenyan woman who has opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

Kenya Orphans20120303

We meet an ordinary Kenyan woman who has done an extraordinary thing and opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

She is one of an increasing number of Kenyans who are stepping forward to adopt or care for children in need.

The programme explores her motives and finds out how she copes, but also discovers that the situation is more complicated than it first appears.

Meet the Kenyan woman who has opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

Kenya Orphans20120304

Meet the Kenyan woman who has opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

Kenya Orphans20120304

Meet the Kenyan woman who has opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

Kenya Orphans20120305
Kenya Orphans20120305

Meet the Kenyan woman who has opened her home to 50 orphaned children.

Knitting In Tripoli20111203

tells an intimate story of life during the Libyan war through the eyes of people who battled their own fears to step out of Gaddafi's dark shadow.

Within days of the uprising, the BBC's Rana Jawad was forced underground, petrified the secret police would come knocking partly because her husband is from Benghazi.

She became the BBC website's Tripoli witness and took up knitting to cope with the strains of living in hiding and secretly gathering information.

Rana recounts those days and reconnects with friends, who helped her through those fearful months, and the sources whose courage to speak out allowed her to get the story out to the world.

The mother and daughter who witnessed the murder of four men who protested against Gaddafi and a friend's father who reveals exclusively to the BBC how he operated a network of safe houses in Tripoli.

We also meet young women who over the months risked their lives to help the cause of the revolutionaries and create a new Libya.

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Knitting In Tripoli20111203

tells an intimate story of life during the Libyan war through the eyes of people who battled their own fears to step out of Gaddafi's dark shadow.

Within days of the uprising, the BBC's Rana Jawad was forced underground, petrified the secret police would come knocking partly because her husband is from Benghazi.

She became the BBC website's Tripoli witness and took up knitting to cope with the strains of living in hiding and secretly gathering information.

Rana recounts those days and reconnects with friends, who helped her through those fearful months, and the sources whose courage to speak out allowed her to get the story out to the world.

The mother and daughter who witnessed the murder of four men who protested against Gaddafi and a friend's father who reveals exclusively to the BBC how he operated a network of safe houses in Tripoli.

We also meet young women who over the months risked their lives to help the cause of the revolutionaries and create a new Libya.

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Knitting in Tripoli tells an intimate story of life during the Libyan war through the eyes of people who battled their own fears to step out of Gaddafi's dark shadow.

Within days of the uprising, the BBC's Rana Jawad was forced underground, petrified the secret police would come knocking partly because her husband is from Benghazi.

She became the BBC website's Tripoli witness and took up knitting to cope with the strains of living in hiding and secretly gathering information.

Rana recounts those days and reconnects with friends, who helped her through those fearful months, and the sources whose courage to speak out allowed her to get the story out to the world.

The mother and daughter who witnessed the murder of four men who protested against Gaddafi and a friend's father who reveals exclusively to the BBC how he operated a network of safe houses in Tripoli.

We also meet young women who over the months risked their lives to help the cause of the revolutionaries and create a new Libya.

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Knitting In Tripoli20111204

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Knitting In Tripoli20111204

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Knitting In Tripoli20111205
Knitting In Tripoli20111205

Tripoli residents relive the last few dark months of the Gaddafi regime.

Learning To Lose20120729

Olympic athletes dream of winning, but don't they owe it to themselves to prepare for the more probable outcome of losing?

In this programme we hear North American Olympic competitors confess the shame and agony of their losses. They echo a sense of heartbreak, which is shared by elite athletes across the world.

In each sport the moment when a defeat becomes obvious is different. But in all events, an athlete who doesn't make it to the podium feels a sense of national shame. Indeed, for many even a silver medal is a setback.

Many coaches believe that it is counter productive to talk about losing because it will sap adrenalin and focus. Yet there is increasing criticism from sports psychologists, that 'the win at all costs' attitude is over valued and can have tragic results.

In retrospect many of the athletes in the program admit that they would have benefited from being prepared to tackle the effect of a loss.

Track star Suzy Hamilton shares her battle with severe depression after she sabotaged her own performance during the Sydney Olympics by faking a fall when she realized she wasn't going to win.

Judo competitor Taraje Williams-Murray talks about the sting when medals elude you twice.

Luge gold medal winner Cameron Myler remembers losing by 2/1000 of a second.

In these stories and more, athletes demonstrate that if their whole lives are bound up in their sport, a feeling of loss in an Olympic competition is something they may never recover from.

(Image: Taraje Williams-Murray of the United States on the mat after losing a judo bout to Javier Antonio Guedez Sanchez of Venezuela at the Beijing Olympics. Credit: Getty Images)

Learning To Lose20120729

When Olympic athletes lose it can be devastating - should they be preparing for this?

Learning To Lose2012072920120730 (WS)

When Olympic athletes lose it can be devastating - should they be preparing for this?

Learning To Lose2012072920120730
20120730 (WS)

When Olympic athletes lose it can be devastating - should they be preparing for this?

Olympic athletes dream of winning, but don't they owe it to themselves to prepare for the more probable outcome of losing?

In this programme we hear North American Olympic competitors confess the shame and agony of their losses. They echo a sense of heartbreak, which is shared by elite athletes across the world.

In each sport the moment when a defeat becomes obvious is different. But in all events, an athlete who doesn't make it to the podium feels a sense of national shame. Indeed, for many even a silver medal is a setback.

Many coaches believe that it is counter productive to talk about losing because it will sap adrenalin and focus. Yet there is increasing criticism from sports psychologists, that 'the win at all costs' attitude is over valued and can have tragic results.

In retrospect many of the athletes in the program admit that they would have benefited from being prepared to tackle the effect of a loss.

Track star Suzy Hamilton shares her battle with severe depression after she sabotaged her own performance during the Sydney Olympics by faking a fall when she realized she wasn't going to win.

Judo competitor Taraje Williams-Murray talks about the sting when medals elude you twice.

Luge gold medal winner Cameron Myler remembers losing by 2/1000 of a second.

In these stories and more, athletes demonstrate that if their whole lives are bound up in their sport, a feeling of loss in an Olympic competition is something they may never recover from.

(Image: A person crying)

(Image: Taraje Williams-Murray of the United States on the mat after losing a judo bout to Javier Antonio Guedez Sanchez of Venezuela at the Beijing Olympics. Credit: Getty Images)

Life Blood2012110320121104 (WS)
20121105 (WS)

Most people don’t give much thought to their blood group, unless they have an operation or an accident and need a transfusion. But in Japan, blood type - or ketsueki-gata - is an enormously popular way of defining temperament and personality, and has big implications for life, work and love.

Discussion of blood types is popular in women's magazines as a way of determining compatibility in relationships. Morning television shows and daily newspapers feature blood type horoscopes. Young Japanese also commonly exchange blood types on first meeting. Anime, manga and video games often mention characters' blood types and special shampoo, bath salts and other products are marketed for different blood types.

Type A are believed to be earnest, sensible, responsible; type B selfish, irresponsible, unpredictable. Job interviews can be determined by blood type and it even affects politics. A former prime minister put the fact that he was a type A in his official profile on the internet. A Japanese minister recently resigned, blaming his failings on his blood type B.

(Image: Vials of blood. Credit: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Why the Japanese believe that blood types define temperament and personality.

Life Blood2012110320121104 (WS)
20121105 (WS)

Why the Japanese believe that blood types define temperament and personality.

Most people don’t give much thought to their blood group, unless they have an operation or an accident and need a transfusion. But in Japan, blood type - or ketsueki-gata - is an enormously popular way of defining temperament and personality, and has big implications for life, work and love.

Discussion of blood types is popular in women's magazines as a way of determining compatibility in relationships. Morning television shows and daily newspapers feature blood type horoscopes. Young Japanese also commonly exchange blood types on first meeting. Anime, manga and video games often mention characters' blood types and special shampoo, bath salts and other products are marketed for different blood types.

Type A are believed to be earnest, sensible, responsible; type B selfish, irresponsible, unpredictable. Job interviews can be determined by blood type and it even affects politics. A former prime minister put the fact that he was a type A in his official profile on the internet. A Japanese minister recently resigned, blaming his failings on his blood type B.

(Image: Vials of blood. Credit: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Why the Japanese believe that blood types define temperament and personality.

Most people don’t give much thought to their blood group, unless they have an operation or an accident and need a transfusion. But in Japan, blood type - or ketsueki-gata - is an enormously popular way of defining temperament and personality, and has big implications for life, work and love.

Discussion of blood types is popular in women's magazines as a way of determining compatibility in relationships. Morning television shows and daily newspapers feature blood type horoscopes. Young Japanese also commonly exchange blood types on first meeting. Anime, manga and video games often mention characters' blood types and special shampoo, bath salts and other products are marketed for different blood types.

Type A are believed to be earnest, sensible, responsible; type B selfish, irresponsible, unpredictable. Job interviews can be determined by blood type and it even affects politics. A former prime minister put the fact that he was a type A in his official profile on the internet. A Japanese minister recently resigned, blaming his failings on his blood type B.

(Image: Vials of blood. Credit: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Listening Post - 22011100120111002 (WS)
20111003 (WS)
Lullabies In The Arab World2012122220121223 (WS)
20121224 (WS)

Many people believe that lullabies play a vital role in child development, yet in numerous countries around the world there are concerns that singing bedtime lullabies is a dying practice. This Your World programme asks if lullabies are disappearing in the Arab world or whether the humble lullaby is evolving and adapting to modern life.

In a remote rural village in the Atlas Mountains, Your World visits a family that spans four generations to find out if the practice of singing lullabies has changed for them. At the local school lullabies are enthusiastically sung in the previously repressed Amazigh language but the teacher fears that advances in technology are changing traditional lifestyle and threatening cultural forms. A Syrian woman in Kuwait also reflects on the lullabies of her childhood and blames the changing role of women for the decline in the practice of singing lullabies.

Yet, as Archeomusicologist Richard Dumbrill points out there is evidence of lullabies being sung 4000 years ago in the Arab world. For British-born Palestinian singer Reem Kelani, lullabies can affirm cultural identity, and for Malak an Iraqi grandmother living in the UK, lullabies like the Iraqi song she sings to her grandchildren will never die.

(Image: A mother holds out her baby, Credit: Rosland Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Lullabies in the Arab world are a form of self-expression. How are they evolving?

Lullabies In The Arab World2012122220121223 (WS)
20121224 (WS)

Many people believe that lullabies play a vital role in child development, yet in numerous countries around the world there are concerns that singing bedtime lullabies is a dying practice. This Your World programme asks if lullabies are disappearing in the Arab world or whether the humble lullaby is evolving and adapting to modern life.

In a remote rural village in the Atlas Mountains, Your World visits a family that spans four generations to find out if the practice of singing lullabies has changed for them. At the local school lullabies are enthusiastically sung in the previously repressed Amazigh language but the teacher fears that advances in technology are changing traditional lifestyle and threatening cultural forms. A Syrian woman in Kuwait also reflects on the lullabies of her childhood and blames the changing role of women for the decline in the practice of singing lullabies.

Yet, as Archeomusicologist Richard Dumbrill points out there is evidence of lullabies being sung 4000 years ago in the Arab world. For British-born Palestinian singer Reem Kelani, lullabies can affirm cultural identity, and for Malak an Iraqi grandmother living in the UK, lullabies like the Iraqi song she sings to her grandchildren will never die.

(Image: A mother holds out her baby, Credit: Rosland Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Lullabies in the Arab world are a form of self-expression. How are they evolving?

Many people believe that lullabies play a vital role in child development, yet in numerous countries around the world there are concerns that singing bedtime lullabies is a dying practice. This Your World programme asks if lullabies are disappearing in the Arab world or whether the humble lullaby is evolving and adapting to modern life.

In a remote rural village in the Atlas Mountains, Your World visits a family that spans four generations to find out if the practice of singing lullabies has changed for them. At the local school lullabies are enthusiastically sung in the previously repressed Amazigh language but the teacher fears that advances in technology are changing traditional lifestyle and threatening cultural forms. A Syrian woman in Kuwait also reflects on the lullabies of her childhood and blames the changing role of women for the decline in the practice of singing lullabies.

Yet, as Archeomusicologist Richard Dumbrill points out there is evidence of lullabies being sung 4000 years ago in the Arab world. For British-born Palestinian singer Reem Kelani, lullabies can affirm cultural identity, and for Malak an Iraqi grandmother living in the UK, lullabies like the Iraqi song she sings to her grandchildren will never die.

(Image: A mother holds out her baby, Credit: Rosland Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Lullabies in the Arab world are a form of self-expression. How are they evolving?

Mexico Rising2012090820120909 (WS)

BBC correspondent Will Grant challenges stereotypes as he investigates Mexico's economy.

Mexico Rising2012090820120910 (WS)

BBC correspondent Will Grant challenges stereotypes as he investigates Mexico's economy.

Mexico Rising20120908

If you imagine a lazy Mexican lounging in the sun, think again. Mexicans are the hardest workers in the world, according to an OCED survey. The Mexico economy is amongst the top 20 in the world - and still growing despite the global economic crisis and drugs problems which have cost 60,000 lives over the past five years.

The BBC's Central America correspondent Will Grant challenges the stereotypes as he investigates how foreign investment and exports are driving the economy. The richest man in the world is Mexican.

In 1994, after the so-called Tequila crisis when Mexican defaulted on US debt and devalued the peso, signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the sell-off of state-owned assets and companies kick-started the economy again.

Mexico now has free trade agreements with more than 40 countries - with growing export sectors such as the automobile, electronics and aviation industries. On the doorstep of the United States - the largest consumer market in the world - Mexico is looking to overtake China in US trade and this year hosted the G20.

But all the same, when the new government takes over in November, it faces not only the challenges of drugs and corruption but also huge inequality in income and wages. The Mexico economy also relies on $23 billion of remittances sent back to families by Mexicans crossing into the States to find work.

Will Grant talks to industry leaders, workers, politicians and economists about the state of the Mexico economy and how it will survive the global downturn.

(Image: Picture of the Mexican five hundred peso notes. Credit: YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico Rising2012090820120909 (WS)
20120910 (WS)

If you imagine a lazy Mexican lounging in the sun, think again. Mexicans are the hardest workers in the world, according to an OCED survey. The Mexico economy is amongst the top 20 in the world - and still growing despite the global economic crisis and drugs problems which have cost 60,000 lives over the past five years.

The BBC's Central America correspondent Will Grant challenges the stereotypes as he investigates how foreign investment and exports are driving the economy. The richest man in the world is Mexican.

In 1994, after the so-called Tequila crisis when Mexican defaulted on US debt and devalued the peso, signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the sell-off of state-owned assets and companies kick-started the economy again.

Mexico now has free trade agreements with more than 40 countries - with growing export sectors such as the automobile, electronics and aviation industries. On the doorstep of the United States - the largest consumer market in the world - Mexico is looking to overtake China in US trade and this year hosted the G20.

But all the same, when the new government takes over in November, it faces not only the challenges of drugs and corruption but also huge inequality in income and wages. The Mexico economy also relies on $23 billion of remittances sent back to families by Mexicans crossing into the States to find work.

Will Grant talks to industry leaders, workers, politicians and economists about the state of the Mexico economy and how it will survive the global downturn.

(Image: Picture of the Mexican five hundred peso notes. Credit: YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

BBC correspondent Will Grant challenges stereotypes as he investigates Mexico's economy.

Mexico Rising2012090820120909 (WS)
20120910 (WS)

If you imagine a lazy Mexican lounging in the sun, think again. Mexicans are the hardest workers in the world, according to an OCED survey. The Mexico economy is amongst the top 20 in the world - and still growing despite the global economic crisis and drugs problems which have cost 60,000 lives over the past five years.

The BBC's Central America correspondent Will Grant challenges the stereotypes as he investigates how foreign investment and exports are driving the economy. The richest man in the world is Mexican.

In 1994, after the so-called Tequila crisis when Mexican defaulted on US debt and devalued the peso, signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the sell-off of state-owned assets and companies kick-started the economy again.

Mexico now has free trade agreements with more than 40 countries - with growing export sectors such as the automobile, electronics and aviation industries. On the doorstep of the United States - the largest consumer market in the world - Mexico is looking to overtake China in US trade and this year hosted the G20.

But all the same, when the new government takes over in November, it faces not only the challenges of drugs and corruption but also huge inequality in income and wages. The Mexico economy also relies on $23 billion of remittances sent back to families by Mexicans crossing into the States to find work.

Will Grant talks to industry leaders, workers, politicians and economists about the state of the Mexico economy and how it will survive the global downturn.

(Image: Picture of the Mexican five hundred peso notes. Credit: YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

BBC correspondent Will Grant challenges stereotypes as he investigates Mexico's economy.

If you imagine a lazy Mexican lounging in the sun, think again. Mexicans are the hardest workers in the world, according to an OCED survey. The Mexico economy is amongst the top 20 in the world - and still growing despite the global economic crisis and drugs problems which have cost 60,000 lives over the past five years.

The BBC's Central America correspondent Will Grant challenges the stereotypes as he investigates how foreign investment and exports are driving the economy. The richest man in the world is Mexican.

In 1994, after the so-called Tequila crisis when Mexican defaulted on US debt and devalued the peso, signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the sell-off of state-owned assets and companies kick-started the economy again.

Mexico now has free trade agreements with more than 40 countries - with growing export sectors such as the automobile, electronics and aviation industries. On the doorstep of the United States - the largest consumer market in the world - Mexico is looking to overtake China in US trade and this year hosted the G20.

But all the same, when the new government takes over in November, it faces not only the challenges of drugs and corruption but also huge inequality in income and wages. The Mexico economy also relies on $23 billion of remittances sent back to families by Mexicans crossing into the States to find work.

Will Grant talks to industry leaders, workers, politicians and economists about the state of the Mexico economy and how it will survive the global downturn.

(Image: Picture of the Mexican five hundred peso notes. Credit: YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

BBC correspondent Will Grant challenges stereotypes as he investigates Mexico's economy.

Michael Jackson: The Thrill Of Thriller2012102720121028 (WS)
20121029 (WS)

The story of the singer's African heritage and legacy of 30 years of Thriller.

To mark the 30th anniversary of the world's biggest selling album we look at what Michael Jackson means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo - where after DNA tests revealed the singer was descended from the royal Sanwi line - he was declared a royal, known as Prince Michael Jackson Amalaman Anoh.

The story of Thriller story is one that has been continually shared in developed counties through TV, radio and film. However, there is one small pocket of the planet that has never had the chance to fully express its love of the music and the man, it's the village where Michael Jackson is more than the King of Pop. He really is royalty.

In this documentary we unveil the thrill of Thriller and what it means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo. In 1992 Michael went to Africa and his visit to the Ivory Coast saw him draw more spectators than the Pope. Whilst on this visit he participated in an historic ceremony conducted beneath a sacred tree in the gold-mining village.

We talk to those in Krindjabo who met and orchestrated the King of Pop's visit and those who have been inspired by Michael and his most famous piece of work.

Presenter Jacqueline Springer has a rare meeting with the King and elders of Krindjabo, she tours the village and chats to some of the young people who witnessed the 1992 ceremony, and asks what Michael means to them. She also hears about the lengths they went to mourn his funeral and give him the celebration deserved by a prince.

Michael Jackson: The Thrill Of Thriller2012102720121028 (WS)
20121029 (WS)

To mark the 30th anniversary of the world's biggest selling album we look at what Michael Jackson means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo - where after DNA tests revealed the singer was descended from the royal Sanwi line - he was declared a royal, known as Prince Michael Jackson Amalaman Anoh.

The story of Thriller story is one that has been continually shared in developed counties through TV, radio and film. However, there is one small pocket of the planet that has never had the chance to fully express its love of the music and the man, it's the village where Michael Jackson is more than the King of Pop. He really is royalty.

In this documentary we unveil the thrill of Thriller and what it means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo. In 1992 Michael went to Africa and his visit to the Ivory Coast saw him draw more spectators than the Pope. Whilst on this visit he participated in an historic ceremony conducted beneath a sacred tree in the gold-mining village.

We talk to those in Krindjabo who met and orchestrated the King of Pop's visit and those who have been inspired by Michael and his most famous piece of work.

Presenter Jacqueline Springer has a rare meeting with the King and elders of Krindjabo, she tours the village and chats to some of the young people who witnessed the 1992 ceremony, and asks what Michael means to them. She also hears about the lengths they went to mourn his funeral and give him the celebration deserved by a prince.

The story of the singer's African heritage and legacy of 30 years of Thriller.

The story of the singer's African heritage and legacy of 30 years of Thriller.

To mark the 30th anniversary of the world's biggest selling album we look at what Michael Jackson means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo - where after DNA tests revealed the singer was descended from the royal Sanwi line - he was declared a royal, known as Prince Michael Jackson Amalaman Anoh.

The story of Thriller story is one that has been continually shared in developed counties through TV, radio and film. However, there is one small pocket of the planet that has never had the chance to fully express its love of the music and the man, it's the village where Michael Jackson is more than the King of Pop. He really is royalty.

In this documentary we unveil the thrill of Thriller and what it means to the Ivory Coast village of Krindjabo. In 1992 Michael went to Africa and his visit to the Ivory Coast saw him draw more spectators than the Pope. Whilst on this visit he participated in an historic ceremony conducted beneath a sacred tree in the gold-mining village.

We talk to those in Krindjabo who met and orchestrated the King of Pop's visit and those who have been inspired by Michael and his most famous piece of work.

Presenter Jacqueline Springer has a rare meeting with the King and elders of Krindjabo, she tours the village and chats to some of the young people who witnessed the 1992 ceremony, and asks what Michael means to them. She also hears about the lengths they went to mourn his funeral and give him the celebration deserved by a prince.

Neon Cowboy20120401

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy.

With the Iran hostage crisis in full flow in the early 1980s, Bart Bull was drawn into a hostage situation of an entirely different breed.

"Phoenix and Scottsdale used to be really remarkable places and the Round Up Drive-In was right at the dividing line between the two.

"It was desert there still, and when you saw this huge looming grinning Neon Cowboy, with his blue jeans and yellow and red checked shirt and black boots, and huge white hat - all outlined in blue and yellow and red and pink neon - well, you knew where you were.

"In the 1970s the so-called Gas Crisis was to affect American car culture and so the Drive-Ins began to disappear.

"At the very height of all this, I was asleep in front of the TV at my former girlfriend's parents' house - there on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix - and even more importantly, I had a Chevy pickup truck.

"So my ex-girlfriend's mom Carol, shook me awake and explained that they had cut the Round Up Drive-In cowboy into pieces, and we were about to go steal his head. And, of course, his hat. Which, we did.

"We became the NCLF - the Neon Cowboy Liberation Front. The new owner of the Round Up Drive-In had no sense of humour, and he contacted the police - who laughed - basically, and then the FBI, who announced their involvement in the investigation to the press and it was off to the races..."

For Bart, this odd little event became something of significance, a symbol of the eradication of individuality, of the onslaught of monoculture.

And in this programme he tells the story of the cowboy against the backdrop of Birmingham, a British city that has suffered a similar fate to that of Phoenix, in that its cultural and industrial connections have been severed over the last 50 years, just as its heart has been ripped out to make way for motorways and ringroads.

Neon Cowboy20120401

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy.

With the Iran hostage crisis in full flow in the early 1980s, Bart Bull was drawn into a hostage situation of an entirely different breed.

"Phoenix and Scottsdale used to be really remarkable places and the Round Up Drive-In was right at the dividing line between the two.

"It was desert there still, and when you saw this huge looming grinning Neon Cowboy, with his blue jeans and yellow and red checked shirt and black boots, and huge white hat - all outlined in blue and yellow and red and pink neon - well, you knew where you were.

"In the 1970s the so-called Gas Crisis was to affect American car culture and so the Drive-Ins began to disappear.

"At the very height of all this, I was asleep in front of the TV at my former girlfriend's parents' house - there on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix - and even more importantly, I had a Chevy pickup truck.

"So my ex-girlfriend's mom Carol, shook me awake and explained that they had cut the Round Up Drive-In cowboy into pieces, and we were about to go steal his head. And, of course, his hat. Which, we did.

"We became the NCLF - the Neon Cowboy Liberation Front. The new owner of the Round Up Drive-In had no sense of humour, and he contacted the police - who laughed - basically, and then the FBI, who announced their involvement in the investigation to the press and it was off to the races..."

For Bart, this odd little event became something of significance, a symbol of the eradication of individuality, of the onslaught of monoculture.

And in this programme he tells the story of the cowboy against the backdrop of Birmingham, a British city that has suffered a similar fate to that of Phoenix, in that its cultural and industrial connections have been severed over the last 50 years, just as its heart has been ripped out to make way for motorways and ringroads.

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy.

With the Iran hostage crisis in full flow in the early 1980s, Bart Bull was drawn into a hostage situation of an entirely different breed.

"Phoenix and Scottsdale used to be really remarkable places and the Round Up Drive-In was right at the dividing line between the two.

"It was desert there still, and when you saw this huge looming grinning Neon Cowboy, with his blue jeans and yellow and red checked shirt and black boots, and huge white hat - all outlined in blue and yellow and red and pink neon - well, you knew where you were.

"In the 1970s the so-called Gas Crisis was to affect American car culture and so the Drive-Ins began to disappear.

"At the very height of all this, I was asleep in front of the TV at my former girlfriend's parents' house - there on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix - and even more importantly, I had a Chevy pickup truck.

"So my ex-girlfriend's mom Carol, shook me awake and explained that they had cut the Round Up Drive-In cowboy into pieces, and we were about to go steal his head. And, of course, his hat. Which, we did.

"We became the NCLF - the Neon Cowboy Liberation Front. The new owner of the Round Up Drive-In had no sense of humour, and he contacted the police - who laughed - basically, and then the FBI, who announced their involvement in the investigation to the press and it was off to the races..."

For Bart, this odd little event became something of significance, a symbol of the eradication of individuality, of the onslaught of monoculture.

And in this programme he tells the story of the cowboy against the backdrop of Birmingham, a British city that has suffered a similar fate to that of Phoenix, in that its cultural and industrial connections have been severed over the last 50 years, just as its heart has been ripped out to make way for motorways and ringroads.

Neon Cowboy20120402

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy.

Neon Cowboy20120402

Writer Bart Bull explores the extraordinary story of the Neon Cowboy.

No Country For Old Women20120901

Elderly women in Ghana are being banished to remote camps, exiled from their homes, ostracised from their communities and left to fend for themselves – sometimes never again to see their families. And all because someone somewhere accused them of being a witch.

At any one time there are around a thousand such women languishing in appalling conditions in six isolated camps in the impoverished North of Ghana.

Kati Whitaker has been given rare access to Ghana's witch camps where she has followed the fortunes of some of these women.

We meet 82 year-old Samata as she arrives at the camp and undergoes ritual cleansing. Also 62 year-old Awabu, formerly a successful clothes seller, who now survives on the peelings from other people's cooking. We also witness the welcome return home to her village of one lucky woman. But not all are so fortunate and for many their exile is a life imprisonment for those who protest their innocence. We step inside two of these witchcamps to discover what life is really like for these women.

We also uncover the many social, economic, religious and even psychological reasons why this is still happening in an apparently modern progressive nation such as Ghana - uncovering the complex roots behind the labelling of old women as witches.

And we consider whether - far from being a throw back to traditional belief systems - a belief in witchcraft is an essential part of what it means to be a modern African.

(Image: Safia. Credit: Kati Whitaker)

No Country For Old Women2012090120120902 (WS)

Old women accused of witchcraft are banished to Northern Ghana's witchcamps.

No Country For Old Women2012090120120903 (WS)

Old women accused of witchcraft are banished to Northern Ghana's witchcamps.

No Country For Old Women2012090120120902 (WS)
20120903 (WS)

Old women accused of witchcraft are banished to Northern Ghana's witchcamps.

Elderly women in Ghana are being banished to remote camps, exiled from their homes, ostracised from their communities and left to fend for themselves – sometimes never again to see their families. And all because someone somewhere accused them of being a witch.

At any one time there are around a thousand such women languishing in appalling conditions in six isolated camps in the impoverished North of Ghana.

Kati Whitaker has been given rare access to Ghana's witch camps where she has followed the fortunes of some of these women.

We meet 82 year-old Samata as she arrives at the camp and undergoes ritual cleansing. Also 62 year-old Awabu, formerly a successful clothes seller, who now survives on the peelings from other people's cooking. We also witness the welcome return home to her village of one lucky woman. But not all are so fortunate and for many their exile is a life imprisonment for those who protest their innocence. We step inside two of these witchcamps to discover what life is really like for these women.

We also uncover the many social, economic, religious and even psychological reasons why this is still happening in an apparently modern progressive nation such as Ghana - uncovering the complex roots behind the labelling of old women as witches.

And we consider whether - far from being a throw back to traditional belief systems - a belief in witchcraft is an essential part of what it means to be a modern African.

(Image: Safia. Credit: Kati Whitaker)

Kati Whitaker has been given rare access to Northern Ghana's Witchcamps, where old women accused of witchcraft are banished.

No Greater Love2012072120120722 (WS)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

No Greater Love2012072120121216 (WS)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

No Greater Love2012072120120722 (WS)

Leigh Pitt was an ordinary man. One summer evening in June 2007, he jumped into a London canal to save a nine-year-old boy. The boy survived; Leigh drowned.

Two years later he became the first person in 78 years to be commemorated on the Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice - one of London's least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman's Park - a patch of green behind St Paul's Cathedral - the Memorial was established in 1900 by the artist George Frederic Watts.

It recognises the bravery of individuals who die rescuing others, each of its plaques offering an insight into the dangers of Victorian life. Those remembered include Sarah Smith, the pantomime artiste whose dress caught fire as she saved her friend and Frederick Croft, who rescued 'a lunatic woman' from suicide but 'was himself run over by the train'.

Time has distanced us from these tragedies. But as we hear more about Leigh's death every sacrifice commemorated in the park becomes more poignant.

A documentary-memorial to an ordinary man's bravery, exploring the gap between the words on a plaque and the immensity of a life loved, lived and lost.

No Greater Love is presented by Cathy FitzGerald, and produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson.

(Image: Leigh Pitt)

No Greater Love2012072120121217 (WS)

Leigh Pitt was an ordinary man. One summer evening in June 2007, he jumped into a London canal to save a nine-year-old boy. The boy survived; Leigh drowned.

Two years later he became the first person in 78 years to be commemorated on the Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice - one of London's least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman's Park - a patch of green behind St Paul's Cathedral - the Memorial was established in 1900 by the artist George Frederic Watts.

It recognises the bravery of individuals who die rescuing others, each of its plaques offering an insight into the dangers of Victorian life. Those remembered include Sarah Smith, the pantomime artiste whose dress caught fire as she saved her friend and Frederick Croft, who rescued 'a lunatic woman' from suicide but 'was himself run over by the train'.

Time has distanced us from these tragedies. But as we hear more about Leigh's death every sacrifice commemorated in the park becomes more poignant.

A documentary-memorial to an ordinary man's bravery, exploring the gap between the words on a plaque and the immensity of a life loved, lived and lost.

No Greater Love is presented by Cathy FitzGerald, and produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson.

(Image: Leigh Pitt)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

No Greater Love2012072120121215 (WS)

Leigh Pitt was an ordinary man. One summer evening in June 2007, he jumped into a London canal to save a nine-year-old boy. The boy survived; Leigh drowned.

Two years later he became the first person in 78 years to be commemorated on the Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice - one of London's least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman's Park - a patch of green behind St Paul's Cathedral - the Memorial was established in 1900 by the artist George Frederic Watts.

It recognises the bravery of individuals who die rescuing others, each of its plaques offering an insight into the dangers of Victorian life. Those remembered include Sarah Smith, the pantomime artiste whose dress caught fire as she saved her friend and Frederick Croft, who rescued 'a lunatic woman' from suicide but 'was himself run over by the train'.

Time has distanced us from these tragedies. But as we hear more about Leigh's death every sacrifice commemorated in the park becomes more poignant.

A documentary-memorial to an ordinary man's bravery, exploring the gap between the words on a plaque and the immensity of a life loved, lived and lost.

No Greater Love is presented by Cathy FitzGerald, and produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson.

(Image: Leigh Pitt)

No Greater Love2012072120120722

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from drowning, but did not himself survive.

No Greater Love2012072120120722
20121215 (WS)
20121217 (WS)
20120722 (WS)
20121216 (WS)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from drowning, but did not himself survive.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from.

Leigh Pitt was an ordinary man. One summer evening in June 2007, he jumped into a London canal to save a nine-year-old boy. The boy survived; Leigh drowned.

Two years later he became the first person in 78 years to be commemorated on the Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice - one of London's least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman's Park - a patch of green behind St Paul's Cathedral - the Memorial was established in 1900 by the artist George Frederic Watts.

It recognises the bravery of individuals who die rescuing others, each of its plaques offering an insight into the dangers of Victorian life. Those remembered include Sarah Smith, the pantomime artiste whose dress caught fire as she saved her friend and Frederick Croft, who rescued 'a lunatic woman' from suicide but 'was himself run over by the train'.

Time has distanced us from these tragedies. But as we hear more about Leigh's death every sacrifice commemorated in the park becomes more poignant.

A documentary-memorial to an ordinary man's bravery, exploring the gap between the words on a plaque and the immensity of a life loved, lived and lost.

No Greater Love is presented by Cathy FitzGerald, and produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson.

(Image: Leigh Pitt)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

Leigh Pitt was an ordinary man. One summer evening in June 2007, he jumped into a London canal to save a nine-year-old boy. The boy survived; Leigh drowned.

Two years later he became the first person in 78 years to be commemorated on the Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice - one of London's least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman's Park - a patch of green behind St Paul's Cathedral - the Memorial was established in 1900 by the artist George Frederic Watts.

It recognises the bravery of individuals who die rescuing others, each of its plaques offering an insight into the dangers of Victorian life. Those remembered include Sarah Smith, the pantomime artiste whose dress caught fire as she saved her friend and Frederick Croft, who rescued 'a lunatic woman' from suicide but 'was himself run over by the train'.

Time has distanced us from these tragedies. But as we hear more about Leigh's death every sacrifice commemorated in the park becomes more poignant.

A documentary-memorial to an ordinary man's bravery, exploring the gap between the words on a plaque and the immensity of a life loved, lived and lost.

No Greater Love is presented by Cathy FitzGerald, and produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson.

(Image: Leigh Pitt)

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man, Leigh Pitt, who saved a boy from drowning, but did not himself survive.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

A powerful memorial to the bravery of an ordinary man - Leigh Pitt.

Picturesque Street20110626

Steve Rosenberg hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

This year Russia is marking the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the USSR.

The last two decades have been a real roller coaster for the Russian people - in the 1990s they experienced freedom but also chaos as communism was replaced by chaotic capitalism.

They have seen civil war in the Caucasus, and, in recent years, the return to more authoritarian rule under Vladimir Putin and his protege Dmitry Medvedev.

But what next for Russia?

Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg took a walk down his favourite street to find out how Russians view the past and to hear their hopes for the future.

Picturesque Street20110626

Steve Rosenberg hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

This year Russia is marking the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the USSR.

The last two decades have been a real roller coaster for the Russian people - in the 1990s they experienced freedom but also chaos as communism was replaced by chaotic capitalism.

They have seen civil war in the Caucasus, and, in recent years, the return to more authoritarian rule under Vladimir Putin and his protege Dmitry Medvedev.

But what next for Russia?

Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg took a walk down his favourite street to find out how Russians view the past and to hear their hopes for the future.

This year Russia is marking the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the USSR.

The last two decades have been a real roller coaster for the Russian people - in the 1990s they experienced freedom but also chaos as communism was replaced by chaotic capitalism.

They have seen civil war in the Caucasus, and, in recent years, the return to more authoritarian rule under Vladimir Putin and his protege Dmitry Medvedev.

But what next for Russia?

Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg took a walk down his favourite street to find out how Russians view the past and to hear their hopes for the future.

Steve Rosenberg hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

Picturesque Street20110627

This year Russia is marking the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the USSR.

The last two decades have been a real roller coaster for the Russian people - in the 1990s they experienced freedom but also chaos as communism was replaced by chaotic capitalism.

They have seen civil war in the Caucasus, and, in recent years, the return to more authoritarian rule under Vladimir Putin and his protege Dmitry Medvedev.

But what next for Russia?

Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg took a walk down his favourite street to find out how Russians view the past and to hear their hopes for the future.

Steve Rosenberg hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

Picturesque Street20110627

This year Russia is marking the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the USSR.

The last two decades have been a real roller coaster for the Russian people - in the 1990s they experienced freedom but also chaos as communism was replaced by chaotic capitalism.

They have seen civil war in the Caucasus, and, in recent years, the return to more authoritarian rule under Vladimir Putin and his protege Dmitry Medvedev.

But what next for Russia?

Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg took a walk down his favourite street to find out how Russians view the past and to hear their hopes for the future.

Steve Rosenberg hears how Russians view the last 20 years since USSR collapse

Reality Radio2012111020121112 (WS)

Phil Maguire, Chief Executive of the Prison Radio Association (PRA), reports for the BBC World Service on the launch of Rise Maximum Radio, based inside Trinidad and Tobago's Maximum Security Prison, and hears this remarkable radio station's first moments on-air.

Last year, Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar took the drastic and unprecedented step of declaring a state of emergency and imposing curfews following a spate of 11 murders in just a couple of days. This followed huge police seizures of consignments from drug gangs worth millions of dollars.

The crisis has led to upheaval as the country's Ministry of Justice looks to transform the country's justice and penal systems.

Improving prisoner conditions in the country is one part of that plan – and Rise Maximum Radio is at its heart. Phil meets the architect of the project, Garth St Clair, a former soldier who was himself imprisoned for his involvement with cocaine. Now a radio talk show host on the country's state broadcaster, he was inspired by a prison radio station he encountered during a visit to Britain.

Garth has received support for this courageous project from the pioneering UK-based charity, the PRA, which runs National Prison Radio - the world's first national radio station for prisoners.

Presented by prisoners, its programmes are designed to encourage prisoners to take responsibility for their own futures. Now Phil Maguire from the PRA makes a return visit to find out if prison radio can really work in Trinidad and Tobago.

(Image: Prison bars)

Reality Radio2012111020121112 (WS)
20121111 (WS)

Phil Maguire, Chief Executive of the Prison Radio Association (PRA), reports for the BBC World Service on the launch of Rise Maximum Radio, based inside Trinidad and Tobago's Maximum Security Prison, and hears this remarkable radio station's first moments on-air.

Last year, Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar took the drastic and unprecedented step of declaring a state of emergency and imposing curfews following a spate of 11 murders in just a couple of days. This followed huge police seizures of consignments from drug gangs worth millions of dollars.

The crisis has led to upheaval as the country's Ministry of Justice looks to transform the country's justice and penal systems.

Improving prisoner conditions in the country is one part of that plan – and Rise Maximum Radio is at its heart. Phil meets the architect of the project, Garth St Clair, a former soldier who was himself imprisoned for his involvement with cocaine. Now a radio talk show host on the country's state broadcaster, he was inspired by a prison radio station he encountered during a visit to Britain.

Garth has received support for this courageous project from the pioneering UK-based charity, the PRA, which runs National Prison Radio - the world's first national radio station for prisoners.

Presented by prisoners, its programmes are designed to encourage prisoners to take responsibility for their own futures. Now Phil Maguire from the PRA makes a return visit to find out if prison radio can really work in Trinidad and Tobago.

(Image: Prison bars)

Phil Maguire, Chief Executive of the Prison Radio Association (PRA), reports for the BBC World Service on the launch of Rise Maximum Radio, based inside Trinidad and Tobago's Maximum Security Prison, and hears this remarkable radio station's first moments on-air.

Last year, Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar took the drastic and unprecedented step of declaring a state of emergency and imposing curfews following a spate of 11 murders in just a couple of days. This followed huge police seizures of consignments from drug gangs worth millions of dollars.

The crisis has led to upheaval as the country's Ministry of Justice looks to transform the country's justice and penal systems.

Improving prisoner conditions in the country is one part of that plan – and Rise Maximum Radio is at its heart. Phil meets the architect of the project, Garth St Clair, a former soldier who was himself imprisoned for his involvement with cocaine. Now a radio talk show host on the country's state broadcaster, he was inspired by a prison radio station he encountered during a visit to Britain.

Garth has received support for this courageous project from the pioneering UK-based charity, the PRA, which runs National Prison Radio - the world's first national radio station for prisoners.

Presented by prisoners, its programmes are designed to encourage prisoners to take responsibility for their own futures. Now Phil Maguire from the PRA makes a return visit to find out if prison radio can really work in Trinidad and Tobago.

(Image: Prison bars)

Phil Maguire attends the launch of Trinidads first prison radio station.

Rosa Parks - Quiet Revolutionary2013022320130224 (WS)
20130225 (WS)

An ordinary woman assumed an extraordinary place in history after a simple act of defiance

Rosa Parks's moment in history - refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955 - is celebrated as the birth of the civil rights movement in the USA.

Max Easterman offers a unique portrait of the woman who's simple act of defiance inspired Martin Luther King and civil rights activism across the world.

He speaks to those who knew her and worked with her, and to those who are inspired to carry her message around the globe in emerging societies and wherever minorities struggle to be heard.

We also hear a never before broadcast interview with Rosa Parks in which she tells biographer James Haskins what it was really like during the years of segregation in the Deep South.

She describes her upbringing and the events that led her to become a civil rights activist. She dispels many of the myths that have grown up around her 'act of disobedience': for example, she reveals that she had already been active in bus boycotts for over a decade; and that she believed even as a child that she was the equal of any white person. She gives grim accounts of life under Jim Crow: visits by the Ku Klux Klan; her grandfather sitting up at night with a shotgun to defend the household.

February 4 2013 is the centenary of the birth of Rosa Parks. Today She is celebrated as a very ordinary woman, who assumed an extraordinary place in the pantheon of modern American heroes after a simple act of defiance in an otherwise obscure southern US city.

As Max Easterman discovers, it was this simple act which set in train a complex series of events that led, ultimately, to the election of America's first black president.

(Image: Rosa Parks, Credit: AP)

Rosa Parks - Quiet Revolutionary2013022320130224 (WS)
20130225 (WS)

Rosa Parks's moment in history - refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955 - is celebrated as the birth of the civil rights movement in the USA.

Max Easterman offers a unique portrait of the woman who's simple act of defiance inspired Martin Luther King and civil rights activism across the world.

He speaks to those who knew her and worked with her, and to those who are inspired to carry her message around the globe in emerging societies and wherever minorities struggle to be heard.

We also hear a never before broadcast interview with Rosa Parks in which she tells biographer James Haskins what it was really like during the years of segregation in the Deep South.

She describes her upbringing and the events that led her to become a civil rights activist. She dispels many of the myths that have grown up around her 'act of disobedience': for example, she reveals that she had already been active in bus boycotts for over a decade; and that she believed even as a child that she was the equal of any white person. She gives grim accounts of life under Jim Crow: visits by the Ku Klux Klan; her grandfather sitting up at night with a shotgun to defend the household.

February 4 2013 is the centenary of the birth of Rosa Parks. Today She is celebrated as a very ordinary woman, who assumed an extraordinary place in the pantheon of modern American heroes after a simple act of defiance in an otherwise obscure southern US city.

As Max Easterman discovers, it was this simple act which set in train a complex series of events that led, ultimately, to the election of America's first black president.

(Image: Rosa Parks, Credit: AP)

An ordinary woman assumed an extraordinary place in history after a simple act of defiance

Sisters In Science20130331

Penny Dale travels to Tanzania to explore the state of science and technology.

Penny Dale travels to Tanzania to explore the state of science and technology in one of Africa's poorest countries – through the eyes of its female scientists. Tanzania's leaders are trying to see science and technology as the keys to progress. The government has started to try to cut down on foreign funding and strengthen home-grown research by boosting funding. However, women are still in the minority in scientific research, even after years of campaigns to get girls to take up science subjects.

But there are pockets of excellence - and it is these pioneers we meet. Penny visits the laboratory where Tanzania's first female haematologist is working on a pilot study to screen new-borns for sickle cell anaemia. New-born screening has significantly reduced mortality from sickle cell anaemia in the West, but there have not been any studies in Africa - despite the fact that over 70% of carriers live there.

Tanzania's economy is mostly based on agriculture, and a significant amount of scientific research is now being focused in this field. Penny travels to some villages with agricultural scientists who are exploring new technologies for cassava, a crop which is resistant to the droughts Tanzania is prone to, and for feed to improve the nutritional value of chickens. And she journeys to the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro where river pollution by nitrates in fertilizers has inspired three secondary-school girls to turn to science for solutions - and earned them top prize in Tanzania's first ever Young Scientist Of The Year competition.

We explore the science and we find out the personal stories of these women scientists - what inspired them to take up science in a society where there is not a strong culture of science, and where women still struggle to have their voices heard?

(Image: The Tanga Girls)

Sisters In Science20130331

Penny Dale travels to Tanzania to explore the state of science and technology.

Penny Dale travels to Tanzania to explore the state of science and technology in one of Africa's poorest countries – through the eyes of its female scientists. Tanzania's leaders are trying to see science and technology as the keys to progress. The government has started to try to cut down on foreign funding and strengthen home-grown research by boosting funding. However, women are still in the minority in scientific research, even after years of campaigns to get girls to take up science subjects.

But there are pockets of excellence - and it is these pioneers we meet. Penny visits the laboratory where Tanzania's first female haematologist is working on a pilot study to screen new-borns for sickle cell anaemia. New-born screening has significantly reduced mortality from sickle cell anaemia in the West, but there have not been any studies in Africa - despite the fact that over 70% of carriers live there.

Tanzania's economy is mostly based on agriculture, and a significant amount of scientific research is now being focused in this field. Penny travels to some villages with agricultural scientists who are exploring new technologies for cassava, a crop which is resistant to the droughts Tanzania is prone to, and for feed to improve the nutritional value of chickens. And she journeys to the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro where river pollution by nitrates in fertilizers has inspired three secondary-school girls to turn to science for solutions - and earned them top prize in Tanzania's first ever Young Scientist Of The Year competition.

We explore the science and we find out the personal stories of these women scientists - what inspired them to take up science in a society where there is not a strong culture of science, and where women still struggle to have their voices heard?

(Image: The Tanga Girls)

Song By Song By London - Episode One2012062320120625

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

This two-part special features songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: Professor Green performing in 2010. Credit: Getty Images)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

Song By Song By London - Episode One2012062320120625

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

This two-part special features songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: Professor Green performing in 2010. Credit: Getty Images)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

This two-part special features songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: Professor Green performing in 2010. Credit: Getty Images)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

Song By Song By London - Episode Two2012063020120701
20120702 (WS)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

Featuring songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: London in twilight. Credit: Science Photo Library)

Song By Song By London - Episode Two2012063020120701
20120702 (WS)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

Featuring songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: London in twilight. Credit: Science Photo Library)

Robert Elms roams the capital finding the musical soul of London, past and present.

It's a city that wisecracks, swaggers, sweeps you up and spits you out.

So Robert Elms is searching for the musical soul of London, celebrated in over a century of song.

He finds it in the characters of street sellers, wartime entertainers and the songs that were played in East End music halls.

He maps the music shaped by Mayfair ballrooms, Soho basements and afterhour's clubs in Ladbroke Grove.

What do Robert's personal musical highlights reveal about the history and geography of the capital?

How are the city's streets, people and characters reflected in its popular music?

Songs about park life, protest, housing or just looking out over a dirty old river - they've become part of the musical bricks and mortar that give the city and Londoners, a sense of place.

Featuring songs by The Clash, David Bowie, Lord Kitchener, Gert and Daisy, Lily Allen, The Kinks and many more.

***A podcast for this documentary will be available soon for UK listeners only***

(Image: London in twilight. Credit: Science Photo Library)

Song By Song By London - Episode Two2012063020120702
The Ancestors Are Calling20110529

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it's believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried - her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on.

Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her.

But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego's experience of sangomas is limited.

Though it's estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been.

And then to meet some of Soweto's sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose - will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

The Ancestors Are Calling20110529

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it's believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried - her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on.

Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her.

But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego's experience of sangomas is limited.

Though it's estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been.

And then to meet some of Soweto's sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose - will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it's believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried - her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on.

Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her. But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego's experience of sangomas is limited. Though it's estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been. And then to meet some of Soweto's sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose - will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

The Ancestors Are Calling20110530

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

The Ancestors Are Calling20110530

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

The Ancestors Are Waiting20110528

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it’s believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried: her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on.

Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her.

But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego’s experience of sangomas is limited.

Though it’s estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been.

And then to meet some of Soweto’s sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose: will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

The Ancestors Are Waiting20110528

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it’s believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried: her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on.

Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her.

But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego’s experience of sangomas is limited.

Though it’s estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been.

And then to meet some of Soweto’s sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose: will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

In a South African family where there has been a traditional healer, or sangoma, it’s believed that the ancestors want a representative in each generation, to take on the role of healing and providing a channel for the power of the ancestral spirits.

Lesego Mangwanyane of SAFM radio in Johannesburg is worried: her great grandfather was a traditional healer but her grandmother and mother didn’t want to take it on. Lesego is starting to have dreams and premonitions and fears that the ancestral finger is pointing at her. But she doesn’t want to be sucked into that world of ancestral spirits and herbal medicines – she just wants to get on with her life as a young African woman in the 21st Century.

Lesego’s experience of sangomas is limited. Though it’s estimated that 70% of South Africans initially visit a doctor of African Traditional Medicine if they have concerns about their health, Lesego has never been to see one about her health or well-being, so she sets out to find out from friends what their experiences have been. And then to meet some of Soweto’s sangomas themselves.

At the climax of her journey the drums summoning the ancestors put Lesego into a deep trance and she is told that she has to choose: will she listen to the call of the ancestors or not?

Are the ancestors calling Lesego Mangwanyane to be a traditional healer? Can she say no?

The Antartic Explorer20120116

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Shackleton's second-in-command, as Wild's ashes are taken to South Georgia for burial next to Shackleton.

Sir Ernest Shackleton has a heroic place in the annals of Antarctic exploration, famously for his expedition on the aptly-named Endurance in 1914.

He intended to cross over the Antarctic landmass.

Instead, his ship became stuck in ice which eventually crushed it.

Shackleton and his crew made a desperate voyage in three small boats to Elephant Island, where they split up.

The men on the island were left under the command of Shackleton's Number two, Frank Wild.

Shackleton and a small team sailed 800 miles to South Georgia, from where they mounted a rescue mission for Wild's group.

Nearly a century on, reporter Karen Bowerman joins a group of Wild's relatives retracing his extraordinary journey to the southern seas.

They are bearing Wild's ashes, which they bury next to Shackleton, on South Georgia.

(Image: Frank Wild (far left) with Sir Ernest Shackleton (second left) and crew aboard the Nimrod. Credit: Getty Images)

Retracing the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Shackleton's second-in-command.

The Antartic Explorer20120116

Karen Bowerman retraces the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Shackleton's second-in-command, as Wild's ashes are taken to South Georgia for burial next to Shackleton.

Sir Ernest Shackleton has a heroic place in the annals of Antarctic exploration, famously for his expedition on the aptly-named Endurance in 1914.

He intended to cross over the Antarctic landmass.

Instead, his ship became stuck in ice which eventually crushed it.

Shackleton and his crew made a desperate voyage in three small boats to Elephant Island, where they split up.

The men on the island were left under the command of Shackleton's Number two, Frank Wild.

Shackleton and a small team sailed 800 miles to South Georgia, from where they mounted a rescue mission for Wild's group.

Nearly a century on, reporter Karen Bowerman joins a group of Wild's relatives retracing his extraordinary journey to the southern seas.

They are bearing Wild's ashes, which they bury next to Shackleton, on South Georgia.

(Image: Frank Wild (far left) with Sir Ernest Shackleton (second left) and crew aboard the Nimrod. Credit: Getty Images)

Retracing the route of Antarctic explorer Frank Wild, Shackleton's second-in-command.

The Bizarre And Influential World Of Alice Cooper20120312

Alice Cooper is into his fifth decade in the rock business.

This profile looks at the way Alice has shaped rock performance around the globe, starting with his latest Halloween gig in London's Alexandra Palace.

Why is Alice the king of rock theatre? What inspires his spectacular stage shows? And who's been influenced by Alice to take rock performance to the extreme?

Led by Alice himself, a high profile selection of music producers, rock journalists, artists and fans, examine the spirit of 'shock rock'.

We hear about Alice's guillotine act; his love of horror films and his surrealist storylines.

We also trace Alice's popularity around the globe, through five decades of song-writing and innumerable onstage executions.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper - how has he shaped rock performance around the globe?

The Bizarre And Influential World Of Alice Cooper20120312

Alice Cooper is into his fifth decade in the rock business.

This profile looks at the way Alice has shaped rock performance around the globe, starting with his latest Halloween gig in London's Alexandra Palace.

Why is Alice the king of rock theatre? What inspires his spectacular stage shows? And who's been influenced by Alice to take rock performance to the extreme?

Led by Alice himself, a high profile selection of music producers, rock journalists, artists and fans, examine the spirit of 'shock rock'.

We hear about Alice's guillotine act; his love of horror films and his surrealist storylines.

We also trace Alice's popularity around the globe, through five decades of song-writing and innumerable onstage executions.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper - how has he shaped rock performance around the globe?

Alice Cooper is into his fifth decade in the rock business.

This profile looks at the way Alice has shaped rock performance around the globe, starting with his latest Halloween gig in London's Alexandra Palace.

Why is Alice the king of rock theatre? What inspires his spectacular stage shows? And who's been influenced by Alice to take rock performance to the extreme?

Led by Alice himself, a high profile selection of music producers, rock journalists, artists and fans, examine the spirit of 'shock rock'.

We hear about Alice's guillotine act; his love of horror films and his surrealist storylines.

We also trace Alice's popularity around the globe, through five decades of song-writing and innumerable onstage executions.

A profile of musician Alice Cooper - how has he shaped rock performance around the globe?

The Dead News Network20110725

"Sometimes I don't know the difference between talking to the living and talking to the dead."

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two.

She lives on a perfectly normal housing estate in a medium-sized Irish town, about a half-hour’s drive from Dublin.

Her husband, Paul, is a carpenter.

From the outside, her life looks as normal as any other.

But after her sons have left for school and Paul has gone to work, Anne sits down at her kitchen table to talk to spirits.

Anne is a medium and communing with the dead is part of her daily life.

Anne tells Colette Kinsella what it’s like to have a life like the film, The Sixth Sense, how bored spirits play havoc with her love life, and why grocery shopping is a challenge.

A medium talks about life with bored spirits playing havoc with her love life

The Dead News Network20110725

"Sometimes I don't know the difference between talking to the living and talking to the dead."

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two.

She lives on a perfectly normal housing estate in a medium-sized Irish town, about a half-hour’s drive from Dublin.

Her husband, Paul, is a carpenter.

From the outside, her life looks as normal as any other.

But after her sons have left for school and Paul has gone to work, Anne sits down at her kitchen table to talk to spirits.

Anne is a medium and communing with the dead is part of her daily life.

Anne tells Colette Kinsella what it’s like to have a life like the film, The Sixth Sense, how bored spirits play havoc with her love life, and why grocery shopping is a challenge.

A medium talks about life with bored spirits playing havoc with her love life

"Sometimes I don't know the difference between talking to the living and talking to the dead."

Anne is a 37-year-old mother of two. She lives on a perfectly normal housing estate in a medium-sized Irish town, about a half-hour’s drive from Dublin.

Her husband, Paul, is a carpenter. From the outside, her life looks as normal as any other.

But after her sons have left for school and Paul has gone to work, Anne sits down at her kitchen table to talk to spirits.

Anne is a medium and communing with the dead is part of her daily life.

Anne tells Colette Kinsella what it’s like to have a life like the film, The Sixth Sense, how bored spirits play havoc with her love life, and why grocery shopping is a challenge.

A medium talks about life with bored spirits playing havoc with her love life

The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110813

Can a young Canadian man with Down's Syndrome get a university degree?

Every day Ashif Jaffer heads out to Toronto's Ryerson University, satchel in hand and makes his way to a seminar classroom.

By his very presence in that classroom, he is breaking new ground.

Ashif Jaffer has Down's Syndrome.

Until not so long ago, the idea of a student with Down's Syndrome in a university was unthinkable.

After all, how could a person with an intellectual disability belong in a place built for higher learning?

The gates to the universities have widened considerably, to include people with a wide range of physical and learning disabilities.

And schools provide all kinds of support to make that possible.

But intellectual disabilities present a conundrum.

Some Canadian universities and colleges have welcomed people with Down's Syndrome – but only to audit individual courses or participate in special programs.

Ashif Jaffer wants to change that.

He's now registered in one course.

But his dream - and his mother's dream - is for a full university education and the degree that goes with it.

Ashif’s story is about testing limits - his own and the university's.

Producer and Presenter: Alisa Siegal for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110813

Can a young Canadian man with Down's Syndrome get a university degree?

Every day Ashif Jaffer heads out to Toronto's Ryerson University, satchel in hand and makes his way to a seminar classroom.

By his very presence in that classroom, he is breaking new ground.

Ashif Jaffer has Down's Syndrome.

Until not so long ago, the idea of a student with Down's Syndrome in a university was unthinkable.

After all, how could a person with an intellectual disability belong in a place built for higher learning?

The gates to the universities have widened considerably, to include people with a wide range of physical and learning disabilities.

And schools provide all kinds of support to make that possible.

But intellectual disabilities present a conundrum.

Some Canadian universities and colleges have welcomed people with Down's Syndrome – but only to audit individual courses or participate in special programs.

Ashif Jaffer wants to change that.

He's now registered in one course.

But his dream - and his mother's dream - is for a full university education and the degree that goes with it.

Ashif’s story is about testing limits - his own and the university's.

Producer and Presenter: Alisa Siegal for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Can a young Canadian man with Down's Syndrome get a university degree?

Every day Ashif Jaffer heads out to Toronto's Ryerson University, satchel in hand and makes his way to a seminar classroom. By his very presence in that classroom, he is breaking new ground. Ashif Jaffer has Down's Syndrome. Until not so long ago, the idea of a student with Down's Syndrome in a university was unthinkable. After all, how could a person with an intellectual disability belong in a place built for higher learning?

The gates to the universities have widened considerably, to include people with a wide range of physical and learning disabilities. And schools provide all kinds of support to make that possible.

But intellectual disabilities present a conundrum. Some Canadian universities and colleges have welcomed people with Down's Syndrome – but only to audit individual courses or participate in special programs.

Ashif Jaffer wants to change that. He's now registered in one course. But his dream - and his mother's dream - is for a full university education and the degree that goes with it.

Ashif’s story is about testing limits - his own and the university's.

Producer and Presenter: Alisa Siegal for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110814

Can a young Canadian man with Down's Syndrome get a university degree?

The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110814

Can a young Canadian man with Down's Syndrome get a university degree?

The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110815
The Education Of Ashif Jaffer20110815
The Language Of Lullabies2012120120121202 (WS)
20121203 (WS)

Around the world lullabies pave the road to sleep and dreams, and in every culture the 'signature' melodies and inflections of a mother tongue are carried in lullabies. This prepares a child's voice, brain and ear for language.

In this programme we visit a lullaby project in the neo-natal ward of the Royal London Hospital; Neuro-Psychologist Sally Blythe discusses the importance of the mother's voice in child development and Emeritus Professor of Child Psychology and Psychobiology at the University of Edinburgh, Colwyn Trevarthen, discusses how lullabies are a 'cultivated enjoyment' of the innate musicality of babies.

The music and narratives of a vivid selection of lullabies are explored and we discover why so many lullabies from around the world often contain dark or threatening imagery.

(A newborn baby listening to music with headphones. Credit: KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection...

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection of lullabies from around the world.

The Language Of Lullabies2012120120121202 (WS)
20121203 (WS)

Around the world lullabies pave the road to sleep and dreams, and in every culture the 'signature' melodies and inflections of a mother tongue are carried in lullabies. This prepares a child's voice, brain and ear for language.

In this programme we visit a lullaby project in the neo-natal ward of the Royal London Hospital; Neuro-Psychologist Sally Blythe discusses the importance of the mother's voice in child development and Emeritus Professor of Child Psychology and Psychobiology at the University of Edinburgh, Colwyn Trevarthen, discusses how lullabies are a 'cultivated enjoyment' of the innate musicality of babies.

The music and narratives of a vivid selection of lullabies are explored and we discover why so many lullabies from around the world often contain dark or threatening imagery.

(A newborn baby listening to music with headphones. Credit: KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection...

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection of lullabies from around the world.

Around the world lullabies pave the road to sleep and dreams, and in every culture the 'signature' melodies and inflections of a mother tongue are carried in lullabies. This prepares a child's voice, brain and ear for language.

In this programme we visit a lullaby project in the neo-natal ward of the Royal London Hospital; Neuro-Psychologist Sally Blythe discusses the importance of the mother's voice in child development and Emeritus Professor of Child Psychology and Psychobiology at the University of Edinburgh, Colwyn Trevarthen, discusses how lullabies are a 'cultivated enjoyment' of the innate musicality of babies.

The music and narratives of a vivid selection of lullabies are explored and we discover why so many lullabies from around the world often contain dark or threatening imagery.

(A newborn baby listening to music with headphones. Credit: KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection of lullabies from around the world.

An artistic and curious feature exploring the music and narrative of a vivid selection...

The Nowhere Man2012102020121021 (WS)
20121022 (WS)

At a time when estranged South Asian siblings India and Pakistan are taking steps to mend their relationship through increased cross border people-to-people contacts and a liberal visa regime, 45-year-old Idrees is a forgotten victim and a tragic reminder of how animosity between nations can tear apart the lives of individual's families.

Twenty five years ago, Idrees, who hails from India, married a Pakistani woman and became a citizen of his wife's country.

Thirteen years ago, he returned to India to take care of his ailing father.

His father died and in the ensuing chaos, Idrees ended up overstaying his visa by several days.

When he visited the local visa office to rectify his problem, the authorities threw him behind the bars.

Eventually, Idrees was freed without any charges.

But this was the start of a long bureaucratic nightmare, as authorities in both countries failed to carry out the necessary paperwork to regularise his visa and allow him to return home.

Thirteen years later, Idrees is still stranded in India, depending on charity in the northern city of Kanpur and out of touch with his family and four children who remain in the Pakistani port city of Karachi.

All Idrees wants is to return to his family.

The problem is that nobody in authority will listen to him and Pakistan and India deny his citizenship claims.

He is stateless, trapped in the land of his birth, clueless about the fate of his family, and losing hope.

The man who overstayed his Indian visa and was stripped of his nationality and identity.

The Nowhere Man2012102020121021 (WS)
20121022 (WS)

The man who overstayed his Indian visa and was stripped of his nationality and identity.

At a time when estranged South Asian siblings India and Pakistan are taking steps to mend their relationship through increased cross border people-to-people contacts and a liberal visa regime, 45-year-old Idrees is a forgotten victim and a tragic reminder of how animosity between nations can tear apart the lives of individual's families.

Twenty five years ago, Idrees, who hails from India, married a Pakistani woman and became a citizen of his wife's country.

Thirteen years ago, he returned to India to take care of his ailing father.

His father died and in the ensuing chaos, Idrees ended up overstaying his visa by several days.

When he visited the local visa office to rectify his problem, the authorities threw him behind the bars.

Eventually, Idrees was freed without any charges.

But this was the start of a long bureaucratic nightmare, as authorities in both countries failed to carry out the necessary paperwork to regularise his visa and allow him to return home.

Thirteen years later, Idrees is still stranded in India, depending on charity in the northern city of Kanpur and out of touch with his family and four children who remain in the Pakistani port city of Karachi.

All Idrees wants is to return to his family.

The problem is that nobody in authority will listen to him and Pakistan and India deny his citizenship claims.

He is stateless, trapped in the land of his birth, clueless about the fate of his family, and losing hope.

The man who overstayed his Indian visa and was stripped of his nationality and identity.

At a time when estranged South Asian siblings India and Pakistan are taking steps to mend their relationship through increased cross border people-to-people contacts and a liberal visa regime, 45-year-old Idrees is a forgotten victim and a tragic reminder of how animosity between nations can tear apart the lives of individual's families.

Twenty five years ago, Idrees, who hails from India, married a Pakistani woman and became a citizen of his wife's country.

Thirteen years ago, he returned to India to take care of his ailing father.

His father died and in the ensuing chaos, Idrees ended up overstaying his visa by several days.

When he visited the local visa office to rectify his problem, the authorities threw him behind the bars.

Eventually, Idrees was freed without any charges.

But this was the start of a long bureaucratic nightmare, as authorities in both countries failed to carry out the necessary paperwork to regularise his visa and allow him to return home.

Thirteen years later, Idrees is still stranded in India, depending on charity in the northern city of Kanpur and out of touch with his family and four children who remain in the Pakistani port city of Karachi.

All Idrees wants is to return to his family.

The problem is that nobody in authority will listen to him and Pakistan and India deny his citizenship claims.

He is stateless, trapped in the land of his birth, clueless about the fate of his family, and losing hope.

The People's Games: London 201220120812

The Olympic Games through the sounds of the people involved.

The People's Games: London 201220120812

The world's biggest sporting event is coming to an end.

We capture the story of the London Olympic Games through the sounds of the people who went to, worked on and competed in them.

(Image: Spectators wave union jacks and applaud during the Women's Modern Pentathlon on Day 16 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 12, 2012 in London, England. Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

The People's Games: London 201220120812

The world's biggest sporting event is coming to an end.

We capture the story of the London Olympic Games through the sounds of the people who went to, worked on and competed in them.

(Image: Spectators wave union jacks and applaud during the Women's Modern Pentathlon on Day 16 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 12, 2012 in London, England. Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

The Olympic Games through the sounds of the people involved.

The Secret Policemen20120324

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be the difference between life and death.

For decades most Catholics were suspicious of the police - because the force was overwhelmingly Protestant and seen as enforcing British rule.

Political agreement in Northern Ireland revolutionised policing.

The police force became a police service, made more representative by the adoption of neutral symbols and by a recruitment programme designed to increase the numbers of Catholic officers.

Constable Ronan Kerr was one of that new generation of recruits.

A Catholic officer from a nationalist family, he was killed by a bomb which exploded under his car on the 2 of April 2011.

He was 25 years of age and had been a serving officer for a matter of months.

His killers are dissidents who oppose the political settlement and who view any Catholic and nationalist who joins up as a traitor.

Catholic members of the PSNI must be extremely careful about who they tell about their job - sometimes even having to lie to family and friends.

Barbara Collins investigates the toll taken by this life of secrecy.

(Image: A heavily armed PSNI (Police Service of Northern Ireland) police officer on patrol. Credit: Press Association)

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be a life or death situation.

The Secret Policemen20120324

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be the difference between life and death.

For decades most Catholics were suspicious of the police - because the force was overwhelmingly Protestant and seen as enforcing British rule.

Political agreement in Northern Ireland revolutionised policing.

The police force became a police service, made more representative by the adoption of neutral symbols and by a recruitment programme designed to increase the numbers of Catholic officers.

Constable Ronan Kerr was one of that new generation of recruits.

A Catholic officer from a nationalist family, he was killed by a bomb which exploded under his car on the 2 of April 2011.

He was 25 years of age and had been a serving officer for a matter of months.

His killers are dissidents who oppose the political settlement and who view any Catholic and nationalist who joins up as a traitor.

Catholic members of the PSNI must be extremely careful about who they tell about their job - sometimes even having to lie to family and friends.

Barbara Collins investigates the toll taken by this life of secrecy.

(Image: A heavily armed PSNI (Police Service of Northern Ireland) police officer on patrol. Credit: Press Association)

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be a life or death situation.

The Secret Policemen20120325

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be a life or death situation.

The Secret Policemen20120325

Secrecy for Catholic police officers in Northern Ireland can be a life or death situation.

The Strange World Of The People's Mujahedin20120409

The People's Mujahedin of Iran - a group of dissident Iranians who have been fighting to topple the Mullahs since the 1980s - say they fear they are about to be massacred.

Over 3,000 PMOI members – designated terrorists by the US and a cult by some former members - live in Iraq at Camp Ashraf, 40 miles north of Baghdad and 70 miles from Iran itself.

The camp residents say they are vulnerable because with the US now having left Iraq, they are at the mercy of the pro-Iranian, Iraqi government, which is demanding the camp be closed down.

Whether they leave voluntarily, or by force, leave they must.

The PMOI has a history of killing Americans and mounting attacks within Iran.

But it now says it has renounced violence and should be removed from America's list of designated foreign terrorist organisations.

Its high profile PR campaign involves paying senior retired US officials who then speak on its behalf.

We report on the way in which a former pariah group accused of killing Americans has won over intelligence experts, generals, and congressmen from both sides of the political divide.

As the deadline for the closing of Camp Ashraf draws near we ask just who are the People's Mujahedin of Iran - terrorists or freedom fighters?

A cult or a deeply committed army who could be used by the US to fight for change in Iran?

The People's Mujahedin of Iran - terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

The Strange World Of The People's Mujahedin20120409

The People's Mujahedin of Iran - a group of dissident Iranians who have been fighting to topple the Mullahs since the 1980s - say they fear they are about to be massacred.

Over 3,000 PMOI members – designated terrorists by the US and a cult by some former members - live in Iraq at Camp Ashraf, 40 miles north of Baghdad and 70 miles from Iran itself.

The camp residents say they are vulnerable because with the US now having left Iraq, they are at the mercy of the pro-Iranian, Iraqi government, which is demanding the camp be closed down.

Whether they leave voluntarily, or by force, leave they must.

The PMOI has a history of killing Americans and mounting attacks within Iran.

But it now says it has renounced violence and should be removed from America's list of designated foreign terrorist organisations.

Its high profile PR campaign involves paying senior retired US officials who then speak on its behalf.

We report on the way in which a former pariah group accused of killing Americans has won over intelligence experts, generals, and congressmen from both sides of the political divide.

As the deadline for the closing of Camp Ashraf draws near we ask just who are the People's Mujahedin of Iran - terrorists or freedom fighters?

A cult or a deeply committed army who could be used by the US to fight for change in Iran?

The People's Mujahedin of Iran - terrorists, victims or Iranian government-in-waiting?

The Too Hard Basket20110820

Why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied

***Warning: This documentary contains conversations about sexual experience***

Disabled people are rarely touched in a loving way or thought of as sexually desirable.

Yet they have the same need for a sexual life as everyone else.

It's an issue that, along with other problems are too difficult or tedious to deal with, has been thrown into the "too hard" basket, which gives the documentary its name.

In an open and frank programme, made by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, broadcaster John Blades, who has a major disability himself, lifts the lid on this taboo subject.

The sense of self-esteem and well-being that sex can bring along with the challenges of achieving this for disabled people are all discussed in this episode of the Global Perspective series of documentaries on the theme of 'who says I cant?'.

John Blades talks to sex workers about why they work with disabled clients and the importance of touch to every human being.

John also talks to other people with disabilities about their sexual experience; Gary, a clinical psychologist who has burns to 60% of his body and finds that being touched by his wife on his burnt skin makes him feel desirable; and feisty Caitlin who has cerebral palsy, but doesn't want to be thought of as needy.

The Too Hard Basket offers a perspective on why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied, and points out the responsibility of the able bodied in helping to achieve this.

The Too Hard Basket20110820

Why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied

***Warning: This documentary contains conversations about sexual experience***

Disabled people are rarely touched in a loving way or thought of as sexually desirable.

Yet they have the same need for a sexual life as everyone else.

It's an issue that, along with other problems are too difficult or tedious to deal with, has been thrown into the "too hard" basket, which gives the documentary its name.

In an open and frank programme, made by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, broadcaster John Blades, who has a major disability himself, lifts the lid on this taboo subject.

The sense of self-esteem and well-being that sex can bring along with the challenges of achieving this for disabled people are all discussed in this episode of the Global Perspective series of documentaries on the theme of 'who says I cant?'.

John Blades talks to sex workers about why they work with disabled clients and the importance of touch to every human being.

John also talks to other people with disabilities about their sexual experience; Gary, a clinical psychologist who has burns to 60% of his body and finds that being touched by his wife on his burnt skin makes him feel desirable; and feisty Caitlin who has cerebral palsy, but doesn't want to be thought of as needy.

The Too Hard Basket offers a perspective on why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied, and points out the responsibility of the able bodied in helping to achieve this.

***Warning: This documentary contains conversations about sexual experience***

Disabled people are rarely touched in a loving way or thought of as sexually desirable.

Yet they have the same need for a sexual life as everyone else.

It's an issue that, along with other problems are too difficult or tedious to deal with, has been thrown into the "too hard" basket, which gives the documentary its name.

In an open and frank programme, made by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, broadcaster John Blades, who has a major disability himself, lifts the lid on this taboo subject.

The sense of self-esteem and well-being that sex can bring along with the challenges of achieving this for disabled people are all discussed in this episode of the Global Perspective series of documentaries on the theme of 'who says I cant?'.

John Blades talks to sex workers about why they work with disabled clients and the importance of touch to every human being.

John also talks to other people with disabilities about their sexual experience; Gary, a clinical psychologist who has burns to 60% of his body and finds that being touched by his wife on his burnt skin makes him feel desirable; and feisty Caitlin who has cerebral palsy, but doesn't want to be thought of as needy.

The Too Hard Basket offers a perspective on why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied, and points out the responsibility of the able bodied in helping to achieve this.

Why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied

The Too Hard Basket20110821

Why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied

The Too Hard Basket20110821

Why disabled people have as much right to a sex life as the able bodied

The Too Hard Basket20110822
The Too Hard Basket20110822
The Trouble With Condoms20111126

Around one million people around the world are infected with a sexually transmitted disease every single day.

Yet even those with easy access to condoms often choose not to use them.

Paul Bakibinga sets out to discover why.

From Nigeria comes the story of Emmanuel and Kate, who both contracted HIV because Emmanuel played away without using condoms because he thought they were not meant for him.

Amazingly, their marriage has become stronger as a result, and they now teach other couples how to protect themselves.

In Britain, Louise, who is in her 40s, is dating again after her partner's death.

She has a deep dislike of condoms - so what is her strategy for protecting herself? And what will she tell her daughter when she is older?

Meanwhile in Zimbabwe, hairdresser Clarice empowers her customers by teaching them how to use the female condom.

Negotiating condom use seems to be the biggest stumbling block for many people and Paul hears some outspoken advice from relationship psychologist Anjula Mutanda.

(Image: A Chinese man checks condoms at Aids awareness display at exhibition in Shanghai.

Credit: Reuters)

Frank and intimate personal stories of why the safe sex message is still so often ignored.

The Trouble With Condoms20111126

Around one million people around the world are infected with a sexually transmitted disease every single day.

Yet even those with easy access to condoms often choose not to use them.

Paul Bakibinga sets out to discover why.

From Nigeria comes the story of Emmanuel and Kate, who both contracted HIV because Emmanuel played away without using condoms because he thought they were not meant for him.

Amazingly, their marriage has become stronger as a result, and they now teach other couples how to protect themselves.

In Britain, Louise, who is in her 40s, is dating again after her partner's death.

She has a deep dislike of condoms - so what is her strategy for protecting herself? And what will she tell her daughter when she is older?

Meanwhile in Zimbabwe, hairdresser Clarice empowers her customers by teaching them how to use the female condom.

Negotiating condom use seems to be the biggest stumbling block for many people and Paul hears some outspoken advice from relationship psychologist Anjula Mutanda.

(Image: A Chinese man checks condoms at Aids awareness display at exhibition in Shanghai.

Credit: Reuters)

Frank and intimate personal stories of why the safe sex message is still so often ignored.

Around one million people around the world are infected with a sexually transmitted disease every single day.

Yet even those with easy access to condoms often choose not to use them.

Paul Bakibinga sets out to discover why.

From Nigeria comes the story of Emmanuel and Kate, who both contracted HIV because Emmanuel played away without using condoms because he thought they were not meant for him.

Amazingly, their marriage has become stronger as a result, and they now teach other couples how to protect themselves.

In Britain, Louise, who is in her 40s, is dating again after her partner's death.

She has a deep dislike of condoms - so what is her strategy for protecting herself? And what will she tell her daughter when she is older?

Meanwhile in Zimbabwe, hairdresser Clarice empowers her customers by teaching them how to use the female condom.

Negotiating condom use seems to be the biggest stumbling block for many people and Paul hears some outspoken advice from relationship psychologist Anjula Mutanda.

(Image: A Chinese man checks condoms at Aids awareness display at exhibition in Shanghai. Credit: Reuters)

Frank and intimate personal stories of why the safe sex message is still so often ignored.

The Trouble With Condoms20111127

Frank and intimate personal stories of why the safe sex message is still so often ignored.

The Trouble With Condoms20111127

Frank and intimate personal stories of why the safe sex message is still so often ignored.

The Trouble With Condoms20111128
The Trouble With Condoms20111128
The Women Of Tahrir Square20120109

Women were at the forefront of the revolution that toppled the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, in February 2011 and they continue to play a prominent role in the movement that is calling for an end to military rule.

But many are disappointed by the lack of progress made in women's rights over the last year, and by the failure of women to make an impression in politics.

Hanan Razek meets three women who all took part in the '18 Days', the revolution that brought Mubarak down, and whose lives were changed by their dramatic events.

There's Sally, a university graduate in her mid-20s; rumours at the time suggested she had been killed in Tahrir Square, and her parents began funeral preparations. This later turned out to be a case of mistaken identity, but Sally is still dealing with the consequences. She is especially angry that almost no women will be elected to the new Egyptian parliament.

There's Samira, an activist from upper Egypt. Her story is especially shocking. She was arrested in Tahrir Square in the weeks after the fall of Mubarak. Along with 16 other women she was forcibly subjected to a 'virginity test'. Samira, however, is fighting back. She's opened judicial proceedings against the military council ruling Egypt.

Sarah is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, whose political wing looks likely to be the largest wing of the new party. Just 19, Sarah also spent much of the 18 Days in Tahrir Square. Her ambition is one day to be prime minister of Egypt, but first she has to fight an internal battle to secure more women's representation within the Brotherhood itself.

Many people in Egypt acknowledge the need for reform in attitudes to women but they say now is not the time.

Hanan asks if now is not the time, then when is?

(Image: Egyptian female protesters shout anti-military council slogans at Tahrir Square in Cairo. Credit: Reuters)

Why some women are disappointed and angry at the Egyptian revolution's failures.

The Women Of Tahrir Square20120109

Women were at the forefront of the revolution that toppled the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, in February 2011 and they continue to play a prominent role in the movement that is calling for an end to military rule.

But many are disappointed by the lack of progress made in women's rights over the last year, and by the failure of women to make an impression in politics.

Hanan Razek meets three women who all took part in the '18 Days', the revolution that brought Mubarak down, and whose lives were changed by their dramatic events.

There's Sally, a university graduate in her mid-20s; rumours at the time suggested she had been killed in Tahrir Square, and her parents began funeral preparations. This later turned out to be a case of mistaken identity, but Sally is still dealing with the consequences. She is especially angry that almost no women will be elected to the new Egyptian parliament.

There's Samira, an activist from upper Egypt. Her story is especially shocking. She was arrested in Tahrir Square in the weeks after the fall of Mubarak. Along with 16 other women she was forcibly subjected to a 'virginity test'. Samira, however, is fighting back. She's opened judicial proceedings against the military council ruling Egypt.

Sarah is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, whose political wing looks likely to be the largest wing of the new party. Just 19, Sarah also spent much of the 18 Days in Tahrir Square. Her ambition is one day to be prime minister of Egypt, but first she has to fight an internal battle to secure more women's representation within the Brotherhood itself.

Many people in Egypt acknowledge the need for reform in attitudes to women but they say now is not the time.

Hanan asks if now is not the time, then when is?

(Image: Egyptian female protesters shout anti-military council slogans at Tahrir Square in Cairo. Credit: Reuters)

Why some women are disappointed and angry at the Egyptian revolution's failures.

Torture By Music20120317

British citizen, Ruhal Ahmed spent two years in Guantanamo Bay.

After his release he returned home to Tipton, England without ever being charged with a crime by the British or US governments.

During his incarceration Ruhal was repeatedly tortured by his captors.

The technique he feared most was being tortured with music.

This documentary charts the progress of Ruhal alongside other ex-detainees, campaigners and psychologists as they attempt to silence music torture.

It explains how an art form meant to bring joy is being used to degrade, embarrass and break the spirit of an unlucky few.

It will also make public Ruhal's own, very emotional, story of suffering and his attempts to move on.

Ruhal, who was 19 at the time of his incarceration, says he learnt to cope with the physical beatings he often suffered but was traumatised by being short-shackled to the floor in a crouching position and forced to listen to Eminem's Kim for hours on end at very high volume.

Strobe lights were shone in his eyes and guards with barking dogs surrounded him.

Reflecting on the practice of 'music torture' Ruhal says it's worse than physical pain because you can't block it out and you feel that you are losing your mind.

As well as Eminem, songs by AC/DC, Bruce Springsteen, Metallica and children's artists Barney the Dinosaur and Sesame Street were repeatedly played to Ruhal and other detainees at extreme volume as part of a 'torture playlist'.

Campaigners believe these techniques are still in use at black-site prisons around the world to induce sleep depravation, prolong capture shock, disorientate detainees during interrogations and to drown out screams.

The effect of this technique to break a man's mind and spirit was so strong that Ruhal can no longer listen to music and if he hears a track that was used to torture him he suffers horrific flashbacks.

Other guests in this programme include US army veteran Donald Vance who was working in Iraq as a military contractor when he was picked up and detained at Bagram airbase and subjected to 'music torture'; former Guantanamo guards Brandon Neely and Albert Melise who participated in the torture sessions, Michael Korzinski PhD, a psychologist who's spent 15 years working with victims of torture, Chris Cerf, musician and composer of the music from Sesame Street and human rights campaigner Clive Stafford Smith who through legal charity Reprieve continues the campaign to halt torture by music.

(Image: An unidentified US Army guard standing inside Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp. Credit: Getty Images)

Ruhal Ahmed spent two years in Guantanamo Bay, where he was repeatedly tortured with music

Torture By Music20120318

Ruhal Ahmed spent two years in Guantanamo Bay, where he was repeatedly tortured with music

Torture By Music20120319
Uzbek To My Roots2013011920130120 (WS)
20130121 (WS)

A young Londoner traces her roots back to her family's homeland in Uzbekistan.

Twenty-five-year-old north Londoner Amy Cordell has grown up embracing the rituals, food and music of a far-away world, one that still cleaves to the ancient traditions of her Bukharian grandparents who were once part of a 95,000-strong community of Jews, living in Uzbekistan in central Asia.

Uzbek To My Roots is an audio diary tracing Amy's journey back to her family's homeland, to the teeming provinces of Bukhara and Samarkand along the Silk Road in a reunion involving various cousins, aunts and uncles gathered from the UK, Israel and America.

Together they visit grandpapa John's place of birth, where he went to school, played and worshipped. Against a backdrop of palaces and mosques, wide avenues and imposing, intricate architecture, they find the old Jewish quarter and its cemeteries still largely intact and encounter an array of characters, from carpet and silk sellers to street acrobats to a bazaar filled with gold-teethed women trading in gold, silk and velvet garments.

Amy and her party are embarking on a voyage of discovery: to learn both their family's back-story and to learn about themselves as they travel by coach, car and plane, crossing the length and breadth of this vast cotton growing country where Western impulses are encroaching on long held custom and tradition.

(Image: A brightly-coloured, tiled floor)

Uzbek To My Roots2013011920130120 (WS)
20130121 (WS)

Twenty-five-year-old north Londoner Amy Cordell has grown up embracing the rituals, food and music of a far-away world, one that still cleaves to the ancient traditions of her Bukharian grandparents who were once part of a 95,000-strong community of Jews, living in Uzbekistan in central Asia.

Uzbek To My Roots is an audio diary tracing Amy's journey back to her family's homeland, to the teeming provinces of Bukhara and Samarkand along the Silk Road in a reunion involving various cousins, aunts and uncles gathered from the UK, Israel and America.

Together they visit grandpapa John's place of birth, where he went to school, played and worshipped. Against a backdrop of palaces and mosques, wide avenues and imposing, intricate architecture, they find the old Jewish quarter and its cemeteries still largely intact and encounter an array of characters, from carpet and silk sellers to street acrobats to a bazaar filled with gold-teethed women trading in gold, silk and velvet garments.

Amy and her party are embarking on a voyage of discovery: to learn both their family's back-story and to learn about themselves as they travel by coach, car and plane, crossing the length and breadth of this vast cotton growing country where Western impulses are encroaching on long held custom and tradition.

(Image: A brightly-coloured, tiled floor)

A young Londoner traces her roots back to her family's homeland in Uzbekistan.

What If We Fall In Love In The Future2013021420130216 (WS)
20130217 (WS)
20130218 (WS)

Nine short stories from around the world, looking at who we fall in love with, the way we do it now, and how it's changing.

(Photo: Heart-shaped balloons tied to the roof of a building overlooking Sydney skyline. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Nine short stories from around the world, looking at how love is changing

What If... We All Had A Car?2013032320130324 (WS)
20130325 (WS)

How can new cars be developed to prevent global gridlock and increased pollution?

There are over a billion cars in the world today, and there could be as many as four billion by the middle of the century. So how will we keep the roads moving and prevent pollution rising? Theo Leggett meets the people developing new cars that can fold, drive themselves and even communicate with each other. But are these new cars appealing enough to entice drivers away from traditional car ownership and are they suitable for the mega-cities of the future?

(Image: Cars line up as they stop at traffic lights on a street in Shanghai. Credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)

What If... We All Had A Car?2013032320130324 (WS)
20130325 (WS)

There are over a billion cars in the world today, and there could be as many as four billion by the middle of the century. So how will we keep the roads moving and prevent pollution rising? Theo Leggett meets the people developing new cars that can fold, drive themselves and even communicate with each other. But are these new cars appealing enough to entice drivers away from traditional car ownership and are they suitable for the mega-cities of the future?

(Image: Cars line up as they stop at traffic lights on a street in Shanghai. Credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)

How can new cars be developed to prevent global gridlock and increased pollution?

What If... Women Ruled The World?2013030820130309 (WS)
20130310 (WS)
20130311 (WS)

The status, responsibilities and realities of women in power around the world.

Dee Dee Myers, author of Why Women Should Rule the World is the former White House Press Secretary to Bill Clinton. She was the first woman to hold that role and also acted as an advisor on the West Wing TV series - she gives us her personal take on women and power.

Dee Dee looks at the US State Department – it's had three female heads in the last 15 years – how has that changed the culture of the organisation? She also takes a wide-ranging view on the status, responsibilities and realities of women in power around the world.

(Image: Women's fists, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

What If... Women Ruled The World?2013030820130309 (WS)
20130310 (WS)
20130311 (WS)

The status, responsibilities and realities of women in power around the world.

Dee Dee Myers, author of Why Women Should Rule the World is the former White House Press Secretary to Bill Clinton. She was the first woman to hold that role and also acted as an advisor on the West Wing TV series - she gives us her personal take on women and power.

Dee Dee looks at the US State Department – it's had three female heads in the last 15 years – how has that changed the culture of the organisation? She also takes a wide-ranging view on the status, responsibilities and realities of women in power around the world.

(Image: Women's fists, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

What If… Chicken Conquers The World?2013012720130128 (WS)
20130202 (WS)
20130203 (WS)
20130204 (WS)

Chicken farming dates back 10,000 years and produces 50 billion chickens to eat each year

Susie Emmett goes on a journey to investigate chicken production, an industry which dates back 10,000 years.

In programme one Emmett visits farms with millions of birds, speaks to the reclusive world-dominating poultry breeders who control the genetics of most of the 50 billion chickens eaten globally each year, and travels to the US to see the grain harvest which feeds the birds that feed us.

Emmett also hears concerns that modern chicken-keeping is all about the needs of those who eat them and not those of the chickens.

Back on the farm, Emmett also examines what has made the all-important 'feed conversion ratio' even better and faster than ever. Surprisingly, it's not some new high tech intervention that is making the difference. Giving the chickens a bit of exercise is what matters.

(Image: Chicks, Credit: Susie Emmett, Green Shoots Productions)

The second programme begins in Senegal where Emmett hears about the aspirational appetite for chicken. She also visits the development kitchen of a global poultry meat company for a taste of the chicken menu of the future, and witnesses the factory-scale kitchens in Northern Ireland, where a workforce of thousands kill and process 200 million birds a year. Emmett questions whether test tube or laboratory reared chicken could ever replace meat from birds.

In Pakistan and India where there is consumer resistance to 'industrial' chicken, Emmett hears from those who hope that smaller scale producers, and the breeds they keep, will survive. She speaks to a UK scientist, at the forefront of building immunity in chickens to diseases that affect them and humans, explains how to vaccinate a chick before it hatches.

(Image: Chickens Credit: Getty Images)

Could test tube or laboratory-reared chicken ever

What If… Chicken Conquers The World?2013012720130128 (WS)

Susie Emmett goes on a journey to investigate chicken production, an industry which dates back 10,000 years.

In programme one Emmett visits farms with millions of birds, speaks to the reclusive world-dominating poultry breeders who control the genetics of most of the 50 billion chickens eaten globally each year, and travels to the US to see the grain harvest which feeds the birds that feed us.

Emmett also hears concerns that modern chicken-keeping is all about the needs of those who eat them and not those of the chickens.

Back on the farm, Emmett also examines what has made the all-important 'feed conversion ratio' even better and faster than ever. Surprisingly, it's not some new high tech intervention that is making the difference. Giving the chickens a bit of exercise is what matters.

(Image: Chicks, Credit: Susie Emmett, Green Shoots Productions)

Chicken farming dates back 10,000 years and produces 50 billion chickens to eat each year

Womb For Rent20110718

With surrogacy costing up to $70,000 in the US compared to only $12,000 in India, many Western women are outsourcing pregnancy abroad.

It's a multi-million dollar industry that sees rural Indians receive the equivalent of 10 years' salary.

Over the course of nine months, we follow the lives of two women, who in each other seek solutions to the problems of poverty and infertility, and explore whether it's a relationship that is exploitative or mutually beneficial.

We examine their reasons for choosing cross continent surrogacy, and hear of the legal and emotional battles they can face.

The programme is both touching and revealing.

The 'relationship' expected of each by the other won't always match and the language barrier doesn't help.

The social mother - the one who will bring up the child - must go through a full pregnancy but with a womb that's thousands of miles away.

Equally the surrogate must live through the term knowing that, while she participates in nature's greatest gift, the result of her labours will become someone else's responsibility just days after she delivers.

Away from these deeply personal stories many question the morality of international surrogacy, where rich meet poor in what's usually a one-time deal.

Defending the criticism is Doctor Patel, Director of the Akanshka Clinic, nicknamed 'cradle of the world'.

She believes the surrogates are empowered to change their lives, but is this really a choice when these same women can't afford to educate their own children, ultimately what role does money play?

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial?

Womb For Rent20110718

With surrogacy costing up to $70,000 in the US compared to only $12,000 in India, many Western women are outsourcing pregnancy abroad.

It's a multi-million dollar industry that sees rural Indians receive the equivalent of 10 years' salary.

Over the course of nine months, we follow the lives of two women, who in each other seek solutions to the problems of poverty and infertility, and explore whether it's a relationship that is exploitative or mutually beneficial.

We examine their reasons for choosing cross continent surrogacy, and hear of the legal and emotional battles they can face.

The programme is both touching and revealing.

The 'relationship' expected of each by the other won't always match and the language barrier doesn't help.

The social mother - the one who will bring up the child - must go through a full pregnancy but with a womb that's thousands of miles away.

Equally the surrogate must live through the term knowing that, while she participates in nature's greatest gift, the result of her labours will become someone else's responsibility just days after she delivers.

Away from these deeply personal stories many question the morality of international surrogacy, where rich meet poor in what's usually a one-time deal.

Defending the criticism is Doctor Patel, Director of the Akanshka Clinic, nicknamed 'cradle of the world'.

She believes the surrogates are empowered to change their lives, but is this really a choice when these same women can't afford to educate their own children, ultimately what role does money play?

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial?

With surrogacy costing up to $70,000 in the US compared to only $12,000 in India, many Western women are outsourcing pregnancy abroad.

It's a multi-million dollar industry that sees rural Indians receive the equivalent of 10 years' salary.

Over the course of nine months, we follow the lives of two women, who in each other seek solutions to the problems of poverty and infertility, and explore whether it's a relationship that is exploitative or mutually beneficial.

We examine their reasons for choosing cross continent surrogacy, and hear of the legal and emotional battles they can face.

The programme is both touching and revealing. The 'relationship' expected of each by the other won't always match and the language barrier doesn't help.

The social mother - the one who will bring up the child - must go through a full pregnancy but with a womb that's thousands of miles away.

Equally the surrogate must live through the term knowing that, while she participates in nature's greatest gift, the result of her labours will become someone else's responsibility just days after she delivers.

Away from these deeply personal stories many question the morality of international surrogacy, where rich meet poor in what's usually a one-time deal.

Defending the criticism is Doctor Patel, Director of the Akanshka Clinic, nicknamed 'cradle of the world'.

She believes the surrogates are empowered to change their lives, but is this really a choice when these same women can't afford to educate their own children, ultimately what role does money play?

Is outsourcing pregnancy to India exploitative or mutually beneficial?

01A Short History Of Story20111105

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's online gaming and the recording of our personal lives by way of social media.

In the first programme he shows how creation myths and cautionary tales were created to explain humans' place in the world, and how we should conduct ourselves in it.

And when groups came into contact with each other, myths and epics were invented which showed how they might deal with the threats and danger that sprang from conflict.

The arrival of the novel he argues came at a time when society felt less threatened and so could explore the highways and byways of living our lives.

Among those taking part in the series are Steven Pinker, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, anthropologist Hugh Brody, Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst and artificial intelligence expert David Ferrucci.

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

01A Short History Of Story20111105

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's online gaming and the recording of our personal lives by way of social media.

In the first programme he shows how creation myths and cautionary tales were created to explain humans' place in the world, and how we should conduct ourselves in it.

And when groups came into contact with each other, myths and epics were invented which showed how they might deal with the threats and danger that sprang from conflict.

The arrival of the novel he argues came at a time when society felt less threatened and so could explore the highways and byways of living our lives.

Among those taking part in the series are Steven Pinker, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, anthropologist Hugh Brody, Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst and artificial intelligence expert David Ferrucci.

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

01A Short History Of Story20111106

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

01A Short History Of Story20111106

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

01A Short History Of Story20111107
01A Short History Of Story20111107

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111210

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh. Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.There was a blackout. Bombs were falling. There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: A soldier serving in East Pakistan's struggle to become the independent state of Bangladesh on December 22, 1971 in Pakistan. Photo by Express/Getty Images).

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111210

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh.

Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.There was a blackout.

Bombs were falling.

There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: A soldier serving in East Pakistan's struggle to become the independent state of Bangladesh on December 22, 1971 in Pakistan.

Photo by Express/Getty Images).

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111210

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh.

Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.There was a blackout.

Bombs were falling.

There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: A soldier serving in East Pakistan's struggle to become the independent state of Bangladesh on December 22, 1971 in Pakistan.

Photo by Express/Getty Images).

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111211

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111211

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Boundaries Of Blood20111212
01Boundaries Of Blood20111212

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111224

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from 1941 to leaving Bush House in 2012.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111224

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from 1941 to leaving Bush House in 2012.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111224

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from 1941 to leaving Bush House in 2012.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111225

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

01Goodbye To Bush House20111225

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

01Goodbye To Bush House20111225

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111226

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111226

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

01Goodbye To Bush House20111226

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

01Great Expectations20110402

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

01Great Expectations20110402

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

01Great Expectations20110403

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

01Great Expectations20110403

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

01Great Expectations20110403

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo...

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

01Great Expectations20110404

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

01Great Expectations20110404

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

01Great Expectations20110404

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

01Great Expectations20120121

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, the hosts in 2016.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Great Expectations20120121

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, the hosts in 2016.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Great Expectations20120122

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Great Expectations20120122

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Great Expectations20120123

This BBC World Service series has been tracking the lives of East Londoners living on a deprived housing estate, in the shadow of the 2012 Olympic Park for the past two years.

In the latest instalment of Great Expectations, Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, who will host the Olympics in 2016.

In this first programme we explore the issue of forced evictions and re-locations due to the Olympics.

A Brazilian from London, who had to move his motorbike business, talks to a woman in Rio whose whole community is threatened with eviction.

And in China we find out what happened to some of the communities evicted in 2008.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing and Rio de Janeiro.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Great Expectations20120123

This BBC World Service series has been tracking the lives of East Londoners living on a deprived housing estate, in the shadow of the 2012 Olympic Park for the past two years.

In the latest instalment of Great Expectations, Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, who will host the Olympics in 2016.

In this first programme we explore the issue of forced evictions and re-locations due to the Olympics.

A Brazilian from London, who had to move his motorbike business, talks to a woman in Rio whose whole community is threatened with eviction.

And in China we find out what happened to some of the communities evicted in 2008.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing and Rio de Janeiro.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110827

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110827

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110827

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110828

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110828

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110829
01Iconic Geometry, Stonehenge20110829

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of Stonehenge

01Listening Post20110924

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-e...

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-east London and in British Guiana.

01Listening Post20110924

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-e.

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-east London and in British Guiana.

01Listening Post20110925

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-e.

01Listening Post20110926
01Listening Post20110926

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-east London and in British Guiana.

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-e.

01Listening Post - 12011092420110925 (WS)
20110926 (WS)

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-e.

Eighty-four year old Sybil Phoenix is a legendary figure in her adopted home of south-east London and in British Guiana.

01Musical Migrants20111022

Portraits of people who relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

01Musical Migrants20111022

Portraits of people who relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

01Musical Migrants20111022

Portraits of people who relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

01Musical Migrants20111023

Portraits of people who relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

01Musical Migrants20111023

Portraits of people who relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

01Musical Migrants20111024
01Musical Migrants20111024
01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120421

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120421

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120421

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists and sociologists that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists and sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120422

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120422

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists and sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120422

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120423
01Soap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120423

Tamsin Greig explores a belief among psychologists & sociologists that soap operas shap.

01Sporting Chances20120505

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Sudan and Australia.

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

01Sporting Chances20120505

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Sudan and Australia.

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

01Sporting Chances20120506

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

01Sporting Chances20120506

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

01Sporting Chances20120507
01Sporting Chances20120507

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

01The Big House20110703

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a...

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme at Port Augusta prison in South Australia.

01The Big House20110703

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme at Port Augusta prison in South Australia.

01The Big House20110703

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme at Port Augusta prison in South Australia.

01The Big House20110704

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a...

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men – mostly Aboriginal – who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country’s vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme the jail is 'The Big House': a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives. But The Big House has a new boss – a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence. In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region. It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work – under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

01The Big House20110704

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men – mostly Aboriginal – who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country’s vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme the jail is 'The Big House': a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives.

But The Big House has a new boss – a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence.

In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region.

It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work – under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

01The Big House20110704

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men – mostly Aboriginal – who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country’s vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme the jail is 'The Big House': a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives.

But The Big House has a new boss – a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence.

In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region.

It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work – under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110816

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and...

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and its human consequences.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110816

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and its human consequences.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110816

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and its human consequences.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110817

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110817

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110821

On Sunday 13 August 1961, East Berliners awoke to find telephone wires cut and the beginnings of a wall which ultimately extended for over 100 miles and separated them from family, friends and jobs for 28 years.

In so doing, it became a potent symbol of the Cold War.

On the 50th anniversary of the Berlin Wall going up, Gerry Northam examines the wall’s political context and re-visits the day which signified the peak of the Cold War, the constant threat of nuclear war, and the human price paid for yet more failed ideologies.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context

01The Day The Wall Went Up20110821

On Sunday 13 August 1961, East Berliners awoke to find telephone wires cut and the beginnings of a wall which ultimately extended for over 100 miles and separated them from family, friends and jobs for 28 years.

In so doing, it became a potent symbol of the Cold War.

On the 50th anniversary of the Berlin Wall going up, Gerry Northam examines the wall’s political context and re-visits the day which signified the peak of the Cold War, the constant threat of nuclear war, and the human price paid for yet more failed ideologies.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context

01The Kill Factor20110604

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today.

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after. And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

01The Kill Factor20110604

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

01The Kill Factor20110604

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

01The Kill Factor20110605

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today.

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after. And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the...

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

01The Kill Factor20110605

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

01The Kill Factor20110605

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

01The Kill Factor20110606

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today.

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after. And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the...

01The Kill Factor20110606

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

01The Kill Factor20110606

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk about how it affects them today

Those who've committed the ultimate deed reflect on how it has – or hasn’t – lived with them in their minds.

They talk frankly about their feelings before, during and after.

And they reflect on whether humans are "natural" killers or whether they have to be trained to go against their instinctive repulsion.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110903

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110903

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110903

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110904
02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110904

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110904

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110905

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

02Iconic Geometry, The Taj Mahal20110905

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Taj Mahal

02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111112

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's social media.

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths th.

02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111112

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's social media.

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths th.

02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111113

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's online gaming and the recording of our personal lives by way of social media.

The second programme looks at how creation myths and epics in the 21st Century continue to be part of our experience of storytelling, and that through computer games and social media people assume different identities – hero, villain, warrior, and peacemaker.

The series ends with the thought that perhaps we humans are the servant of the story, the vessel through which story lives, and it's the survival of 'story' that is paramount.

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111113

Noah Richler traces the development of storytelling from the earliest creation myths through to today's online gaming and the recording of our personal lives by way of social media.

The second programme looks at how creation myths and epics in the 21st Century continue to be part of our experience of storytelling, and that through computer games and social media people assume different identities – hero, villain, warrior, and peacemaker.

The series ends with the thought that perhaps we humans are the servant of the story, the vessel through which story lives, and it's the survival of 'story' that is paramount.

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111114
02 LASTA Short History Of Story20111114

Noah Richler asks why humans from the earliest times have felt the need to tell stories.

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111217
02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111217

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111217

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111218

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh. Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.

There was a blackout. Bombs were falling. There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: An Indian tank during the India-Pakistan War of 1971)

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111218

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh.

Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.

There was a blackout.

Bombs were falling.

There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: An Indian tank during the India-Pakistan War of 1971)

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111218

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

Forty years ago, Shahzeb Jillani was born in Sindh Province, Pakistan.

At the same time, a new nation was being born - Bangladesh.

Shahzeb was born in the middle of the night.

There was a blackout.

Bombs were falling.

There was a war, and Pakistan was losing.

Forty years on, Shahzeb, now the BBC World Service South Asia Editor, returns to the region to find out how these traumatic events shaped contemporary Pakistan.

It will be a personal journey of discovery to challenge the contradictions in the Pakistani narrative he was taught in school.

There he learned little, if anything, of the injustices visited in the 1950s and 1960s on Eastern Pakistan by the Western half - with government spending and political power overwhelmingly biased towards the West.

The discrimination came to a head in the bid for Bangladeshi independence and then a brutal war, which Pakistan expected to win.

When India entered on the Bangladeshi side, Pakistan suffered the ultimate humiliation: surrender on 16 December 1971.

Through this series, Shahzeb will try to understand what really happened in 1971 and to chart how it still continues to affect contemporary Pakistan.

He will explore how the memory of defeat at the hands of India has shaped the thinking of the Pakistani military - that the country faces a continued existential threat from its much larger neighbour, whether in Bangladesh or in Afghanistan.

Did it create the determination that Pakistan must acquire the bomb? Did the vacillation of the Western powers instil an essential distrust towards the outside world, and a belief that Pakistan must depend on itself?

And Shahzeb will explore the hidden legacy of violence, coming face to face with Bangladeshis who witnessed the widespread rape, torture, killings by Pakistani forces and to understand the resentment most Bangladeshis still feel towards Pakistan.

(Image: An Indian tank during the India-Pakistan War of 1971)

02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111219
02 LASTBoundaries Of Blood20111219

Shahzeb Jillani explains how the 1971 war over Bangladesh shaped modern Pakistan.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20111231
02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20111231

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from 1941 to leaving Bush House in 2012.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120101

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120101

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120101

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120102

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120102

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGoodbye To Bush House20120102

The BBC World Service has been housed in Bush House since 1941.

For over 70 years it has broadcast from this home in The Strand; through a World War, Cold War, decolonisation throughout Africa, the Iranian Revolution, Perestroika, Tiananmen Square, two Gulf Wars and into the new Millennium.

Now it's leaving Bush, to join the rest of BBC News in one building elsewhere in London.

To mark the occasion, this documentary series - presented by the former managing director of the World Service, John Tusa - combine memories with archive.

He talks to producers and presenters who've worked in Bush House over the years, and reporters who've filed to London from all over the globe.

From De Gaulle's broadcasts to the Free French during World War II, up to the seismic events this year in the Arab world, Goodbye to Bush House hears from journalists past and present, from those working in English or in one of the 45 language services which once operated out of the building.

John Tusa examines the key World Service values of impartiality, adherence to the truth and public service - did the BBC always live up to its own standards when reporting the world?

When did it fall down and why?

And what was it like to work in Bush House, with its grand exterior of huge columns and arches, and marble floors and staircases inside, hiding a confusing rabbit warren of offices and studios behind.

One Hungarian journalist remembers the advice his editor gave him on his first day in Bush House, "Rule one, everywhere where you put a comma now, put a full-stop because this is radio.

"Rule two, whatever your political beliefs, leave them outside with your coat on a hanger when you come into the studio, and the third rule, don't sit down at a clean table in the canteen because it's just been wiped by a smelly rag".

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House.

John Tusa presents memories and archive about the BBC World Service in Bush House, from.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110409
02 LASTGreat Expectations20110409

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo...

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110409

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overlooks the 2012 Olympic site in East London.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110410
02 LASTGreat Expectations20110410

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110410

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110411

In dense blocks of flats and social housing, just 10 minutes way from the Olympics Park, young people, with nothing much else to do, are at risk of gangs.

The BBC's Nina Robinson explores the problem of crime for those affected.

You can catch up and find out more about the community featured in these programmes by going to bbcworldservice.com/greatexpectations.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110411

In dense blocks of flats and social housing, just 10 minutes way from the Olympics Park, young people, with nothing much else to do, are at risk of gangs.

The BBC's Nina Robinson explores the problem of crime for those affected.

You can catch up and find out more about the community featured in these programmes by going to bbcworldservice.com/greatexpectations.

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20110411

The third installment in a series following residents of a housing estate which overloo...

In dense blocks of flats and social housing, just 10 minutes way from the Olympics Park, young people, with nothing much else to do, are at risk of gangs.

The BBC's Nina Robinson explores the problem of crime for those affected.

You can catch up and find out more about the community featured in these programmes by going to bbcworldservice.com/greatexpectations.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20120128
02 LASTGreat Expectations20120128
02 LASTGreat Expectations20120129
02 LASTGreat Expectations20120129

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20120130

This BBC World Service series has been tracking the lives of East Londoners living on a deprived housing estate, in the shadow of the 2012 Olympic Park for the past two years.

In the latest instalment of Great Expectations, Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, who will host the Olympics in 2016.

In part two, as London hopes for a sporting legacy for young people, a favela in Rio takes advantage of a new sports complex which is changing the lives of young people who live there.

A Brazilian martial arts instructor who works on the estate in East London talks to a judo instructor in the favela about their shared experiences of young people, drugs and the police.

In China, the legacy is there for everyone to see - but are the transport, venues and sporting legacies still having an impact?

(Image: Skyline of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing and Rio de Janeiro.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

02 LASTGreat Expectations20120130

This BBC World Service series has been tracking the lives of East Londoners living on a deprived housing estate, in the shadow of the 2012 Olympic Park for the past two years.

In the latest instalment of Great Expectations, Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, and Rio de Janeiro, who will host the Olympics in 2016.

In part two, as London hopes for a sporting legacy for young people, a favela in Rio takes advantage of a new sports complex which is changing the lives of young people who live there.

A Brazilian martial arts instructor who works on the estate in East London talks to a judo instructor in the favela about their shared experiences of young people, drugs and the police.

In China, the legacy is there for everyone to see - but are the transport, venues and sporting legacies still having an impact?

(Image: Skyline of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Nina Robinson reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing and Rio de Janeiro.

Nina Robinson with reports from two Olympic cities - Beijing who were hosts in 2008, an.

02 LASTListening Post20111001

A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals.

02 LASTListening Post20111001

A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals.

02 LASTListening Post20111002
02 LASTListening Post20111002

A series that invites close, unhurried listening to the stories of individuals.

02 LASTListening Post20111003
02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111029

Watching the Live Aid concert on television in the mid 80s changed the life of Englishman, Yusuf Mahmoud.

At the time, Yusuf was working as a milkman in Cheltenham and doing the odd bit of DJ-ing, but when he realised that music could be used as a tool for change he got involved in music promotion and festival organising for the anti-apartheid movement and similar operations.

After several years of doing that, an opportunity arose for him to work at the first Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Driven by his interest in the music of the region, he headed off to Tanzania intending to stay for only six months.

Thirteen years on, he's still there and has set up the Sauti Za Busara Festival - a thriving festival that promotes the music of East Africa.

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world; Yusuf is used to going for months without power and his daily shower consists of a beaker and a bucket of water.

Yet such things don't phase him because - he says - he's nourished by the cultural richness of his adopted land.

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111029

Watching the Live Aid concert on television in the mid 80s changed the life of Englishman, Yusuf Mahmoud.

At the time, Yusuf was working as a milkman in Cheltenham and doing the odd bit of DJ-ing, but when he realised that music could be used as a tool for change he got involved in music promotion and festival organising for the anti-apartheid movement and similar operations.

After several years of doing that, an opportunity arose for him to work at the first Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Driven by his interest in the music of the region, he headed off to Tanzania intending to stay for only six months.

Thirteen years on, he's still there and has set up the Sauti Za Busara Festival - a thriving festival that promotes the music of East Africa.

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world; Yusuf is used to going for months without power and his daily shower consists of a beaker and a bucket of water.

Yet such things don't phase him because - he says - he's nourished by the cultural richness of his adopted land.

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111030

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111030

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111031
02 LASTMusical Migrants, Zanzibar20111031
02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120428

Researchers in Rwanda have found that radio soap operas there, are helping defuse the country's dangerous ethnic tensions.

Turkish soap operas have set off a public debate about women's roles in the Middle East.

A team of economists credits Brazilian TV "novelas" for helping to dramatically lower a fertility rate that in the 60's was above six births per woman.

In India, where the world's most popular soap operas are watched by at least one third of the country's one billion inhabitants, the programmes have a major impact on Indian society, with regard to national integration, identity, globalisation, women and ethics.

Recently they have highlighted the country's economic liberalisation in the context of globalisation and explained the impact of India's booming economy on local communities.

Villages where people consume more TV and radio give more responsibilities and rights to women and girls, with wives having more autonomy and more of a role in household financial matters.

Their daughters are also more likely to be enrolled in school.

From learning how to cope with the personal financial impact of the global economic crisis to dealing with the emotional impact of losing your job, storylines in soap operas around the world are helping millions of viewers and listeners approach their lives with a more positive attitude – thanks to the lives of their favourite fictional characters.

Exploring the notion that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120428

Researchers in Rwanda have found that radio soap operas there, are helping defuse the country's dangerous ethnic tensions.

Turkish soap operas have set off a public debate about women's roles in the Middle East.

A team of economists credits Brazilian TV "novelas" for helping to dramatically lower a fertility rate that in the 60's was above six births per woman.

In India, where the world's most popular soap operas are watched by at least one third of the country's one billion inhabitants, the programmes have a major impact on Indian society, with regard to national integration, identity, globalisation, women and ethics.

Recently they have highlighted the country's economic liberalisation in the context of globalisation and explained the impact of India's booming economy on local communities.

Villages where people consume more TV and radio give more responsibilities and rights to women and girls, with wives having more autonomy and more of a role in household financial matters.

Their daughters are also more likely to be enrolled in school.

From learning how to cope with the personal financial impact of the global economic crisis to dealing with the emotional impact of losing your job, storylines in soap operas around the world are helping millions of viewers and listeners approach their lives with a more positive attitude – thanks to the lives of their favourite fictional characters.

Exploring the notion that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120429

Exploring the notion that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120429

Exploring the notion that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120430
02 LASTSoap Operas - Art Imitating Life20120430

Exploring the notion that soap operas shape societies in subtle but profound ways.

02 LASTSporting Chances20120512
02 LASTSporting Chances20120512

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Sudan and Australia.

Farayi Mungazi looks at the close links between sport and national identity in South Su.

02 LASTThe Big House20110709

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme at Port Augusta prison in South Australia.

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110709

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme at Port Augusta prison in South Australia.

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110710

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110710

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110711

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men - mostly Aboriginal - who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country's vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme, the jail is 'The Big House' - a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives. But The Big House has a new boss - a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence. In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region. It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work - under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110711

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men - mostly Aboriginal - who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country's vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme, the jail is 'The Big House' - a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives.

But The Big House has a new boss - a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence.

In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region.

It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work - under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Big House20110711

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young men - mostly Aboriginal - who are serving time at Port Augusta prison in South Australia, on the edge of the country's vast Outback.

To the men featured in the programme, the jail is 'The Big House' - a rite of passage, which has become ingrained in their culture.

Many Aboriginal men from the desert lands to the north expect to spend time here, at some point in their lives.

But The Big House has a new boss - a former military man, who is himself descended from migrant roots.

He is determined to help young men escape criminality, substance abuse and violence.

In a first for Port Augusta Prison, Sharon Mascall is granted exclusive access to follow the men as they experience a new rehabilitation programme.

Unique to Port Augusta, the rehabilitation programme is also being primed for export to other countries in the Asia Pacific region.

It includes typical boot-camp training as well as literacy and creative writing work - under the tutelage of the internationally-acclaimed Aboriginal playwright Jared Thomas.

Sharon follows the men as they learn to tell themselves a different story about their past and present, hopefully beginning the process of transforming their future.

A look at the rehabilitation of young Aboriginals in a prison in South Australia

Sharon Mascall follows 18 young Aboriginal men through a new rehabilitation programme a.

02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110823
02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110823
02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110824
02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110824

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110824

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context and.

02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110828

On Sunday 13 August 1961, Berliners awoke to find telephone wires cut and a wall being erected across the city.

The wall, which ultimately extended for over 100 miles, separated them from family, friends and jobs for 28 years.

In so doing, it became a potent symbol of the Cold War.

On the 50th anniversary of the Berlin Wall going up Gerry Northam examines the Wall’s political context and re-visits the day which signified the peak of the Cold War, the constant threat of nuclear war, and the human price paid for yet more failed ideologies.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context

02 LASTThe Day The Wall Went Up20110828

On Sunday 13 August 1961, Berliners awoke to find telephone wires cut and a wall being erected across the city.

The wall, which ultimately extended for over 100 miles, separated them from family, friends and jobs for 28 years.

In so doing, it became a potent symbol of the Cold War.

On the 50th anniversary of the Berlin Wall going up Gerry Northam examines the Wall’s political context and re-visits the day which signified the peak of the Cold War, the constant threat of nuclear war, and the human price paid for yet more failed ideologies.

On the Berlin Wall's 50th anniversary, Gerry Northam looks at its political context

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110611

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the...

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110611

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110611

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects them today.

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110612

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110612

Soldiers who have killed in war at close quarters talk frankly about how it affects the.

02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110613
02 LASTThe Kill Factor20110613
03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110910

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110910

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110910

Leading structural engineer and designer Cecil Balmond goes beyond the well known histories of three celebrated monuments: Stonehenge, the Taj Mahal and the Great Pyramid, to reveal the hidden geometry at their cores.

At each iconic structure he examines a fundamental form: at Stonehenge - the circle: the Taj Mahal - the square and the Great Pyramid - the triangle.

Through the abstraction of these forms Cecil reveals the secrets that lie within their iconic design and discovers what these basic shapes can tell us about the sacred and religious, the spiritual and transcendent intentions of the buildings' architects.

On a global journey across structure and shape, Cecil also explores how these simple forms influence our lives.

From the earliest of times to our present culture, they have shaped our thinking in science, mathematics and design.

Redefining our view of the familiar circle, square and triangle: this is Iconic Geometry.

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid

03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110911

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid

03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110911

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid

03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110912
03 LASTIconic Geometry, The Great Pyramid20110912

Cecil Balmond examines the hidden geometry at the core of the Great Pyramid