The Great Bleep Forward

Presented by Andrew Collins

The story of modern music is one of subversion and experimentation, of heroes and villains.

But what if we've got it all wrong?

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0120111018 (6M)
20200519 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0120111018 (6M)
20190716 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0120111018 (6M)
20190716 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0120161206 (6M)
20111018 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0120200519 (6M)
20111018 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

012004070520061127
20091020 (6M)
20100727 (6M)
20111018 (6M)
20121211 (6M)
20140520 (6M)
Presented by Andrew Collins

The story of modern music is one of subversion and experimentation, of heroes and villains.

But what if we've got it all wrong?

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

The Great Bleep Forward is a series four programmes, presented by Andrew Collins exploring the history of electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

You'll also get a sense of the sound of the future.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, The Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

Andrew Collins explores the history of electronic music.

The Great Bleep Forward: Presented by Andrew Collins

As a follow-up to BBC Four's Synth Britannia programme there's another chance to hear a series made by 6 Music in 2004 in which Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

But what if we've got it all wrong? What if the real subversives didn't wear leather and denim but smart suits and white lab coats? What if the true experimentation wasn't with LSD but with DX7's and S900s? What if the real heroes of music aren't John, and Paul, Mick and Keith, but Ralf, Florian, Robert and Wendy!

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

0120170718Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

01Part 12010072720121211
20140520 (6M)
20150120 (6M)
20150728 (6M)
20161206 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

As the BBC's My Generation season reaches the 1980, another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, the Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

As the BBC 6 Music Prom explores the borderlands of classical music, with the pioneers of a new generation of musicians who draw on contemporary electronic influences, there another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronica.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle-aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day. You'll also get a sense of the sound of the future.

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

Andrew Collins presents a four-part exploration of electronica.

0220111019 (6M)
20200520 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0220161207 (6M)
20111019 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0220180912 (6M)
20111019 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0220190717 (6M)
20111019 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0220200520 (6M)
20111019 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

022004070620061128
20091021 (6M)
20091027 (6M)
20100728 (6M)
20111019 (6M)
20121212 (6M)
20140521 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk.

Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation.

Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the worlds first million selling synth and we hear why? We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins takes an in-depth look at the end of the seventies.

The Great Bleep Forward (2/4) Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

022010080320111019 (6M)
20190717 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0220170719Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

0320111020 (6M)
20200521 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0320161208 (6M)
20111020 (6M)
Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0320200521 (6M)
20111020 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Tonight Andrew considers the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leapt out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

032004070720061129
20091022 (6M)
20100729 (6M)
20111020 (6M)
20121213 (6M)
20140522 (6M)

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

Tonight Andrew considers the electronic music of the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and The Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leaped out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms turning music into a democracy.

032004071320111020 (6M)
20190718 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Tonight Andrew considers the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leapt out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0320170720Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Tonight Andrew considers the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leapt out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

032017072620111020 (6M)
20190718 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Tonight Andrew considers the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leapt out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0420111021 (6M)
20200522 (6M)
Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0420161209 (6M)
20111021 (6M)
Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0420180914 (6M)
20111021 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0420190719 (6M)
20111021 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

0420200522 (6M)
20111021 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

042004071420111021 (6M)
20190719 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

042010073020150123 (6M)
20150731 (6M)
20161209 (6M)
As the BBC 6 Music Prom explores the borderlands of classical music, with the pioneers of a new generation of musicians who draw on contemporary electronic influences, there another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronica.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004 when this seires was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands like Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronica.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

0420170721Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

042017072720111021 (6M)
20190719 (6M)
Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004, when this series was made.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals at their live shows.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the history and future of electronic music.

04 LAST2004070820061130
20091023 (6M)
20091029 (6M)
20100730 (6M)
20111021 (6M)
20121214 (6M)
20140523 (6M)
Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew Collins gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands like Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have become sophisticated in the live environment with bands like radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each.

Andrew Collins takes a look at the future of electronic music as it appeared to him.

The Great Bleep Forward: Presented by Andrew Collins (part 4 of 4)

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music as it appeared to him in 2004.

Having given us another chance to hear Heaven 17, Soft Cell, and various Krautrockers, Andrew Collins is wrapping up his fascinating survey of electronic music.

Computers now dominate large swathes of pop, and programming skills sometimes seem at leaat as important as musical ability.

Vintage instruments can be recreated on laptops, and even live performances are being digitally manipulated, with bands such as Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during gigs.

You can buy software singers and guitarists that will never be late for rehearsals.

So, Collins asks, have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

6M0120091020

Andrew Collins explores the history of electronic music.

The Great Bleep Forward: Presented by Andrew Collins

As a follow-up to BBC Four's Synth Britannia programme there's another chance to hear a series made by 6 Music in 2004 in which Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The story of modern music is one of subversion and experimentation, of heroes and villains. But what if we've got it all wrong? What if the real subversives didn't wear leather and denim but smart suits and white lab coats? What if the true experimentation wasn't with LSD but with DX7's and S900s? What if the real heroes of music aren't John, and Paul, Mick and Keith, but Ralf, Florian, Robert and Wendy!

The Great Bleep Forward is a series four programmes, presented by Andrew Collins exploring the history of electronic music. Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day. You'll also get a sense of the sound of the future.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, The Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

6M01Part 12010072720121212. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

The Great Bleep Forward Pt 1 of 4. Andrew Collins looks at the history of the Synthesizer.

6M01Part 120111018The Great Bleep Forward is a series four programmes, presented by Andrew Collins exploring the history of electronic music.

Hear the first baby's cry of the moog synthesiser, embrace the difficult childhood of prog rock, grapple with the 'experimental' teenage years of the New Romantics and discover the middle aged maturity and nostalgia of the present day.

You'll also get a sense of the sound of the future.

The series features interviews with many of the key players in the development of electronic music including Robert Moog, Kraftwerk's Ralph Hutter, Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood, Factory's Tony Wilson, Thomas Dolby, The Human League, Primal Scream, A Guy Called Gerald, Zoot Woman and Grandaddy.

. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

6M0220091021

Andrew Collins takes an in-depth look at the end of the seventies.

The Great Bleep Forward (2/4) Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands. We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world. The DX7 is the worlds first million selling synth and we hear why? We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

6M022010072820140521 (6M)
20150121 (6M)
20150729 (6M)
20161207 (6M)
The Great Bleep Forward Pt 2 of 4. Andrew Collins looks at the history of the Synthesizer.

. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

As the BBC 6 Music Prom explores the borderlands of classical music, with the pioneers of a new generation of musicians who draw on contemporary electronic influences, there another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronica.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk. Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation. Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the world's first million-selling synth and we hear why. We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

6M0220111019Andrew Collins explores the development of electronic music.

The series continues with an in depth look at the end of the seventies, the end of punk.

Kids who can't play the guitar well enough to get in a punk band start forming synth bands.

We hear how The Human League, Heaven 17, Thomas Dolby, Depeche Mode and New Order shaped the sounds of a generation.

Synths then are everywhere and ultimately take over the world.

The DX7 is the worlds first million selling synth and we hear why? We also discover how synths joined the musical mainstream and paved the way for others to follow and emulate.

First broadcast in 2004.

. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

6M0220111025

6M0320091022

Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and drum machines.

The Great Bleep Forward (3/4) Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and The Thompson Twins approach to music the electronic Genie leaped out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear. In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80's. We hear how technology became cheap letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms turning music into a democracy.

6M032010072920121213
20140522 (6M)
20150122 (6M)
20150730 (6M)
20161208 (6M)
The Great Bleep Forward Pt 3 of 4. Andrew Collins looks at the history of the Synthesizer.

. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and The Thompson Twins' approach to music, the electronic genie leaped out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80s.

We hear how technology became cheap, letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms.

Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

As the BBC 6 Music Prom explores the borderlands of classical music, with the pioneers of a new generation of musicians who draw on contemporary electronic influences, there another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronica.

Tonight Andrew considers the electronic music of the late 80s.

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

Another chance to hear Andrew Collins presenting a four-part series on electronic music.

Tonight Andrew considers the late 80s.

6M0320111020. Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 1980s.

The Great Bleep Forward (3/4) Andrew Collins explores the electronic music of the late 80s.

As people grew tired of the Soft Cell and The Thompson Twins approach to music the electronic Genie leaped out the bottle to reveal how sampling would change what we hear.

In this third programme Andrew Collins explores the sampling boom and the way drum machines could never drive a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool but could redefine the beat of the late 80's.

We hear how technology became cheap letting groups like M/A/R/R/S and White Town release singles from their bedrooms turning music into a democracy.

6M0320111026

6M0420111027

6M04 LAST20091023Andrew Collins takes a look at the future of electronic music as it appeared to him.

The Great Bleep Forward: Presented by Andrew Collins (part 4 of 4)

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music as it appeared to him in 2004.

In the final part of the series, Andrew Collins gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004. As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up to date technology to create new fusions. Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. Vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop. Electronics have become sophisticated in the live environment with bands like radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track. You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

6M04 LAST2010073020121214
20140523 (6M)
The Great Bleep Forward Pt 4 of 4. Andrew Collins concludes his look at the history of the Synthesizer.

. Andrew Collins explores the history of the synthesizer.

In the final part of the series, Andrew Collins gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up-to-date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music. You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer. And vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have also become sophisticated in the live environment, with bands like Radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

As 6 Music celebrates electronica, there's another chance to hear Andrew Collins's four-part exploration of its history.

In the final part of the series, Andrew gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each. Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?

6M04 LAST20111021. Andrew Collins provides a glimpse of the future of electronic music.

In the final part of the series, Andrew Collins gives us a glimpse of the electronic future as it appeared to him in 2004.

As electronic music reaches maturity, new artists are going back to the original synthesizers and mixing them with the most up to date technology to create new fusions.

Computers rule the planet and music.

You no longer need to be a musician to make music, you can be a programmer.

Vintage instruments can be re-created on your laptop.

Electronics have become sophisticated in the live environment with bands like radiohead sampling and replaying vocals during a live track.

You can buy a software singer and guitarist for under £200 each.

Have we finally created Kraftwerk's Man Machine?