Episodes

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12/11/2016 Gmt2016111220161113 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate in Dublin with politicians and thinkers on the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate in Dublin with politicians and thinkers on the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate in Dublin with politicians and thinkers on the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate in Dublin with politicians and thinkers on the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate in Dublin with politicians and thinkers on the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe

25/05/2017 Gmt20170525Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians debate questions from the public about issues affecting Europe and the EU.
Addis Ababa2019051120190512 (WS)World Questions comes to Ethiopia at a crucial time in the country's history.
Ethiopia's prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, has initiated a series of unprecedented reforms in his first year in office. He's made peace with Eritrea, freed 60,000 political prisoners, unbanned opposition groups and appointed women to half his cabinet. He's pledged free elections in 2020 and now faces one of his biggest challenges - moving the economy from state-led to market-based growth while overseeing far-reaching political reforms. If he succeeds, Ethiopia could cement its position as one of Africa's biggest players.
The BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by a panel of leading Ethiopian politicians in a debate led by questions from the audience.
The panel:
Mustafa Omer: President of the Somali region
Merera Gudina: Leader of the Oromo People's Congress
Tsedale Lemma: Editor of The Addis Standard
Eskinder Nega: journalist, campaigner and former political prisoner

Producer: Helen Towner

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Lion of Judah, Credit: M.Torres /Getty Images)

A debate about the future of Ethiopia, recorded in front of a public audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Amsterdam2017040820170409 (WS)Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

BBC World Questions comes to Amsterdam as the in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

Immigration, national identity and the role of the EU continue to divide Dutch society. The ruling party held back a surge of support for what they called the “wrong kind of populism ? and a wave of small parties did well in the election, but immigration and assimilation are still matters of great debate. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a politically engaged audience.

The panel includes: Han Ten Broeke, Member of Parliament, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and spokesman on Foreign Affairs, Annabel Nanninga, journalist and commentator, Sylvana Simons, television presenter and founder of political party Artikel 1 and Petra Stienen, author, Arabist and Senator for Democrats 66 (D66).

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Amsterdam in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

Immigration, national identity and the role of the EU continue to divide Dutch society. The ruling party held back a surge of support for what they called the “wrong kind of populism” and a wave of small parties did well in the election, but immigration and assimilation are still matters of great debate. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a politically engaged audience.

The panel includes: Han Ten Broeke, Member of Parliament, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and spokesman on Foreign Affairs, Annabel Nanninga, journalist and commentator, Sylvana Simons, television presenter and founder of political party Artikel 1 and Petra Stienen, author, Arabist and Senator for Democrats 66 (D66).

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Amsterdam in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

Immigration, national identity and the role of the EU continue to divide Dutch society. The ruling party held back a surge of support for what they called the “wrong kind of populism ? and a wave of small parties did well in the election, but immigration and assimilation are still matters of great debate. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a politically engaged audience.

The panel includes: Han Ten Broeke, Member of Parliament, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and spokesman on Foreign Affairs, Annabel Nanninga, journalist and commentator, Sylvana Simons, television presenter and founder of political party Artikel 1 and Petra Stienen, author, Arabist and Senator for Democrats 66 (D66).

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

BBC World Questions comes to Amsterdam as the in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

"

"Jonny Dymond hosts a panel discussion on the challenges facing the Netherlands

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Amsterdam in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

Immigration, national identity and the role of the EU continue to divide Dutch society. The ruling party held back a surge of support for what they called the “wrong kind of populism” and a wave of small parties did well in the election, but immigration and assimilation are still matters of great debate. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a politically engaged audience.

The panel includes: Han Ten Broeke, Member of Parliament, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and spokesman on Foreign Affairs, Annabel Nanninga, journalist and commentator, Sylvana Simons, television presenter and founder of political party Artikel 1 and Petra Stienen, author, Arabist and Senator for Democrats 66 (D66).

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"BBC World Questions comes to Amsterdam as the in the aftermath of a fiercely fought election.

Immigration, national identity and the role of the EU continue to divide Dutch society. The ruling party held back a surge of support for what they called the “wrong kind of populism ? and a wave of small parties did well in the election, but immigration and assimilation are still matters of great debate. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a politically engaged audience.

The panel includes: Han Ten Broeke, Member of Parliament, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and spokesman on Foreign Affairs, Annabel Nanninga, journalist and commentator, Sylvana Simons, television presenter and founder of political party Artikel 1 and Petra Stienen, author, Arabist and Senator for Democrats 66 (D66).

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The 'Womens march for a united Netherlands' demonstration in Amsterdam. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)"

Beirut2017090920170910 (WS)
20170913 (WS)
Politicians and thinkers join Jonny Dymond to discuss the future of Lebanon.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Politicians and thinkers join Jonny Dymond to discuss the future of Lebanon.

BBC World Questions, comes to Beirut to discuss the future of Lebanon and at a crucial moment in the history of the Middle East.

From the American University of Beirut a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The ongoing legacy of sectarianism and the civil war, how the nation can best achieve political change, Lebanon's role in the Syrian conflict, environmental degradation, the role of Hezbollah within Lebanon and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of Deputy Prime Minister, Ghassan Hasbani MP, AUB Neighborhood Initiative Director and Beirut Madinati member Mona El Hallak Ghaisbeh, former Health Minister, Wael Abu Faour MP, the Vice President of the Free Patriotic Movement, Nicolas Sehnaoui and economist and political analyst, Kamel Wazne.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Lebanese flags hang from a car on the Corniche waterfront promenade in Beirut. Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

(Photo: Lebanese flags hang from a car on the Corniche waterfront promenade in Beirut. Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)"

(Photo: Lebanese flags hang from a car on the Corniche waterfront promenade in Beirut. Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)"

Beirut20170913Politicians and thinkers join Jonny Dymond to discuss the future of Lebanon.

BBC World Questions, comes to Beirut to discuss the future of Lebanon and at a crucial moment in the history of the Middle East.

From the American University of Beirut a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The ongoing legacy of sectarianism and the civil war, how the nation can best achieve political change, Lebanon's role in the Syrian conflict, environmental degradation, the role of Hezbollah within Lebanon and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of Deputy Prime Minister, Ghassan Hasbani MP, AUB Neighborhood Initiative Director and Beirut Madinati member Mona El Hallak Ghaisbeh, former Health Minister, Wael Abu Faour MP, the Vice President of the Free Patriotic Movement, Nicolas Sehnaoui and economist and political analyst, Kamel Wazne.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Lebanese flags hang from a car on the Corniche waterfront promenade in Beirut. Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

"Politicians and thinkers join Jonny Dymond to discuss the future of Lebanon.

(Photo: Lebanese flags hang from a car on the Corniche waterfront promenade in Beirut. Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) "

Belgrade2018031020180311 (WS)BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Serbia's future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Serbia's future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Serbia became a stand-along country peacefully in 2006, after years of ethnic tensions and the exceptionally brutal break up of the socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. Now, under the leadership of the powerful President Vucic, Serbia is undergoing radical economic reform in a bid to join the European Union. How is the country coping with the large budget cuts and state sell-offs? Are violent ethnic tensions a thing of the past? Decades of communist rule brought Yugoslavia very close to Russia - how strong is Russian influence now?

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of influential politicians and thinkers discuss the future of Serbia with a public audience in Belgrade."

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Serbia's future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Serbia's future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Serbia's future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

"

Serbia became a stand-along country peacefully in 2006, after years of ethnic tensions and the exceptionally brutal break up of the socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. Now, under the leadership of the powerful President Vucic, Serbia is undergoing radical economic reform in a bid to join the European Union. How is the country coping with the large budget cuts and state sell-offs? Are violent ethnic tensions a thing of the past? Decades of communist rule brought Yugoslavia very close to Russia - how strong is Russian influence now?

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of influential politicians and thinkers discuss the future of Serbia with a public audience in Belgrade.

"

"

BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Serbia became a stand-along country peacefully in 2006, after years of ethnic tensions and the exceptionally brutal break up of the socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. Now, under the leadership of the powerful President Vucic, Serbia is undergoing radical economic reform in a bid to join the European Union. How is the country coping with the large budget cuts and state sell-offs? Are violent ethnic tensions a thing of the past? Decades of communist rule brought Yugoslavia very close to Russia - how strong is Russian influence now?

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of influential politicians and thinkers discuss the future of Serbia with a public audience in Belgrade."

"

BBC World Questions is in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia - a pivotal country between East and West - for a heated debate at Bitef Theatre.

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses Kosovo, the European Union, Russian sanctions and Serbian democracy with a diverse panel: Nebojša Stefanović, Interior Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia; Marija Janjušević, Member of the National Assembly for the right wing party Dveri; Writer and human rights activist, Miloš Ćirić and Gordana Čomić of the Democratic Party, Deputy Speaker in the National Assembly.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

Brexit And Europe2016091520160917 (WS)A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said "Brexit means Brexit" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images"

"A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said "Brexit means Brexit" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

"

"A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said "Brexit means Brexit" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

"

Brexit And Europe2016091620160917 (WS)A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

"The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said ""Brexit means Brexit"" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

"

"The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said ""Brexit means Brexit"" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images"

"A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said ""Brexit means Brexit"" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

"

"A panel of experts debate the future of Britain and the EU after the vote.

The UK has voted to leave the EU and now the real work begins to untangle itself from the other 27 countries. Theresa May, the British Prime Minister, has said ""Brexit means Brexit"" but there is still a lot of debate about what that means in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

From the BBC's headquarters in central London, Jonathan Dimbleby tackles these issues head-on with a panel of politicians and thinkers. There's Chris Patten, Conservative Peer and Chancellor of Oxford University; Frank Field, Labour politician who also co-chairs a parliamentary group on migration; Ruth Lea, an economic advisor at Arbuthnot Banking Group; Professor Michael Dougan who's an expert in European Law at the University of Liverpool and Daniela Schwarzer from the German Marshall Fund of the United States based in Berlin.

They answer questions from an audience in the BBC's historic Radio Theatre, whilst listeners from all around the world join in via the BBC World Service Facebook page.

Image: Seaside slot machine showing Union Jack and EU flag Credit: Getty Images

"

Britain And Europe2016052120160522 (WS)Stay or Leave? A panel in London debate the issues on Britain's EU membership

As the UK prepares to vote on whether to stay or leave the European Union we hear different sides of Britain's great debate. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by former EU Commissioner Lord Chris Patten and the economic historian Nick Crafts, both who favour remaining in the EU, as well as former Foreign Secretary Lord David Owen and the economist Ruth Lea who support Britain leaving the European Union.

(Photo: The European Union flag and the British flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Stay or Leave? A panel in London debate the issues on Britain's EU membership

"

(Photo: The European Union flag and the British flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

(Photo: The European Union flag and the British flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)"

"As the UK prepares to vote on whether to stay or leave the European Union we hear different sides of Britain's great debate. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by former EU Commissioner Lord Chris Patten and the economic historian Nick Crafts, both who favour remaining in the EU, as well as former Foreign Secretary Lord David Owen and the economist Ruth Lea who support Britain leaving the European Union.

(Photo: The European Union flag and the British flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)"

Brussels2019041020190413 (WS)
20190414 (WS)
The European Union has fresh elections coming up - a new leadership to find - and of course Brexit - with the United Kingdom spending the last three years arguing over how, when and whether it should leave the Union.

The UK is the second largest economy in the E.U, and represents more than one in ten of its population. Is the loss of Britain a threat to Europe, or a new opportunity? The European Union faces the challenges of migration, security, the economy and a rise in Euroscepticism across much of the continent. So what next for Europe? How does an audience in Brussels and a European panel of politicians think Britain should react to life on the outside? Following on from last month's edition about Brexit in London, Jonathan Dimbleby and an expert panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by an audience in Brussels.

The panel:
Margrethe Vestager, European Commissioner for Competition
Mairead McGuinness MEP, First Vice President of the European Parliament
Bas Eickhout MEP, Leading Candidate of the European Greens
Pieter Cleppe, Brussels Director of Open Europe

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Photo: The European Union flag Credit: Yves Herman/Reuters

What should the EU do next? A Brussels panel and audience debate the future after Brexit

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Bucharest2019121420191215 (WS)This December, Romanians mark 30 years since the 1989 Revolution which saw the fall of the Communist regime. Three decades on, Romania has prospered in many ways - incomes have risen and new technology and auto-making sectors fuel one of the EU's fastest-growing economies - however development continues to be hampered by corruption and unstable governments.

World Questions comes to Bucharest at an exciting time in the country's history to discuss the issues that matter to Romanian people – how to end corruption and rural poverty, how to improve education levels, and how to stem the flow of young people leaving the country for better lives abroad.

Anita Anand and a panel of leading politicians and opinion makers debate questions raised by an audience at the ASE University in Bucharest. The panel will include:

Tănase Stamule - Associate Professor at ASE and advisor to Prime Minister Ludovic Orban
Carmen Avram - MEP, Social Democratic Party (PSD)
Mădălina Mocan - Civil society researcher and activist
Dan Turturică - Editor and journalist

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The Palace of the Parliament seen from Constitution Square in Bucharest, Credit: Laszlo Szirtesi/Getty Images)

World Questions is in Bucharest to discuss the issues that matter to Romanian people

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Tanase Stamule - Associate Professor at ASE and advisor to Prime Minister Ludovic Orban
Carmen Avram - MEP, Social Democratic Party (PSD)
Mădălina Mocan - Civil society researcher and activist
Dan Turturică - Editor and journalist

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Buenos Aires2020031420200315 (WS)Coronavirus , multibillion dollar debt, inflation, poverty - the new government faces a host of challenges. Will President Fernandez's team be able to turn the tide, and see the highly-educated, resource-rich, vast and fertile Republic of Argentina return to prosperity? What about Falklands/Las Malvinas? And plans to legalise abortion in the Pope's home country? Jonny Dymond and a panel of politicians discuss the fascinating future of Argentina.

The panel:
Juan Grabois: Leader of the Confederación de Trabajadores de la Economía Popular (CTEP) and Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace
Camila Crescimbeni: Member of the Chamber of Deputies of Argentina and President of PRO Youth
Fernanda Vallejos: Member of the Chamber of Deputies of Argentina and President of the Finance Commission
Ivan Petrella: Writer on Politics and Theology and Former Secretary of Federal Integration and International Cooperation at the Ministry of Culture

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A woman dressed like former Argentinian first lady, Eva Peron, shows an image of "Evita" on the back of her mobile phone as she marches in a political protest, Credit: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Coronavirus, inflation, poverty and hopes for a new Argentina - a debate in the capital

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Colombia And Peace2016121020161211 (WS)Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with some of the key voices in this historic moment.

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with some of the key voices in this historic moment.

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with some of the key voices in this historic moment.

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with some of the key voices in this historic moment.

"

"Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonny Dymond is in Colombia to debate peace and the legacy of violence with key voices.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"BBC World Questions comes to Bogota, Colombia, as the country seeks a recipe for peace and an end to one of the world's longest running conflicts.

President Juan Manuel Santos has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, but the people rejected his deal with the leader of The Farc in a referendum. A new deal has been signed, but will it have legitimacy without a second referendum?

BBC World Questions, staged with the British Council at Bogota's Luis Angel Arango Concert Hall, provides an opportunity to discuss the future for Colombia at this key moment in its history.

Featuring a distinguished panel of guests including Sergio Jaramillo, Colombia's High Commissioner for Peace; Senator Ivan Duque, of the Movement Democratic Centre; Mariela Kohon, Director of Justice for Colombia and Advisor to the Peace Delegation of The Farc; and Dr María Emma Wills Obregón, who leads the Department of Gender and Women at Colombia's Historical Memory Commission.

(Picture: Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and the head of the Farc guerrilla Timoleon Jimenez, aka Timochenko (R), with Cuban President Raul Castro (C) holding their handshake. Credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)"

Copenhagen2018090820180909 (WS)
20180912 (WS)
BBC World Questions is in Copenhagen to host a debate on Denmark's future. It has a reputation for being one of the happiest places on the planet but for many that has always felt like a bit of a myth. Increasingly the challenges of immigration, integration, and high taxes are causing some Danes to question whether their country can still afford a generous welfare state. Others feel that new laws to 'ban the burka' and cuts to welfare have put the character of their nation on the line.

Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by an influential panel to debate the state of the nation and its role in the world:

Martin Henriksen, MP – Spokesperson on Immigration and Integration for the Danish People's Party
Knud Romer - Author and social commentator
Uzma Ahmed – Integration Advisor and founder of the Brown Feminists Network
Pernille Skipper, MP – Political Spokesperson for the Red Green Alliance

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Colourful traditional houses in Copenhagen old town at sunset. Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark, Credit: Getty Images)

What do Danes have to say about world events and their country's future?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"What do Danes have to say about world events and their country's future?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Copenhagen to host a debate on Denmark's future. It has a reputation for being one of the happiest places on the planet but for many that has always felt like a bit of a myth. Increasingly the challenges of immigration, integration, and high taxes are causing some Danes to question whether their country can still afford a generous welfare state. Others feel that new laws to 'ban the burka' and cuts to welfare have put the character of their nation on the line.

Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by an influential panel to debate the state of the nation and its role in the world:

Martin Henriksen, MP – Spokesperson on Immigration and Integration for the Danish People's Party
Knud Romer - Author and social commentator
Uzma Ahmed – Integration Advisor and founder of the Brown Feminists Network
Pernille Skipper, MP – Political Spokesperson for the Red Green Alliance

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Colourful traditional houses in Copenhagen old town at sunset. Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark, Credit: Getty Images)

"

"What do Danes have to say about world events and their country's future?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions is in Copenhagen to host a debate on Denmark's future. It has a reputation for being one of the happiest places on the planet but for many that has always felt like a bit of a myth. Increasingly the challenges of immigration, integration, and high taxes are causing some Danes to question whether their country can still afford a generous welfare state. Others feel that new laws to 'ban the burka' and cuts to welfare have put the character of their nation on the line.

Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by an influential panel to debate the state of the nation and its role in the world:

Martin Henriksen, MP – Spokesperson on Immigration and Integration for the Danish People's Party
Knud Romer - Author and social commentator
Uzma Ahmed – Integration Advisor and founder of the Brown Feminists Network
Pernille Skipper, MP – Political Spokesperson for the Red Green Alliance

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Colourful traditional houses in Copenhagen old town at sunset. Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark, Credit: Getty Images)

"

Coronavirus2020050920200510 (WS)World Questions explores the impact of Covid-19 with experts from around the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions explores the impact of Covid-19 on Asia with a panel of leading public health experts, politicians and analysts from across the region.
What can be done to slow down the spread of the virus? And how should countries balance the needs of their economies with the need to save lives?
The programme is presented by Jonny Dymond and the panel includes:

Manish Sisodia: Deputy Chief Minister of Delhi, India
Jiyoon Kim: Analyst and broadcaster, South Korea
Dr Shahid Jameel: Leading virologist, India
Sophia Yan: Daily Telegraph Beijing Correspondent, China

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Manager: Tim Heffer

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A representative of the Tokyo metropolitan government wearing a face mask holds a sign saying Stay Home, Credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi / Getty Images)

Coronavirus And Africa2020071820200719 (WS)As Coronavirus figures rise sharply in Africa, World Questions hears from the public across the continent and tackles some of the big social and political questions raised by the pandemic: The terrible choice between hunger and infection, police imposing lockdowns with brutality and the unexpected positives to come out of the pandemic.
Presented by Toyosi Ogunseye in Lagos with panellists and questioners across Africa.

On the panel:
Dr Matshidiso Moeti: WHO Regional Director for Africa, based in Congo
Bright Simons: Social entrepreneur, President of mPedigree, Ghana
Sabina Chege MP: Health Select Committee Chair, Kenya
Ralph Mathekga: Political analyst and writer, South Africa

Producer: Charlie Taylor
Studio Manager: Emma Harth

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Students wear face masks following resumption of classes in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Credit: Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images)

The impact of Coronavirus on Africa

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Coronavirus And Asia20200509World Questions explores the impact of Covid-19 with experts from around the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions explores the impact of Covid-19 on Asia with a panel of leading public health experts, politicians and analysts from across the region.
What can be done to slow down the spread of the virus? And how should countries balance the needs of their economies with the need to save lives?
The programme is presented by Jonny Dymond and the panel includes:

Manish Sisodia: Deputy Chief Minister of Delhi, India
Jiyoon Kim: Analyst and broadcaster, South Korea
Dr Shahid Jameel: Leading virologist, India
Sophia Yan: Daily Telegraph Beijing Correspondent, China

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Manager: Tim Heffer

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A representative of the Tokyo metropolitan government wearing a face mask holds a sign saying Stay Home, Credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi / Getty Images)

Coronavirus And Europe2020041120200412 (WS)World Questions responds to the global Coronavirus crisis with a special programme focusing on the pandemic in Europe.
Jonny Dymond will explore the challenges posed by and the consequences of the outbreak of COVID-19 as he is joined by a panel of experts from across the continent who answer questions from the public.

The panel:

Dunja Mijatovic: Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe
Margaret Harris: World Health Organisation
Richard Horton: Editor in Chief of The Lancet
Nathalie Tocci: Political analyst and Director of the Institute of International Affairs
Danae Kyriakopoulou: Economist from OMFIF, the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, an independent financial think tank

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Manager: Donald MacDonald

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: worker in PPE, Credit: Getty Images)

World Questions debates the global Coronavirus crisis focusing on the pandemic in Europe.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Coronavirus And Latin America2020061320200614 (WS)The impact of Coronavirus on Latin America: how has it dealt with the pandemic?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions examines the impact of Coronavirus on Latin America. How has it dealt with the pandemic?

The lockdown, the needs of the economy, cash pay-outs to the poor, culture, tradition and safety in a time of crisis are all discussed with an expert panel and questions from the public across the region.

The programme is presented by Jonny Dymond and the panel of experts includes

Dr Denise Dresser - political scientist, Mexico.
Luiz Philippe de Orleans e Braganca - Chamber of Representatives , Social Liberal Party, Brazil.
Laura Alonso - former head of Argentina's Anti-Corruption office.
Margarita Lopez Maya - Venezuelan historian.
Dr Marcus Espinal - Pan American Health Organisation.

Producer: Helen Towner

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Photo: A medical professional stands by a disinfection tunnel at a Brazilian hospital, Credit: Luis Alvarenga/Getty Images

Covid-19 And Information2021032420210325 (WS)World Questions tackles the global issue of Covid-19: not just the disease itself but the information surrounding the pandemic. What should we have known and what questions should have been asked? Sharing information - and understanding the basis of the decisions of the scientists and the politicians - has never been more important or more difficult. So, do we always get the best information? How do we interpret the science and the policies that goes with it? And how does the world's media respond to a pandemic? How have any of us - politicians, health experts and journalists - communicated with the public?

As we try and get to grips with the best way to share information about what is really happening, what's the best way to deal with “fake news” – is it a major force or a distraction from the crisis? And what's the best counter to it? Attack it, understand it, or ignore it? In our digital world, can it ever be eradicated or regulated?

The BBC's Media Editor, Amol Rajan, is joined by four leading experts from around the world and members of the public with their questions.

The panel:

Nick Pickles: Senior Director, Public Policy Strategy and Development, Twitter.
Zeynep Tufekci: Sociologist and writer
Eliot Higgins: Investigative journalist, founder of Bellingcat
Margaret Harris: Spokesperson for the World Health Organisation

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Studio Engineers: Ronan Loftus and Duncan Hannant

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A protester holds a placard that says Fake News Is The Real Virus. Credit: Stanton Sharpe/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)

Debate exploring the issues of information and misinformation about the Covid-19 pandemic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Delhi2018111720181118 (WS)India's key issues are hotly debated with a Delhi audience at the British Council's HQ. Anu Anand and a panel of leading politicians and commentators tackle jobs, pollution, fake news and the controversy over spending $430m building the world's tallest statue.
On the panel:
Sambit Patra: National spokesperson for the Bharatiya Janata Party
Saba Naqvi: Political journalist and author of Shades of Saffron
Sharmistha Mukherjee: President of the Delhi Mahila Congress and President of the Congress's women's wing in Delhi
Gurcharan Das: Author of Kama the Riddle of Desire and India Unbound and former CEO of Procter & Gamble India

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: The India Gate, Credit: narvikk/Getty Images)

Pollution, jobs, #metoo and the world's tallest statue debated with a Delhi audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Dublin2016111220161113 (WS)What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire.

BBC World Questions is in Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland.

A panel of four, chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby, tackle some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics. Expect a lively debate with panellists locking horns and some humour.

BBC World Question is an English language event staged in partnership with the British Council. The debate is lead entirely by questions from the audience.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University.

What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire.

BBC World Questions is in Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland.

A panel of four, chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby, tackle some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics. Expect a lively debate with panellists locking horns and some humour.

BBC World Question is an English language event staged in partnership with the British Council. The debate is lead entirely by questions from the audience.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University."

"What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire. Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate in Dublin, lead entirely by questions from the audience. He is joined by a panel of four to discuss some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University.

(Photo: A young girl waves a green flag with the words Irish Republic. Credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: A young girl waves a green flag with the words Irish Republic. Credit: Getty Images)

BBC World Questions is in Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland.

A panel of four, chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby, tackle some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics. Expect a lively debate with panellists locking horns and some humour.

BBC World Question is an English language event staged in partnership with the British Council. The debate is lead entirely by questions from the audience.

"

"What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire. Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate in Dublin, lead entirely by questions from the audience. He is joined by a panel of four to discuss some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University.

(Photo: A young girl waves a green flag with the words Irish Republic. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"What are the issues affecting Ireland and post-Brexit Europe?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire. Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate in Dublin, lead entirely by questions from the audience. He is joined by a panel of four to discuss some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University.

(Photo: A young girl waves a green flag with the words Irish Republic. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Ireland is the only EU country with a land border with the UK, and for that reason Brexit could have a profound impact on Eire.

BBC World Questions is in Dublin, the capital of the Republic of Ireland.

A panel of four, chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby, tackle some of the most pressing issues of the day including Brexit, Donald Trump, abortion and getting young people involved in politics. Expect a lively debate with panellists locking horns and some humour.

BBC World Question is an English language event staged in partnership with the British Council. The debate is lead entirely by questions from the audience.

On the panel are Leo Varadkar, Ireland's Minister for Social Protection and a Fine Gael TD; Mary Lou McDonald, the Deputy Party Leader for Sinn Fein; Conor Lenihan, a businessman and former Fianna Fail Minister, and Dr JoAnne Mancini, a Senior Lecturer in History at Maynooth University."

Europe2021011620210117 (WS)In January, World Questions will focus on Europe, with a special programme from Brussels.

Presented by the BBC's Europe editor, Katya Adler, World Questions will debate the big issues facing the continent in the aftermath of Brexit.

What are the EU's biggest challenges going ahead? How has Europe coped with Covid-19?

These and other political, economic and social issues will be debated by a panel of leading European politicians answering questions from the public across the region.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

World Questions focuses on Europe, with a special programme from Brussels.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Europe And Hungary2016100820161009 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of experts in Budapest debate questions from the public on issues affecting Hungary and Europe.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of experts in Budapest debate questions from the public on issues affecting Hungary and Europe.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of experts in Budapest debate questions from the public on issues affecting Hungary and Europe.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of experts in Budapest debate questions from the public on issues affecting Hungary and Europe.

Freedom, democracy, immigration - issues affecting Hungary and Europe - are examined

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Freedom, democracy, immigration - issues affecting Hungary and Europe - are examined

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hungary has just held a deeply controversial referendum on the EU's plan to impose migrant quotas. The European Union wants to share the responsibility for those entering the region through its southern borders. Many of them refugees from war. In a lively and frank debate at Corvinus University, Budapest, a large public audience debates freedom, democracy and immigration with a panel of politicians and thinkers chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby.

The panel includes the Government spokesperson Zoltán Kovács, Opposition MP for the Together party, Zsuzsanna Szelényi, business leader and former Hungarian Ambassador to the United Kingdom, János Csák and the Greek expert on the European Union, professor Loukas Tsoukalis.

Sixty years after the Hungarian Uprising against Soviet control, what is Hungary's future within the EU?

(Photo: Debate panel and audience at Corvinus University, Budapest)

(Photo: Debate panel and audience at Corvinus University, Budapest)

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of experts in Budapest debate questions from the public on issues affecting Hungary and Europe.

"

"Freedom, democracy, immigration - issues affecting Hungary and Europe - are examined

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hungary has just held a deeply controversial referendum on the EU's plan to impose migrant quotas. The European Union wants to share the responsibility for those entering the region through its southern borders. Many of them refugees from war. In a lively and frank debate at Corvinus University, Budapest, a large public audience debates freedom, democracy and immigration with a panel of politicians and thinkers chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby.

The panel includes the Government spokesperson Zoltán Kovács, Opposition MP for the Together party, Zsuzsanna Szelényi, business leader and former Hungarian Ambassador to the United Kingdom, János Csák and the Greek expert on the European Union, professor Loukas Tsoukalis.

Sixty years after the Hungarian Uprising against Soviet control, what is Hungary's future within the EU?

(Photo: Debate panel and audience at Corvinus University, Budapest)

"

"Freedom, democracy, immigration - issues affecting Hungary and Europe - are examined

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hungary has just held a deeply controversial referendum on the EU's plan to impose migrant quotas. The European Union wants to share the responsibility for those entering the region through its southern borders. Many of them refugees from war. In a lively and frank debate at Corvinus University, Budapest, a large public audience debates freedom, democracy and immigration with a panel of politicians and thinkers chaired by Jonathan Dimbleby.

The panel includes the Government spokesperson Zoltán Kovács, Opposition MP for the Together party, Zsuzsanna Szelényi, business leader and former Hungarian Ambassador to the United Kingdom, János Csák and the Greek expert on the European Union, professor Loukas Tsoukalis.

Sixty years after the Hungarian Uprising against Soviet control, what is Hungary's future within the EU?

(Photo: Debate panel and audience at Corvinus University, Budapest)

"

Europe's Challenges2016062820160703 (WS)World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

"

"World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

"

"World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

"

"World Questions goes to Nicosia - the last divided city of Europe.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)

"

"Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus, is the European Union's only divided city. The two main communities on the island, the Greek Cypriots and the Turkish Cypriots, have been separated since 1974. As leaders of both sides claim progress is being made towards reconciliation, World Questions is in Cyprus with the British Council and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers. Is the challenge of a united Cyprus a problem that the European Union can solve? In a time of turmoil, what does the future of the European Union mean to the island of Cyprus?

On the panel: Averof Neophytou, leader of DISY, the governing party of the Republic of Cyprus; Meltem Onurkan Samani, Adviser to the Turkish Cypriot Leadership; Christiana Erotokritou, DIKO, Republic of Cyprus MP; Jan Techau, director of Brussels-based research institute Carnegie Europe and Niyazi Kizilyurek, professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Cyprus.

(Photo: A sign reads 'UN Buffer Zone'. credit: Getty Images)"

Gaborone2019092120190922 (WS)Botswana is an African success story: a stable democracy with a healthy economy based on diamonds and tourism. But despite many free elections since independence in 1966 only one party has ever won power. This October that could change, as a newly united opposition is fielding a single candidate for president in the forthcoming election. Worries about jobs, inequality, waste, corruption and issues such as the country's elephant population and the decriminalisation of homosexuality give the sense that Botswana is at a turning point, and the opposition and the government are both promising change.

World Questions comes to Botswana for a vibrant debate in the heat of an election campaign. The BBC's Toyosi Ogunseye is joined by a panel of leading politicians and thinkers as well as an audience of the public in Gaborone, the country's capital.

The panel:
Dorcas Makgato MP: Minister of Transport and Communications for the Republic of Botswana
Spencer Mogapi: Deputy Editor of The Sunday Standard
Tumi Mbaakanyi: Businesswoman and former President of Women in Business Botswana
Dumelang Saleshando: Deputy President of Umbrella for Democratic Change

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A man wears an elephant mask to raise awareness on protecting wildlife and nature, in Gaborone, Botswana. Credit: Monirul BhuiyanAFP/Getty Images)

Hunting elephants and the legalisation of homosexuality: a vibrant debate in Botswana

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Germany And Europe2016050720160508 (WS)Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Can Germany accommodate more migrants? A panel and audience debate this issue and more.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"As Europe faces some of the greatest crises of modern time, Germany's leadership in the Europe Union has been put under pressure. World Questions is in Berlin at the Deutsches Historiches Museum to explore a German audience's questions to a panel of opinion-formers and decision-makers. Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by Aydan Özoguz, Cabinet Member and Federal Commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration; Christian Schmidt, leader of the ALFA party in Berlin; the contemporary historian professor Gerhard Hirschfeld; the migration researcher professor Naika Foroutan; and Philipp Lengsfeld, CDU Member of the Bundestag.

(Photo: Refugees waiting to register in Passau, South Germany, on 16 January2016. Credit: Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images)"

Ghana2018041420180415 (WS)This month's World Questions come to Ghana and tackles some of the big questions facing different countries across the globe - defence, the environment, religion, relations between women and men. In the capital Accra, Jonathan Dimbleby brings politicians, business leaders and other guests together to answer questions from the public in an exceptionally lively and exciting debate. These tough questions cover US military aid, the legal status of homosexuality and whether women should still be expected to cook for men in modern Africa, or anywhere for that matter!

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Image: Port full of people in Ghana, Africa, Credit: Getty Images

Tough questions on US military aid and whether women should still cook for men

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Tough questions on US military aid and whether women should still cook for men

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions come to Ghana and tackles some of the big questions facing different countries across the globe - defence, the environment, religion, relations between women and men. In the capital Accra, Jonathan Dimbleby brings politicians, business leaders and other guests together to answer questions from the public in an exceptionally lively and exciting debate. These tough questions cover US military aid, the legal status of homosexuality and whether women should still be expected to cook for men in modern Africa, or anywhere for that matter!

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Image: Port full of people in Ghana, Africa, Credit: Getty Images

"

"Tough questions on US military aid and whether women should still cook for men

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions come to Ghana and tackles some of the big questions facing different countries across the globe - defence, the environment, religion, relations between women and men. In the capital Accra, Jonathan Dimbleby brings politicians, business leaders and other guests together to answer questions from the public in an exceptionally lively and exciting debate. These tough questions cover US military aid, the legal status of homosexuality and whether women should still be expected to cook for men in modern Africa, or anywhere for that matter!

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Image: Port full of people in Ghana, Africa, Credit: Getty Images

"

"Tough questions on US military aid and whether women should still cook for men

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions come to Ghana and tackles some of the big questions facing different countries across the globe - defence, the environment, religion, relations between women and men. In the capital Accra, Jonathan Dimbleby brings politicians, business leaders and other guests together to answer questions from the public in an exceptionally lively and exciting debate. These tough questions cover US military aid, the legal status of homosexuality and whether women should still be expected to cook for men in modern Africa, or anywhere for that matter!

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Image: Port full of people in Ghana, Africa, Credit: Getty Images

"

Harare2018070720180708 (WS)In a highly charged debate, an audience of Zimbabweans debates the upcoming presidential elections, land reform, the economic crisis and the legacy of the former President, Robert Mugabe.

Allan Little chairs the public debate with Paul Mangwana of Zanu PF, Welshman Ncube of the MDC Alliance, Fadzayi Mahere – independent parliamentary candidate, and Trevor Ncube – the journalist and publisher.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A supporter of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party waves the flag of Zimbabwe. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

World Questions is in Harare just weeks before the country goes to the polls.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"World Questions is in Harare just weeks before the country goes to the polls.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

In a highly charged debate, an audience of Zimbabweans debates the upcoming presidential elections, land reform, the economic crisis and the legacy of the former President, Robert Mugabe.

Allan Little chairs the public debate with Paul Mangwana of Zanu PF, Welshman Ncube of the MDC Alliance, Fadzayi Mahere – independent parliamentary candidate, and Trevor Ncube – the journalist and publisher.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A supporter of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party waves the flag of Zimbabwe. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"World Questions is in Harare just weeks before the country goes to the polls.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

In a highly charged debate, an audience of Zimbabweans debates the upcoming presidential elections, land reform, the economic crisis and the legacy of the former President, Robert Mugabe.

Allan Little chairs the public debate with Paul Mangwana of Zanu PF, Welshman Ncube of the MDC Alliance, Fadzayi Mahere – independent parliamentary candidate, and Trevor Ncube – the journalist and publisher.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A supporter of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party waves the flag of Zimbabwe. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"World Questions comes to Harare just weeks before the country goes to the polls.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The BBC's flagship World Service radio debate programme, World Questions, comes to Zimbabwe at a crucial time in the country's history. Zimbabwe's president has announced the country will hold its national elections on 30th July. It will be the first time in decades former leader Robert Mugabe is not standing for president. Zanu PF's Emmerson Mnangagwa - who took power after Mr Mugabe resigned in November last year – has promised that he will oversee "free and fair elections".

Will the opposition be able to challenge the ruling Zanu PF party? Who offers the best solutions to the country's economic problems?

The BBC's Allan Little will be joined by a panel of leading politicians and thinkers in a debate led entirely by questions from a public audience at the Meikles Hotel in Harare.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

Helsinki2019061520190616 (WS)World Questions comes to Finland at a time of political change. In elections this April, the left wing Social Democratic Party won a narrow victory over the nationalist Finns Party. What does the result mean for the country? Jonathan Dimbleby is joined by leading politicians and a public audience at Finlandia Hall in Helsinki to find out.
The panel:
Ville Skinnari: Vice Chairman, Social Democratic Party
Riikka Purra: The Finns Party
Elina Lepomäki: The National Coalition Party
Jari Hanska: Freelance Journalist

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Photo: Helsinki cityscape with City Hall and Cathedral, Credit: Lehnartz/ullstein bild/Getty Images

Carbon neutrality, happiness and depression were what Finns were keen to discuss

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions comes to Finland at a time of political change. In elections this April, the left wing Social Democratic Party won a narrow victory over the nationalist Finns Party. What does the result mean for the country? Jonathan Dimbleby will be joined by leading politicians and a public audience at Finlandia Hall in Helsinki to find out.
BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

World Questions comes to Finland at a time of political change after elections in April

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Highlights2018081820180819 (WS)
20180822 (WS)
From Zimbabwe to Hong Kong, Washington to Seoul, World Questions showcases the views of a vast array of panellists and audiences from around the world. No two programmes are the same – yet the questions asked are often similar. Immigration, the environment, the rise of populism, wealth distribution and corruption - the themes are of universal concern. Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments and offers a unique insight into how the programmes are made.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

From Zimbabwe to Hong Kong, Washington to Seoul, World Questions showcases the views of a vast array of panellists and audiences from around the world. No two programmes are the same – yet the questions asked are often similar. Immigration, the environment, the rise of populism, wealth distribution and corruption - the themes are of universal concern. Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments and offers a unique insight into how the programmes are made.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

From Zimbabwe to Hong Kong, Washington to Seoul, World Questions showcases the views of a vast array of panellists and audiences from around the world. No two programmes are the same – yet the questions asked are often similar. Immigration, the environment, the rise of populism, wealth distribution and corruption - the themes are of universal concern. Jonathan Dimbleby highlights some of World Questions' key moments and offers a unique insight into how the programmes are made.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

"

Hong Kong2017070820170709 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel at the University of Hong Kong debate questions on the country's economic and political future.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel at the University of Hong Kong debate questions on the country's economic and political future.

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

Politicians and experts debate Hong Kong's economic, political and international future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Politicians and experts debate Hong Kong's economic, political and international future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel at the University of Hong Kong debate questions on the country's economic and political future.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

"Politicians and experts debate Hong Kong's economic, political and international future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Politicians and experts debate Hong Kong's economic, political and international future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel at the University of Hong Kong debate questions on the country's economic and political future.

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images) "

"Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel at the University of Hong Kong debate questions on the country's economic and political future.

Hong Kong, on China's Pearl River Delta, is one of the most densely populated territories on earth. It regularly ranks as the most developed financial centre globally, and the world's most economically competitive place.

On 1 July 1997 the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. It was a landmark event that marked the end of British rule and the start of a new era for Hong Kong.

Twenty years on, as a new Chief Executive takes over the running of the Hong Kong Government, what are the great issues facing the territory today?

A panel of politicians and thinkers from across the spectrum join Jonathan Dimbleby at the University of Hong Kong. They debate questions from a public audience on Hong Kong's economic, political and international future.

World Questions Hong Kong was staged in partnership with the Journalism and Media Studies Centre of the University of Hong Kong.

(Photo: Hong Kong street scene with neon signs at night. Credit: Getty Images)

"

Houston2019110920191110 (WS)Over 2000 kilometres of the United States border run through Texas. The number one port in the US is the land port at Laredo on its Southern border. If the State of Texas was a country it would have the 10th largest economy in the world. It's an extremely important state to the union.

There has been a debate about gun law since the racially-motivated shooting of 46 people in El Paso a few weeks ago. Texas has a productive energy industry but with flooding a threat, there are growing environmental fears.

As the country starts to gear up for the presidential election in one year's time, World Questions goes to the city of Houston for a Texan perspective on some of the great issues convulsing the nation: Impeachment, immigration, the economy and President Trump's Wall.

Jonny Dymond and a panel of Republicans and Democrats will debate questions raised by the audience in Houston.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Photo: Texas State Rough Vector Illustration, Credit: Subtropica/Getty Images)

World Questions is in Houston for a Texan view of some of the issues convulsing the US.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Gun rights, racism, climate change, impeachment... World Questions is in downtown Houston to debate some of the big issues convulsing the United States.

Congressman Joaquin Castro, Judge Lina Hidalgo, Congressman Randy Weber and State Senator Joan Huffman join Jonny Dymond to debate questions raised by the audience in Houston.

Johannesburg2017081220170813 (WS)
20170816 (WS)
South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)"

"South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

"

Johannesburg20170813Nancy Kacungira and guests in Johannesburg are discussing the major issues facing South Africa at a crucial time in its history.

The BBC World Service programme World Questions comes to South Africa next month at a crucial time in the country's history. Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote who will replace him as party leader. Which direction will South Africa take?

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira, a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience will be in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans now - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution - and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

"Nancy Kacungira and guests in Johannesburg are discussing the major issues facing South Africa at a crucial time in its history.

The BBC World Service programme World Questions comes to South Africa next month at a crucial time in the country's history. Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote who will replace him as party leader. Which direction will South Africa take?

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira, a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience will be in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans now - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution - and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

"

"

Nancy Kacungira and guests in Johannesburg are discussing the major issues facing South Africa at a crucial time in its history.

The BBC World Service programme World Questions comes to South Africa next month at a crucial time in the country's history. Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote who will replace him as party leader. Which direction will South Africa take?

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira, a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience will be in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans now - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution - and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

"

Johannesburg20170816South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

"South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"

South Africa's major issues debated with a public audience in Johannesburg.

Opposition parties have pushed for a vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, and later in the year, the ANC will vote on who will replace him as party leader. While President Zuma may have narrowly survived this week - South Africa's political future is far from settled.

BBC presenter Nancy Kacungira is joined by a panel of leading politicians and a lively audience in Johannesburg to discuss the major issues facing South Africans today - social and economic transformation, black economic empowerment, corruption, land redistribution, and of course, the future leader of the ANC.

Our panel comprises of Sihle Zikalala of the ANC, Leigh-Ann Mathys of the opposition party, the Economic Freedom Fighters, Adam Habib vice chancellor of Wits University and Sipho Pityana, leading businessman and convenor of the Save South Africa campaign.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created with the British Council.

(Picture: A woman with a South African flag pinned to her headscarf Picture credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP/Getty Images)

"

Kingston2019011920190120 (WS)The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, how to tackle the fourth highest murder rate in the world: World Questions is in Jamaica to debate the big issues of a country which despite its problems has a host of successes in fields as diverse as academia, athletics, literature and reggae music.

Chairing the debate in the capital, Kingston, is the BBC's Jonny Dymond. His panel of guests are: Kamina Johnson Smith, the Foreign Secretary; Peter Bunting, the opposition MP and former Minister of National Security; Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate; Alvin Wint, emeritus professor of International Business at the University of the West Indies

Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo A fruit and vegetable seller sitting at her stall. Credit: BBC)

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, crime - the big issues debated in Jamaica

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, how to tackle the fourth highest murder rate in the world: World Questions is in Jamaica to debate the big issues of a country which despite its problems has a host of successes in fields as diverse as academia, athletics, literature and reggae music. Chairing the debate in the capital, Kingston, the BBC's Jonny Dymond is joined by:
Kamina Johnson Smith: the Foreign Secretary
Peter Bunting: the opposition MP and former Minister of National Security
Lorna Goodison: Poet Laureate
Alvin Wint: Emeritus Professor of International Business at the University of the West Indies

Producer: Charlie Taylor
(Photo Credit: BBC)

"

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, how to tackle the fourth highest murder rate in the world: World Questions is in Jamaica to debate the big issues of a country which despite its problems has a host of successes in fields as diverse as academia, athletics, literature and reggae music.

Chairing the debate in the capital, Kingston, is the BBC's Jonny Dymond. His panel of guests are: Kamina Johnson Smith, the Foreign Secretary; Peter Bunting, the opposition MP and former Minister of National Security; Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate; Alvin Wint, emeritus professor of International Business at the University of the West Indies

Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo A fruit and vegetable seller sitting at her stall. Credit: BBC)

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, crime - the big issues debated in Jamaica

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, how to tackle the fourth highest murder rate in the world: World Questions is in Jamaica to debate the big issues of a country which despite its problems has a host of successes in fields as diverse as academia, athletics, literature and reggae music.

Chairing the debate in the capital, Kingston, is the BBC’s Jonny Dymond. His panel of guests are: Kamina Johnson Smith, the Foreign Secretary; Peter Bunting, the opposition MP and former Minister of National Security; Lorna Goodison, Poet Laureate; Alvin Wint, emeritus professor of International Business at the University of the West Indies

Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo A fruit and vegetable seller sitting at her stall. Credit: BBC)

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, crime - the big issues debated in Jamaica

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, how to tackle the fourth highest murder rate in the world: World Questions is in Jamaica to debate the big issues of a country which despite its problems has a host of successes in fields as diverse as academia, athletics, literature and reggae music. Chairing the debate in the capital, Kingston, the BBC's Jonny Dymond is joined by:
Kamina Johnson Smith: the Foreign Secretary
Peter Bunting: the opposition MP and former Minister of National Security
Lorna Goodison: Poet Laureate
Alvin Wint: Emeritus Professor of International Business at the University of the West Indies

Producer: Charlie Taylor
(Photo Credit: BBC)

The cannabis industry, reparations for slavery, crime - the big issues debated in Jamaica

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

Kingston, Jamaica20190119"

Its university is ranked within the top five percent in the world. Its athletes regulary outperform countries more than ten times its size. All over the world Jamaican music like reggae, rocksteady, dancehall and ska holds people in its sway. Jamaica has a population of under three million, but its small size belies the big impact the country has on culture worldwide.

But economic development has been difficult, poverty is widespread and infrastucture is still weak. Crime is shocking and includes drug trafficking, gang violence and one of the highest murder rates in the world. Is there something holding Jamaica back? Why are the extraordinary pockets of world-beating excellence not more widespread?

Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading Jamaican politicians and cultural figures debate the future of Jamaica with a large public audience in Kingston.

Crime, slavery and the relationship with Britain: Debating the big issues in Jamaica.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

Lagos2020020820200209 (WS)Nigeria is one of the world's largest oil producers, but national infrastructure, youth unemployment and insecurity are huge challenges for its civilian government. Jihadist attacks and separatist movements threaten to tear the country apart and despite being the biggest economy south of the Sahara, extreme poverty is very high. What next for Nigeria?

The BBC's Toyosi Ogunseye is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers for a public debate in Lagos, the country's largest city.

The panel:
Chude Jideonwo, Social Entrepreneur
Dr Abigail Ogwezzy-Ndisika, Professor of Mass Communication, University of Lagos
Joe Igbokwe, Former Lagos State Spokesman of governing APC
Aisha Yesufu, Human Rights Activist

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Roadside vendors vie for space with public transport in central Lagos, Nigeria, Credit: Pius Utomi Ekpeiafp / Getty Images)

What next for Nigeria? Toyosi Ogunseye is joined by politicians for a debate in Lagos

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nigeria is one of the world's largest oil producers, it's the most populous country in Africa and after years of military coups, it's recently re-elected a civilian government.

But Jihadist attacks and separatist movements threaten to tear the country apart and the government is challenged with establishing security to encourage more foreign investment. What next for Nigeria?

What next for Nigeria? Toyosi Ogunseye is joined by politicians for a debate in Lagos.

Lisbon2020011820200119 (WS)This month, World Questions is in Lisbon to bring together leading politicians and the public to discuss the issues that matter to Portuguese people: housing, tourism, the environment and how best to grow the economy.
The BBC's Manuela Saragosa presents the programme recorded in front of an audience at the CCB Cultural Centre in Lisbon.
The panel:
Pedro Siza Vieira, Minister of State for the Economy and the Digital Transition, Socialist Party (PS)
Miguel Pinto Luz, Deputy Mayor of Cascais, Social Democratic Party (PSD)
António Costa Pinto, Professor at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon
Catarina Carvalho, Journalist and Executive Editor in Chief, Diário de Notícias

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Lisbon, Portugal, Credit: (Frédéric Soltan / Corbis via Getty Images)

Manuela Saragosa hosts World Questions in Lisbon to discuss what matters to Portugal.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month, World Questions comes to Lisbon to bring together leading politicians and the public to discuss the issues that matter to Portuguese people: education and public health services, the environment, housing, tourism and how best to grow the economy.
The programme, which will be presented by the BBC's Manuela Saragosa, will be recorded in front of an audience at the CCB Cultural Centre in Lisbon.
The panel will include:
Pedro Siza Vieira, Minister of State for the Economy and the Digital Transition, Socialist Party (PS)
Miguel Pinto Luz, Deputy Mayor of Cascais, Social Democratic Party (PSD)
António Costa Pinto, Professor at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon
Catarina Carvalho, Journalist and Executive Editor in Chief, Diário de Notícias

London20170525Is it possible for countries to protect themselves from acts of terror - and if so, how?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Is it possible for countries to protect themselves from acts of terror - and if so, how?

Following the bombing of a pop concert in Manchester, we explore whether it is possible for countries to protect themselves from acts of terror - and if so, how? This issue is discussed with eminent British politicians - as the country heads towards a General Election. What drives people to commit such atrocities? What should Governments do to prevent them?

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions from around the world in London's Broadcasting House. The panel includes: Lord Kinnock, former leader of the Labour Party, Lord Howard, former leader of the Conservative party, Lord Campbell, former leader of the Liberal Democrats, Susan Glasser, founding editor of Politico and Daniela Schwarzer of the German Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: Manchester Comes Together to Remember Victims Of Terror Attack. Credit: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

"

London2019030920190310 (WS)The deep divisions of Brexit Britain are explored with a raucous London audience and an expert panel. A further referendum? The Prime Minister's withdrawal deal? How has voting to leave the European Union affected Britain's standing in the world? BBC World Questions is in the capital to debate some of the contentious issues that are still dividing the UK.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the debate. His panel guests are:

Rory Stewart, MP: Minister of State at the Ministry of Justice, former Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lara Spirit: Co-President of Our Future Our Choice, a youth group opposed to Britain leaving the European Union
Isabel Oakeshott: Political Journalist and Author
Hilary Benn, MP: Chair of the Exiting the European Union, Select Committee

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Sunset over Big Ben, Credit: Getty Images)

BBC World Questions is in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

The deep divisions of Brexit Britain are explored with a raucous London audience and an expert panel. A further referendum? The Prime Minister's withdrawal deal? How has voting to leave the European Union affected Britain's standing in the world? BBC World Questions is in the capital to debate some of the contentious issues that are still dividing the UK.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the debate. His panel guests are:

Rory Stewart, MP: Minister of State at the Ministry of Justice, former Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lara Spirit: Co-President of Our Future Our Choice, a youth group opposed to Britain leaving the European Union
Isabel Oakeshott: Political Journalist and Author
Hilary Benn, MP: Chair of the Exiting the European Union, Select Committee

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

BBC World Questions is in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"

The deep divisions of Brexit Britain are explored with a raucous London audience and an expert panel. A further referendum? The Prime Minister's withdrawal deal? How has voting to leave the European Union affected Britain's standing in the world? BBC World Questions is in the capital to debate some of the contentious issues that are still dividing the UK.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the debate. His panel guests are:

Rory Stewart, MP: Minister of State at the Ministry of Justice, former Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Lara Spirit: Co-President of Our Future Our Choice, a youth group opposed to Britain leaving the European Union
Isabel Oakeshott: Political Journalist and Author
Hilary Benn, MP: Chair of the Exiting the European Union, Select Committee

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

BBC World Questions is in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

"

BBC World Questions is at the Royal Institution in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.
Britain was split down the middle when it voted to leave the European Union, and it is still divided today. In Parliament, there is no agreement on an alternative to EU membership and a deal which would take Britain out. Across the country, there is anxiety about what the future may hold and division over what to do for the best; friends have been divided, families have been split up. Would a further referendum help, or create more anger? Should Britain make a clean break with the world's biggest free-trade block, in order to make its own deals around the world?

In the first of two editions on Brexit, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of leading politicians will debate questions raised by the audience. The following month World Questions will be in Brussels.

BBC World Questions is in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"

BBC World Questions is at the Royal Institution in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.
Britain was split down the middle when it voted to leave the European Union, and it is still divided today. In Parliament, there is no agreement on an alternative to EU membership and a deal which would take Britain out. Across the country, there is anxiety about what the future may hold and division over what to do for the best; friends have been divided, families have been split up. Would a further referendum help, or create more anger? Should Britain make a clean break with the world's biggest free-trade block, in order to make its own deals around the world?

In the first of two editions on Brexit, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of leading politicians will debate questions raised by the audience. The following month World Questions will be in Brussels.

BBC World Questions is in London to discuss Brexit and Britain's place in the world.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

Madrid2018012020180121 (WS)BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

The future of Spain and the prospect of Catalonia breaking away is debated by a panel

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"The future of Spain and the prospect of Catalonia breaking away is debated by a panel

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

"

"The future of Spain and the prospect of Catalonia breaking away is debated by a panel

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Madrid to discuss the future for Spain.

BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

Weekend Breakfast"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Madrid to discuss the future for Spain.

BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Madrid to discuss the future for Spain.

BBC World Questions comes to Madrid to discuss the future of Spain at a moment of high crisis. As the new parliament of the province of Catalonia takes its seats, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the prospect of Catalonia breaking away from Spain. They also address the role of the monarchy and how the country addresses its past history of violence with a public audience in the centre of the capital.

The Panel:
Francisco Martínez, Deputy and Spokesperson for the Governing Partido Popular on constitutional matters
Alfred Bosch, leader of the Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) in the Barcelona City Hall,
Begoña Villacís, one of the leaders of Cuidadanos, Madrid Councillor and former candidate for Mayor
Ana Romero, writer, journalist and authority on the Spanish Royal Family

(Photo: Spain flag on broken brick wall and half Catalan flag, Credit: Getty images)

!1835"

Mexico2017120920171210 (WS)With an election looming a Mexican panel discuss the country's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"With an election looming a Mexican panel discuss the country's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

BBC World Questions is in Mexico City to discuss the country's political future.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the NAFTA trade agreement? And what positions will the Presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images) "

"With an election looming a Mexican panel discuss the country's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"With an election looming a Mexican panel discuss the country's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"BBC World Questions is in Mexico City to discuss the country's political future.

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the NAFTA trade agreement? And what positions will the Presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images) "

"BBC World Questions is in Mexico City to discuss the country's political future.

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the Nafta trade agreement? And what positions will the presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

"

"BBC World Questions is in Mexico City to discuss the country's political future.

With a general election on the horizon, Mexicans will soon decide who will become their new President - and which direction the country should now take. How should Mexico engage with the USA and President Trump? Will the wall between the two nations ever be built? What will happen to the NAFTA trade agreement? And what positions will the Presidential candidates take on drugs issues, inequality, corruption and violence?

Jonathan Dimbleby discusses these issues with a Mexican panel:

Armando Rios Piter - Independent Presidential candidate and Senator
Denise Dresser - Professor of Political Science and writer
Andrés Rozental - former Deputy of Foreign Affairs Minister and former Ambassador
Valeria Moy - economist and director of the think tank Como Vamos?

(Photo: People holding Mexican flag. Credit: Getty Images)

"

Moscow20171007BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia, 100 years on from the Revolution of 1917.

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia, 100 years on from the Revolution of 1917.

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia, 100 years on from the Revolution of 1917.

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"

"BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia, 100 years on from the Revolution of 1917."

"""BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia, 100 years on from the Revolution of 1917.

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"""

Moscow And The Future2017100720171008 (WS)The future of Russia discussed 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"The future of Russia discussed 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)"

"The future of Russia discussed 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"

"The future of Russia discussed 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Moscow to discuss the future of Russia 100 years after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

From the Digital October building, in the heart of the capital, BBC presenter Allan Little and a panel of politicians and thinkers debate the key issues facing the nation, with a lively audience. The state of democracy in Russia, Russia's role in the world, the 2018 Presidential elections and more. All questions come directly from our public audience.

Our panel comprises of the former Russian Prime Minister and current leader of the People's Freedom Party (PARNAS), Mikhail Kasyanov, the director of Institute of Democracy and Cooperation, Natalia Narochnitskaya, the President and Founder of the American University in Moscow, Dr Edward Lozansky and the human rights campaigner Polina Nemirovskaia.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow Photo credit: Getty Images)

"

Nairobi2017111120171112 (WS)
20171115 (WS)
Jonathan Dimbley and a panel of politicians and thinkers are at Nairobi University.

BBC World Questions comes to Nairobi to discuss the future of Kenya after two disputed elections.

Kenya has the largest economy in Central and Eastern Africa. It is a proud democracy with a liberal economy, but the country is going through troubled times. After months of divisive legal and political processes it is experiencing its worst crisis for a decade.
From the University of Nairobi with a large audience, Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of political and cultural leaders discuss some of the key controversies facing the nation.

The panel:
Kipchumba Murkomen, Senate Majority Leader
Gladys Wanga MP, Women's Representative for Homa Bay County
Nerima Wako, Executive Director of Siasa Place
Joy Mdivo, Lawyer and Executive Director of East Africa Centre for Law and Justice

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Kenyans gather in small queues to vote just after dawn at a polling station in Huruma, Nairobi on October 26, 2017.Photo credit: Getty Images)

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and thinkers are at Nairobi University.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonathan Dimbley and a panel of politicians and thinkers are at Nairobi University.

(Photo: Kenyans gather in small queues to vote just after dawn at a polling station in Huruma, Nairobi on October 26, 2017.Photo credit: Getty Images)

(Photo: Kenyans gatherWorld Questions [world Service]

(Photo: Kenyans gather in small queues to vote just after dawn at a polling station in Huruma, Nairobi on October 26, 2017.Photo credit: Getty Images)"

(Photo: Kenyans gather in small queues to vote just after dawn at a polling station in Huruma, Nairobi on October 26, 2017.Photo credit: Getty Images)"

(Photo: Kenyans gather in small queues to vote just after dawn at a polling station in Huruma, Nairobi on October 26, 2017.Photo credit: Getty Images)"

Nepal2018021020180211 (WS)Can the landslide victory for the Left Alliance deliver political stability and peace?

After an historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace?

Nepal has been through turmoil in recent years. A decade-long insurgency led by Maoist rebels left more than 17,000 people dead before a 2006 peace deal ushered in democracy. In April 2015, a series of earthquakes killed nearly 9,000 people and destroyed thousands of homes. In the past decade alone, ten different Prime Ministers have held office.

The elections in December were meant to mark the final phase in the country's long political transition from the abolition of the monarchy to the establishment of an inclusive, federal republic.

But the new government faces many challenges – will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal's two giant neighbours – China and India? And how can the country reduce its pollution levels?

The BBC's Anu Anand is joined by: former Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai, government representative Pradeep Gyawali, writer C. K. Lal and journalist Subina Shrestha in a debate led by questions from a public audience to discuss the big issues facing Nepal.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Supporters of the Communist Party of Nepal, Credit: Getty Images)

After an historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace?

Nepal has been through turmoil in recent years. A decade-long insurgency led by Maoist rebels left more than 17,000 people dead before a 2006 peace deal ushered in democracy. In April 2015, a series of earthquakes killed nearly 9,000 people and destroyed thousands of homes. In the past decade alone, ten different Prime Ministers have held office.

The elections in December were meant to mark the final phase in the country's long political transition from the abolition of the monarchy to the establishment of an inclusive, federal republic.

But the new government faces many challenges – will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal's two giant neighbours – China and India? And how can the country reduce its pollution levels?

The BBC's Anu Anand is joined by: former Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai, government representative Pradeep Gyawali, writer C. K. Lal and journalist Subina Shrestha in a debate led by questions from a public audience to discuss the big issues facing Nepal.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Supporters of the Communist Party of Nepal, Credit: Getty Images)

Can the landslide victory for the Left Alliance deliver political stability and peace?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Can the landslide victory for the Left Alliance deliver political stability and peace?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

After an historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace?

Nepal has been through turmoil in recent years. A decade-long insurgency led by Maoist rebels left more than 17,000 people dead before a 2006 peace deal ushered in democracy. In April 2015, a series of earthquakes killed nearly 9,000 people and destroyed thousands of homes. In the past decade alone, ten different Prime Ministers have held office.

The elections in December were meant to mark the final phase in the country's long political transition from the abolition of the monarchy to the establishment of an inclusive, federal republic.

But the new government faces many challenges – will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal's two giant neighbours – China and India? And how can the country reduce its pollution levels?

The BBC's Anu Anand is joined by: former Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai, government representative Pradeep Gyawali, writer C. K. Lal and journalist Subina Shrestha in a debate led by questions from a public audience to discuss the big issues facing Nepal.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Supporters of the Communist Party of Nepal, Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Can the landslide victory for the Left Alliance deliver political stability and peace?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

After an historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace?

Nepal has been through turmoil in recent years. A decade-long insurgency led by Maoist rebels left more than 17,000 people dead before a 2006 peace deal ushered in democracy. In April 2015, a series of earthquakes killed nearly 9,000 people and destroyed thousands of homes. In the past decade alone, ten different Prime Ministers have held office.

The elections in December were meant to mark the final phase in the country's long political transition from the abolition of the monarchy to the establishment of an inclusive, federal republic.

But the new government faces many challenges – will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal's two giant neighbours – China and India? And how can the country reduce its pollution levels?

The BBC's Anu Anand is joined by: former Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai, government representative Pradeep Gyawali, writer C. K. Lal and journalist Subina Shrestha in a debate led by questions from a public audience to discuss the big issues facing Nepal.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Supporters of the Communist Party of Nepal, Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Can the landslide victory for the Left Alliance deliver political stability and peace?

After an historic election, Nepal has chosen a communist coalition to run the country. Could this landslide victory for the Left Alliance mark a turning point for the country, and deliver a long awaited period of political stability and peace?

Nepal has been through turmoil in recent years. A decade-long insurgency led by Maoist rebels left more than 17,000 people dead before a 2006 peace deal ushered in democracy. In April 2015, a series of earthquakes killed nearly 9,000 people and destroyed thousands of homes. In the past decade alone, ten different Prime Ministers have held office.

The elections in December were meant to mark the final phase in the country's long political transition from the abolition of the monarchy to the establishment of an inclusive, federal republic.

But the new government faces many challenges – will the coalition remain united? How will it deal with Nepal's two giant neighbours – China and India? And how can the country reduce its pollution levels?

The BBC's Anu Anand is joined by: former Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai, government representative Pradeep Gyawali, writer C. K. Lal and journalist Subina Shrestha in a debate led by questions from a public audience to discuss the big issues facing Nepal.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Supporters of the Communist Party of Nepal, Credit: Getty Images)

"

Paris2017051320170514 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Paris following an election that will define the future direction of France and the EU.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Paris following a dramatic presidential election.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a debate in Paris following a dramatic presidential election.

BBC World Questions comes to Paris following a dramatic presidential election.

Support for the traditional parties of the left and right melted away and French voters were left with the stark choice between the politics of the Front National and the new centrist movement En Marche - led by 39-year-old former Socialist minister Emmanuel Macron. They chose Macron. But can he solve France's many pressing economic and social problems – unemployment, the terror threat and cultural divisions?

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of leading politicians and thinkers debate questions raised by a large lively audience at Radio France in Paris. The panel includes: Sylvie Goulard MEP and En Marche member, Olivier Tonneau, parliamentary candidate for Jean Luc Melenchon's France Insoumise party, Front National councillor Aymeric Merlaud and journalist Pascale Tournier.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Emmanuel Macron Celebrates His Presidential Election Victory At The Louvre Photo credit: David Ramos/Getty Images)

"

(Photo: Emmanuel Macron Celebrates His Presidential Election Victory At The Louvre Photo credit: David Ramos/Getty Images)"

Poland2017021120170212 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of key voices discuss Poland's new era of change with a public audience in the centre of Warsaw.

Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of key voices discuss Poland's new era of change with a public audience in the centre of Warsaw.

Prague2018051220180513 (WS)Politicians, writers and commentators answer audience questions on the future of the Czech Republic, chaired by Allan Little.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these were debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Cityscape of Prague, Credit: Getty Images)

Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public in a lively debate.

The populist billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the economy, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these, and other subjects, are debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these were debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Cityscape of Prague, Credit: Getty Images)

Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public in a lively debate.

The populist billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the economy, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these, and other subjects, are debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these were debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Cityscape of Prague, Credit: Getty Images)

Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these were debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Cityscape of Prague, Credit: Getty Images)

"

"Politicians and commentators answer questions on the future of the Czech Republic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

This month's World Questions comes from the Czech Republic and tackles some of the big questions facing the country. In the capital, Prague, Allan Little brings politicians and commentators together to answer questions from the public. There was heated debate about billionaire Prime Minister Andrej Babis who has been struggling for months to form a coalition government. Which political direction should the country now take on issues like immigration, the health service, membership of the EU and foreign relations? All these were debated in the Archa Theatre, Prague in front of a large audience.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Cityscape of Prague, Credit: Getty Images)

"

Rome2017011420170115 (WS)A panel of experts discuss Italy's pressing challenges with a public audience in Rome.

BBC World Questions comes to Rome to discuss the future for Italy at a key moment in its history.

Paolo Gentiloni has recently been appointed as Italy's 7th Prime Minister in 10 years, but it is not only political stability that threatens the country. A banking crisis and economic conditions have the potential to impact the lives of all Italians and could even destroy the Euro. Youth unemployment is extremely high. Italy is also at the frontline of the wave of migration from Africa to Europe. Early elections are possible and with the euro-sceptic Five Star Movement riding high in the polls, a referendum on Italy's place in Europe could be just around the corner.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate to discuss the challenges facing the nation. He is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers with all questions raised coming directly from the audience.

The panel includes Alessandro Gozi, Undersecretary to the Prime Minister with responsibility for European Affairs; Deborah Bergamini, Member of the Chamber of Deputies and former spokesperson for Forza Italia; Nathalie Tocci, Chief Advisor to Federica Mogherini High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Manlio di Stefano of the 5 Star Movement, who is a Member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.

This international series of events is created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Roman Forum Picture Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

A panel of experts discuss Italy's pressing challenges with a public audience in Rome.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"BBC World Questions comes to Rome to discuss the future for Italy at a key moment in its history.

Paolo Gentiloni has recently been appointed as Italy's 7th Prime Minister in 10 years, but it is not only political stability that threatens the country. A banking crisis and economic conditions have the potential to impact the lives of all Italians and could even destroy the Euro. Youth unemployment is extremely high. Italy is also at the frontline of the wave of migration from Africa to Europe. Early elections are possible and with the euro-sceptic Five Star Movement riding high in the polls, a referendum on Italy's place in Europe could be just around the corner.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate to discuss the challenges facing the nation. He is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers with all questions raised coming directly from the audience.

The panel includes Alessandro Gozi, Undersecretary to the Prime Minister with responsibility for European Affairs; Deborah Bergamini, Member of the Chamber of Deputies and former spokesperson for Forza Italia; Nathalie Tocci, Chief Advisor to Federica Mogherini High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Manlio di Stefano of the 5 Star Movement, who is a Member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.

This international series of events is created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Roman Forum Picture Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

A panel of experts discuss Italy's pressing challenges with a public audience in Rome.

"

"BBC World Questions comes to Rome to discuss the future for Italy at a key moment in its history.

Paolo Gentiloni has recently been appointed as Italy's 7th Prime Minister in 10 years, but it is not only political stability that threatens the country. A banking crisis and economic conditions have the potential to impact the lives of all Italians and could even destroy the Euro. Youth unemployment is extremely high. Italy is also at the frontline of the wave of migration from Africa to Europe. Early elections are possible and with the euro-sceptic Five Star Movement riding high in the polls, a referendum on Italy's place in Europe could be just around the corner.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate to discuss the challenges facing the nation. He is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers with all questions raised coming directly from the audience.

The panel includes Alessandro Gozi, Undersecretary to the Prime Minister with responsibility for European Affairs; Deborah Bergamini, Member of the Chamber of Deputies and former spokesperson for Forza Italia; Nathalie Tocci, Chief Advisor to Federica Mogherini High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Manlio di Stefano of the 5 Star Movement, who is a Member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.

This international series of events is created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Roman Forum Picture Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)"

"A panel of experts discuss Italy's pressing challenges with a public audience in Rome.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Rome to discuss the future for Italy at a key moment in its history.

Paolo Gentiloni has recently been appointed as Italy's 7th Prime Minister in 10 years, but it is not only political stability that threatens the country. A banking crisis and economic conditions have the potential to impact the lives of all Italians and could even destroy the Euro. Youth unemployment is extremely high. Italy is also at the frontline of the wave of migration from Africa to Europe. Early elections are possible and with the euro-sceptic Five Star Movement riding high in the polls, a referendum on Italy's place in Europe could be just around the corner.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate to discuss the challenges facing the nation. He is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers with all questions raised coming directly from the audience.

The panel includes Alessandro Gozi, Undersecretary to the Prime Minister with responsibility for European Affairs; Deborah Bergamini, Member of the Chamber of Deputies and former spokesperson for Forza Italia; Nathalie Tocci, Chief Advisor to Federica Mogherini High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Manlio di Stefano of the 5 Star Movement, who is a Member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.

This international series of events is created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Roman Forum Picture Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

"

"A panel of experts discuss Italy's pressing challenges with a public audience in Rome.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Rome to discuss the future for Italy at a key moment in its history.

Paolo Gentiloni has recently been appointed as Italy's 7th Prime Minister in 10 years, but it is not only political stability that threatens the country. A banking crisis and economic conditions have the potential to impact the lives of all Italians and could even destroy the Euro. Youth unemployment is extremely high. Italy is also at the frontline of the wave of migration from Africa to Europe. Early elections are possible and with the euro-sceptic Five Star Movement riding high in the polls, a referendum on Italy's place in Europe could be just around the corner.

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a lively debate to discuss the challenges facing the nation. He is joined by a panel of leading politicians and opinion formers with all questions raised coming directly from the audience.

The panel includes Alessandro Gozi, Undersecretary to the Prime Minister with responsibility for European Affairs; Deborah Bergamini, Member of the Chamber of Deputies and former spokesperson for Forza Italia; Nathalie Tocci, Chief Advisor to Federica Mogherini High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Manlio di Stefano of the 5 Star Movement, who is a Member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.

This international series of events is created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Roman Forum Picture Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

"

Se3o Paulo2018120820181209 (WS)Brazil's burning issues are discussed with an audience of Brazilians at the Cultura Inglesa in São Paulo. Jonny Dymond and a panel of leading politicians and commentators tackle the recent election of President-elect Jair Bolsonaro, the environment, racism and crime.
On the panel:
Luiz Philippe de Orléans e Bragança of the Social Liberal Party
Margarida Salomão of the Workers' Party
Mércia Silva of the anti-slavery organisation, Inpacto
Fernando Schüler, Professor of Political Science at Insper University

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Hands over the Brazilian national flag, Credit: RapidEye/Getty Images)

Elections, racism, the environment and crime debated with a Brazilian audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Seoul2018061620180617 (WS)At a packed event in Seoul, a Korean audience debates unification, nuclear weapons and the cancellation of war games in the wake of the Singapore Summit between President Trump and Chairman Kim.

Jonny Dymond chairs a public debate with Professor Moon Chung-in, the South Korean President's Special Advisor for Foreign Affairs and Distinguished Professor of Yonsei University; General Hwang Jin Ha, former Chair of the Defence Committee of the National Assembly; Kim Jiyoon, Research Fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies; and Sohn Jie-Ae , former Seoul Bureau Chief for CNN and Invited Professor of International Studies at Ewha, the Womans University - where the debate is held.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Sunset at Seoul City Skyline, South Korea, Credit: Getty Images)

World Questions is in Seoul to debate the future of Korea and the prospects for peace.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"World Questions is in Seoul to debate the future of Korea and the prospects for peace.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions is in Seoul, the capital of the Republic of Korea, for a public debate on the outcome of the summit between President Trump and Chairman Kim. What do the people of South Korea feel about the prospects of lasting peace on the Korean peninsula?

Jonny Dymond chairs a public debate with Professor Moon Chung-in, the South Korean President's Special Advisor for Foreign Affairs and Distinguished Professor of Yonsei University; General Hwang Jin Ha, former Chair of the Defence Committee of the National Assembly; Kim Jiyoon, Research Fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies; and Sohn Jie-Ae , former Seoul Bureau Chief for CNN and Invited Professor of International Studies at Ewha, the Womans University - where the debate is held.

BBC World Questions is created in partnership with the British Council.

"

Sudan2020121220201213 (WS)After a revolution and the fall of a long-term military dictator, Sudan is officially on the road to democracy and civilian rule. How do you rebuild a country? The US has promised to take Sudan off the state sponsors of terrorism blacklist, and within the country a peace process is bringing regional rebels into the fold. But is the movement to civilian rule fast enough? When will the conditions of women's lives start to improve? At what point will becoming a mainstream nation again mean an improvement in the extreme economic hardships felt by so many in Sudan? The BBC's James Copnall presents with a panel of leading figures from Sudan debating questions put to them from the public across the country.

The panel:
Omer Ismail: Foreign Minister
Walaa al-Boushi: Minister for Youth and Sport
Reem Abbas: Journalist and Blogger
Mohammed Nagi al-Assam: Nominee to Transition Partners Council

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Studio Engineers: Ian Mitchell, Rob Symington and Donald McDonald

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Alaa Salah during a demonstration in Khartoum on April 8th 2019, Credit: Courtesy Lana H. Haroun)

Leading figures in Sudan debate questions from the public across the country

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

After a revolution, a massacre and the fall of a long-term dictator, Sudan is officially on the road to democracy and civilian rule. The US has promised to take the country off the terrorism blacklist, and Sudan recently started to normalise relations with Israel.

But is the movement to civilian rule fast enough? How will the country be affected by the Great Nile Dam being built up-river by its Ethiopian neighbours? And will new acceptance as a mainstream nation mean that the extreme economic hardships felt by Sudanese people will finally come to an end?

James Copnall and a panel of leading figures in Sudan debate questions from the public.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The Environment2020111420201115 (WS)World Questions focuses on a single global issue – the environment.

The BBC's Justin Rowlatt chairs a remote debate with leading scientists, academics, businesspeople and activists from around the world – to try to come up with some answers to one of the most pressing issues of our times.

The questions come from members of the public from across the world – from a stall holder in Haiti, to an engineer in Hong Kong and a group of schoolgirls in Spain. Are we too selfish to save the planet? What lessons can we learn from the Coronavirus pandemic? Why is it proving so difficult to stop climate change and the destruction of the natural world?

The panel:
Professor Sir Robert Watson: Leading climatologist and former chair of IPCC
Ska Keller: German Green MEP and co-president of the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament
Sir Partha Dasgupta: Professor of Economics at Cambridge University, author of an independent global review on the Economics of Biodiversity
Elizabeth Wathuti: Kenyan environmental campaigner and activist
Michael Liebreich: Chairman and CEO of Liebreich Associates, consultant on clean energy, climate finance and sustainable development

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Studio Engineers: Tim Heffer, Chris Weightman and Ian Mitchell

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Turtle holding plastic bag, Credit: Sarayut Thaneerat/EyeEm / Getty Images

Why is it so difficult to stop climate change and the destruction of the natural world?

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

In November, World Questions will focus on a single issue – the environment.

The BBC's Justin Rowlatt will chair a remote debate with leading scientists, businesspeople and activists from around the world – to try to come up with some answers to the most pressing issue of our times.

The European Union2021011620210117 (WS)Europe Editor, Katya Adler, presents a debate focusing on the European Union post Brexit. Politicians from across the region and the political spectrum discuss tough questions put to them by the public on issues such as the EU's environmental record, migration, Brexit, bailouts, the handling of the pandemic and the future of the Union.

The panel:
Katja Leikert: Deputy Chair of the CDU Parliamentary Group in the German Bundestag (in Berlin)
Dominik Tarcynski: Polish MEP – Law and Justice Party (in Warsaw)
Eva Kaili: Greek MEP –Social Democrats (in Athens)
Nathalie Tocci: Director of the Institute for International Affairs (in Rome)

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Assistant Producer: Steven Williams
Studio Engineers: Nigel Dix, Chris Weightman and Ian Mitchell

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: European Union flags, Credit: Getty Images)

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The future of work2021041720210418 (WS)

Life has changed in many ways in the year since the pandemic hit. Countless millions have been forced to work from home, offices have closed, livelihoods have disappeared and videoconferencing and online shopping have made huge inroads into everyday life. What will be the long term impact on the world of work?

Katya Adler explores the future of work with a high level panel facing questions from the public around the world. What will stay changed, what will happen next and what will we miss from the way things were?

The panel:
Nicolas Schmit: EU Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights
Molly Kinder: David M. Rubenstein Fellow at the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Programme
Manish Bahl: Senior Director, Centre for the Future of Work at Cognizant, Asia Pacific
Ivan Petrella: Former Director of Argentina 2030. Fellow of the Center for Internet and Society – Harvard University

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Sound Engineers: Ian Mitchell and Mark MacDonald

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Commuters rushing to work across Reuters Square, Canary Wharf, Credit: Doug Armand/Getty Images)

Katya Adler and a panel face questions about the future of work after the pandemic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

The Future Of Work2021041720210418 (WS)Life has changed in many ways in the year since the pandemic hit. Countless millions have been forced to work from home, offices have closed, livelihoods have disappeared and videoconferencing and online shopping have made huge inroads into everyday life. What will be the long term impact on the world of work?

The BBC's Katya Adler explores the future of work with a high level panel facing questions from the public around the world. What will stay changed, what will happen next and what will we miss from the way things were?

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Katya Adler and a panel face questions about the future of work after the pandemic

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions, presented by the BBC's Katya Adler will explore The Future of Work with a high level panel facing questions from the public around the world. What will stay changed, what will happen next and what will we miss from the way things were.

Katya Adler and a panel face questions fabout the future of work after the pandemic.

The Politics Of Covid-192021021320210214 (WS)Covid 19 has made huge changes to the way we live, and exposed underlying health inequalities across the world. Personal liberties have been sacrificed for public health, and national interest has sometimes come at the expense of global cooperation..
As we approach a year of the pandemic, World Questions debates how politics has been affected by the Coronavirus. Some countries have been hit much harder than others. How has democracy fared?

Jonny Dymond and an international panel of experts and political leaders debate questions put to them by the public around the world.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world.

What works - and at what cost - in the fight against Covid? Jonny Dymond brings together top flight decision-makers with the public feeling the brunt of those decisions around the world. How some countries get ahead with vaccines, what the world has learned about preventing the next pandemic and whether vaccine passports are an assault on human rights - a few of the political questions on which a global panel from Singapore, USA, Kenya, South Korea and the United Kingdom, compare notes.

On the panel:
Nadhim Zahawi, MP: UK Minister for Covid-19 Vaccine Deployment
Sabina Chege, MP: Chair of Parliamentary Committee on Health, Kenya
Prof Kenneth Mac: Director of Medical Services, Singapore
Jennifer Nuzzo: Director of The Outbreak Observatory, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Jie-Ae Sohn: Former CNN Bureau Chief in Seoul and Advisor to the World Bank

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Assistant Producer: Steven Williams
Studio Engineers: Chris Weightman, Ian Mitchell and Giles Aspen

(Photo: Lucy Powderly receives a Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine from sergeant Julia Benson of the Illinois Army National Guard, Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images)

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Tokyo2019100520191006 (WS)The BBC's World Questions programme comes to Tokyo in October to discuss the country's economic, social and political future.

Presenter Jonny Dymond will be joined by a panel of leading Japanese politicians and commentators and a public audience to debate growth, the population problem, immigration and Japan's place in the world.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Tokyo with Mount Fuji in the background, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

World Questions is in Tokyo to discuss the country's economic, social and political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Japan's big challenges: An ageing society, slow economic growth, the role of women, a declining population. As Japan hosts the Rugby World Cup, an audience and panel in Tokyo open up about some of the major issues the country is facing.

The panel:

Senator Rui Matsukawa: Liberal Democrat Party
Senator Hiroe Makiyama: Constitutional Democratic Party
Professor Sayuri Shirai: Keio University
Roland Kelts: Author of Japanamerica

Japan's issues with immigration and an ageing society. A Tokyo audience debates

Usa2020091920200920 (WS)The upcoming elections in the US are the focus for this month's World Questions.
Katty Kay in Washington D.C. chairs a lively debate with four leading US politicians from across the country to discuss the big issues: Covid-19, the wearing of masks, support for the poor, Black Lives Matter, law and order and the recent wildfires. An audience from across the US joins remotely with questions to the panel coming from around the world.

The panel:
Mayor Quinton Lucas, Kansas City
Rep. Bruce Westerman, Arkansas
Mayor Aja Brown, Compton City
Mayor Francis Suarez, Miami City

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Managers: Lee Chaundy, Henry Dutton & Duncan Hannant

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Statue of Liberty in a medical mask. Credit: Anton Petrus/Getty Images)

Katty Kay and a panel of leading US politicians discuss the big issues facing the USA now

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

(Photo: Statue of Liberty in a medical mask. Credit: Anton Petrus/Getty Images)

Vienna2018101320181014 (WS)A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Following a swing to the right in elections last year, Austria is governed by a coalition between the ruling Conservative People's Party and the far-right Freedom Party. It has taken over the presidency of the Council of the European Union with the motto, “A Europe that protects”, with a focus on efforts to prevent illegal immigration into the EU.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a public debate on Austria's political and economic future at the Theatre Museum in Vienna. The panel includes Government spokesperson Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal, Liberal Party leader Beate Meinl Reisinger, Eva Blimlinger, Rector of the Academy of Fine Arts and Claus Raidl, former President of the Austrian National Bank.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Vienna Old Town, Credit: tupungato/Getty Images)

A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

"A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

Following a swing to the right in elections last year, Austria is governed by a coalition between the ruling Conservative People's Party and the far-right Freedom Party. It has taken over the presidency of the Council of the European Union with the motto, “A Europe that protects ?, with a focus on efforts to prevent illegal immigration into the EU.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a public debate on Austria's political and economic future at the Theatre Museum in Vienna. The panel includes Government spokesperson Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal, Liberal Party leader Beate Meinl Reisinger, Eva Blimlinger, Rector of the Academy of Fine Arts and Claus Raidl, former President of the Austrian National Bank.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Vienna Old Town, Credit: tupungato/Getty Images)

A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Following a swing to the right in elections last year, Austria is governed by a coalition between the ruling Conservative People's Party and the far-right Freedom Party. It has taken over the presidency of the Council of the European Union with the motto, “A Europe that protects ?, with a focus on efforts to prevent illegal immigration into the EU.

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a public debate on Austria's political and economic future at the Theatre Museum in Vienna. The panel includes Government spokesperson Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal, Liberal Party leader Beate Meinl Reisinger, Eva Blimlinger, Rector of the Academy of Fine Arts and Claus Raidl, former President of the Austrian National Bank.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Vienna Old Town, Credit: tupungato/Getty Images)

A debate on Austria's political future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Warsaw2017021120170212 (WS)A panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Poland's new era of political change.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"A panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Poland's new era of political change.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Warsaw as Poland is in the midst of a new era of political change.

Poland's opposition leaders claim the ruling party, Law and Justice, is restricting democratic freedom and hobbling the nation's highest court, the Constitutional Tribunal. Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the party's leader, says the opposition refuses to accept his party's victory in the 2015 election and its continuing popularity throughout the country. There have been occupations of parliament, demonstrations in the streets and a determination by the government to implement its mandate for sweeping reform. Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and opinion formers discuss Poland's new era of change before politically charged audience.

The panel includes the film director Agnieszka Holland; the Editor of online newspaper 'wSieci' Jacek Karnowski; MP Rafal Trzaskowski from Civic Platform; and MP Dominik Tarczyński from the governing Law and Justice Party.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Polish pro-government demonstrators mark the 35th anniversary of the martial law in Warsaw Picture credit: JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"A panel of politicians and thinkers discuss Poland's new era of political change.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

BBC World Questions comes to Warsaw as Poland is in the midst of a new era of political change.

Poland's opposition leaders claim the ruling party, Law and Justice, is restricting democratic freedom and hobbling the nation's highest court, the Constitutional Tribunal. Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the party's leader, says the opposition refuses to accept his party's victory in the 2015 election and its continuing popularity throughout the country. There have been occupations of parliament, demonstrations in the streets and a determination by the government to implement its mandate for sweeping reform. Jonathan Dimbleby and a panel of politicians and opinion formers discuss Poland's new era of change before politically charged audience.

The panel includes the film director Agnieszka Holland; the Editor of online newspaper 'wSieci' Jacek Karnowski; MP Rafal Trzaskowski from Civic Platform; and MP Dominik Tarczyński from the governing Law and Justice Party.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Picture: Polish pro-government demonstrators mark the 35th anniversary of the martial law in Warsaw Picture credit: JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

"

Washington D.c.2017031120170312 (WS)Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion as President Trump's administration starts to reshape the American political landscape.

To his supporters, his promise to make America great again means more jobs, more security, controlled immigration and a foreign policy based upon putting America first. To his critics, he is plunging the country into an era of isolationism and prejudice. The country remains deeply divided.

Jonathan Dimbleby, a panel of politicians and opinion formers, and an audience at George Washington University discuss the USA's most pressing challenges and what “Trumpism ? might mean for the rest of the world.

The panel includes the Republican Congressman Tom Cole, Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute and author Carol Anderson.

(Photo: President Trump Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

"""

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion as President Trump's administration starts to reshape the American political landscape.

To his supporters, his promise to make America great again means more jobs, more security, controlled immigration and a foreign policy based upon putting America first. To his critics, he is plunging the country into an era of isolationism and prejudice. The country remains deeply divided.

Jonathan Dimbleby, a panel of politicians and opinion formers, and an audience at George Washington University discuss the USA's most pressing challenges and what “Trumpism ? might mean for the rest of the world.

The panel includes the Republican Congressman Tom Cole, Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute and author Carol Anderson.

(Photo: President Trump Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion as President Trump's administration starts to reshape the American political landscape.

To his supporters, his promise to make America great again means more jobs, more security, controlled immigration and a foreign policy based upon putting America first. To his critics, he is plunging the country into an era of isolationism and prejudice. The country remains deeply divided.

Jonathan Dimbleby, a panel of politicians and opinion formers, and an audience at George Washington University discuss the USA's most pressing challenges and what “Trumpism” might mean for the rest of the world.

The panel includes the Republican Congressman Tom Cole, Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute and author Carol Anderson.

(Photo: President Trump Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion on America's new political landscape

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion as President Trump's administration starts to reshape the American political landscape.

To his supporters, his promise to make America great again means more jobs, more security, controlled immigration and a foreign policy based upon putting America first. To his critics, he is plunging the country into an era of isolationism and prejudice. The country remains deeply divided.

Jonathan Dimbleby, a panel of politicians and opinion formers, and an audience at George Washington University discuss the USA's most pressing challenges and what “Trumpism” might mean for the rest of the world.

The panel includes the Republican Congressman Tom Cole, Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute and author Carol Anderson.

(Photo: President Trump Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a panel discussion as President Trump's administration starts to reshape the American political landscape.

To his supporters, his promise to make America great again means more jobs, more security, controlled immigration and a foreign policy based upon putting America first. To his critics, he is plunging the country into an era of isolationism and prejudice. The country remains deeply divided.

Jonathan Dimbleby, a panel of politicians and opinion formers, and an audience at George Washington University discuss the USA's most pressing challenges and what “Trumpism ? might mean for the rest of the world.

The panel includes the Republican Congressman Tom Cole, Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute and author Carol Anderson.

(Photo: President Trump Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)"

What's The World Talking About?2019081120190814 (WS)Anu Anand and a panel of leading correspondents from around the world discuss the big political trends of the year. The rise of populist political parties, Brexit, powerful leaders and immigration are just some of the big issues up for discussion. Panellists include Ethiopian journalist and editor of The Addis Standard, Tsedale Lemma; Susan Glasser from the New Yorker; and BBC Europe Correspondent Kevin Conolly.

Anu Anand and a panel from around the world discuss the big political trends of the year.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Anu Anand and a panel of leading correspondents from around the world discuss the big political trends of the year. The rise of populist political parties, Brexit, powerful leaders and immigration are just some of the big issues up for discussion. Panellists include Ethiopian journalist and editor of The Addis Standard, Tsedale Lemma; Susan Glasser from the New Yorker; and BBC Europe correspondent Kevin Connolly.

Photo: World map and hands. Credit: Rawpixel/Getty Images)

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

World Questions: Europe After Paris2015111920151122 (WS)
20151121 (WS)
A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

"As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

"

"As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

"

"As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)"

World Questions: Europe After Paris2015112120151119 (WS)
20151122 (WS)
"A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)"

"A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"A discussion on global issues impacting Europe

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

As Europe faces some of the biggest crises of modern times - the mass movement of migrants across its borders, and now the attacks on Paris - Jonathan Dimbleby hosts a discussion on these and other important issues impacting Europe. Recorded in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, at the heart of the EU, you will hear from Frans Timmermans, the first vice president of the European Commisison, the Maltese MEP Roberta Metsola, the Euro-sceptic Swedish Democrat MEP Peter Lundgren, and David van Reybrouck, the controversial best-selling writer and author of Against Elections, who reads a moving postcard To the World outside Europe. The panel respond to questions from the audience, but also from BBC World Service fans via Facebook.

(Photo: Special force officers stand guard on a roof top near the scene of police raids in the district of Molenbeek, Brussels. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

World Questions: Greece And Europe2016022720160228 (WS)
20160302 (WS)
A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)"

"A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

"

"A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

"

World Questions: Greece And Europe2016022820160302 (WS)A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

"Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

"

"Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

A panel of politicians and thinkers debate questions from the public about Greece and EU

"

"Nowhere has felt the challenge of mass migration and pain of austerity more keenly than Greece, or has struggled harder in its relationship with the European Union. From the Megaron concert hall in Athens, the BBC's Jonathan Dimbleby discusses the issues with a panel of politicians and thinkers - The Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos; the former Mayor of Athens and former Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis; underwater archaeologist and union official Despina Koutsoumba; and Josef Janning, Senior Policy Adviser at the European Council on Foreign Relations. They answer questions from an audience in Athens, and also those from BBC World Service followers on social media.

(Photo: The archaeological site of Acropolis in Athens, seen through a fence on November 2015 due to a 24-hour general strike. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)"

World Questions: Latvia And Europe2016031220160313 (WS)
20160316 (WS)
A debate on Latvia and its future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"A debate on Latvia and its future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; OjĀ?rs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)
(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)
(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)"

"A debate on Latvia and its future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; Ojārs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)
(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

"

"A debate on Latvia and its future

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; Ojārs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)
(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

"

World Questions: Latvia And Europe2016031320160316 (WS)A debate on Latvia and its future

A debate on Latvia and its future

We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; OjĀ?rs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)

(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

A debate on Latvia and its future

"We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; OjĀ?rs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)

(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

A debate on Latvia and its future

"

"We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; OjĀ?rs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)

(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)

A debate on Latvia and its future

"

"We're at the National Library of Latvia in the capital, Riga, for the third of our series of debates across Europe. Questions on the challenges and opportunies ahead for this northern European Baltic state - which lies on the EU's border with northern Russia - are answered by a panel of Latvian politicians and thinkers: Nils Ušakovs, the ethnic-Russian mayor of Riga; OjĀ?rs Ēriks Kalniņš, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee in parliament; and Baiba Rubesa, chair of the new Rail Baltica project, intended to link the Baltic states to the European rail network. They are joined by Magnus Christiansson, a Swedish security strategist specialising in NATO and the Baltic states. Questions come from the audience in Riga, and also BBC World Service social media followers.

(Photo: National Library of Latvia)

(Credit: Indriķis Stūrmanis)"

Yerevan2019020920190210 (WS)World Questions visits Armenia at a crucial time in the country's history. Following a popular and peaceful uprising last year, the country's new Prime Minister, Nikol Pashinyan, won over 70% of the vote at recent elections. He says his political bloc will now lead an economic revolution that will help pull many of its people out of poverty. How will the new government deliver this transformation? Will it balance growth and investment with environmental concerns? And what will drive Armenia's foreign policy goals?

The BBC's Jonny Dymond is joined by a panel of leading Armenian politicians and thinkers in a debate, in English, led by questions from a lively, youthful audience at the American University in Yerevan.

The panel:
Arevik Anapiosyan: Deputy Minister of Education and Sciences
Mane Tandilyan: Deputy at the National Assembly, Bright Armenia Party
Maria Titizian: Editor of EVN Report
Ara Tadevosyan: Director of Mediamax

Producer: Helen Towner

(Photo: Armenian opposition supporters shout slogans after protest movement leader Nikol Pashinyan announced a nationwide campaign of civil disobedience, Republic Square, Yerevan, Armenia 2 May 2018, Credit: Gleb Garanich/Reuters)

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

A debate about the future of Armenia, recorded with a live audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

World Questions visits Armenia at a crucial time in the country's history. Following a popular and peaceful uprising last year, the country's new Prime Minister, Nikol Pashinyan, won over 70% of the vote at recent elections. He says his political bloc will now lead an economic revolution that will help pull many of its people out of poverty. How will the new government deliver this transformation? Will it balance growth and investment with environmental concerns? And what will drive Armenia's foreign policy goals?

The BBC's Jonny Dymond is joined by a panel of leading Armenian politicians and thinkers in a debate, in English, led by questions from a lively, youthful audience at the American University in Yerevan.

The panel:
Arevik Anapiosyan: Deputy Minister of Education and Sciences
Mane Tandilyan: Deputy at the National Assembly, Bright Armenia Party
Maria Titizian: Editor of EVN Report
Ara Tadevosyan: Director of Mediamax

Producer: Helen Towner

(Photo: Armenian opposition supporters shout slogans after protest movement leader Nikol Pashinyan announced a nationwide campaign of civil disobedience, Republic Square, Yerevan, Armenia 2 May 2018, Credit: Gleb Garanich/Reuters)

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

A debate about the future of Armenia, recorded with a live audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

"

"

World Questions visits Armenia at a crucial time in the country's history. Following a popular and peaceful uprising last year, the country's new Prime Minister, Nikol Pashinyan, won over 70% of the vote at recent elections. He says his political bloc will now lead an economic revolution that will help pull many of its people out of poverty. How will the new government deliver this transformation? Will it balance growth and investment with environmental concerns? And what will drive Armenia's foreign policy goals?

The BBC's Jonny Dymond is joined by a panel of leading Armenian politicians and thinkers in a debate, in English, led by questions from a lively, youthful audience at the American University in Yerevan.

The panel:
Arevik Anapiosyan: Deputy Minister of Education and Sciences
Mane Tandilyan: Deputy at the National Assembly, Bright Armenia Party
Maria Titizian: Editor of EVN Report
Ara Tadevosyan: Director of Mediamax

Producer: Helen Towner

(Photo: Armenian opposition supporters shout slogans after protest movement leader Nikol Pashinyan announced a nationwide campaign of civil disobedience, Republic Square, Yerevan, Armenia 2 May 2018, Credit: Gleb Garanich/Reuters)

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

A debate about the future of Armenia, recorded with a live audience

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world"

Young Lebanon2020101020201011 (WS)Even before the explosion, Lebanon already suffered from decades of economic mismanagement, endemic corruption, a political system said to serve vested interests, a currency crisis and on top of all that, the global pandemic. Now the blast at the port has caused untold damage to the wealth of the nation and an entire political class stands accused of letting their country down.

When the French President visited the crisis-hit nation recently, a young volunteer, Lilian Hawila, voiced the frustration of a generation when she harangued him in the street, prompting Macron to respond “Your anger is my source of optimism”. She is one of the panel of four young Lebanese opinion-formers discussing the issues that matter most to their generation. They tackle questions raised from across the country by those under 35 in a programme hosted from Beirut by BBC Arabic correspondent, Carine Torbey.

On the panel:
Michelle Keserwany: Script writer and singer-song writer
Timour Azhari: Journalist
Lilian Hawila: Student known for confronting President Macron at the site of the blast
Marwa Osman: Academic and broadcaster

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Producers: Charlie Taylor & Helen Towner
Studio Managers: Henry Dutton & Tim Heffer

Photo: People help to clean debris after massive blasts in Beirut, Credit: Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Young Lebanese opinion-formers debate the future of their country

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world

Young Turkey2021051520210516 (WS)In May, World Questions will be discussing the future of Turkey – with young people from across the country.

Jonny Dymond will chair a debate featuring a panel of under 35-year olds from the nation's leading think tanks, universities and news outlets.

The questioners will come from across the country – and across Turkey's political divide – to debate the big issues of the day.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

World Questions discusses the future of Turkey with young people from across the country.

Every month, members of the public put their questions on issues impacting the world